Date   

Volvo turbo on SM

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Me again. We have the standard Volvo, 78 hp governed to 60, on Pen Azen, SM 302.Now 10 years old. Very happy with it. Still putting out full power after about 2,500 hrs. Last winter I found that the spring loaded lever which controls the turbo was stuck in the closed position. The Volvo guy had a look at it and told me just to douse it with WD 40 , leave it for a few days and then detach the lever from the little vertical stub which had become immobile and gradually work the stub free with a wrench. This I did, but when I came to reattach the lever to the stub I had to pull the lever out from its round housing containing the spring in order to reattach it to the stub. Having thus reattached the lever, the position of the stub ( although the stub is now free)will no longer allow the lever to reenter the spring housing to the extent that it used to. To me, this means that the little door within the turbo is now permanently ajar.When I raised this with the Volvo mechanic he said it was of no concern.It would only be of concern if the door was permanently closed.However, we do seem to have a dirtier exhaust since. I would be interested if anyone could tell me1.Is there a problem with the fact that the lever no longer goes back into the spring housing to the extent that it used to?2. If so what should I do about it---probably strip down the turbo and see what is preventing it.3. Is there a connexion between the turbo door being ajar ( as I assume it must now be) and a dirtier exhaust?
Thanks, Ian and Judy, Pen azen, SM 302, Plockton

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Re: [Amel] Batteries for SM

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

Ian,

Here in the USA they are called group 31 batteries. They are an exact
replacement for the original ones.

Even though they are maintenance free batteries they do have a lid that can
be removed. The lid might be under a label. You can then add distilled water
and check each cell with a hydrometer.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Ian & Judy Jenkins
Sent: Wednesday, July 07, 2010 1:49 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Batteries for SM






hi y'all, We have some fading batteries on Pen Azen of indeterminate origin
which we picked up in the Dominican Republic. I want to replace them with
the sort that Amel originally used. I believe they were ACDelco maintenance
free, 110ah. Does anyone have the specification for them? Thanks, Ian and
Judy, Pen Azen, SM302, Plockton
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Batteries for SM

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

hi y'all, We have some fading batteries on Pen Azen of indeterminate origin which we picked up in the Dominican Republic. I want to replace them with the sort that Amel originally used. I believe they were ACDelco maintenance free, 110ah. Does anyone have the specification for them? Thanks, Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM302, Plockton
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Re: [Amel] Foredeck Light

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

The foredeck light retaining ring is available from Aqua Signal.

Here is a note I received from Aqua Signal.

Could someone add this to the parts data list on the Amel webdsite.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite



Good afternoon,

We do not sell direct but the retaining ring can be ordered through your
regular Aqua Signal provider.

p/n 80510-1 Black Locking Ring w/Gasket for Spreader Light

p/n 80515-1 White Locking Ring w/Gasket for Spreader Light



Thank you and kind regards,

Shari Severson

Inside Sales

Aqua Signal Corp.

1125 Alexander Court

Cary, IL 60013

P: (847) 639-6412 x103

F: (847) 639-7047

E: sseverson@...



_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Malcolm Phillips
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 4:16 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel] Foredeck Light





Hi Eric.

The foredeck light is a sealed beam unit the same as the one
mounted on the mizzen and is used in light aircraft and can
be usually purchased locally.

Having just replaced mine I will send you the name next week.
However, I was forced to purchase the complete assembly of
steaming light, foredeck light and plastic shroud from Amel as
the plastic shroud was broken - an expensive option. It comes
complete with the 2 light fittings and has to be riveted to
the mast- a somewhat tricky operation at that height as a
large rivet gun is needed and the shroud has to be secured
in position round the curvature of the mast.

Regards,

Malcolm.

