Date   

Re: [Amel] S.M. for sale

aersolkid <aersolkid@...>
 

Hi,

can you share more details?

thnks
R


________________________________
De: ivarmylde <mylde@online.no>
Para: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Enviado: Miércoles, 27 de junio, 2012 15:22:35
Asunto: [Amel] S.M. for sale


 
Hello all,

After more than 30 years of sailing of which more than 10 years in the Med. I am willing to part with my Super Maramu 1991 at a far too low price of USD 200.000,-
I am the second owner since 2003. Many upgrades ( engine, generator sails etc )Very good condition based Corfu/Greece.
I am not buying a new boat, but will stop sailing due age/ other interests.
Norwegian flag. Not VAT paid.
Rgds Ivar




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


string with foam pieces in mast

Mark Hayden
 

In pulling a new coax up the mast we found in the starboard side channel a string with pieces of foam tied on every meter or so. I suppose it had once been tied on at the top but had fallen at some point.

The only purpose I can think of for this is that it was to prevent the VHF coax in that channel from moving & making noise.

Is that correct or does it have some other mysterious purpose?

Should there be a similar string with foam in the channel on the other side (which may not need it because the number of cables prevents too much movement)?

Thanks in advance!

Mark
SV Northfork
SM2k 331


Gelcoat Problems

ewatk49734 <no_reply@...>
 

I am the owner of an older 1985 Maramu hull number 177. In the last few years the teak look alike gel coat is beginning to flake of fairly significantly. It really does not enhance the appearance of the boat. I am thinking about stripping it off and putting on one of the new fabricated teak (flexiteak etc.) that have become available in the last few years, I know this will be a huge job and want to make sure the new deck will hold up as long as the original deck has. Does anyone have any experience with these materials or other ideas about how to fix the teak gelcoat. It is clearly worst on the back deck and it looks like the gelcoat is abit thicker there.



Regards Jim Watkins Act II currently in Rhode Island


Re: Test-- no author no email address

Eric Freedman
 

_____

From: Sailormon [mailto:kimberlite@optonline.net]
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 3:18 AM
To: 'amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com'
Subject: Test-- no author no email address







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of eric
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2012 3:00 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] no author no email address





Hi,
does anyone know why my posts are now showing up with this header?
Fair winds,
Eric
Sm Kimberlite # 376


Re: [Amel] Re: Heavy Weather

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Dave and Eric, I really appreciate the information both of you provide. Don't have to always agree with either of you but what you have to say goes into the decision making mix in a way that is helpfull to all of us. There are boats and there are people, we put them together and go sailing. Each one of us does it differently, becauses we are different. Important thing? does it work for us. Doesn't have to be the same for everyone.
Thanks to everyone who contributes to this forum, it is what makes it great.
Kind Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
Mangonui
New Zealand (departing for the South Pacfic Islands next week)

From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@yahoo.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, 29 June 2012 5:21 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Heavy Weather


 
Eric,

Depends on your definition of works. Many recreational sailors think if the sail is still in one piece, it works. If they care nothing about sail shape and performance, then perhaps that's true. But the marketing fluff is simply bogus and if you're reefing your 10 oz furling headsail to use it in 50 knots you are greatly reducing the life of the sail. Call 3 or 4 sailmakers and ask what they think about it. I can guarantee you I'm not alone in my opinion.

Why not do it right instead? Use a purpose built sail like the Gale Sail or other proper storm sail. It's about having the right tool for the job.

What concerns me is you're giving people bad advice about storm sails. We know a bit about the subject having been in the business a long while and outfitting numerous cruising boats, some of which we've worked with for up to 60,000 miles. I'd hate to see someone follow your advice and find themselves with a shredded sail while working off a lee shore on that night the prop got fouled and they have to sail out of harms way.

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Dave,

I am not a sailmaker. All I can say is that it works. Joel potter recommends
the loft and I am quite happy with my 2 identical sails. The one that is up
on the boat has been up for 5 years , the other one is in a bag in the
locker. It seems to have a good shape and I am happy with it.

I think this horse has ridden and needs a rest.

Fair Winds

Eric







_____

From: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
[mailto:mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 9:21 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I've read a lot of marketing fluff and am quite skeptical. The 500 denier
warp yarn makes me wonder if it's High Mass Fiber Weave. That cloth costs
about a third less than the premium cruising Dacron and I've thought it
would be good for a charter boat where we don't care as much about long term
shape retention and just want something to fill in the triangle while the
owner or operator maximizes financial return. We make it a point to spell
out exactly what we use for our sails rather than resort to ambiguous
descriptions. It's always a red flag when a sailmaker won't spell it out -
IE: Sail constructed with Challenge 9.62, etc. It's great to spell out the
features and benefits of a product but say what it is.

