Date   

Onan Sea water suction

Victoria Stewart harper
 

Hi Ian,Have you rodded through the pipe to the strainer (with the sea cock open)?John & VickySM JOVICMalaysia
_________________________________________________________________
The New Busy think 9 to 5 is a cute idea. Combine multiple calendars with Hotmail.
http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multicalendar&ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_5


Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Hi Ian,

I did not ask for the experience, but I have had a lot of experience with salt water flow and the Onan because I had 3 strange issues occurring at the same time:
(1) The stainless steel pipe had a suction leak.
(2) A high rate of impeller failure.
(3) Water-flow sensor failure.
At one point I thought they were related, but later found that they were separate. The water pump impeller shaft key was sufficiently worn causing the impeller to spin on the shaft, the pipe had a defective seam, and the water-flow sensor was filled with crud.

During these issues I found that the slightest amount of air entering on the suction side of the pump would cause a water-flow shutdown, a small amount of crud would cause a water-flow shutdown, and a missing or cracked impeller blade would also cause a shutdown. Recently, I found a 4th cause of water-flow shutdown:
"Y" fitting off the sea chest clogged very tightly with mussels.

The more I think about your problem, the more I am curious about your situation. I have disconnected the input hose to the salt water pump enough times to know that if the sea chest valve is open and the lines are clear of obstructions, gravity will cause water to flow freely through the hose when it is disconnected from the intake side of the sea water pump. Close the intake valve to the sea chest and the water flow at the intake to the salt water pump stops.

I believe that if water is flowing freely to the intake side of the salt water pump, it is impossible to have air replace the water in the salt water pump unless air is entering as the pump begins to operate, or possibly a cracked or broken impeller blade.

Like I said, I have done this drill more times than I can count. Here is what I would do:

1. Remove the hose from the intake side of the Onan salt water pump, holding the end over a bucket. Loosen the clamp on the hose where connected to the SS pipe. Twist the hose downward several inches. Water should begin to flow and continue to flow freely (no dribbles) until the sea chest valve is closed...If NOT, there is an obstruction. Clear the obstruction and go sailing. If this does not solve the issue, go to 2.

2. Buy a 2-3 meter piece of wire-reinforced 25mm hose. Disconnect the Onan 25mm hose from the "Y" on the sea chest. Using a piece of wire, inspect the "Y" carefully to ensure no obstructions then connect this new hose to the "Y." Connect the other end of the hose to the input side of Onan Salt Water pump. Go sail. If this solves the problem you either have an obstruction in the SS pipe or 25mm hose or you have an air leak in either or both (it is possible to have a small tear in the hose which does not leak water, but will allow air). If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 3.

3. Pull the Onan Salt Water pump. Change the impeller, carefully inspecting the shaft key to ensure it is not worn. Go sail. If this does not solve the issue, leave the hose in place and go to 4.

4. Remove the heat exchanger and have it properly cleaned; reinstall it with a new zinc (take care with the end caps as they are delicate and will probably need replacing). Go sail.

If this does not solve the issue, I have wasted your time, and for that I apologize. If it works, one Red Stripe, please.

I remain curious of your eventual solution.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Malaysia

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

thanks for the suggestion. I have checked the stainless pipe and there
is no sign of any leaking water, though I have been unable to check the
aft end of the pipe yet as it is buried under storage boxes that I built
above the hot water tank.

If left at it's berth, the genset will always start normally with a good
supply of water. It's only when sailing that the water disappears. It
would seem that the forward motion sucks the water out of the system,
creating an air lock. Why water does not get forced back to the pump
when the boat is staionary and on an even keel is a mystery. Maybe if
the impeller vanes straddle the intake opening, then the air cannot pas
through the pump?

Two solutions come to mind. Install a scoop at the strainer intake.
(Haul out required and more drag), or install a non return valve just
below the impeller. I am dubious as to whether such a valve exists that
will withstand prolonged salt water immersion.

I have emailed Amel for help and will pass it along if they come up with
the answer.