S/M # 464 Bon Jovi

From: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of kimberlite
Sent: 01 July 2010 05:50
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Foredeck Light

Does anyone know the manufacturer of the foredeck light mounted just
below
the steaming light?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Raising the waterline on an SM

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi y'all, Over the years we have lost count of the number of times we have cleaned our water line, the white line between the antifouling and the orange strip and indeed the orange strip itself aft of the cockpit as Pen Azen, in common with many SMs , always seems to be slightly down at the stern. Last August, when we applied Coppercoat, we decided to be bold and apply the Coppercoat right up to the top of the orange strip and to add a new blue strip above that, leaving a white strip between the Coppercoat and the blue. We were not certain how the raised waterline would look but having done it we are delighted.No longer does the white strip need cleaning and the raised waterline makes the hull look just a little bit sleeker. When you do clean and polish the topsides there is a smaller area to clean and, when still in the water, little risk of getting your rag wet.We can recommend it.
And what of the Coppercoat? We applied it last August and from then until mid June this year Pen Azen did not leave her marina berth at Swanwick on the Hamble river in southern England. The marina is in a very muddy river and ordinarily we would have expected fouling and barnacles.This time when I dived to check the hull ( 14 degrees C .....) there were no barnacles but there was a layer of slime, thicker higher up, very little below 50cm or so. It came off easily with a wipe of a scratchy kitchen sponge and from the experience of others I would not expect to have to wipe the hull again while we are using the boat.For those that don't haul their boat it seems that an annual wipe usually suffices. For those that do, a pressure wash on hauling does the trick. I will report in about 6 months time to see how things proceed.
Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Plockton , Scotland( at anchor with a F9 forecast,an improvement on the F10 of two days ago but with the same rain....)

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Re: [Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions

karkauai
 

Thanks, Bill, I'm sure you've looked hard at it.  I'm doing some more research and finding that this is definitely a problem with 24v systems...not so much with 12v.  Apparantly surge suppressors won't protect led's at all.  The folks who sell the Intervolt Power Conditioners say that this product is used extensively for this very application and that they've had very few problems.  It's $205US.  Can buy a lot of incandescents for that, but it may save some in the long run if they last "forever" and require less charging.  Nick Cancro at Sailorssolutions.com says that they've modified the Sensibulb and MiniSensibulb to protect against surges/dips/etc. and that no conditioner should be necessary with the newer bulbs.
 
I'm probably going to go ahead and get the conditioner and gradually add led's as the incandescent's burn out.  I'll let you all know how it works out.
 
Kent
S/V KRISTY
SM243

 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Looking to visit an Amel in eastern US or Canada

patrickbodnar <patrickbodnar@...>
 

Hello,

As total fans of Amel Boats, my wife and I would like ton confirm our virtual fanatism by visiting an Amel (ideally a Mango). We have sold our C&C in order to clear some dollars to buy a boat that would be better for cruising.

All our searches point to Amels. It's now time to confirm this. We are situated in Montreal, Canada and would not mind driving anywhere on the east coast to visit a boat. Please note that there is no need for the visited boat to be for sale as we would go ahead finding one for sale once confirmed in our choice.

So to make things clearer, would there be anyone on the forum who could have us over for a few hours?

Thanks ahead to time for your replies.

Patrick Bodnar


[Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

No, I am not using an Intervolt conditioner.

I bought 6 LED bulbs for use in the anchor and tricolor fixture. Four of these bulbs have burned out. I have experienced an average LED bulb life of 950 hours...about the same as incandescent bulbs. My navigation light LED's consume 0.1 amps while the incandescents use 1.0 amps.

The LED bulbs cost me about $30 more than an incandescent bulb and over the 950 hour life of the bulb, save me $31 in energy costs. That is about a break-even. Throwing more money at LED's does not make sense to me. This situation seems to be peculiar to 24 volt systems where LED's do not last as long as they do in 12 volt systems.

LED's sound good, but I would be fooling myself if I considered them cost savers when taking into consideration all of the costs.

When the last two LED's burn out, I will go back to conventional bulbs.

When you ask a retired CFO this kind of question, you are likely to get more than you wanted...I have the sreadsheet to back up the numbers.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:



Thank you, Bill.
A couple followup ?'s
Are you using the Intervolt conditioner?  Seems like I read someone's post that they had a surge supressor or conditioner on each/all of the three cabin lite circuits...can't find it any more.  Does anyone have one of these conditioners for the transition to LED bulbs?  Has anyone had problems with their LED's without a conditioner in the system?
 