Be interesting to see pictures of the shape when the sail was brand new and
how the shape has held over the years.

In my opinion a Dacron headsail suitable for use in 14-50 knots is a pipe
dream, sailmaker marketing hype/BS aside.

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.



Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on
up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with
a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu
over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs
for
this type of application.. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.



Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups..com> ] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a
much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail
could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one
of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it
for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm
jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers
that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are
interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of
25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want
to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


no author no email address

Eric Freedman
 

Hi,
does anyone know why my posts are now showing up with this header?
Fair winds,
Eric
Sm Kimberlite # 376


Re: Heavy Weather

Dave_Benjamin
 

Eric,

Depends on your definition of works. Many recreational sailors think if the sail is still in one piece, it works. If they care nothing about sail shape and performance, then perhaps that's true. But the marketing fluff is simply bogus and if you're reefing your 10 oz furling headsail to use it in 50 knots you are greatly reducing the life of the sail. Call 3 or 4 sailmakers and ask what they think about it. I can guarantee you I'm not alone in my opinion.

Why not do it right instead? Use a purpose built sail like the Gale Sail or other proper storm sail. It's about having the right tool for the job.

What concerns me is you're giving people bad advice about storm sails. We know a bit about the subject having been in the business a long while and outfitting numerous cruising boats, some of which we've worked with for up to 60,000 miles. I'd hate to see someone follow your advice and find themselves with a shredded sail while working off a lee shore on that night the prop got fouled and they have to sail out of harms way.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Dave,

I am not a sailmaker. All I can say is that it works. Joel potter recommends
the loft and I am quite happy with my 2 identical sails. The one that is up
on the boat has been up for 5 years , the other one is in a bag in the
locker. It seems to have a good shape and I am happy with it.

I think this horse has ridden and needs a rest.

Fair Winds

Eric







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 9:21 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I've read a lot of marketing fluff and am quite skeptical. The 500 denier
warp yarn makes me wonder if it's High Mass Fiber Weave. That cloth costs
about a third less than the premium cruising Dacron and I've thought it
would be good for a charter boat where we don't care as much about long term
shape retention and just want something to fill in the triangle while the
owner or operator maximizes financial return. We make it a point to spell
out exactly what we use for our sails rather than resort to ambiguous
descriptions. It's always a red flag when a sailmaker won't spell it out -
IE: Sail constructed with Challenge 9.62, etc. It's great to spell out the
features and benefits of a product but say what it is.

Be interesting to see pictures of the shape when the sail was brand new and
how the shape has held over the years.

In my opinion a Dacron headsail suitable for use in 14-50 knots is a pipe
dream, sailmaker marketing hype/BS aside.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.



Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on
up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with
a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu
over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs
for
this type of application. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.



Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a
much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail
could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one
of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it
for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm
jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers
that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are
interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of
25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want
to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Heavy Weather

Eric Freedman
 

Dave,

I am not a sailmaker. All I can say is that it works. Joel potter recommends
the loft and I am quite happy with my 2 identical sails. The one that is up
on the boat has been up for 5 years , the other one is in a bag in the
locker. It seems to have a good shape and I am happy with it.

I think this horse has ridden and needs a rest.

Fair Winds

Eric







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 9:21 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I've read a lot of marketing fluff and am quite skeptical. The 500 denier
warp yarn makes me wonder if it's High Mass Fiber Weave. That cloth costs
about a third less than the premium cruising Dacron and I've thought it
would be good for a charter boat where we don't care as much about long term
shape retention and just want something to fill in the triangle while the
owner or operator maximizes financial return. We make it a point to spell
out exactly what we use for our sails rather than resort to ambiguous
descriptions. It's always a red flag when a sailmaker won't spell it out -
IE: Sail constructed with Challenge 9.62, etc. It's great to spell out the
features and benefits of a product but say what it is.

Be interesting to see pictures of the shape when the sail was brand new and
how the shape has held over the years.

In my opinion a Dacron headsail suitable for use in 14-50 knots is a pipe
dream, sailmaker marketing hype/BS aside.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
wrote:

Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.



Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on
up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with
a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu
over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs
for
this type of application. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.



Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a
much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail
could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one
of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it
for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm
jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers
that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are
interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of
25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want
to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA












Re: [Amel] Re: Heavy air Sail

Eric Freedman
 

Dave,
I use who I consider the best weather router in the Atlantic Herb
Hilgenberg.

I speak with him every day on the ssb as hundreds of other Atlantic sailors
do.



However where I sail north of the Gulf Stream is notorious for bad weather
and sh** happens.

The original forecast for my last hurricane trip was for winds abating.
However a low turned back and joined with another making for hellish
conditions.

A 72 or 96 hour forecast in my opinion is usually close to useless.

Fair Winds

Eric







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 9:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Heavy air Sail





Eric,

I've noted your propensity to expose yourself to a number of hurricanes and
gales. At least you have a boat that will stand up well to it. I like to
engage the services of a weather router if the passage is questionable.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
wrote:

Dave,

When I bought Kimberlite, I also bought a ATN sail. After buying the
Caribbean blaster it has been in the sail locker ever since. When the
blaster no longer works, it is time for the Jordan series drogue.

Please see my article in Ocean navigator

http://www.oceannavigator.com/March-April-2011/Prepare-for-survival-conditio
ns/



We were in hurricane force winds for about 36 hours if I remember
correctly.

Fair Winds

Eric



_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:38 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Furling jib





Fred,

Congratulations on your SM purchase. You will love the boat. We have an
older Maramu and I make my living as a sailmaker.

A smaller furling jib or blaster as some refer to it is popular with some
of
the Amel owners in higher wind venues like the Caribbean. While it is
designed and built for heavy air, it is by no means appropriate for use as
a
storm sail. If you plan to stay along the more popular tradewind routes,
an
ATN Gale Sail could be your best solution for a storm jib. If you plan on
high latitude routes, then a proper storm flown from a separate stay is
advisable.

As for running in light air, the stock Amel arrangement with the twin
poles
and jockey struts flying twins is incredibly efficient. For most of us
that's a two person job getting the poles deployed although it can be
managed by one. I am curious who you are getting feedback from, whether
that
is experienced Amel owners or people who have not sailed the boat.

If you want to move away from the ballooner, there are a variety of light
air sails than can be easily managed using a Facnor foil-less furler or
similar hardware from another manufacturer. A while back I wrote a post
about an alternative sailplan for Amel's.

It would be great if you could connect with another Amel owner that could
give you a demonstration of how to set up and use the poles. You'll find
it's pretty easy once you learn the system.

I'd be happy to spend some time on the phone with you but I'm on the west
coast so not available to meet in person.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "fhoudaille" <fhoudaille@>
wrote:

Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want
to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA






Re: Heavy air Sail

Dave_Benjamin
 

Eric,

I've noted your propensity to expose yourself to a number of hurricanes and gales. At least you have a boat that will stand up well to it. I like to engage the services of a weather router if the passage is questionable.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Dave,

When I bought Kimberlite, I also bought a ATN sail. After buying the
Caribbean blaster it has been in the sail locker ever since. When the
blaster no longer works, it is time for the Jordan series drogue.

Please see my article in Ocean navigator

http://www.oceannavigator.com/March-April-2011/Prepare-for-survival-conditio
ns/



We were in hurricane force winds for about 36 hours if I remember correctly.

Fair Winds

Eric



_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:38 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Furling jib





Fred,

Congratulations on your SM purchase. You will love the boat. We have an
older Maramu and I make my living as a sailmaker.

A smaller furling jib or blaster as some refer to it is popular with some of
the Amel owners in higher wind venues like the Caribbean. While it is
designed and built for heavy air, it is by no means appropriate for use as a
storm sail. If you plan to stay along the more popular tradewind routes, an
ATN Gale Sail could be your best solution for a storm jib. If you plan on
high latitude routes, then a proper storm flown from a separate stay is
advisable.

As for running in light air, the stock Amel arrangement with the twin poles
and jockey struts flying twins is incredibly efficient. For most of us
that's a two person job getting the poles deployed although it can be
managed by one. I am curious who you are getting feedback from, whether that
is experienced Amel owners or people who have not sailed the boat.

If you want to move away from the ballooner, there are a variety of light
air sails than can be easily managed using a Facnor foil-less furler or
similar hardware from another manufacturer. A while back I wrote a post
about an alternative sailplan for Amel's.

It would be great if you could connect with another Amel owner that could
give you a demonstration of how to set up and use the poles. You'll find
it's pretty easy once you learn the system.

