Date   

Auto Prop Locking Nut Removal Tool

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi JP:

Regarding your post #5582

Sorry to be so slow to respond. I have been gone for three weeks and just not got back to where I had internet access.

I do not know what size socket I used to fabricate the tool to remove the locking nut. I just chose a socket, the diameter of which matched the notches in the locking nut. I then filed and ground away enough material on the lip of the socket to create 4 "teeth" that would engage the notches in the locking nut. I used a deep socket because that is the only one I had that matched but a normal depth socket would work.

I also subsequently made a tool to remove the cover cap. The cap I am referring to is the brass cap with the 4 holes in it that covers the hub retaining materials. The 2 peg wrench that I purchased from Brunton was inadequate and quickly fell apart. I made a 4 peg wrench by cutting a piece of 1/4 in thick stainless steel, 1 1/2 inches square, drilling 4 holes in it on one inch centers to match the position of the holes in the cap, then I created 4 pegs to fit in the holes in the cap. They are slightly smaller than 1/8 inch (as I recall but measure to be sure). I chucked some round stainless stock in a drill and using sand paper ground them down to match the size of the holes in the cap. I then welded the pegs into the holes of the 1 1/2 square piece noted above. To this I welded two stainless 3/8 dowel pieces to act as handles. Now I can use all four holes for torque and have two handles rather than one. Next time I am on the boat I will take a photo and post it to the photos section.

Regards, Gary Silver Amel SM2000 Hull # 335

PS I have posted this three time but the site isn't accepting it, so if it shows up repeatedly that is why. GS


Auto Prop Locking Nut Removal Tool

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi JP:

Regarding your post #5582

Sorry to be so slow to respond. I have been gone for three weeks and just not got back to where I had internet access.

I do not know what size socket I used to fabricate the tool to remove the locking nut. I just chose a socket, the diameter of which matched the notches in the locking nut. I then filed and ground away enough material on the lip of the socket to create 4 "teeth" that would engage the notches in the locking nut. I used a deep socket because that is the only one I had that matched but a normal depth socket would work.

I also subsequently made a tool to remove the cover cap. The cap I am referring to is the brass cap with the 4 holes in it that covers the hub retaining materials. The 2 peg wrench that I purchased from Brunton was inadequate and quickly fell apart. I made a 4 peg wrench by cutting a piece of 1/4 in thick stainless steel, 1 1/2 inches square, drilling 4 holes in it on one inch centers to match the position of the holes in the cap, then I created 4 pegs to fit in the holes in the cap. They are slightly smaller than 1/8 inch (as I recall but measure to be sure). I chucked some round stainless stock in a drill and using sand paper ground them down to match the size of the holes in the cap. I then welded the pegs into the holes of the 1 1/2 square piece noted above. To this I welded two stainless 3/8 dowel pieces to act as handles. Now I can use all four holes for torque and have two handles rather than one. Next time I am on the boat I will take a photo and post it to the photos section.

I hope this helps. Gary Silver SM2000 Hull # 335


Auto Prop Locking Nut Removal Tool

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi JP -

RE: your post # 5528 (which for some reason I could not reply to)

Sorry for the delayed reply. I have been in Europe for 3 weeks and not getting the messages from this site during that time.

Take a look at the photo's in the Folder entitled Auto Prop Service. One of the photo's shows the locking nut, which has four indentations along its periphery to accept a special tool. Unfortunately, I do not recall what size socket I used. Just choose one that is the size such that the diameter of the socket overlaps the indentations. Then cut/grind/file away enough material so that the four teeth that you create on the lip of the socket fits into the indentations in the locking nut.

I also fabricated a cap removal tool to replace the one that Brunton supplied that was not up to the task. I don't recall if I wrote about that previously or not, you might search this site for details, but I recall that the pins were 1/8 in stainless welded onto a 1.5 inch square of metal at 1 inch on centers so that they matched the 4 holes in the cap. To this I welded two round pieces of stainless for handles so that I could use both hands to loosen the cap. Normally the cap has no retention except torque, the O-ring, and some Lock Tite.

I hope this helps.

Best regards, Gary Silver, Amel SM 2000 Hull #335


Re: [Amel] St Martin-heading South

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Kent, if you have to leave the boat in Virgins, think about using American or one of the others on St. Thomas.  They are safe and there are no extra tax issues.
Richard and Joan on Challenge SM 209

--- On Sat, 9/12/09, Jorge Zlatar <jorge.zlatar@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Jorge Zlatar <jorge.zlatar@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] St Martin-heading South
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, September 12, 2009, 2:42 AM






 





Hi Kent

I did the 1500 last year, and like Eric mention, after one hour we lost every body of sight, we use to comunicate at 7 am and at 7 pm by SSB and every boat of the 52 that were on the rally gave their positions. The 1500 organisation installed on each boat a tracking device so they knew exactly where we were.That also could be seen on Google Earth by others on land.We contrated the services of Chris Parker who daily suggest us the route to follow to avoid bad weather.He saved us 3 days on bad see avoiding TS Paloma that evolutioned as we left Hampton.

We did 1700 miles( 200 milles more than the rest) and we cross the line 8 days after departure. Some boats did it on 10 and a couple that had problems on 12. After sailing in the BVI, we left the boat on Soper´s Hole in the west end of Tortola. The ferry departs from S.Hole to St Thomas. The Tortola Airport is at 30 min by taxi.If you want more details of the boat yard where we left it, just email me.

Best regards

SV Excalibur



____________ _________ _________ __

From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com>

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2009 5:15:21 PM

Subject: Re: [Amel] St Martin-heading South



Thanks, Eric. I think you guys have about got me convinced until you talk about 50-60 footers. The boat came equipped with a ParaTech sea anchor which I haven't deployed yet to see how it works. Anybody have any thoughts about that vs the Drogue? Most important determinant will be the SSB, still working on that. I'll post on a separate thread about my problem there to see if anyone has any ideas. I've got a marine electronics guy looking at it now and hope it will be ready to go by the time I'm ready to leave. Still have to figure out the weather fax and sail mail programs, but I think I'll be able to do that without too much problem once the SSB is working.