I've already had two AquaSignal LED tricolor/anchor lites fail.  AquaSignal said they'd had some problems on some 24 v. boats and sent a surge protector with the second one, but it failed too...interestingly both tricolor lites failed, but both anchor lites worked fine.  I've purchased an ORCA Green tricolor/anchor LED lite.  Anyone have problems with an ORCA, or suggestions regarding installation?
 
As usual, thank you for your  help.
Kent
S/V Kristy


Re: [Amel] SSB

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

Is this paint available in the USA?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Attilio Siviero
Sent: Friday, December 04, 2009 5:06 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] SSB





Maurice,
I have the same program in my Santorin #84 Sisila.
I understood that the "marocchino" (in Italian), i.e. the cable joining top
of main mast and mizzen mast, is electrically insulated in order to be used
as SSB antenna.
Further, a German company http://yachtfunk.
<http://yachtfunk.com/en/installation.html> com/en/installation.html
produces a SSB ground paint, they can also provide and install the whole SSB
apparatus alla over Med. They are the provider for ARC fleet crossing
Atlantic: a friend on mine used their service in Gran Canaria, before
depart, with a Benetau 50, and now he is happily sailing around Indonesia
and tramitting everyday mails via SSB.
Further, look at http://www.yachtcom <http://www.yachtcom.info/> .info/
Anyhow somebody else may have made the experience with Santorin: let's wait
for an answer
Regards
Attilio&Maria SV Santorin#84 Sisila lying in Cagliari


Re: [Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions

karkauai
 

Thank you, Bill.
A couple followup ?'s
Are you using the Intervolt conditioner?  Seems like I read someone's post that they had a surge supressor or conditioner on each/all of the three cabin lite circuits...can't find it any more.  Does anyone have one of these conditioners for the transition to LED bulbs?  Has anyone had problems with their LED's without a conditioner in the system?
 
I've already had two AquaSignal LED tricolor/anchor lites fail.  AquaSignal said they'd had some problems on some 24 v. boats and sent a surge protector with the second one, but it failed too...interestingly both tricolor lites failed, but both anchor lites worked fine.  I've purchased an ORCA Green tricolor/anchor LED lite.  Anyone have problems with an ORCA, or suggestions regarding installation?
 
As usual, thank you for your  help.
Kent
S/V Kristy

--- On Tue, 7/6/10, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...> wrote:


From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
Subject: [Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, July 6, 2010, 6:34 AM


 



Kent,

I have not added a 24VDC to 24VDC converter to the mast lighting circuit. The converter, may, in fact use as much power as the power savings achieved by going to LED's for only the anchor light and tricolor.

I currently have LED's only in the mast tricolor and the mast anchor light. My purpose in posting the information that you read was to give some actual experience to those expecting a long-term energy/cost savings by going to LED's in a 24VDC system. My experience is negative with regard to any benefit.

LED Shop On-line warns owners of 24 volt systems that they may experience premature bulb failure. Check out this page for more on the subject and a 24/24 converter: http://www.ledshoponline.com/switch_mode_%20power_%20conditioner.htm

Here is some ore info: http://www.newmarpower.com/DC-DC_Converters_Standard_Isolated_Series/DC-DC_Converters_Standard_Isolated_Series.html

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Malaysia
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, Bill,
I'm researching the LED switch. In talking to a number of other led companies, I'm not finding anything about using a "power converter". When I read about them online it looks like they are designed to keep the voltage from going too LOW when the engine starter is used. Reading your post sounds like it's something to keep the voltage from going too high when charging. I have already had two AquaSignal 24v tricolor/anchor lites fail, the second one after putting a "surge protector" between the battery bank and the lite.