I'd be happy to spend some time on the phone with you but I'm on the west
coast so not available to meet in person.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "fhoudaille" <fhoudaille@>
wrote:

Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA






Re: [Amel] Furling jib

Dave_Benjamin
 

Eric,

I've read a lot of marketing fluff and am quite skeptical. The 500 denier warp yarn makes me wonder if it's High Mass Fiber Weave. That cloth costs about a third less than the premium cruising Dacron and I've thought it would be good for a charter boat where we don't care as much about long term shape retention and just want something to fill in the triangle while the owner or operator maximizes financial return. We make it a point to spell out exactly what we use for our sails rather than resort to ambiguous descriptions. It's always a red flag when a sailmaker won't spell it out - IE: Sail constructed with Challenge 9.62, etc. It's great to spell out the features and benefits of a product but say what it is.

Be interesting to see pictures of the shape when the sail was brand new and how the shape has held over the years.

In my opinion a Dacron headsail suitable for use in 14-50 knots is a pipe dream, sailmaker marketing hype/BS aside.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.



Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs for
this type of application. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.



Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Furling jib

Frederic Houdaille <fhoudaille@...>
 

Hi again Eric,
Would you mind if I called you in the next few days to discuss?
Thanks.
Fred

From: Sailormon <kimberlite@optonline.net>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 8:53 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel] Furling jib


 
Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.

Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs for
this type of application. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
[mailto:mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib

Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@...

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Heavy air Sail

Eric Freedman
 

Dave,

When I bought Kimberlite, I also bought a ATN sail. After buying the
Caribbean blaster it has been in the sail locker ever since. When the
blaster no longer works, it is time for the Jordan series drogue.

Please see my article in Ocean navigator

http://www.oceannavigator.com/March-April-2011/Prepare-for-survival-conditio
ns/



We were in hurricane force winds for about 36 hours if I remember correctly.

Fair Winds

Eric



_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:38 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Furling jib





Fred,

Congratulations on your SM purchase. You will love the boat. We have an
older Maramu and I make my living as a sailmaker.

A smaller furling jib or blaster as some refer to it is popular with some of
the Amel owners in higher wind venues like the Caribbean. While it is
designed and built for heavy air, it is by no means appropriate for use as a
storm sail. If you plan to stay along the more popular tradewind routes, an
ATN Gale Sail could be your best solution for a storm jib. If you plan on
high latitude routes, then a proper storm flown from a separate stay is
advisable.

As for running in light air, the stock Amel arrangement with the twin poles
and jockey struts flying twins is incredibly efficient. For most of us
that's a two person job getting the poles deployed although it can be
managed by one. I am curious who you are getting feedback from, whether that
is experienced Amel owners or people who have not sailed the boat.

If you want to move away from the ballooner, there are a variety of light
air sails than can be easily managed using a Facnor foil-less furler or
similar hardware from another manufacturer. A while back I wrote a post
about an alternative sailplan for Amel's.

It would be great if you could connect with another Amel owner that could
give you a demonstration of how to set up and use the poles. You'll find
it's pretty easy once you learn the system.

I'd be happy to spend some time on the phone with you but I'm on the west
coast so not available to meet in person.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "fhoudaille" <fhoudaille@...>
wrote:

Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA


Re: [Amel] Furling jib

Eric Freedman
 

Dave,

I have had a duplicate of the exact same sail that I mentioned in my
original post up for days in 45-50 knots.

I believe it is actually a 90% sail. I believe it also has a higher thread
count than the sail you mention.

Here is the note I received from the sailmaker when I bought it.



Eric this sail was designed and built in mind for the toughest of sailing
conditions. The sail really kicks in at 14knts TWS. From there it goes on up
to 50 kts TWS with the sail reefed. It has a raised clew 6 feet above the
deck for good vision and better reefing shape. We developed this sail with a
client over 12 years ago in the Caribbean. I have sailed a super Maramu over
12,000 sea miles. I have worked with over 50 Amel clients

We are using a premium Dacron which we have woven to our specific specs for
this type of application. The cloth weight is 9.6 oz Dacron. It also has a
500 denier warp yarn which really makes the sail last twice as long under
high UV exposure.



Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Furling jib





Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50
knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a much
flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail could
easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one of
the finest Dacron materials available.
http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it for
use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth
for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm jib
or a very heavy #4.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50
knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@...

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives
for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA







Re: [Amel] Furling jib

Dave_Benjamin
 

Eric,

I don't know who told you that a 10oz 110% headsail is appropriate for 50 knots but that is certainly not the case. In 50 knots you would want a much flatter shape than a reefed 110% could offer and the loads on the sail could easily damage it.

