Date   

Re: [Amel] Re: Ocean Hobo Santorin 96

Ivan Campbell <i-campbell@...>
 

Hi Bob and Suzy



You have been a great help. I will now be going to Gran Canaria to start the
ARC with peace of mind. My delivery crew had me frightened. I will
redistribute the weight a little more cleverly but it is good to know that
someone else has had the same experience.



Happy voyaging



Ivan



Ocean Hobo



_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of rossirossix4
Sent: 25 October 2010 00:01
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: Ocean Hobo Santorin 96





Hi Ivan,
This posting assumes that the list to port is static (at rest) as well as
moving. I own a 93 Santorin and my experience is that there can be a
tendency to list to port but that it can be overcome. I believe that the
reasons that it can list to port are the following--heavy house batteries,
oven/stove, pantry, Espar?,both heads, refrigerator+contents are all on the
port side. Also, if you have a heavy life raft and filled jerry cans in the
port life raft locker, that can add significant weight on that side. In
addition, if you use large amounts of diesel in your tank, you lose weight
(up to 800 lbs) on the starboard side. The rear lazarette is not a great
place to try to trim the list of the boat because it significantly tapers
inboard, providing less leverage on the roll axis--in any case the bow and
stern are not a great place to have any heavy items because they increase
forces on the pitch access. I solved my boat's issue--COMPLETELY-- by
putting heavy engine spares etc. in the storage below the starboard pilot
berth --this is the widest part of the boat. I also keep heavy tools below
my nav station area. In addition, heavier food items, etc IF you have them
in the lockers below the salon windows can be shifted to the starboard size.
Finally, heavy canned goods and beer, etc. could be stored in the bottom
shelf of the passageway. Again, I have not had to resort to that, but I do
not have full jerry cans in the life raft compartment. I just spent several
weeks anchored with friends who have finished their circumnavigation in a
(Garcia) sail boat with a Hydrovane which was very significantly offset and
it worked without a hitch....used it virtually all the time and could not
stop raving about it.

Hope this helps.

Bob and Suzanne
Brittany de la Mer 1993 Santorin

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Ivan Campbell"
<i-campbell@...> wrote:

Hi All



I seem to have a serious problem with the stability of my boat. I recently
fitted a Hydrovane Self Steering gear through the bumper offset to the
port
side. My boat now has a list of about 5 degrees to port. When a heavy crew
member stands on the starboard side in the opposing position it makes no
difference. A friend and crew recently took the boat to Gran Canaria in
preparation for the ARC. It was sailed with a lot of weight in the
lazerette
and the boat screwed to windward in force7 so much that it broached
several
times. They are experienced sailors and assure me the sails were well
balanced. They did not use the wind vane. On arrival in port they moved
all
the weight from the lazarette and distributed it on the port side but the
boat still has a 3 degree list to port.



Any answers to this .



The ARC starts in 3 weeks.



Ivan Campbell



Ocean Hobo





how to fix play in rudderstock from amel kirk

brgdebakker
 

Hi,

We are planning to lay up our Amel Kirk for the winter. During this summer I noticed some play in the rudderstock. Does anyone have tips&tricks how to remove and/or adjust the rudder?

Thanks, Bart.


Re: [Amel] Maramu rigging

karkauai
 

It is significantly more expensive to replace the standing rigging with metric wire and fittings if you are in the US.  I understand it's not the case if you are in Europe or elsewhere.  If you switch to US standard sizes, there will be some issues with fittings that are attached to the boat.  I opted to use metric sized cables in spite of the added cost because I thought it might detract from resale value if I switched to US sizes.  I had a little pitting and rust at the entry points of the cables into the swages, and cut two of the swages lengthwise to look at the cables within...there was significant deterioration of the cables and I was glad I'd decided to change the rigging even though I was told I could probably get another year or two out of the originals.
 
Good luck.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Like to purchase Amel Maramu 45-46

yossi_kl
 

Well maintained inside,outside,engine,hull ext. and very good equipped for sea going .
I have a budget for purchasing a boat and can offer 75.000$ (USD).