I haven't looked into where I'll leave the boat. Was planning on going to BVI first and leaving her in Tortola somewhere. Anyone have any recommendations on where to leave her for a few weeks each in BVI, St.Martin, Guadeloupe, St Lucia, or Granada?



Thanks again.

Kent

SM 243 "Kristy"



--- On Wed, 9/9/09, kimberlite@optonlin e.net <kimberlite@ optonlin e.net> wrote:



From: kimberlite@optonlin e.net <kimberlite@ optonlin e.net>

Subject: [Amel] St Martin-heading South

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Date: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 12:34 AM



Kent,

via Bermuda is the only way to go.

I have made the trip in my 37 foot tartan and my SM about 20 times

With the sm unless there is weather, fuel, or provision problems. we go non stop.

Please get your ssb working and speak with herb hilgenberg daily 12359 mhz. he is a lifesaver.

he comes on at 20000 zulu. listen to this frequency 15-20 minute before he comes on as there is a protocal. you acn also google him and read his website.



Traveling in company i believe is a waste as you are on your own after the first day. once in a while you get hammered with weather. This trip there were 3 boats abandoned and one death.

we were lucky to have our Jordan Series drogue ,otherwise i believe we would have been in Very serious trouble with 50- 60 foot seas. there is a video if you are interested. the ssb is the number 1 piece of safety equipment. AIS is also very helpful.



Once you get through the stream life becomes usually rosy.

we ;eave about Oct 28 to get in the right spot for NOV 1 the end of our hurricane season.



you head for what we call I-65 65 degrees west and straight to st martin.

where will you be staying in St Martin?



we have made the trip from 8 3/4 days to 12 days. normally about 10 from Long Island. I went solo 3 years ago and it took just short of 12 days.

fair winds

eric sm 376 Kimberlite



----- Original Message -----

From: Kent Robertson

Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 7:37 pm

Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com



Thanks a bunch John. That's what I needed to hear. All I have
to do now is get my SSB working for weather faxes and
communications, and get my nerve up enough to go to sea for 12
days. I'll probably have to get some professional crew since
none of my friends are up for that kind of trip yet. I think
I'll be OK with it if I have reliable weather info.
Where are you getting your shoulder worked on? I'm an
anesthesiologist in North Carolina. Ask for an interscalene
block and catheter for postop pain relief...it' ll make you
pretty much pain free for 2-3 days after surgery. Only other
advice on shoulder surgery is to do your PT religiously no
matter what. Worst thing that can happen is to limit your
movement enough that you get a frozen shoulder.
Good luck with that.
My phone number is 828 234 6819 (cell). I may give you a call
in a week or two if I haven't made my mind up yet.
Thanks again,
Kent
--- On Tue, 9/8/09, john martin wrote:
From: john martin
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: "Amel YAHOO GROUP"
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 4:15 PM
Kent, I've done that trip many times over the last 35 years.
Don't even think about going the gentlemens route. Its a real
tough way to go. You will spend a lot of time waiting for
weather, like months, And motoring most of the time into big
seas. Bite the bullet,head to Bermuda to get your easting in,
and then head for St, Martin's. You'l be there in 12 days. If
you go to the Virgins first you will have a 80 mile bash to
windward to get to St, Martin's, Better to pick up the Virgins
on the way back. Also stop in the Bahamas on the way back, they
are warm and beautiful in the springtime but are terrible in the
winter. You should also consider the Caribbean 1500. They leave
from Hampton Va, on the 2nd of Nov. Well organized with weather
routing etc. I wouldn't leave the Chesapeake before the first
week in Nov.{ think hurricane.} Going to Savannah is good
because they don't get hurricanes, but you are going west when
you want to go east. The Gentlemens
guide is a wonderful book, I have read it twice. He's a great
writer. I'm going to the States for a shoulder opperation this
week so will have plenty of time to talk while recovering. E-
mail me your phone no. if you need any more
help.symoondog@ hotmail.com John "moon Dog" sm248
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
From: karkauai@yahoo. com
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:27:36 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
Hi, all,
I'm making plans for the trip South from the Chesapeake to the
Caribbean and thought I'd ask for some advice. I've done a few
3-5 day offshore trips across the Gulf and up the coast, but
haven't tackled the trip South yet. From what I've read a lot
of people sail out to Bermuda, then South to avoid the upwind
beat from the Bahamas down the chain, but I still don't have my
SSB working (or have a good way to get weather that far
offshore) I'm working on that, but haven't had much luck yet. I
have a week in Oct that I could take her down to Savannah, then
a month from mid Nov to mid Dec. I've ordered the book "A
Gentleman's Guide to Passages South", but wanted some advice
from folks who've been there and done that. Just how "bad" are
the two approaches to getting to the BVI from the E Coast?
Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
Kent
"Kristy" SM 243
____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
Bing™ brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one
place. Try it now.
http://www.bing. com/search? q=restaurants& form=MLOGEN& publ=WLHMTAG& crea=TEXT_ MLOGEN_Core_ tagline_local_ 1x1
------------ --------- --------- ------
Yahoo! Groups Links


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Yahoo! Groups Links



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































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Re: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

It's easy we tie it to a "u" bolt next to the wheel that is also used to clip in.  If you don't have one, install an "I" bolt in the lazerett next to the wheel.  It does not get to much load as you are about 50-60 deg off the wind. 
  Hey we use a hove to when it's time to stop for repairs or lunch or whatever or whenever we need to have the boat stop and be quite in the water...
  The last time we hove to it was blowing 45-50 kts with 35 foot seas.. we laid there for two days rested and recovered from 3 days for foul weather and cold.  What a treat.
Good luck
Richard and Joan on Challenge in Annapolis MD...

--- On Sat, 9/12/09, Giovanni Testa <gtesta23@tin.it> wrote:

From: Giovanni Testa <gtesta23@tin.it>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, September 12, 2009, 6:17 AM






 





Hi Richard and Joan,

thanks for the suggestions for heavy weather. Only a question, how do you fasten " the wheel to windward" heaving to ?