Have a look at this spec sheet for Challenge 10.62 which is arguably one of the finest Dacron materials available. http://challengesailcloth.com/ha104/10_62.pdf

As you can see in the manufacturer's spec sheet, Challenge recommends it for use as a #2 genoa on a boat your size. That would be an appropriate cloth for a typical genoa. A headsail for use in 50 knots is typically a storm jib or a very heavy #4.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi Fred,

I have a Caribbean blaster made by a loft in Florida Super Sailmakers that
Joel recommended. It was lightly used and available if you are interested
. It is 10 oz material about a 110 Yankee cut. It is god to about 50 knots.

If interested please email me at Kimberlite@...

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of fhoudaille
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2012 2:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Furling jib





Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly
acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25
knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your
experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to
use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives for
downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Furling jib

Dave_Benjamin
 

Fred,

Congratulations on your SM purchase. You will love the boat. We have an older Maramu and I make my living as a sailmaker.

A smaller furling jib or blaster as some refer to it is popular with some of the Amel owners in higher wind venues like the Caribbean. While it is designed and built for heavy air, it is by no means appropriate for use as a storm sail. If you plan to stay along the more popular tradewind routes, an ATN Gale Sail could be your best solution for a storm jib. If you plan on high latitude routes, then a proper storm flown from a separate stay is advisable.

As for running in light air, the stock Amel arrangement with the twin poles and jockey struts flying twins is incredibly efficient. For most of us that's a two person job getting the poles deployed although it can be managed by one. I am curious who you are getting feedback from, whether that is experienced Amel owners or people who have not sailed the boat.

If you want to move away from the ballooner, there are a variety of light air sails than can be easily managed using a Facnor foil-less furler or similar hardware from another manufacturer. A while back I wrote a post about an alternative sailplan for Amel's.

It would be great if you could connect with another Amel owner that could give you a demonstration of how to set up and use the poles. You'll find it's pretty easy once you learn the system.

I'd be happy to spend some time on the phone with you but I'm on the west coast so not available to meet in person.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "fhoudaille" <fhoudaille@...> wrote:

Hello,

We are preparing for a family adventure around the world in our newly acquired SM. Considering adding a furling jib to use in winds north of 25 knots, one that could also be used as a storm sail if need be.
Have some of you done this and if you have, would you please share your experience and recommendations with me?

Also, based on various feedback, I am less than convinced we would want to use our main ballooner (too much work for one person I hear).
What does everyone think about this and about the possible alternatives for downwind runs in light air?
Thanks!

Cheers,
Fred
SM #404, "Zazen", located in Bear, DE, USA


Re: [Amel] bow thruster model number?

Roque
 

HI

On Atica, Amel 54, year 2008, the thruster is:
Model: SP 155 TCi
SLEIPNER MOTOR A.S.
www.side-power.com
(made in Norway)

Roque

2012/6/28 gallivantbob <bobh@hodginsengraving.com>

**


I am home in Western New York and Gallivant is on the hard in Grenada. I
want to order spare parts for my bow thruster. Can anyone tell me the model
number of the thruster on my 2006 Amel 54, hull #31 ?
Imtra supplies the parts here in the US.



bow thruster model number?

gallivantbob <bobh@...>
 

I am home in Western New York and Gallivant is on the hard in Grenada. I want to order spare parts for my bow thruster. Can anyone tell me the model number of the thruster on my 2006 Amel 54, hull #31 ?
Imtra supplies the parts here in the US.


Re: Watermaking

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Jose:

A couple of notes preliminarily:

1- Water makers need to be run frequently to remain in good working order. Daily is best. I realize your boat was on the hard for a prolonged period. The best care in those circumstances is to flush the system with fresh water ever few days that is free of chlorine ( having been filtered through a carbon filter if that water is added from a chlorinated shore source). If you don't know how to do this contact me as noted below and I walk you thru the process.

2- If one chooses to pickle the system, use the minimum sodium meta sulfite concentration possible (pickling solution). Leave the solution in the system for as short a period as possible. Sodium Metabisulite is corrosive and attacks seals and metal, especially at the high temps that occur when the boat is stored in hot climates.