Thanks a lot
Yossi


Maramu rigging

bsarff <bsarff@...>
 

I've been told that i should replace the original rigging before going off shore. There is some pitting on the wires but no visible cracks on the swage fittings.

My question is does it matter if I replace with metric sizes versus US standard size? The US standard size is less expensive. I don't see a big difference as long as I closly match the original size.

Thanks for anything you can share.

Bob

S/V Chara #173


Re: Ocean Hobo Santorin 96

rossirossix4
 

Hi Ivan,
This posting assumes that the list to port is static (at rest) as well as moving. I own a 93 Santorin and my experience is that there can be a tendency to list to port but that it can be overcome. I believe that the reasons that it can list to port are the following--heavy house batteries, oven/stove, pantry, Espar?,both heads, refrigerator+contents are all on the port side. Also, if you have a heavy life raft and filled jerry cans in the port life raft locker, that can add significant weight on that side. In addition, if you use large amounts of diesel in your tank, you lose weight (up to 800 lbs) on the starboard side. The rear lazarette is not a great place to try to trim the list of the boat because it significantly tapers inboard, providing less leverage on the roll axis--in any case the bow and stern are not a great place to have any heavy items because they increase forces on the pitch access. I solved my boat's issue--COMPLETELY-- by putting heavy engine spares etc. in the storage below the starboard pilot berth --this is the widest part of the boat. I also keep heavy tools below my nav station area. In addition, heavier food items, etc IF you have them in the lockers below the salon windows can be shifted to the starboard size. Finally, heavy canned goods and beer, etc. could be stored in the bottom shelf of the passageway. Again, I have not had to resort to that, but I do not have full jerry cans in the life raft compartment. I just spent several weeks anchored with friends who have finished their circumnavigation in a (Garcia) sail boat with a Hydrovane which was very significantly offset and it worked without a hitch....used it virtually all the time and could not stop raving about it.

Hope this helps.

Bob and Suzanne
Brittany de la Mer 1993 Santorin

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Ivan Campbell" <i-campbell@...> wrote:

Hi All



I seem to have a serious problem with the stability of my boat. I recently
fitted a Hydrovane Self Steering gear through the bumper offset to the port
side. My boat now has a list of about 5 degrees to port. When a heavy crew
member stands on the starboard side in the opposing position it makes no
difference. A friend and crew recently took the boat to Gran Canaria in
preparation for the ARC. It was sailed with a lot of weight in the lazerette
and the boat screwed to windward in force7 so much that it broached several
times. They are experienced sailors and assure me the sails were well
balanced. They did not use the wind vane. On arrival in port they moved all
the weight from the lazarette and distributed it on the port side but the
boat still has a 3 degree list to port.



Any answers to this .



The ARC starts in 3 weeks.



Ivan Campbell



Ocean Hobo





Ocean Hobo Santorin 96

Ivan Campbell <i-campbell@...>
 

Hi All



I seem to have a serious problem with the stability of my boat. I recently
fitted a Hydrovane Self Steering gear through the bumper offset to the port
side. My boat now has a list of about 5 degrees to port. When a heavy crew
member stands on the starboard side in the opposing position it makes no
difference. A friend and crew recently took the boat to Gran Canaria in
preparation for the ARC. It was sailed with a lot of weight in the lazerette
and the boat screwed to windward in force7 so much that it broached several
times. They are experienced sailors and assure me the sails were well
balanced. They did not use the wind vane. On arrival in port they moved all
the weight from the lazarette and distributed it on the port side but the
boat still has a 3 degree list to port.



Any answers to this .



The ARC starts in 3 weeks.



Ivan Campbell



Ocean Hobo


Re: [Amel] Re: Like to purchase in US, sail back to Australia

Robert Krieg <ketch_scooter@...>
 

Stefan,

My Amel Maramu 48 is being listed with Jordan Yacht and Ship Co. See
jordanyachts.com.  It is located in Ft Lauderdale FL. 