Thanks and..Buon Vento !

Giovanni TESTA

EUTIKIA SM2K 428

----- Original Message -----

From: Richard Piller

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 3:45 AM

Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter



Kent, you are new at this. There are a lot of us that have done this trip for years. I know the Bahama's look like an easy way, they are NOT>> Once you get our of Norfolk the winds normally will take you to Bermuda anyway.. Take advantage of that go east.. When you depart from Bermuda head for 60 degs as you go south. DON't be tricked into a straight line course to St. Martin.. you head a bit east and when the winds come on your port let them carry you to St. Martin.. Bring lots of fuel cans as there will be wind or NONE... Eric carries lots of fuel so do we. You'll need it.. Also be sure to get your cook gas cans filled before to take off. USE Herb and be sure to call in every day he HATES people that don't.. in fact he worries to death if you don't.. Try hoving two from time to time before you need too. It works. Back wind the shortened headsail, bring the main on center shorten it up to about a #3 reef with a short head sail bring

the wheel to windward and tie off the wheel with the mizzen rolled up. She'll sit there and all will be well. We have done it in several big nor'easter and two tropical blows.. It works.. even 35 foot seas. If you find yourself running before the wind we lay out a big 300 foot u shaped warp of 3/4 line to slow the boat and keep her steady so the auto pilot doesn't kill itself. You've got one of the be sea going boats in the world. Don't panic and you'll do just fine.

Richard and Joan on Challenge SM 209 in Annapolis.



--- On Tue, 9/8/09, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com> wrote:



From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com>

Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 7:36 PM



Thanks a bunch John. That's what I needed to hear. All I have to do now is get my SSB working for weather faxes and communications, and get my nerve up enough to go to sea for 12 days. I'll probably have to get some professional crew since none of my friends are up for that kind of trip yet. I think I'll be OK with it if I have reliable weather info.



Where are you getting your shoulder worked on? I'm an anesthesiologist in North Carolina. Ask for an interscalene block and catheter for postop pain relief...it' ll make you pretty much pain free for 2-3 days after surgery. Only other advice on shoulder surgery is to do your PT religiously no matter what. Worst thing that can happen is to limit your movement enough that you get a frozen shoulder.



Good luck with that.



My phone number is 828 234 6819 (cell). I may give you a call in a week or two if I haven't made my mind up yet.



Thanks again,



Kent



--- On Tue, 9/8/09, john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com> wrote:



From: john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com>



Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter



To: "Amel YAHOO GROUP" <amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com>



Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 4:15 PM



Kent, I've done that trip many times over the last 35 years. Don't even think about going the gentlemens route. Its a real tough way to go. You will spend a lot of time waiting for weather, like months, And motoring most of the time into big seas. Bite the bullet,head to Bermuda to get your easting in, and then head for St, Martin's. You'l be there in 12 days. If you go to the Virgins first you will have a 80 mile bash to windward to get to St, Martin's, Better to pick up the Virgins on the way back. Also stop in the Bahamas on the way back, they are warm and beautiful in the springtime but are terrible in the winter. You should also consider the Caribbean 1500. They leave from Hampton Va, on the 2nd of Nov. Well organized with weather routing etc. I wouldn't leave the Chesapeake before the first week in Nov.{ think hurricane.} Going to Savannah is good because they don't get hurricanes, but you are going west when you want to go east. The Gentlemens



guide is a wonderful book, I have read it twice. He's a great writer. I'm going to the States for a shoulder opperation this week so will have plenty of time to talk while recovering. E-mail me your phone no. if you need any more help.symoondog@ hotmail.com John "moon Dog" sm248



To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com



From: karkauai@yahoo. com



Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:27:36 +0000



Subject: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter



Hi, all,



I'm making plans for the trip South from the Chesapeake to the Caribbean and thought I'd ask for some advice. I've done a few 3-5 day offshore trips across the Gulf and up the coast, but haven't tackled the trip South yet. From what I've read a lot of people sail out to Bermuda, then South to avoid the upwind beat from the Bahamas down the chain, but I still don't have my SSB working (or have a good way to get weather that far offshore) I'm working on that, but haven't had much luck yet. I have a week in Oct that I could take her down to Savannah, then a month from mid Nov to mid Dec. I've ordered the book "A Gentleman's Guide to Passages South", but wanted some advice from folks who've been there and done that. Just how "bad" are the two approaches to getting to the BVI from the E Coast?



Thanks in advance for your thoughts.



Kent



"Kristy" SM 243



____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _



Bing™ brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place. Try it now.



http://www.bing. com/search? q=restaurants& form=MLOGEN& publ=WLHMTAG& crea=TEXT_ MLOGEN_Core_ tagline_local_ 1x1



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------ --------- --------- ------



Yahoo! Groups Links







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -



Nessun virus nel messaggio in arrivo.

Controllato da AVG - www.avg.com

Versione: 8.5.375 / Database dei virus: 270.13.87/2356 - Data di rilascio: 09/09/09 06:53:00



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

Giovanni TESTA
 

Hi Richard and Joan,
thanks for the suggestions for heavy weather. Only a question, how do you fasten " the wheel to windward" heaving to ?
Thanks and..Buon Vento !
Giovanni TESTA
EUTIKIA SM2K 428

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Piller
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, September 12, 2009 3:45 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter


Kent, you are new at this. There are a lot of us that have done this trip for years. I know the Bahama's look like an easy way, they are NOT>> Once you get our of Norfolk the winds normally will take you to Bermuda anyway.. Take advantage of that go east.. When you depart from Bermuda head for 60 degs as you go south. DON't be tricked into a straight line course to St. Martin.. you head a bit east and when the winds come on your port let them carry you to St. Martin.. Bring lots of fuel cans as there will be wind or NONE... Eric carries lots of fuel so do we. You'll need it.. Also be sure to get your cook gas cans filled before to take off. USE Herb and be sure to call in every day he HATES people that don't.. in fact he worries to death if you don't.. Try hoving two from time to time before you need too. It works. Back wind the shortened headsail, bring the main on center shorten it up to about a #3 reef with a short head sail bring
the wheel to windward and tie off the wheel with the mizzen rolled up. She'll sit there and all will be well. We have done it in several big nor'easter and two tropical blows.. It works.. even 35 foot seas. If you find yourself running before the wind we lay out a big 300 foot u shaped warp of 3/4 line to slow the boat and keep her steady so the auto pilot doesn't kill itself. You've got one of the be sea going boats in the world. Don't panic and you'll do just fine.
Richard and Joan on Challenge SM 209 in Annapolis.