3- Don't rely on taste to measure water quality!!! Get a TDS (total Dissolved Solids) meter or an EC (Electrical Conductivity) meter and use it during EACH water making session. I have an EC meter plumbed into the system that continuously monitors production and shuts down transfer of product water to the tanks if EC goes above 650 microseimens. I understand that the current Dessalator production circuit board works appropriately and is safe to use. The original Dessalator circuit board did not work as advertised and should not be relied on unless you install your own measuring and control circuitry!!!!!!! I would NOT use the system unless you can verify water quality with appropriate instrumentation!!!!

The symptoms of a hot running motor that improved with "exercise" sounds like possibly the seals, pump mechanism, or shaft of the pump was placing an undue load on the motor due to corrosion or perhaps motor brushes were dirty or corroded. Another possibility is that a run capacitor on the pump is defective. I would continue to monitor the motor temp closely even though it appears that the temp has stabilized. Monitor both the low pressure feed pump and the high pressure pump motor temps.

Water made at lower than normal pressure will invariably be high in TDS or EC ( 1 TDS = 1.56 EC) . The high pressure needs to be in mid to high green range to have best water quality. Unfortunately, with the original Dessalator circuit board, there is no way to to prevent bad quality water from going to your tanks unles you wire a switch into the bypass solenoid control circuit. This is very easy to do and you can contact me at garysilver at Mac.com (put @ where "at" is to make that work) for directions or other questions..

Happy to help in any way I can.

Gary Silver
Amel SM 2000. Hull No. 335
s/v Liahona

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Jose" <jvenegas@...> wrote:

Background
Ipanema's desalination had been pickled and dormant since I bought her almost 4 years ago. In preparation for our transatlantic passage I had bought a new set of membranes assuming that the ones on board should have certainly been useless. However, after hearing from one of our members, I decided to see if they worked once we put the boat in the water. The boat had been all winter and spring on land at Plymouth's Brewer's Marina being repaired from a substantial, but only cosmetic, damage caused by a loose boat that laid against Impanema during a late October storm while it awaited haul out. So we could only test the system 2 weeks departure while we provisioned the boat at Constitution Marina (Boston). Initially, when I started the desalination, the current drawn by the motor was so excessive that the generator's breaker would stop after a few seconds. Recommended by a tech from Cay electronics, I started it with shore power and IT WORKED making the 35 Gal/hour with the pressure gauge on the middle of the green. Because of the poor quality of water in Boston harbor I only let it run for a few minutes and tasted the water: It was good! Then, we ran the generator and it worked again: we could finally leave last Friday June 21, 2012.
Since I was still a little worried about the desalination, we decided to conserve water and loaded the boat with fresh water, just in case. Well, when I tested the system again, this time 50 miles east of the cape code, the desalination motor started and it made water for about 30 minutes. Then the system stopped and the motor was very hot with the smell of electrical burn. It meant the end of showers for the end of the trip, and a drop in the morale of the crew including me.
Today, Monday June 25, I tried again and … as the motor started the generator began to labor and for the first 2 minutes I thought it was the end of our water making but … miraculously, the generator accelerated and the pump began to purr. I left her without increasing the pressure and monitored its temperature that rached about 65 C. 20 minutes later I increased the high pressure slowly until the flow reached 20 gph and the pressure was still on the orange. One hour later the high pressure motor temperature was still 65 C. We ran it for another hour at 25 gph with only 1 C increase in motor temperature.

The questions are: 1) what happened ? 2) is 65 C too much (It feels hot to touch but does not burn)? 3) is there anything that I should do while underway and after I reach the Azores? 5) any tech at the Azores that can check the system and service it?
Thanks in advance

Jose Gabriel Venegas and crew
Ipanema SM 2K, crossing the atlantic, currently at N40 13 W 60 40.


Re: [Amel] Bow Thruster Propellor Shaft Seal Dimensions

Jean-Luc MERTZ <jluc.mertz@...>
 

Yes
Cottonbay is sm 2000 number 316
Fair winds
Le 28 juin 2012 15:00, "amelliahona" <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> a crit :

**



Jluc

Do you know if that is the same part used on the SuperMaramu 2000?

Thanks,

Gary Silver
AmelnSM 2000 Hull Number 335

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Jean-Luc MERTZ <jluc.mertz@...>
wrote:

30 42 7
Paulstra part number 792521
Note with 2 lips and inox spring

Jluc
Cottonbay
Le 28 juin 2012 13:00, "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@...> a crit :

**


Does anyone have the dimensions of the Lip Seal for the Propellor
Shaft of
the Bow Thruster?
Many thanks,
Craig Briggs
Santorin #68 - Sangaris - about to splash in Leros, GR



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