This yacht has been sailed around the planet twice and I sailed the Great
Barrier Reef from Carins to Darwin having a wonderful experience all the way. 
It has many upgrades for ease of sailing , living aboard at sea and safe
navigation as you can see from the listing.  Lately, I purchased a complete
engine overhaul kit in that the parts are becoming difficult to find.


It is only 1200+/- miles from Ft Lauderdale to the Panama Canal and the Canal
processing number is on board making for an easy registration. 

See many videos on youtube, key in AMEL MARAMU KETCH.
Captain Robert Krieg 
S/V Scooter




________________________________
From: stefan huber <kalimentes@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sun, October 24, 2010 11:19:52 AM
Subject: AW: [Amel] Re: Like to purchase in US, sail back to Australia

 


________________________________
Von: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
An: amelyachtowners@...
Gesendet: Mittwoch, den 20. Oktober 2010, 1:04:19 Uhr
Betreff: [Amel] Re: Like to purchase in US, sail back to Australia

 
Jim,

The Amel Owners Group Moderator asked me to again try to post my original reply
to your Topic...the following is the message that I had to send to you privately

because of some issues with the Amel Owners Group. I apologize for the duplicity

of these postings, but it is of no fault of mine.......

Your best bet is to contact Joel Potter, Amel's rep for the Americas..

1. He sold all of the Amels in the Americas at least the first time when they
were new as he is the sole rep for the Americas.

2. He will not sell a used Amel that has been abused. I personally know of a
boat that he refused to sell.

3. He knows of Amels that are not yet "officially" listed for sale because many
of us who may be considering a future sale of our boat trust Joel to have a
"what if" conversation with him. You should trust him for your search.

Judy and I have sailed BeBe, #387, from the Caribbean across the Pacific to many

destinations including your home and from there through Indonesia to northern
Malaysia, where we are now. If we can be any help to you, we would be pleased to

assist. We will be sailing BeBe from Phuket to India, to the Red Sea, and into
the Med leaving sometime in Dec/Jan...keep us posted of your progress.

Here is Joel's contact information:
Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC
Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas
Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301
Phone: (954) 462-5869
Email: jfpottercys@...

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Langkawi, Malaysia
Blog http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Jim Koulias" <jk@...> wrote:

Hi there all. I am not yet an Amel owner but joined the group a while ago. It's

great to see the power of a strong worldwide boating community all keen to help
each other. I'm considering purchasing an Amel in the US to sail back to
Australia (Sydney). I need to find a knowledgable/highly reputable broker
specialising in Amels in the US (preferably West Coast). We will need to put a
lot of faith in someone's evaluation / recommendations prior to travelling to
the US for a pre-purchase inspection. Any help would be appreciated. We'd be
looking at a pre-2000 model based upon expected cost.

Regards, Jim
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Like to purchase in US, sail back to Australia

stefan huber <kalimentes@...>
 

________________________________
Von: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
An: amelyachtowners@...
Gesendet: Mittwoch, den 20. Oktober 2010, 1:04:19 Uhr
Betreff: [Amel] Re: Like to purchase in US, sail back to Australia

 
Jim,

The Amel Owners Group Moderator asked me to again try to post my original reply
to your Topic...the following is the message that I had to send to you privately
because of some issues with the Amel Owners Group. I apologize for the duplicity
of these postings, but it is of no fault of mine.......

Your best bet is to contact Joel Potter, Amel's rep for the Americas..

1. He sold all of the Amels in the Americas at least the first time when they
were new as he is the sole rep for the Americas.


2. He will not sell a used Amel that has been abused. I personally know of a
boat that he refused to sell.

3. He knows of Amels that are not yet "officially" listed for sale because many
of us who may be considering a future sale of our boat trust Joel to have a
"what if" conversation with him. You should trust him for your search.