--- On Tue, 9/8/09, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 7:36 PM



Thanks a bunch John. That's what I needed to hear. All I have to do now is get my SSB working for weather faxes and communications, and get my nerve up enough to go to sea for 12 days. I'll probably have to get some professional crew since none of my friends are up for that kind of trip yet. I think I'll be OK with it if I have reliable weather info.



Where are you getting your shoulder worked on? I'm an anesthesiologist in North Carolina. Ask for an interscalene block and catheter for postop pain relief...it' ll make you pretty much pain free for 2-3 days after surgery. Only other advice on shoulder surgery is to do your PT religiously no matter what. Worst thing that can happen is to limit your movement enough that you get a frozen shoulder.



Good luck with that.



My phone number is 828 234 6819 (cell). I may give you a call in a week or two if I haven't made my mind up yet.

Thanks again,

Kent

--- On Tue, 9/8/09, john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com> wrote:

From: john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com>

Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

To: "Amel YAHOO GROUP" <amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com>

Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 4:15 PM

Kent, I've done that trip many times over the last 35 years. Don't even think about going the gentlemens route. Its a real tough way to go. You will spend a lot of time waiting for weather, like months, And motoring most of the time into big seas. Bite the bullet,head to Bermuda to get your easting in, and then head for St, Martin's. You'l be there in 12 days. If you go to the Virgins first you will have a 80 mile bash to windward to get to St, Martin's, Better to pick up the Virgins on the way back. Also stop in the Bahamas on the way back, they are warm and beautiful in the springtime but are terrible in the winter. You should also consider the Caribbean 1500. They leave from Hampton Va, on the 2nd of Nov. Well organized with weather routing etc. I wouldn't leave the Chesapeake before the first week in Nov.{ think hurricane.} Going to Savannah is good because they don't get hurricanes, but you are going west when you want to go east. The Gentlemens

guide is a wonderful book, I have read it twice. He's a great writer. I'm going to the States for a shoulder opperation this week so will have plenty of time to talk while recovering. E-mail me your phone no. if you need any more help.symoondog@ hotmail.com John "moon Dog" sm248

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

From: karkauai@yahoo. com

Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:27:36 +0000

Subject: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter



Hi, all,

I'm making plans for the trip South from the Chesapeake to the Caribbean and thought I'd ask for some advice. I've done a few 3-5 day offshore trips across the Gulf and up the coast, but haven't tackled the trip South yet. From what I've read a lot of people sail out to Bermuda, then South to avoid the upwind beat from the Bahamas down the chain, but I still don't have my SSB working (or have a good way to get weather that far offshore) I'm working on that, but haven't had much luck yet. I have a week in Oct that I could take her down to Savannah, then a month from mid Nov to mid Dec. I've ordered the book "A Gentleman's Guide to Passages South", but wanted some advice from folks who've been there and done that. Just how "bad" are the two approaches to getting to the BVI from the E Coast?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Kent

"Kristy" SM 243





















____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _

Bing™ brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place. Try it now.

http://www.bing. com/search? q=restaurants& form=MLOGEN& publ=WLHMTAG& crea=TEXT_ MLOGEN_Core_ tagline_local_ 1x1



------------ --------- --------- ------

Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Nessun virus nel messaggio in arrivo.
Controllato da AVG - www.avg.com
Versione: 8.5.375 / Database dei virus: 270.13.87/2356 - Data di rilascio: 09/09/09 06:53:00


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] St Martin-heading South

Jorge Zlatar <jorge.zlatar@...>
 

Hi Kent
I did the 1500 last year, and like Eric mention, after one hour we lost every body of sight, we use to comunicate at 7 am and at 7 pm by SSB and every boat of the 52 that were on the rally gave their positions. The 1500 organisation installed on each boat a tracking device so they knew exactly where we were.That also could be seen on Google Earth by others on land.We contrated the services of Chris Parker who daily suggest us the route to follow to avoid bad weather.He saved us 3 days on bad see avoiding TS Paloma that evolutioned as we left Hampton.
We did 1700 miles( 200 milles more than the rest) and we cross the line 8 days after departure. Some boats did it on 10 and a couple that had problems on 12. After sailing in the BVI, we left the boat on Soper´s Hole in the west end of Tortola. The ferry departs from S.Hole to St Thomas. The Tortola Airport is at 30 min by taxi.If you want more details of the boat yard where we left it, just email me.
Best regards
SV Excalibur


________________________________
From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2009 5:15:21 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] St Martin-heading South


Thanks, Eric. I think you guys have about got me convinced until you talk about 50-60 footers. The boat came equipped with a ParaTech sea anchor which I haven't deployed yet to see how it works. Anybody have any thoughts about that vs the Drogue? Most important determinant will be the SSB, still working on that. I'll post on a separate thread about my problem there to see if anyone has any ideas. I've got a marine electronics guy looking at it now and hope it will be ready to go by the time I'm ready to leave. Still have to figure out the weather fax and sail mail programs, but I think I'll be able to do that without too much problem once the SSB is working.

I haven't looked into where I'll leave the boat. Was planning on going to BVI first and leaving her in Tortola somewhere. Anyone have any recommendations on where to leave her for a few weeks each in BVI, St.Martin, Guadeloupe, St Lucia, or Granada?