Please tell me if I'm understanding this wrong, and tell me what kind of "Power Conditioners" you put between your batteries and cabin lites.
Thanks,

Kent, Kind of In the Dark
S/V Kristy
SM243

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "svbebe" <yahoogroups@> wrote:

-Richard,

LEDOnline recommends using a power conditioner for 24 volt systems. Did you do this? About 2 years ago I bought some LED mast lights (tricolor and anchor) from LEDonline. They cost about $50 each and lasted about 1 year. I am assuming because of what they say on their website:

"Despite the advances we've made with driving LED's properly at 12vDC we still experience some problems on charging 24vDC systems. This is due to the voltage range of the drivers we use in our bulbs. LEDs are current "driven" and not voltage "driven."
The maximum range achievable right now for quality small current based drivers is 30 vDC. Using 12v DC, voltages can reach as high as 15.5v. This is only half the rated voltage of the 8~30vDC driver.
When we use 24v however - charging voltages can reach 28.8v or even higher if the regulator on the 24v system is not set properly.
This is so very close to the maximum operating voltage of our drivers that we can experience failures sometimes. For that reason we now recommend using a power conditioner on 24v lighting systems."


Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe, SM2, #387
Currently Mackay Australia







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kent,

I have not added a 24VDC to 24VDC converter to the mast lighting circuit. The converter, may, in fact use as much power as the power savings achieved by going to LED's for only the anchor light and tricolor.

I currently have LED's only in the mast tricolor and the mast anchor light. My purpose in posting the information that you read was to give some actual experience to those expecting a long-term energy/cost savings by going to LED's in a 24VDC system. My experience is negative with regard to any benefit.

LED Shop On-line warns owners of 24 volt systems that they may experience premature bulb failure. Check out this page for more on the subject and a 24/24 converter: http://www.ledshoponline.com/switch_mode_%20power_%20conditioner.htm

Here is some ore info: http://www.newmarpower.com/DC-DC_Converters_Standard_Isolated_Series/DC-DC_Converters_Standard_Isolated_Series.html

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Malaysia
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, Bill,
I'm researching the LED switch. In talking to a number of other led companies, I'm not finding anything about using a "power converter". When I read about them online it looks like they are designed to keep the voltage from going too LOW when the engine starter is used. Reading your post sounds like it's something to keep the voltage from going too high when charging. I have already had two AquaSignal 24v tricolor/anchor lites fail, the second one after putting a "surge protector" between the battery bank and the lite.

Please tell me if I'm understanding this wrong, and tell me what kind of "Power Conditioners" you put between your batteries and cabin lites.
Thanks,

Kent, Kind of In the Dark
S/V Kristy
SM243

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "svbebe" <yahoogroups@> wrote:

-Richard,

LEDOnline recommends using a power conditioner for 24 volt systems. Did you do this? About 2 years ago I bought some LED mast lights (tricolor and anchor) from LEDonline. They cost about $50 each and lasted about 1 year. I am assuming because of what they say on their website:

"Despite the advances we've made with driving LED's properly at 12vDC we still experience some problems on charging 24vDC systems. This is due to the voltage range of the drivers we use in our bulbs. LEDs are current "driven" and not voltage "driven."
The maximum range achievable right now for quality small current based drivers is 30 vDC. Using 12v DC, voltages can reach as high as 15.5v. This is only half the rated voltage of the 8~30vDC driver.
When we use 24v however - charging voltages can reach 28.8v or even higher if the regulator on the 24v system is not set properly.
This is so very close to the maximum operating voltage of our drivers that we can experience failures sometimes. For that reason we now recommend using a power conditioner on 24v lighting systems."


Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe, SM2, #387
Currently Mackay Australia


[Amel] Re: "Popeye" & Questions

karkauai
 

Hi, Bill,
I'm researching the LED switch. In talking to a number of other led companies, I'm not finding anything about using a "power converter". When I read about them online it looks like they are designed to keep the voltage from going too LOW when the engine starter is used. Reading your post sounds like it's something to keep the voltage from going too high when charging. I have already had two AquaSignal 24v tricolor/anchor lites fail, the second one after putting a "surge protector" between the battery bank and the lite.

