Date   

Re: [Amel] Re: Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

At the price of not rubbing it in... It may be a good idea to look at a
replacement for the CO2 unit and go the new "halon" system. If you do have a
discharge of the CO 2 you will be unable to use you engine or gen set until you
clear up the CO2 powder... Second is that a CO2 discharge will be in hailed by
the which ever motor your are using and more then likely distroy itself. The if
I remember my fire training course CO2 needs to be directed at the base of the
flames so unless you've got a number of nozzles good luck in putting out the
fire. We put "new Halon" in our engine room and are very happy with it.
Keep cool
Richard on SM 209





________________________________
From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Wed, August 11, 2010 8:28:26 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister


This is probably going to set a record for being wrong and the number of replies
to my own posting...BUT, the automatic engine room extinguisher is CO2, not
Halon...I do not know where I got the idea it was Halon, but at least I know
where the canister is!.

I am truly embarrassed so please don't rub it in.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe"
<yahoogroups@...> wrote:



OK, bad on me for still learning...it has only been 5 years. With some help
from my friends I found it. It is under/inside that nice plywood box in the
cockpit lazerette that I always store my toolbox on top of.

I uploaded a photo of this and the other Fire Suppression equipment at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/2020584319/pic/908011227/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc
c

Sorry I bothered you.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe"
<yahoogroups@> wrote:

I am in Singapore and found a company that services Halon fire suppression
systems. I need to find the Halon canister. I had assumed that it was the
small canister in the ceiling of the engine room. The service man said, no that
the small canister is the starter for the Halon.

I noticed some tubes that disappear in the ceiling foam.

Does anyone know where the canister is?

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com


160ltr Desallator watermaker

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

Hi Eric, Thanks for the info about the E meter shunt. I found it but of course it was fine so I am now trying to get one from the British Agents for it. The company was bought out by a Canadian company called Xantrex which sells a version called Linklite and Powerguage Lite in the UK. Quite hard to find this out on Google as an E meter is some magic spell used by Scientologists !!
The major short circuit was caused by me when I reinstalled the High Pressure pump and made the wrong connections burning out the 2 HP motor. The Cat pump had failed through a failure in the water supply from the LP pump. I was told by Dessalator that a special tool was needed to separate the Cat pump from the motor and I forgot my principle that one must not assume that they were the only people who could do this so I shipped the HP motor with Cat pump and the LP pump back to France from Malta at huge expense. The repair to the Cat pump was obviously a simple matter of replacing the O rings on the pistons which could have been done by any watermaker agent but the LP pump was damaged in transit and its repair was very expensive. When they came back and I burnt out the motor I saw an advert in the Malta Yellow pages by a rewind specialist company who sent a couple independent technicians to remove the unit and it was rewound and brought back and reinstalled by the same two Bulgarian Technicians at a cost of 370 euros for the rewind and 60 euros for their time.
The watermaker would still not work as the pump cut out and the red warning light came on and so they went into the system in the port cockpit locker and the tech, who was obviously familiar with such installations diagnosed the high pressure cutout shown in your excellent piece in the files. I gave him the number of Dessalators Spanish Agent who is very expert and speaks perfect English (Martin de Jong from Dessalator Spain, at 0034965771988 or mobile 0034637890333 or 0033607346511). He said that this cutout had probably failed and gave advice. This was to remove the black cap which contains a plug with four connections of which pins 1 and 4 are the only ones used and to turn the slotted screw on the HP cutout which made a temporary fix pending getting a new cutout. It did the job and at last the watermaker worked again. I got a new cutout from Dessalator and replaced it after more advice from Martin which was to run the machine with someone in the galley to switch it on and turn up the pressurising knob and when the cutout switches it off, pull the cap off the cutout, turn the slotted screwhead on the cutout half a turn clockwise, reconnect and try again. Keep doing this until the cutout does not work until the needle on the HP gauge is just above the end of the red sector by a few millimeters and then all should be well.
On reflection the HP cutout could probably been sourced from any local company selling hydraulic bits.
The machine was then working but later a new problem. The LP gauge stopped working although the machine did not. Back to Martin who said the reason would be air in the system and to turn it off and open the fresh water flushing valve a bit and then switch on so that the air is driven out of the gauge and then turn off the fresh water valve.
The whole performance cost me over £2000 and would have been much less if I had not forgotten that there is not necessarily a need to use the manufacturer as local specialists are often more than capable of servicing motors etc. at less cost.
Best wishes, John SM2K 319 Bali Hai

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Re: [Amel] Bow Locker Drain, Dinghies, Outboards, Grills

karkauai
 

Thanks, everyone, for your input.  I'll be back aboard this weekend and will see if I can find where the water's getting in.
 