Judy and I have sailed BeBe, #387, from the Caribbean across the Pacific to many
destinations including your home and from there through Indonesia to northern
Malaysia, where we are now. If we can be any help to you, we would be pleased to
assist. We will be sailing BeBe from Phuket to India, to the Red Sea, and into
the Med leaving sometime in Dec/Jan...keep us posted of your progress.

Here is Joel's contact information:
Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC
Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas
Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301
Phone: (954) 462-5869
Email: jfpottercys@...

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Langkawi, Malaysia
Blog http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Jim Koulias" <jk@...> wrote:

Hi there all. I am not yet an Amel owner but joined the group a while ago. It's
great to see the power of a strong worldwide boating community all keen to help
each other. I'm considering purchasing an Amel in the US to sail back to
Australia (Sydney). I need to find a knowledgable/highly reputable broker
specialising in Amels in the US (preferably West Coast). We will need to put a
lot of faith in someone's evaluation / recommendations prior to travelling to
the US for a pre-purchase inspection. Any help would be appreciated. We'd be
looking at a pre-2000 model based upon expected cost.

Regards, Jim


Like to purchase Amel Maramu 45-46

yossi_kl
 

Well maintained inside,outside,engine,hull ext. and very good equipped for sea going .
I have a budget for purchasing a boat and can offer 75.000$ (USD).
Thanks a lot
Yossi


Re: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

karkauai
 

Thanks to you too, Gary.  I guess my eye fooled me when I set the pole the first few times.  On reflection, I guess that the downward angle of the pole makes sense because of the upward pull of the sail, eh?
OK, gentlemen, one less thing to scratch my head about.
Kent
SV KRISTY
SM243

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

karkauai
 

Thanks, Bill,
Exactly what I needed to know.
Kent


Re: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
 

hi all, have you seen this photo of downwind pole to pole.




________________________________
From: sv Sangaris <sangaris@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sun, October 24, 2010 7:51:17 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

 


Hi Kent,

The Jockey Poles most definitely should not be parallel to the water. If you
look closely at the stubby cylindrical socket with the retaining pin that's
welded onto the mast and into which your jockey pole goes, you'll see that it is
angled slightly downward.


The Jockey Pole must be aligned with that socket and, therefore, will take that
same slight downward angle from the mast to the "boomerang" (which seems a good
name for the support rail and ring assembly clamped to the shrouds).

You can easily visually judge when the Jockey Pole is "square" with the socket
(not the mast) and that defines the right height that the "boomerang" needs to
be. The Jockey Pole most definitely won't be "parallel to the water line" nor
"straight out from the mast" - it will be perfectly in-line with it's socket
and, thus, will angle slightly down as it goes out to the shrouds.

The "boomerang" should fit nicely at this height - whack it around a bit with
your fist at the front and back until it "settles in". The upper shroud and the
intermediate may have to be spread apart just a bit to get the "U" bolts on (you
should tension the rig before clamping down the "Boomerang").

Cheers,
Craig Briggs, s/v Sangaris in Greece, Santorin #68

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

supports on the shrouds that support the jockey poles...looks too low by about
6 inches. If I raise the support ...to be straight out from the socket in the
mast, it looks like it would pull the shrouds together. ... I think I am right
in assuming that the jockey pole should be parallel to the water line???

Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

Robert Krieg <ketch_scooter@...>
 

I own a 1984 Marmau pre in mast roller furling and pre genoa electric roller
furling with all halyards exposed for inspection.  This yacht has gone around
the planet twice the latest being documented by hi def video. You can see a few
clips on youtube by keying AMEL MARAMU KETCH.  Good on you mate. Captain Bob Y/V
Scooter




________________________________
From: sv Sangaris <sangaris@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sat, October 23, 2010 4:51:17 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Downwind Sailing

 


Hi Kent,

The Jockey Poles most definitely should not be parallel to the water. If you
look closely at the stubby cylindrical socket with the retaining pin that's
welded onto the mast and into which your jockey pole goes, you'll see that it is
angled slightly downward.