Please tell me if I'm understanding this wrong, and tell me what kind of "Power Conditioners" you put between your batteries and cabin lites.
Thanks,

Kent, Kind of In the Dark
S/V Kristy
SM243

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "svbebe" <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

-Richard,

LEDOnline recommends using a power conditioner for 24 volt systems. Did you do this? About 2 years ago I bought some LED mast lights (tricolor and anchor) from LEDonline. They cost about $50 each and lasted about 1 year. I am assuming because of what they say on their website:

"Despite the advances we've made with driving LED's properly at 12vDC we still experience some problems on charging 24vDC systems. This is due to the voltage range of the drivers we use in our bulbs. LEDs are current "driven" and not voltage "driven."
The maximum range achievable right now for quality small current based drivers is 30 vDC. Using 12v DC, voltages can reach as high as 15.5v. This is only half the rated voltage of the 8~30vDC driver.
When we use 24v however - charging voltages can reach 28.8v or even higher if the regulator on the 24v system is not set properly.
This is so very close to the maximum operating voltage of our drivers that we can experience failures sometimes. For that reason we now recommend using a power conditioner on 24v lighting systems."


Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe, SM2, #387
Currently Mackay Australia


Re: [Amel] Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock

G D <maramu@...>
 

Hi Ian
I went through your post and this reminded me what happened to me two years ago.
The symptoms were the same and being unable to find the reason of this breakdown drove me crazy for two days. I checked each and every pipe. As long as there were no counter pressure it was ok. Each time I connected all the pipes the pump did not work. The impeller was new. I changed the entire gasket set of the water pump. I checked every possible solution with no success until I fixed back the old impeller and, miracle everything went back to normal?
Incredible indeed. I took off again the pump impeller cover and while holding it between my fingers I realized that the inner cover face was uneven and slightly worn out. There was a difference of a couple of tenth of millimetres due to the impeller friction which left a print into the steel. In fact the old impeller was matching perfectly the small cavity conversely to the new one which did not. I then polished the plate surface to even it. I fix it back with the new impeller and miracle after two days of nightmare it worked perfectly. It has been working perfectly well since.
It was a very tricky issue which I managed to solve just by luck!
I hope this post will be helpful.
Erick

To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yahoogroups@...
Date: Sun, 4 Jul 2010 08:00:52 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock




























Hi Ian,



I did not ask for the experience, but I have had a lot of experience with salt water flow and the Onan because I had 3 strange issues occurring at the same time:

(1) The stainless steel pipe had a suction leak.

(2) A high rate of impeller failure.

(3) Water-flow sensor failure.

At one point I thought they were related, but later found that they were separate. The water pump impeller shaft key was sufficiently worn causing the impeller to spin on the shaft, the pipe had a defective seam, and the water-flow sensor was filled with crud.



During these issues I found that the slightest amount of air entering on the suction side of the pump would cause a water-flow shutdown, a small amount of crud would cause a water-flow shutdown, and a missing or cracked impeller blade would also cause a shutdown. Recently, I found a 4th cause of water-flow shutdown:

"Y" fitting off the sea chest clogged very tightly with mussels.



The more I think about your problem, the more I am curious about your situation. I have disconnected the input hose to the salt water pump enough times to know that if the sea chest valve is open and the lines are clear of obstructions, gravity will cause water to flow freely through the hose when it is disconnected from the intake side of the sea water pump. Close the intake valve to the sea chest and the water flow at the intake to the salt water pump stops.



I believe that if water is flowing freely to the intake side of the salt water pump, it is impossible to have air replace the water in the salt water pump unless air is entering as the pump begins to operate, or possibly a cracked or broken impeller blade.



Like I said, I have done this drill more times than I can count. Here is what I would do:



1. Remove the hose from the intake side of the Onan salt water pump, holding the end over a bucket. Loosen the clamp on the hose where connected to the SS pipe. Twist the hose downward several inches. Water should begin to flow and continue to flow freely (no dribbles) until the sea chest valve is closed...If NOT, there is an obstruction. Clear the obstruction and go sailing. If this does not solve the issue, go to 2.



2. Buy a 2-3 meter piece of wire-reinforced 25mm hose. Disconnect the Onan 25mm hose from the "Y" on the sea chest. Using a piece of wire, inspect the "Y" carefully to ensure no obstructions then connect this new hose to the "Y." Connect the other end of the hose to the input side of Onan Salt Water pump. Go sail. If this solves the problem you either have an obstruction in the SS pipe or 25mm hose or you have an air leak in either or both (it is possible to have a small tear in the hose which does not leak water, but will allow air). If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 3.