Regards

Ian


Re: Genset Cooling Circuit Airlock

richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Ian, the thought occurs to me that the engine cooling/salt water continues to be feeding the engine but the gen set is higher up the manifold. Why not put a "T" or a "Y" fitting on the engine hose and see the gen set from there???
Just a thought.
Good luck and stay cool..
Richard SM 209

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

thanks for the suggestion. I have checked the stainless pipe and there
is no sign of any leaking water, though I have been unable to check the
aft end of the pipe yet as it is buried under storage boxes that I built
above the hot water tank.

If left at it's berth, the genset will always start normally with a good
supply of water. It's only when sailing that the water disappears. It
would seem that the forward motion sucks the water out of the system,
creating an air lock. Why water does not get forced back to the pump
when the boat is staionary and on an even keel is a mystery. Maybe if
the impeller vanes straddle the intake opening, then the air cannot pas
through the pump?

Two solutions come to mind. Install a scoop at the strainer intake.
(Haul out required and more drag), or install a non return valve just
below the impeller. I am dubious as to whether such a valve exists that
will withstand prolonged salt water immersion.

I have emailed Amel for help and will pass it along if they come up with
the answer.

Regards

Ian


Re: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

Thanks Eric, I was afraid of that, Amel wants 130 euros each, plus shipping,!!!! Oh well, at least I know they will fit and work. I bought spare outhaul lines for the jib and main years ago, I've never used them yet but some dark and stormy night when they break I will know they will fit, be the right size and length, and the light lines to tie it on with. John



To: amelyachtowners@...
From: kimberlite@...
Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2010 20:22:32 -0400
Subject: RE: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel




John,

We just replaced our port wheel with one supplied by Amel.

Roberto had to saw the old one apart as it was frozen together with the s/s
screws. I could not find one anywhere else.

Fair Winds

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of john martin
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 6:06 PM
To: Amel YAHOO GROUP
Subject: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

Hello All,

Most SM's (as well as other Amel models) seem to have the galley portlight
equipped with a plastic drip guard. Ours is starting to chip and degrade. It
works very nicely and I'd like to have one for the aft head port as well.
The Amel parts department just told me they no longer carry them in stock,
and did not offer any advice about an alternative source. I have never seen
one on another type boat. There is nothing similar on the Goiot web site.
Does anyone know of a source for a similar device ?

Similarly, the black line wheel at the aft end of one of our genoa track
systems has cracked and no doubt the other one will crack soon too. These
are stamped Amel; Amel can provide them for 133 Euros each + shipping to the
US. Does anyone know of an alternate source ?

Thanks

Ruth

MOON DOG

SM #248

__________________________________________________________
Hotmail has tools for the New Busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox.
http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:W
L:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_1



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





_________________________________________________________________
The New Busy is not the too busy. Combine all your e-mail accounts with Hotmail.
http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multiaccount&ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_4

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Modifications

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Thanks Ian, it's a great suggestion, given that as the bronze bushing wears it allow more and more salt water to get at the seals. When we were last in the Caribbean the little corals in the water got to the shaft and seals which then failed. We had to haul wash out the Amel drive and replace the bearings, bushings and seals. We are looking forward to your report on the SS bushing replacement.
All the best smooth sailing.
Richard on sm 209





________________________________
From: sv_crusader <sv_freespirit@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sat, July 3, 2010 12:56:25 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Modifications


Hello Richard,

the stainless bush was an exact copy of the bronze one, except that it was made with three grub screws instead of two to allow better centering.

Assembled with grease there are no signs of any Galling after over three years of use. In fact both the shaft and the bush look as new.

I am off for 10 weeks sailing this morning, so will be unable to reply further until I find a wireless network to log on to, but I will be glad to discuss further when I get back.

Regards

Ian SM414 Crusader (Headed for Mersin Eastern Turkey)

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan between the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work well. If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface. It may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them anyway.
This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster, which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time. The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I decided to
not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader



Re: [Amel] topping lift replacement

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

We have also replaced ours on Challenge. We used a 1/2" thick bungee cord and knotted it then stitch the bitter end on the Ring end/rope. The end near the boom was knotted at first until we sail a while then tighten again and stitched to keep the knot from slipping. It takes a bit of doing but you will find it works well. Oh, we used the mizzen halyard to hold up the boom while we worked.
Good luck
Richard SM 209





________________________________
From: kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Fri, July 2, 2010 7:49:13 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel] topping lift replacement


I have replaced mine twice.