The Jockey Pole must be aligned with that socket and, therefore, will take that
same slight downward angle from the mast to the "boomerang" (which seems a good
name for the support rail and ring assembly clamped to the shrouds).

You can easily visually judge when the Jockey Pole is "square" with the socket
(not the mast) and that defines the right height that the "boomerang" needs to
be. The Jockey Pole most definitely won't be "parallel to the water line" nor
"straight out from the mast" - it will be perfectly in-line with it's socket
and, thus, will angle slightly down as it goes out to the shrouds.

The "boomerang" should fit nicely at this height - whack it around a bit with
your fist at the front and back until it "settles in". The upper shroud and the
intermediate may have to be spread apart just a bit to get the "U" bolts on (you
should tension the rig before clamping down the "Boomerang").

Cheers,
Craig Briggs, s/v Sangaris in Greece, Santorin #68

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

supports on the shrouds that support the jockey poles...looks too low by about
6 inches. If I raise the support ...to be straight out from the socket in the
mast, it looks like it would pull the shrouds together. ... I think I am right
in assuming that the jockey pole should be parallel to the water line???

Kent
SM243
KRISTY






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Downwind Sailing

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Kent,

The Jockey Poles most definitely should not be parallel to the water. If you look closely at the stubby cylindrical socket with the retaining pin that's welded onto the mast and into which your jockey pole goes, you'll see that it is angled slightly downward.

The Jockey Pole must be aligned with that socket and, therefore, will take that same slight downward angle from the mast to the "boomerang" (which seems a good name for the support rail and ring assembly clamped to the shrouds).

You can easily visually judge when the Jockey Pole is "square" with the socket (not the mast) and that defines the right height that the "boomerang" needs to be. The Jockey Pole most definitely won't be "parallel to the water line" nor "straight out from the mast" - it will be perfectly in-line with it's socket and, thus, will angle slightly down as it goes out to the shrouds.

The "boomerang" should fit nicely at this height - whack it around a bit with your fist at the front and back until it "settles in". The upper shroud and the intermediate may have to be spread apart just a bit to get the "U" bolts on (you should tension the rig before clamping down the "Boomerang").

Cheers,
Craig Briggs, s/v Sangaris in Greece, Santorin #68

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

supports on the shrouds that support the jockey poles...looks too low by about 6 inches. If I raise the support ...to be straight out from the socket in the mast, it looks like it would pull the shrouds together. ... I think I am right in assuming that the jockey pole should be parallel to the water line???

Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: [Amel] Autohelm 7000 problems

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

I encountered a similar problem with my Raymarine/ Autohelm autopilot.

I believe I had the first model 400 course compute installed in Kimberlite.
Prior to they installed the model 300 course computer it is black with
cooling fins. The 400 is larger and made of grey plastic.



When I took the boat initially from the factory I sailed to Guernsey, one
day we turned on the power and all the instruments went out.

Being familiar wit Raymarine instruments I removed everyone from the circuit
and it still did not work. I finally came across a white small box to the
port of the course computer with Raymarine wires running into it. Knowing
Raymarine equipment I knew it was not from them.



I opened it up and found four sea talk cables connected to a circuit board
just floating loose in the box. I was able to sail back to LaRochelle and
spoke to Pouchon who installed the instruments. They said it was a Raymarine
instrument problem.



When I returned to the USA I wrote Raymarine and asked what was the box that
Pouchon had installed. It seems that when the instruments are turned off on
the 300 course computer the autopilot fails. I told them that I had the 400
autopilot and they said that the "Pouchon box" was not necessary since they
fixed the problem with the 400 series computers.



When I returned to La Rochelle Pouchon finally admitted that their box was
defective and they changed it out. I said it is not necessary please remove
it. They said it was very complicated to do and when I got to Lisbon they
would have their tech remove it. I asked for a schematic diagram, however
they refused.



When the tech arrived at the boat in Lisbon I saw the fax from pouchon
giving directions on how to remove the box.



Basically you just cut the circuit board loose. Then you connect all the red
wires together, all the black wires together, and all the yellow wires
together. Obviously they were just being difficult at Pouchon.