3. Pull the Onan Salt Water pump. Change the impeller, carefully inspecting the shaft key to ensure it is not worn. Go sail. If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 4.



4. Remove the heat exchanger and have it properly cleaned; reinstall it with a new zinc (take care with the end caps as they are delicate and will probably need replacing). Go sail.



If this does not solve the issue, I have wasted your time, and for that I apologize. If it works, one Red Stripe, please.



I remain curious of your eventual solution.



Best,



Bill

BeBe, SM2k, #387

Currently Malaysia



--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,
thanks for the suggestion. I have checked the stainless pipe and there
is no sign of any leaking water, though I have been unable to check the
aft end of the pipe yet as it is buried under storage boxes that I built
above the hot water tank.
If left at it's berth, the genset will always start normally with a good
supply of water. It's only when sailing that the water disappears. It
would seem that the forward motion sucks the water out of the system,
creating an air lock. Why water does not get forced back to the pump
when the boat is staionary and on an even keel is a mystery. Maybe if
the impeller vanes straddle the intake opening, then the air cannot pas
through the pump?
Two solutions come to mind. Install a scoop at the strainer intake.
(Haul out required and more drag), or install a non return valve just
below the impeller. I am dubious as to whether such a valve exists that
will withstand prolonged salt water immersion.
I have emailed Amel for help and will pass it along if they come up with
the answer.
Regards
Ian

















_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail: Trusted email with Microsofts powerful SPAM protection.
https://signup.live.com/signup.aspx?id=60969

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Modifications

Malcolm Phillips <MPhillips@...>
 

Eric/Ian,



You may be interested to note that the bearing spec on my
Redline 464 gives 2 sealed ball races and one open, ie the top
one which then allows you to fill with oil. I am very
impressed with Ian,s modifications which I may do when I next
overhaul the bow thrusters gearbox. Unfortunately on the first
overhaul I concluded that the bevel gears were worn after
running in emulsion for a year SO PACKING WITH WATERPROOF
GREASE MAY BE THE ONLY WAY OF GETTING A SWEETER SOUND BACK !



Malcolm



S/M 464 Bon Jovi



From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of kimberlite
Sent: 03 July 2010 06:13
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Modifications





Ian,

As I understand what you wrote about the bow thruster you added a sleeve
in
the shaft that is connected to the prp and replaced the bearings with
sealed
bearings and then packed the gearbox with grease.

Why can you not add oil from the top of the bow thruster?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of sv_crusader
Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2010 12:56 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Modifications

Hello Richard,

the stainless bush was an exact copy of the bronze one, except that it
was
made with three grub screws instead of two to allow better centering.

Assembled with grease there are no signs of any Galling after over three
years of use. In fact both the shaft and the bush look as new.

I am off for 10 weeks sailing this morning, so will be unable to reply
further until I find a wireless network to log on to, but I will be glad
to
discuss further when I get back.

Regards

Ian SM414 Crusader (Headed for Mersin Eastern Turkey)

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Richard03801
<richard03801@...>
wrote:

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan
between
the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work
well.
If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface.
It
may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from
moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that
have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop
shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled
for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear
to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them
anyway.

This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the
standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer
with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving
too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short
seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of
this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M
of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with
my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M
of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be
for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster,
which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time.
The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had
it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to
run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were
all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course
this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I
decided to

not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip
seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a
sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power
either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to
see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but
it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will
be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that
reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader






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Onan Sea water suction

Victoria Stewart harper
 

Hi Ian,Have you rodded through the pipe to the strainer (with the sea cock open)?John & VickySM JOVICMalaysia
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Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Hi Ian,

I did not ask for the experience, but I have had a lot of experience with salt water flow and the Onan because I had 3 strange issues occurring at the same time:
(1) The stainless steel pipe had a suction leak.
(2) A high rate of impeller failure.
(3) Water-flow sensor failure.
At one point I thought they were related, but later found that they were separate. The water pump impeller shaft key was sufficiently worn causing the impeller to spin on the shaft, the pipe had a defective seam, and the water-flow sensor was filled with crud.