I've learned that new 2-stroke outboards are no longer going to be available for sale in the USA due to environmental regulations.  I guess they'll still be made and available in some other countries and hope I'll be able to purchase one in the Caribbean this winter.
Kent
SM243

 



 






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister

karkauai
 

Interesting, Bill.  Kristy has a canister mounted on the step ladder leading down into the engine room.  It has a glass valve that breaks at 180d F.  It's out of date and I've been reading about these systems.  Everything I read says we should have an engine shutoff switch that will kill both engines and the ventilation system in the engine room if there is a fire.  If the engines keep running and the fan blows the Halon (or newer gases) gets blown out of the engine room and allows the fire to continue burning.  One article says you should have an override that you can use if you need an engine to get off of a lee shore, and then a manual way to shut down when you're clear.  I guess it's possible for the wiring to the cutoff switch to get burned or shorted and make it so you can't shut the engine down with the normal key switch.  Of course you should also shut off the flow of diesel from the tank with the valve in the passageway by the pilot
berth.
 
I've found a company (FireFight1 http://www.firefight1.com ) that sells these systems for quite a bit less than the older more established companies (Fireboy/Xintex, Sea-Fire, Kidde).  They are recommending a system with automatic engine shutoff that would cost only ~$500US.  They use recycled halon but their systems can be recharged with newer gases if/when halon is no longer available.  They are recommending a valve that releases the halon at 165d F, but could go with one that releases at higher temps if desired.  Does anyone have any recommendations?  Seems to me like 165 would be OK.
 
Kent
SM243
KRISTY







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: We are just about ready!!!

GrahamJohnston42 <grahamjohnston42@yahoo.com>
 

For what it is worth here are my thoughts on older Amels.

We bought a 20 year old Sharki this time last year and one of the significant factors in our decision to buy was the high build quality along with a common sense approach to many facets of the design, although some a little quirky!
These boats are well engineered, very strongly built and the basic structure can be expected to last almost indefinitely if not abused, or in our case at least until I give up sailing I hope!

They have solid skin hulls with non of the associated problems that can arise from balsa or foam cores.
Little exterior woodwork and certainly no teak deck to maintain or replace which was a major factor for me as I have spent enough time on my hands and knees working on teak decks.

After spending the last 30+ years building, owning new or refitting 17 previous boats I have come to the conclusion that so no boat builder gets it all right and there will be some issues but perhaps fewer with Amels than some other marks I have come into contact with.

Our Sharki was 20 years old when we bought her and required a mini refit. I did most of it last winter, renewing the standing and running rigging, electric bilge pump, manual bilge pump hoses, painted the masts and booms, overhauled the sail handling electric motors and gearboxes, serviced the heating, rebuilt the autopilot drive, renewed the main alternator, overhauled the shaft and starter battery alternators.
Jobs for this winter include overhauling the bowthruster. Nothing major for 20+ years.

Zephyr had a full out of water survey at the request of our insurers 3 months ago, the surveyor, who has 30+ years experience and is very highly respected by all UK major insurers, could find no faults with her and has been recommending Amels enthusiastically ever since.

Your budget extends to a 10 year old boat, I would have no hesitation in buying an Amel half the age of the one we have. I hope that you will be able to find a fine example and fulfil your 8-10 year plan, lucky you!


Graham
Sharki 181 'Zephyr'

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "markerdos" <markerdos@...> wrote:

Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion


Re: We are just about ready!!!

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Greetings from BeBe,

We have owned and sailed other boats, but none like our 2003 Super Maramu, which is perfect for our circumnavigation. BeBe is over 7 years old now and in great condition...we like to keep it that way. If something looks like it is tired, we replace it. We do it because I know that when we meet another Amel owner he will be looking at everything very closely and frankly we would be ashamed to let Henri Amel down. My experience is that 80% of the Amel owners are this way...it is a "cult," much like Porsche 911 owners. I have not yet met a surveyor who understands how to identify the Amels owned by these "cult" members, or really how to survey Amel systems in general.

If you are still looking for an Amel there is one guy that knows who is a member of this "cult" and who is not. And, more importantly, he knows which Amels are a good value and which Amels to not even attempt to sell for their owners. Yes, I know for a fact that he has turned down selling an Amel because it was not up to his or Amel's standards.

You should contact Joel Potter, Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas. Phone: +1(954) 462-5869 Email: jfpottercys@...