The moral is that if you have the model 300 black course computer your
problems might be with the Pouchon box, it is very poorly built. If you have
a model 400 or newer model the pouchon box is just an accident waiting to
happen, just remove it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite









_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Anne and John Hollamby
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2010 12:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Autohelm 7000 problems





Autohelm has or had agents in Oz and NZ. I had a problem with mine getting
messages on the control head saying something like No Power so far as I can
remember. The problem was the build up of carbon dust in the casing of the
actuator motor. It is quite easy to open this up to check it if it has
covered long distances but if I recall correctly it was neccessary to use
bits of cotton to keep the brushes in place during reassembly.

Regards, Anne and John, SM319, Bali Hai


Re: Downwind Sailing

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Kent:

We have always called this support the "boomerang". I have never paid much attention to this angle before but I have a photo that I will post that is taken from dead ahead of my boat and I can see from that photo that the boomerang is about 6 inches lower (estimating) than the receptacle on the mast. I will post the photo in "Rigging Super Maramu"

Gary
Amel SM #335

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, again, Amel brothers and sisters.

New ? about the downwind rig. After replacing my standing rigging I replaced the supports on the shrouds that support the jockey poles. When they seem to fit perfectly on the shrouds, the ring that the pole goes through looks too low by about 6 inches. If I raise the support (by the way, what do we call these supports?) enough to be straight out from the socket in the mast, it looks like it would pull the shrouds together. Does it give some or should I just try to raise it at the outer shrouds? I think I am right in assuming that the jockey pole should be parallel to the water line???

Thanks again in advance for your advice.

Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: Downwind Sailing

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

Regarding the shroud support ring that the short pole goes through in the rigging, the center of this ring is about 77" from the top of the rail. The rigging has not been removed on BeBe.

Yes, the short pole is slightly lower at the shroud side than the mast side (didn't measure).

Hope this helps.

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Malasia/Thailand area
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, again, Amel brothers and sisters.

New ? about the downwind rig. After replacing my standing rigging I replaced the supports on the shrouds that support the jockey poles. When they seem to fit perfectly on the shrouds, the ring that the pole goes through looks too low by about 6 inches. If I raise the support (by the way, what do we call these supports?) enough to be straight out from the socket in the mast, it looks like it would pull the shrouds together. Does it give some or should I just try to raise it at the outer shrouds? I think I am right in assuming that the jockey pole should be parallel to the water line???

Thanks again in advance for your advice.

Kent
SM243
KRISTY


Re: [Amel] how to fix play in rudderstock from amel kirk

amelforme
 

Where is the movement on the rudder shaft? Does the shaft move inside of the
fiberglass rudder?

All the best,
Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC
Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas
Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301
Phone: (954) 462-5869
Email: jfpottercys@...


Re: Downwind Sailing

Dave_Benjamin
 

For deep downwind we often drop the main and just let the twins do their thing. We carry a roll of self adhesive insignia cloth so we can create sacrificial patches in the event we notice chafe in any of the sails. So far the biggest issue we have is the main has picked up some damage while flaked due to the non-skid on the top of the dodger.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "svbebe" <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

Can't say what others do, but we never let the mainsail touch the shroud. Sails are too expensive to risk damage and it seems that the shroud would wear on the sail. If it is anticipated to be only a half-day run dead downwind, we normally just pole out the jenny and put the mizzen to the opposite side with a preventer, taking care to also keep the mizzen sail off the shroud. We leave the main furled because it just isn't possible to get the main far enough out with the wind directly astern. If winds are very light, we pole out our asymmetrical (not a standard Amel sail). The asymmetrical is not designed for dead downwind, but it works fine with the pole and stays filled better than the heavier genoa because it is such a light material.

For downwind sailing we use just one pole probably 80 to 90% of the time. After you get used to it, rigging the pole is very easy for 2 people.

You will probably get several different answers on this question.

Judy
S/V BeBe
SM2 #387