During these issues I found that the slightest amount of air entering on the suction side of the pump would cause a water-flow shutdown, a small amount of crud would cause a water-flow shutdown, and a missing or cracked impeller blade would also cause a shutdown. Recently, I found a 4th cause of water-flow shutdown:
"Y" fitting off the sea chest clogged very tightly with mussels.

The more I think about your problem, the more I am curious about your situation. I have disconnected the input hose to the salt water pump enough times to know that if the sea chest valve is open and the lines are clear of obstructions, gravity will cause water to flow freely through the hose when it is disconnected from the intake side of the sea water pump. Close the intake valve to the sea chest and the water flow at the intake to the salt water pump stops.

I believe that if water is flowing freely to the intake side of the salt water pump, it is impossible to have air replace the water in the salt water pump unless air is entering as the pump begins to operate, or possibly a cracked or broken impeller blade.

Like I said, I have done this drill more times than I can count. Here is what I would do:

1. Remove the hose from the intake side of the Onan salt water pump, holding the end over a bucket. Loosen the clamp on the hose where connected to the SS pipe. Twist the hose downward several inches. Water should begin to flow and continue to flow freely (no dribbles) until the sea chest valve is closed...If NOT, there is an obstruction. Clear the obstruction and go sailing. If this does not solve the issue, go to 2.

2. Buy a 2-3 meter piece of wire-reinforced 25mm hose. Disconnect the Onan 25mm hose from the "Y" on the sea chest. Using a piece of wire, inspect the "Y" carefully to ensure no obstructions then connect this new hose to the "Y." Connect the other end of the hose to the input side of Onan Salt Water pump. Go sail. If this solves the problem you either have an obstruction in the SS pipe or 25mm hose or you have an air leak in either or both (it is possible to have a small tear in the hose which does not leak water, but will allow air). If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 3.

3. Pull the Onan Salt Water pump. Change the impeller, carefully inspecting the shaft key to ensure it is not worn. Go sail. If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 4.

4. Remove the heat exchanger and have it properly cleaned; reinstall it with a new zinc (take care with the end caps as they are delicate and will probably need replacing). Go sail.

If this does not solve the issue, I have wasted your time, and for that I apologize. If it works, one Red Stripe, please.

I remain curious of your eventual solution.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Malaysia

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

thanks for the suggestion. I have checked the stainless pipe and there
is no sign of any leaking water, though I have been unable to check the
aft end of the pipe yet as it is buried under storage boxes that I built
above the hot water tank.

If left at it's berth, the genset will always start normally with a good
supply of water. It's only when sailing that the water disappears. It
would seem that the forward motion sucks the water out of the system,
creating an air lock. Why water does not get forced back to the pump
when the boat is staionary and on an even keel is a mystery. Maybe if
the impeller vanes straddle the intake opening, then the air cannot pas
through the pump?

Two solutions come to mind. Install a scoop at the strainer intake.
(Haul out required and more drag), or install a non return valve just
below the impeller. I am dubious as to whether such a valve exists that
will withstand prolonged salt water immersion.

I have emailed Amel for help and will pass it along if they come up with
the answer.

Regards

Ian


Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock

richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Ian, the thought occurs to me that the engine cooling/salt water continues to be feeding the engine but the gen set is higher up the manifold. Why not put a "T" or a "Y" fitting on the engine hose and see the gen set from there???
Just a thought.
Good luck and stay cool..
Richard SM 209

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

thanks for the suggestion. I have checked the stainless pipe and there
is no sign of any leaking water, though I have been unable to check the
aft end of the pipe yet as it is buried under storage boxes that I built
above the hot water tank.

If left at it's berth, the genset will always start normally with a good
supply of water. It's only when sailing that the water disappears. It
would seem that the forward motion sucks the water out of the system,
creating an air lock. Why water does not get forced back to the pump
when the boat is staionary and on an even keel is a mystery. Maybe if
the impeller vanes straddle the intake opening, then the air cannot pas
through the pump?