Thanks again.
Kent
SM 243 "Kristy"

--- On Wed, 9/9/09, kimberlite@optonlin e.net <kimberlite@optonlin e.net> wrote:

From: kimberlite@optonlin e.net <kimberlite@optonlin e.net>
Subject: [Amel] St Martin-heading South
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 12:34 AM

Kent,
via Bermuda is the only way to go.
I have made the trip in my 37 foot tartan and my SM about 20 times
With the sm unless there is weather, fuel, or provision problems. we go non stop.
Please get your ssb working and speak with herb hilgenberg daily 12359 mhz. he is a lifesaver.
he comes on at 20000 zulu. listen to this frequency 15-20 minute before he comes on as there is a protocal. you acn also google him and read his website.

Traveling in company i believe is a waste as you are on your own after the first day. once in a while you get hammered with weather. This trip there were 3 boats abandoned and one death.
we were lucky to have our Jordan Series drogue ,otherwise i believe we would have been in Very serious trouble with 50- 60 foot seas. there is a video if you are interested. the ssb is the number 1 piece of safety equipment. AIS is also very helpful.

Once you get through the stream life becomes usually rosy.
we ;eave about Oct 28 to get in the right spot for NOV 1 the end of our hurricane season.

you head for what we call I-65 65 degrees west and straight to st martin.
where will you be staying in St Martin?

we have made the trip from 8 3/4 days to 12 days. normally about 10 from Long Island. I went solo 3 years ago and it took just short of 12 days.
fair winds
eric sm 376 Kimberlite

----- Original Message -----
From: Kent Robertson
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 7:37 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Thanks a bunch John. That's what I needed to hear. All I have
to do now is get my SSB working for weather faxes and
communications, and get my nerve up enough to go to sea for 12
days. I'll probably have to get some professional crew since
none of my friends are up for that kind of trip yet. I think
I'll be OK with it if I have reliable weather info.

Where are you getting your shoulder worked on? I'm an
anesthesiologist in North Carolina. Ask for an interscalene
block and catheter for postop pain relief...it' ll make you
pretty much pain free for 2-3 days after surgery. Only other
advice on shoulder surgery is to do your PT religiously no
matter what. Worst thing that can happen is to limit your
movement enough that you get a frozen shoulder.

Good luck with that.

My phone number is 828 234 6819 (cell). I may give you a call
in a week or two if I haven't made my mind up yet.
Thanks again,
Kent

--- On Tue, 9/8/09, john martin wrote:


From: john martin
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: "Amel YAHOO GROUP"
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 4:15 PM



Kent, I've done that trip many times over the last 35 years.
Don't even think about going the gentlemens route. Its a real
tough way to go. You will spend a lot of time waiting for
weather, like months, And motoring most of the time into big
seas. Bite the bullet,head to Bermuda to get your easting in,
and then head for St, Martin's. You'l be there in 12 days. If
you go to the Virgins first you will have a 80 mile bash to
windward to get to St, Martin's, Better to pick up the Virgins
on the way back. Also stop in the Bahamas on the way back, they
are warm and beautiful in the springtime but are terrible in the
winter. You should also consider the Caribbean 1500. They leave
from Hampton Va, on the 2nd of Nov. Well organized with weather
routing etc. I wouldn't leave the Chesapeake before the first
week in Nov.{ think hurricane.} Going to Savannah is good
because they don't get hurricanes, but you are going west when
you want to go east. The Gentlemens
guide is a wonderful book, I have read it twice. He's a great
writer. I'm going to the States for a shoulder opperation this
week so will have plenty of time to talk while recovering. E-
mail me your phone no. if you need any more
help.symoondog@ hotmail.com John "moon Dog" sm248

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
From: karkauai@yahoo. com
Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:27:36 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter





















Hi, all,

I'm making plans for the trip South from the Chesapeake to the
Caribbean and thought I'd ask for some advice. I've done a few
3-5 day offshore trips across the Gulf and up the coast, but
haven't tackled the trip South yet. From what I've read a lot
of people sail out to Bermuda, then South to avoid the upwind
beat from the Bahamas down the chain, but I still don't have my
SSB working (or have a good way to get weather that far
offshore) I'm working on that, but haven't had much luck yet. I
have a week in Oct that I could take her down to Savannah, then
a month from mid Nov to mid Dec. I've ordered the book "A
Gentleman's Guide to Passages South", but wanted some advice
from folks who've been there and done that. Just how "bad" are
the two approaches to getting to the BVI from the E Coast?

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.

Kent

"Kristy" SM 243






















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[Amel] Re: Downwind rig topping lifts

Craig Briggs
 

PS to my earlier post -
In rereading this I see I might have been a bit more clear: the line that suspends the block has an eye splice around the upper shroud above the lower spreader (so it is not really "attached to the spreader", it just rests on top of the spreader end fitting hurricane clamps).
It then is run down over the end of the spreader (actually through the chafe protector) and goes the(approx)four feet to the block through which the topping lift runs. That block's shackle is fastened to the suspension line and also around the shroud. Basically the block is simply acting as a "fair lead" for the topping lift with no significant force on it in any direction.
Hope that clarifies it.
Cheers, Craig

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "sv_sangaris" <sangaris@...> wrote:

Hi David,
Not really (a bad idea) - the point of having the block suspended down about four feet is that with the pole lifted in place the topping lift runs virtually straight out from the block at the mast, putting no (or very little) downward force on the spreader. Also, with the hurricane clamps on the spreader ends, what little force there is is totally on the clamp, not the spreader. This was actually the factory method and it is excellent. Sorry I wasn't more descriptive in my original post.
Cheers, Craig

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, David Mackintosh <dlm48@> wrote:

If you run a line to the end of the spreader then load it up in a downward
direction you are putting a load on the spreader the fittings and the mast
that was never designed for a VERY BAD Idea.

regards

David

2009/9/9 sv_sangaris <sangaris@>



Hi Kent,
If you run the line straight out to the end of the spreader it may
interfere with your flag halyard and, in the right wind, may "beat" against
the underside of the spreader. Dropping it down about 3 or 4 feet creates a
little triangle of space for your flags and takes the line away from the
spreader, while still providing a good angle for lifting the pole.