Judy and I hope that you join our cult and that you are as happy with your choice as we are with ours.

Do not wait until it is too late!

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "markerdos" <markerdos@...> wrote:

Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion


Re: Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

This is probably going to set a record for being wrong and the number of replies to my own posting...BUT, the automatic engine room extinguisher is CO2, not Halon...I do not know where I got the idea it was Halon, but at least I know where the canister is!.

I am truly embarrassed so please don't rub it in.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe" <yahoogroups@...> wrote:



OK, bad on me for still learning...it has only been 5 years. With some help from my friends I found it. It is under/inside that nice plywood box in the cockpit lazerette that I always store my toolbox on top of.

I uploaded a photo of this and the other Fire Suppression equipment at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/2020584319/pic/908011227/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Sorry I bothered you.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe" <yahoogroups@> wrote:

I am in Singapore and found a company that services Halon fire suppression systems. I need to find the Halon canister. I had assumed that it was the small canister in the ceiling of the engine room. The service man said, no that the small canister is the starter for the Halon.

I noticed some tubes that disappear in the ceiling foam.

Does anyone know where the canister is?

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com


Re: [Amel] Bow Locker Drain, Dinghies, Outboards, Grills

Patrick McAneny
 

Kent, My lockers were often wet as well, in fact I just replaced the floors
due to delamination.I found that in the port locker I could see daylight
coming through at the bow where the chain plate/bow roller is located.You will
have to get down inside the locker to see if this is your problem as well.I
chaulked the area and its been dry since. Pat SM 123 Shenanigans


Re: Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

OK, bad on me for still learning...it has only been 5 years. With some help from my friends I found it. It is under/inside that nice plywood box in the cockpit lazerette that I always store my toolbox on top of.

I uploaded a photo of this and the other Fire Suppression equipment at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/2020584319/pic/908011227/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Sorry I bothered you.

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe" <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

I am in Singapore and found a company that services Halon fire suppression systems. I need to find the Halon canister. I had assumed that it was the small canister in the ceiling of the engine room. The service man said, no that the small canister is the starter for the Halon.

I noticed some tubes that disappear in the ceiling foam.

Does anyone know where the canister is?

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com


Halon Fire Suppression and Halon canister

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

I am in Singapore and found a company that services Halon fire suppression systems. I need to find the Halon canister. I had assumed that it was the small canister in the ceiling of the engine room. The service man said, no that the small canister is the starter for the Halon.

I noticed some tubes that disappear in the ceiling foam.

Does anyone know where the canister is?

Best,

Bill
s/v BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Singapore
Blog: http://www.svbebe.com


Re: [Amel] We are just about ready!!!

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

That should have said rogue wave is our agent in Annapolis

Regards
Richard Piller

On Aug 10, 2010, at 13:52, Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

Rough way in Annapolis has our 1998 listed have a look. She is ready to go. Even a full fuel tank.

Regards
Richard Piller

On Aug 10, 2010, at 13:34, "markerdos" <markerdos@...> wrote:

Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] We are just about ready!

David Mackintosh <sv.highland.fling@...>
 

Nope its not the keel the rudder or even the boom BUT the headlining i
suspect :-) when the heat gets to the foam backed vinyl linings they do more
than droop.

regards

David

On 10 August 2010 21:46, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:



I'm going to show my inexperience again...Amel droop?
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

--- On Tue, 8/10/10, deborah <woodsdeborah_56@...<woodsdeborah_56%40yahoo.co.uk>>
wrote:

From: deborah <woodsdeborah_56@... <woodsdeborah_56%40yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: [Amel] We are just about ready!
To: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, 4:14 PM



We have a 1979 Amel Maramu in which we are just about to do the same as
yourselves! We have had the hull checked out and it is sound we have of
course had some refitting to do but rest assured we have already put her
through her paces in a Force 9 going through Tarifa and she was up to
anything that the elements flung at her that night! She is our pride and joy
and we have already had some great sailing and are looking forward to many
more great sailing Years. The only real issue we have had is the Amel droop
which is common to a lot of older boats but we have just about finished
dealing with that now. With good maintenance and regular updating of
equipment 15 year old Amels are mere adolescents!!