Two solutions come to mind. Install a scoop at the strainer intake.
(Haul out required and more drag), or install a non return valve just
below the impeller. I am dubious as to whether such a valve exists that
will withstand prolonged salt water immersion.

I have emailed Amel for help and will pass it along if they come up with
the answer.

Regards

Ian


Re: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

Thanks Eric, I was afraid of that, Amel wants 130 euros each, plus shipping,!!!! Oh well, at least I know they will fit and work. I bought spare outhaul lines for the jib and main years ago, I've never used them yet but some dark and stormy night when they break I will know they will fit, be the right size and length, and the light lines to tie it on with. John



To: amelyachtowners@...
From: kimberlite@...
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 20:22:32 -0400
Subject: RE: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel




John,

We just replaced our port wheel with one supplied by Amel.

Roberto had to saw the old one apart as it was frozen together with the s/s
screws. I could not find one anywhere else.

Fair Winds

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of john martin
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 6:06 PM
To: Amel YAHOO GROUP
Subject: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

Hello All,

Most SM's (as well as other Amel models) seem to have the galley portlight
equipped with a plastic drip guard. Ours is starting to chip and degrade. It
works very nicely and I'd like to have one for the aft head port as well.
The Amel parts department just told me they no longer carry them in stock,
and did not offer any advice about an alternative source. I have never seen
one on another type boat. There is nothing similar on the Goiot web site.
Does anyone know of a source for a similar device ?

Similarly, the black line wheel at the aft end of one of our genoa track
systems has cracked and no doubt the other one will crack soon too. These
are stamped Amel; Amel can provide them for 133 Euros each + shipping to the
US. Does anyone know of an alternate source ?

Thanks

Ruth

MOON DOG

SM #248

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Re: [Amel] Re: Modifications

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Thanks Ian, it's a great suggestion, given that as the bronze bushing wears it allow more and more salt water to get at the seals. When we were last in the Caribbean the little corals in the water got to the shaft and seals which then failed. We had to haul wash out the Amel drive and replace the bearings, bushings and seals. We are looking forward to your report on the SS bushing replacement.
All the best smooth sailing.
Richard on sm 209





________________________________
From: sv_crusader <sv_freespirit@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sat, July 3, 2010 12:56:25 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Modifications


Hello Richard,

the stainless bush was an exact copy of the bronze one, except that it was made with three grub screws instead of two to allow better centering.

Assembled with grease there are no signs of any Galling after over three years of use. In fact both the shaft and the bush look as new.

I am off for 10 weeks sailing this morning, so will be unable to reply further until I find a wireless network to log on to, but I will be glad to discuss further when I get back.

Regards

Ian SM414 Crusader (Headed for Mersin Eastern Turkey)

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan between the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work well. If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface. It may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them anyway.
This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster, which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time. The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I decided to
not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader



Re: [Amel] topping lift replacement

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

We have also replaced ours on Challenge. We used a 1/2" thick bungee cord and knotted it then stitch the bitter end on the Ring end/rope. The end near the boom was knotted at first until we sail a while then tighten again and stitched to keep the knot from slipping. It takes a bit of doing but you will find it works well. Oh, we used the mizzen halyard to hold up the boom while we worked.
Good luck
Richard SM 209





________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Fri, July 2, 2010 7:49:13 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel] topping lift replacement


I have replaced mine twice.

On Kimberlite I just opened up the end of the boom and you will see the
attachment points to the line that makes up the topping lift. I believe I
used hog rings to replace the bungee cord.

At the mast end of the boom there is a pocket cut into the underside of the
boom and the cord just hooks up on to a bracket inside the boom. The trick
is to figure out how long the bungee cord should be. I pulled a line down
the boom and attached it to the mast end of the cord and had someone pull on
it. You just have to play with the length. There is quite a bit of tension
required on the bungee to keep the boom up.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, July 02, 2010 7:30 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] topping lift replacement

The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke
recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the
procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right
direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark

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