When not in use, just fasten the shackle to the extra hole in the main
chain plate and wrap the other end on the topping life winch on the mast. I
also stretch a shock cord above head height to hold the topping lift off of
the mast so it doesn't beat in the wind.

Cheers,
Craig
--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>,
"karkauai" <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Craig. I thought there was a need to attach a tang to the outer
end of the spreader??? Why do you need the block that hangs down to be
attached by a line? Why not just run it thru a block at the end of the
spreader?
When not in use, do you just tie the working end of the topping lift off
on the rail and the other end somewhere at the base of the mast?

Thanks, Say Hi to Catherine.
Kent
"Kristy"
SM 243




Re: Rép. : [Amel] Re: St Martin-heading South -Weather

Eric Freedman
 


Re: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Kent, you are new at this.  There are a lot of us that have done this trip for years.  I know the Bahama's look like an easy way, they are NOT>>  Once you get our of Norfolk the winds normally will take you to Bermuda anyway.. Take advantage of that go east.. When you depart from Bermuda head for 60 degs as you go south.  DON't be tricked into a straight line course to St. Martin..  you head a bit east and when the winds come on your port let them carry you to St. Martin.. Bring lots of fuel cans as there will be wind or NONE... Eric carries lots of fuel so do we.  You'll need it.. Also be sure to get your cook gas cans filled before to take off.  USE Herb and be sure to call in every day he HATES people that don't.. in fact he worries to death if you don't..  Try hoving two from time to time before you need too.  It works.  Back wind the shortened headsail, bring the main on center shorten it up to about a #3 reef with a short head sail bring
the wheel to windward and tie off the wheel with the mizzen rolled up.  She'll sit there and all will be well.  We have done it in several big nor'easter and two tropical blows..  It works.. even 35 foot seas.  If you find yourself running before the wind we lay out a big 300 foot u shaped warp of 3/4 line to slow the boat and keep her steady so the auto pilot doesn't kill itself.  You've got one of the be sea going boats in the world.  Don't panic and you'll do just fine.
Richard and Joan on Challenge SM 209 in Annapolis.

--- On Tue, 9/8/09, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 7:36 PM






 





Thanks a bunch John.  That's what I needed to hear.  All I have to do now is get my SSB working for weather faxes and communications, and get my nerve up enough to go to sea for 12 days.  I'll probably have to get some professional crew since none of my friends are up for that kind of trip yet.  I think I'll be OK with it if I have reliable weather info.

 

Where are you getting your shoulder worked on?  I'm an anesthesiologist in North Carolina.  Ask for an interscalene block and catheter for postop pain relief...it' ll make you pretty much pain free for 2-3 days after surgery.  Only other advice on shoulder surgery is to do your PT religiously no matter what.  Worst thing that can happen is to limit your movement enough that you get a frozen shoulder.

 

Good luck with that.

 

My phone number is 828 234 6819 (cell).  I may give you a call in a week or two if I haven't made my mind up yet.

Thanks again,

Kent



--- On Tue, 9/8/09, john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com> wrote:



From: john martin <symoondog@hotmail. com>

Subject: RE: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

To: "Amel YAHOO GROUP" <amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com>

Date: Tuesday, September 8, 2009, 4:15 PM



Kent, I've done that trip many times over the last 35 years. Don't even think about going the gentlemens route. Its a real tough way to go. You will spend a lot of time waiting for weather, like months, And motoring most of the time into big seas. Bite the bullet,head to Bermuda to get your easting in, and then head for St, Martin's. You'l be there in 12 days. If you go to the Virgins first you will have a 80 mile bash to windward to get to St, Martin's, Better to pick up the Virgins on the way back. Also stop in the Bahamas on the way back, they are warm and beautiful in the springtime but are terrible in the winter. You should also consider the Caribbean 1500. They leave from Hampton Va, on the 2nd of Nov. Well organized with weather routing etc. I wouldn't leave the Chesapeake before the first week in Nov.{ think hurricane.} Going to Savannah is good because they don't get hurricanes, but you are going west when you want to go east. The Gentlemens

guide is a wonderful book, I have read it twice. He's a great writer. I'm going to the States for a shoulder opperation this week so will have plenty of time to talk while recovering. E-mail me your phone no. if you need any more help.symoondog@ hotmail.com   John "moon Dog" sm248



To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

From: karkauai@yahoo. com

Date: Sun, 30 Aug 2009 14:27:36 +0000

Subject: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter



   

                  Hi, all,



I'm making plans for the trip South from the Chesapeake to the Caribbean and thought I'd ask for some advice.  I've done a few 3-5 day offshore trips across the Gulf and up the coast, but haven't tackled the trip South yet.  From what I've read a lot of people sail out to Bermuda, then South to avoid the upwind beat from the Bahamas down the chain, but I still don't have my SSB working (or have a good way to get weather that far offshore) I'm working on that, but haven't had much luck yet.  I have a week in Oct that I could take her down to Savannah, then a month from mid Nov to mid Dec.  I've ordered the book "A Gentleman's Guide to Passages South", but wanted some advice from folks who've been there and done that.  Just how "bad" are the two approaches to getting to the BVI from the E Coast?



Thanks in advance for your thoughts.



Kent



"Kristy" SM 243



     



   

   

   

   

   

   



   



   

                              

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Bing™  brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place.   Try it now.

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Re: Rép. : [Amel] Re: St Martin-heading South -Weather

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

I/we have found that if you stay with Southbound2 you'll be fine..  We also get weather on Sailmail using the SSB or sat phone.  You have got to have more then on source.

Does anyone ever try to hove 2 when it starts to blow???  It works.  We have used it up to and over 50..
Richard and Joan on Challenge..SM 209

--- On Thu, 9/10/09, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Rép. : [Amel] Re: St Martin-heading South -Weather
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009, 5:22 PM






 





Thank you, Serge,

It looks like there are a lot of weather services out there.  Now just a matter of me picking a couple and becoming familiar with how they work.  I think I will use the services of a professional as well as Herb's the first few times out.  Unfortunately don't speak enough French to use the RDC, but the Bouyweather looks great.