Best of luck and in case you haven't got the right impression you will have
to go a long way to beat an Amel!! (LOL)

Deb and John
SV Orion1

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] We are just about ready!

karkauai
 

I'm going to show my inexperience again...Amel droop?
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

--- On Tue, 8/10/10, deborah <woodsdeborah_56@...> wrote:


From: deborah <woodsdeborah_56@...>
Subject: [Amel] We are just about ready!
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, 4:14 PM


 



We have a 1979 Amel Maramu in which we are just about to do the same as yourselves! We have had the hull checked out and it is sound we have of course had some refitting to do but rest assured we have already put her through her paces in a Force 9 going through Tarifa and she was up to anything that the elements flung at her that night! She is our pride and joy and we have already had some great sailing and are looking forward to many more great sailing Years. The only real issue we have had is the Amel droop which is common to a lot of older boats but we have just about finished dealing with that now. With good maintenance and regular updating of equipment 15 year old Amels are mere adolescents!!

Best of luck and in case you haven't got the right impression you will have to go a long way to beat an Amel!! (LOL)

Deb and John
SV Orion1








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


We are just about ready!

deborah <woodsdeborah_56@...>
 

We have a 1979 Amel Maramu in which we are just about to do the same as yourselves! We have had the hull checked out and it is sound we have of course had some refitting to do but rest assured we have already put her through her paces in a Force 9 going through Tarifa and she was up to anything that the elements flung at her that night! She is our pride and joy and we have already had some great sailing and are looking forward to many more great sailing Years. The only real issue we have had is the Amel droop which is common to a lot of older boats but we have just about finished dealing with that now. With good maintenance and regular updating of equipment 15 year old Amels are mere adolescents!!

Best of luck and in case you haven't got the right impression you will have to go a long way to beat an Amel!! (LOL)

Deb and John
SV Orion1


Re: [Amel] We are just about ready!!!

karkauai
 

Hi, markerdos,
I've owned "Kristy" for 2 1/2 years now.  She's a 1999 SM2000 hull #243.  She sat essentially unused on a lake in Texas for 5 years or so before I bought her.  I've had to add new sails, a new VHF, replaced the running rigging, now replacing the standing rigging, replacing the outhaul and main furling gear boxes, and have spent a lot of $ chasing a problem with the Vovo that's looking like it was an overpropping problem all along...jury's still out, but I've got an essentially completely overhauled Volvo that should last me a long time.  Most everything else I've done has been routine maintenance (or what should have been routine).  The hull is sound, not a blister anywhere.
 
Of course it will depend on the boat you buy and how well it's been maintained, but I'd have no hesitation about buying a 10 yr old Amel.  I'm counting on Kristy lasting me another 15-20 years.
 
Good luck on your search and welcome to the family.
Kent
SM243
KRISTY

--- On Tue, 8/10/10, markerdos <markerdos@...> wrote:


From: markerdos <markerdos@...>
Subject: [Amel] We are just about ready!!!
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, August 10, 2010, 1:34 PM


 



Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] We are just about ready!!!

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Rough way in Annapolis has our 1998 listed have a look. She is ready to go. Even a full fuel tank.

Regards
Richard Piller

On Aug 10, 2010, at 13:34, "markerdos" <markerdos@...> wrote:

Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


We are just about ready!!!

markerdos <markerdos@...>
 

Dear Amel Owners,

My wife and I are about to fulfill our life-long dream and enter the world of full time cruising. We have saved and sacrificed over the years to finally reach this point. We have enough savings that we can comfortably cruise for 8-10 years. We both have moderate sailing experience and figured we would step in slowly and grow our experience with our next boat. We owned a 38ft Cheoy Leak for 15 years and have the basics down pat. We sold Water-Melon about 5 years ago as we became land-locked with a job. It was over 20 years old by the time we sold it and was fully committed to self-destruct. We spent more time repairing than we did sailing.

Here is the question that has been hanging over us for quite some time. We really like the Amel for reasons you all are already very familiar with. Amel is at the top of our list. But, they are not cheap. Our budget for our next boat is limited. How old is too old? Amel's in our price range tend to be about 10 years old. What can we expect from an Amel as it turns 15+ years old? My belief is at any point in a boat life, it reaches a point where things start to break faster than they can be repaired. I would like to cruise safely and not spend all my time chasing after parts and doing repairs.

I am very much looking forward to hearing your opinion


Re: [Amel] Mast Painting Paint Code

GrahamJohnston42 <grahamjohnston42@yahoo.com>
 

Hi Frank,
The code was given to me by the Service Centre at Hyeres, I gathered from that conversation that Amel have always used the same colour, though it may me worth contacting them to confirm.
 
Regards
Graham

--- On Tue, 10/8/10, bootlegger@... <bootlegger@...> wrote:


From: bootlegger@... <bootlegger@...>
Subject: [Amel] Mast Painting Paint Code
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, 10 August, 2010, 8:58


 



Graham

Would you happen to know if the quoted Renault White 348 as used on the
Sharki masts is the same paint code Amel applied on the Super Maramu 2000?