 

I guess you all can tell I'm a little anxious about this first real offshore passage, thank you for holding my hand.

Kent

SM243

"Kristy"



--- On Thu, 9/10/09, Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@yahoo. ca> wrote:



From: Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@yahoo. ca>

Subject: Rép. : [Amel] Re: St Martin-heading South -Weather

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009, 4:40 PM



 



As a skipper having sailed the Med, the Atlantic, the Caribean, a small portion of the Pacific over the last 35 years,  weather has been a central concern. The situation has much changed from the 70. Yes Herb is a great ressource, but even better NOAA for the charts, WeatherOnline from England or France, Météo France. For me the best in the last few years is Buoyweather. com. Subscription is less than 100$-y, but the service is far superior to most because of the ease of use, the accuracy (I have compared the info with many other sources including the English, the German, the French and Spanish service providers) is remarquable. The BuoyWeather Grib files are great.

 

After downloading the files from Buoyweather and or Airmail, if i have the time, i like looking at the general weather charts from NOAA which, as most of you know, are downloaded as fax with the SSB, it allows me to understand the basis of the Buoyweather forecasts which are based on historical computer models applied to NOAA info, forecast and others. If you look at the wind and wave NOAA central Atlantic, now, you will see hurricane Fred with its 100Km wind developping in the Eastern Atlantic...

 

Of course as a ham, I use Airmail which also provides Grib files, but i beleive  non ham can have the same service through Sailmail.

 

If you understand French (the operators however do accept communications in English) the ham Net called: Le reseau du capitaine (reseauducapitaine. com, 14118 Mhz, 11 Z summer, 12 Z winter)  (RDC) provides weather info -forecast analysed by VE2NOR, who has many years of experience doing so with countless bluewater sailors. This net covers the Atlantic and part of the Pacific (from Panama to the Galapagos). This source is very reliable, as evidenced by the large number of sailboats it direcly guide every year to and from N-Y to and from the Caribeans. When i first went to Bermuda from N-Y in 1979, the info on eddies on the Gulf Stream was not only approximate, but once at 100 miles from N-Y, the only resource for a small sailboat was a shortwave receiver... Now RDC operators provide current, general as well as personalized, info and their recommendations at the time of broadcast! And its free.

 

I am not related to any weather service provider.

 

Serge, SY Opera,  Mango #51



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[Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

On BeBe #387:
Inside the right side cabinet door below the nav station:

The 24-12 converter on the right is an ICOM DC24-12 step-down converter and it provides 13.6vdc to the SSB.

There are three SAILOR N420 24-12vdc converters on the left. They are bolted together and may appear as one unit, but there are three. The closest to the cabinet door is labeled PERMANENT - This provides voltage to the AM/FM radio and cig lighter. The second is marked HYDRA and it provides 12vdc to the B&G Hydra instruments. The third is marked VHF SAILOR and it provides 12vdc to the VHF.

My guess is that the rocker switch on the ICOM DC24-12 step-down converter is your problem. If yours was installed by Amel, you will find it easy to remove because it is mounted on a finished piece of mahogany with Amel-type thumb screws securing the mahogany to the cabinet side. There is an extra long pigtail allowing you ease of removal. Before you remove it, turn the breaker "ON" and rock the rocker switch back and forth to see if you can get it to come ON. If it does not come ON, turn the breaker OFF and remove the converter and disconnect it. Remove the converter case and test the switch. You will note that the switch is double pole. It turns ON both the positive and the negative. Be sure to check continuity on both sides of the switch.

Hope this helps.

Bill,

s/v BeBe SM2000 #387
currently Darwin


Re: [Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

Eric Freedman
 

hi on my Sm #376 there are 24 to 1 volt convertses. on the left sid of the lower tight Nav station cabinet. Stereo, tvs, instruments etc. in the midle on thebottom is a very large Icom Black vox that suplies the 12 volts for the ssb.
Fair wind,
eric

24-12 v converters under the nav table, but I think they're both
Mastervolt units. There may be a fuse or breaker on them, but I
can't even see the connections with it mounted up under the nav
table in the cabinet. Is there a way to get to them without
removing them from under the table? So your ICOM converter was bad?
Thanks,
Kent

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite@... wrote:

Hi, if you have a Icom 24-12 volt converter it only powers the
radio. the fix is to send it to Icom. I had the same problem.
Eric


Re: [Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

Eric Freedman
 

I had exactly the same poblem.
on my power supply
eric
Kimberlite sm 376

----- Original Message -----
From: svbebe
Date: Friday, September 11, 2009 12:50 am
Subject: [Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

Kent,

The ON/OFF double pole rocker switch on the front of the Icom 24
to 12vdc converter failed on s/v BeBe #387. I was not where I
could buy a replacement switch so I just jumpered the switch
"closed." I turn the 24 - 12vdc converter with the breaker
until I find a suitable replacement for the rocker switch.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2 #387
Currently Darwin, Australia


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "karkauai"
wrote:

Hi, again folks,
I'm trying to get my SSB working again after the technician in
Galveston who installed my new VHF, Pactor Modem, and AIS pulled
the panel out and set it on the nav station in such a way that
the mic plug broke off at the radio. We were unable to remove
the plug from it's receptacle due to corrosion of 10 years at
sea. The unit would come on but wouldn't receive or send (I'm
guessing because the pins were shorted in the send mode). After
sailing without it I had it repaired in Charleston but it wasn't
ready until after I left for the Chesapeake. I had it shipped
to me and installed it last weekend, but now it won't come on at
all. I checked the two fuses on the back of the unit, and then
checked the incoming power plug with my multitester. It seems
that there is no power coming to the plug. I traced the wires
back to the top of the 24v-12v converter under the nav station,
but didn't remove the converter to look at the top of the
converter since it looked like an awkward job and I wasn't
really sure what I was looking for anyway. All other 12 v
electronics are working fine.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what it might be?
Probably something simple if my previous misadventures are any clue.