Frank Newton
SM 2K 321 'Bootlegger of Mann'

For those who may be considering re-painting or making repairs to the
mast/boom paintwork.

Renault White 348 is the paint code that I believe to be correct. It
certainly matches the existing colour on our 1989 Sharki very closely.


I had to both prepare and paint our masts and booms outside in the UK in
October of last year in between rain showers and gales, so although a two
pack finish would have been preferred I did not have the conditions to
apply it. As a result I used Seajet 017 Epoxy Bonding Prima for Alloys and
a fast, air drying, drying roller applied enamel originally manufactured
for painting plant and machinery.

I found that other than where the original paint had flaked off, usually
around fittings or welds etc, that the original coating was still in very
good condition and very well adhered to the aluminium substrate. The
surface was very chalky which required de-greasing and sanding to provide
a key for the new coating doing so proved to be unusual in that the
surface would sand easily but return to a semi gloss with the wipe of a
cloth. My paint guru suggested a ceramic epoxy perhaps? I have no idea but
the new stuff seems to have stuck pretty well.

The final gloss finish is excellent but obviously it is not as hard as a
two pack, an advantage over a two pack though is that the enamel is touch
dry in 20 minutes and is very easy to touch up and blend in should it be
necessary. So far the finish has withstood the worst winter in the UK for
30 years and a good soaking up in the Outer Hebrides this summer. I am
hoping it lasts for another 10 years, we shall see!

Regards Graham
Sharki 181 `Zephyr'












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Mast Painting Paint Code

bootlegger@...
 

Graham

Would you happen to know if the quoted Renault White 348 as used on the
Sharki masts is the same paint code Amel applied on the Super Maramu 2000?

Frank Newton
SM 2K 321 'Bootlegger of Mann'

For those who may be considering re-painting or making repairs to the
mast/boom paintwork.

Renault White 348 is the paint code that I believe to be correct. It
certainly matches the existing colour on our 1989 Sharki very closely.


I had to both prepare and paint our masts and booms outside in the UK in
October of last year in between rain showers and gales, so although a two
pack finish would have been preferred I did not have the conditions to
apply it. As a result I used Seajet 017 Epoxy Bonding Prima for Alloys and
a fast, air drying, drying roller applied enamel originally manufactured
for painting plant and machinery.

I found that other than where the original paint had flaked off, usually
around fittings or welds etc, that the original coating was still in very
good condition and very well adhered to the aluminium substrate. The
surface was very chalky which required de-greasing and sanding to provide
a key for the new coating doing so proved to be unusual in that the
surface would sand easily but return to a semi gloss with the wipe of a
cloth. My paint guru suggested a ceramic epoxy perhaps? I have no idea but
the new stuff seems to have stuck pretty well.

The final gloss finish is excellent but obviously it is not as hard as a
two pack, an advantage over a two pack though is that the enamel is touch
dry in 20 minutes and is very easy to touch up and blend in should it be
necessary. So far the finish has withstood the worst winter in the UK for
30 years and a good soaking up in the Outer Hebrides this summer. I am
hoping it lasts for another 10 years, we shall see!

Regards Graham
Sharki 181 `Zephyr'



Re: [Amel] B&G Sonic Speed sensor and "the barnacle"

Giovanni TESTA
 

Bill,
I have contacted the main B&G support in Viareggio.
They told me that the neoprene extension is mainly for protection of the transducer.
For now you can sail but you have to keep it cleaned, obviously with great attention.
The technician was working and sailing out of laboratory...in these days there is a lot of work, but he told me that as soon as possible, with the trasducer in his hands, he could check how to re-attach the extension under water..if possible.
Ciao
Gianni

----- Original Message -----
From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Monday, August 09, 2010 2:15 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] B&G Sonic Speed sensor and "the barnacle"





Richard,

It is the upper hull-mount sensor i.e the rear facing sensor.

Bill
s/v BeBe

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:
>
> Bill this looks like the lens and and cover. Can or will you please confirm that your photo is from the "upper" hull mount sensor and not the keel unit. I think if it is the upper you can access-it from the forward cabin. If it is the keel you most likely have a big job on your hands. We have an SM and getting to the keel unit would be a major pain to the point that I'd consider putting in a new speed and water temp unit in place of the forward sensor. I know it's not Amel but given your current location well we all do what we have to do. In any case we would NOT go to sea w/0 a fix or at least fast expoxie on the hole and deal with later. Good luck.
> Regards
> Richard Piller
>
>






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