Thanks again for any help.
Kent
SM 243 "Kristy"


Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

karkauai
 

I'll be back on the boat tonight, Eric. I think there are two 24-12 v converters under the nav table, but I think they're both Mastervolt units. There may be a fuse or breaker on them, but I can't even see the connections with it mounted up under the nav table in the cabinet. Is there a way to get to them without removing them from under the table? So your ICOM converter was bad?
Thanks,
Kent

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, kimberlite@... wrote:

Hi, if you have a Icom 24-12 volt converter it only powers the radio. the fix is to send it to Icom. I had the same problem.
Eric


[Amel] Re: Downwind rig topping lifts

Craig Briggs
 

Hi David,
Not really (a bad idea) - the point of having the block suspended down about four feet is that with the pole lifted in place the topping lift runs virtually straight out from the block at the mast, putting no (or very little) downward force on the spreader. Also, with the hurricane clamps on the spreader ends, what little force there is is totally on the clamp, not the spreader. This was actually the factory method and it is excellent. Sorry I wasn't more descriptive in my original post.
Cheers, Craig

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, David Mackintosh <dlm48@...> wrote:

If you run a line to the end of the spreader then load it up in a downward
direction you are putting a load on the spreader the fittings and the mast
that was never designed for a VERY BAD Idea.

regards

David

2009/9/9 sv_sangaris <sangaris@...>



Hi Kent,
If you run the line straight out to the end of the spreader it may
interfere with your flag halyard and, in the right wind, may "beat" against
the underside of the spreader. Dropping it down about 3 or 4 feet creates a
little triangle of space for your flags and takes the line away from the
spreader, while still providing a good angle for lifting the pole.

When not in use, just fasten the shackle to the extra hole in the main
chain plate and wrap the other end on the topping life winch on the mast. I
also stretch a shock cord above head height to hold the topping lift off of
the mast so it doesn't beat in the wind.

Cheers,
Craig
--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>,
"karkauai" <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Craig. I thought there was a need to attach a tang to the outer
end of the spreader??? Why do you need the block that hangs down to be
attached by a line? Why not just run it thru a block at the end of the
spreader?
When not in use, do you just tie the working end of the topping lift off
on the rail and the other end somewhere at the base of the mast?

Thanks, Say Hi to Catherine.
Kent
"Kristy"
SM 243




For Gary of Amelliahona

galacsea2000 <no_reply@...>
 

Please look at message 5582. Thanks.JP


Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

The ON/OFF double pole rocker switch on the front of the Icom 24 to 12vdc converter failed on s/v BeBe #387. I was not where I could buy a replacement switch so I just jumpered the switch "closed." I turn the 24 - 12vdc converter with the breaker until I find a suitable replacement for the rocker switch.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2 #387
Currently Darwin, Australia

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "karkauai" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, again folks,
I'm trying to get my SSB working again after the technician in Galveston who installed my new VHF, Pactor Modem, and AIS pulled the panel out and set it on the nav station in such a way that the mic plug broke off at the radio. We were unable to remove the plug from it's receptacle due to corrosion of 10 years at sea. The unit would come on but wouldn't receive or send (I'm guessing because the pins were shorted in the send mode). After sailing without it I had it repaired in Charleston but it wasn't ready until after I left for the Chesapeake. I had it shipped to me and installed it last weekend, but now it won't come on at all. I checked the two fuses on the back of the unit, and then checked the incoming power plug with my multitester. It seems that there is no power coming to the plug. I traced the wires back to the top of the 24v-12v converter under the nav station, but didn't remove the converter to look at the top of the converter since it looked like an awkward job and I wasn't really sure what I was looking for anyway. All other 12 v electronics are working fine.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what it might be? Probably something simple if my previous misadventures are any clue.

Thanks again for any help.
Kent
SM 243 "Kristy"


Re: [Amel] Heading South for the Winter

Eric Freedman
 


Re: [Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems

Eric Freedman
 

Hi, if you have a Icom 24-12 volt converter it only powers the radio. the fix is to send it to Icom. I had the same problem.
Eric

----- Original Message -----
From: amelliahona
Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009 2:57 pm
Subject: [Amel] Re: ICOM 710 SSB Problems
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

Hi Kent:
Regarding:

" I had it shipped to me and installed it last weekend, but now
it won't come on at all. I checked the two fuses on the back of
the unit, and then checked the incoming power plug with my
multitester. It seems that there is no power coming to the
plug. I traced the wires back to the top of the 24v-12v
converter under the nav station, but didn't remove the converter
to look at the top of the converter since it looked like an
awkward job and I wasn't really sure what I was looking for
anyway. All other 12 v electronics are working fine."

I believe there are two 24 vdc to 12 vdc converters. One for
the SSB and one for virtually everything else. This due to the
loads the SSB draws during it's transmit condition.

I don't know for sure, but each of these converters (actually
just voltage dropping resistors from what I have been told) may
be fused. At lease I seem to recall a small bag of fuses
attached to the wiring going into one when I got my boat.

Additionally, I recall Olivier Beaute, the Amel pre-delivery and
after-market-customer-support guy for many years, telling me
that European code (and probably US code for that matter) called
for a breaker on the positive and negative side of power supply
for electronics. My boat has two breakers in the hanging locker
and one breaker in the aft-most cupboard under the nav station.
One is a double pole breaker and the other two are single pole
breakers (as I recall). I can't remember which feeds the SSB.
In addition there is a switch in that same cupboard that turns
off the "keep-alive" direct battery power to the AM/FM/CD radio
memory.
At any rate, check all of those breakers and any fuses and make
sure that you have input power to the voltage dropper before
trying to remove and test it. My guess is that one of the
breakers isn't set or a fuse in the voltage dropping device is
blown.

I hope this helps.

PS Almost all transmitters have a duty cycle (i.e. a percent of
time that the transmit mode may be used). This is to prevent
overheating of the power supply etc. Hopefully when you unit was
locked in the transmit mode it didn't do any damage, but then I
would think that the technicians who effected your repair would
have "benched tested" the unit to meet manufacturer's specifications.

PSS When uploading the pic of the topping lift rigging I see
that I was beat to the punch. Nonetheless my photo is posted
along side Bill's

Gary SM2000 Hull # 335