On Kimberlite I just opened up the end of the boom and you will see the
attachment points to the line that makes up the topping lift. I believe I
used hog rings to replace the bungee cord.

At the mast end of the boom there is a pocket cut into the underside of the
boom and the cord just hooks up on to a bracket inside the boom. The trick
is to figure out how long the bungee cord should be. I pulled a line down
the boom and attached it to the mast end of the cord and had someone pull on
it. You just have to play with the length. There is quite a bit of tension
required on the bungee to keep the boom up.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, July 02, 2010 7:30 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] topping lift replacement

The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke
recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the
procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right
direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Modifications

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

Ian,

As I understand what you wrote about the bow thruster you added a sleeve in
the shaft that is connected to the prp and replaced the bearings with sealed
bearings and then packed the gearbox with grease.

Why can you not add oil from the top of the bow thruster?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of sv_crusader
Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2010 12:56 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: Modifications





Hello Richard,

the stainless bush was an exact copy of the bronze one, except that it was
made with three grub screws instead of two to allow better centering.

Assembled with grease there are no signs of any Galling after over three
years of use. In fact both the shaft and the bush look as new.

I am off for 10 weeks sailing this morning, so will be unable to reply
further until I find a wireless network to log on to, but I will be glad to
discuss further when I get back.

Regards

Ian SM414 Crusader (Headed for Mersin Eastern Turkey)

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
wrote:

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan between
the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work well.
If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface. It
may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from
moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them anyway.
This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster, which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time. The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I decided to
not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader



Re: [Amel] topping lift replacement

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Mark and Eric,

I replaced the topping lines and shock cord in the main boom as well as the mizzen boom. My reason for replacement was the deterioration of the shock cord which seemed to be damaged only where UV got to it.

I am traveling inland Thailand and off the boat for 3 weeks. I remember a knot in the line and a washer. The washer backed against something. When the knot was properly adjusted (which took me several tries), the line and knot/washer held the boom horizontal, not the shock cord...the shock cord took in the excess topping line caused by easing the main sheet while under sail.

It will be three weeks before I am back, and when I return, I believe I can give you the topping line/shock cord dimensions for a Super Maramu...possibly someone else can confirm what I "remember" above and give you dimensions of this topping lift system.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently in Malaysia

--- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I have replaced mine twice.

On Kimberlite I just opened up the end of the boom and you will see the
attachment points to the line that makes up the topping lift. I believe I
used hog rings to replace the bungee cord.

At the mast end of the boom there is a pocket cut into the underside of the
boom and the cord just hooks up on to a bracket inside the boom. The trick
is to figure out how long the bungee cord should be. I pulled a line down
the boom and attached it to the mast end of the cord and had someone pull on
it. You just have to play with the length. There is quite a bit of tension
required on the bungee to keep the boom up.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, July 02, 2010 7:30 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] topping lift replacement





The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke
recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the
procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right
direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark







Re: Modifications

Ian Shepherd
 

Hello Richard,

the stainless bush was an exact copy of the bronze one, except that it was made with three grub screws instead of two to allow better centering.

Assembled with grease there are no signs of any Galling after over three years of use. In fact both the shaft and the bush look as new.

I am off for 10 weeks sailing this morning, so will be unable to reply further until I find a wireless network to log on to, but I will be glad to discuss further when I get back.

Regards

Ian SM414 Crusader (Headed for Mersin Eastern Turkey)

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan between the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work well. If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface. It may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them anyway.
This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster, which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time. The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I decided to
not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] topping lift replacement

karkauai
 

Hi, Mark,
Ditto what Eric told you.  I used 3/8" bungee and it seems to be holding up fine after a year.
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

--- On Fri, 7/2/10, Mark <markghayden@...> wrote:


From: Mark <markghayden@...>
Subject: [Amel] topping lift replacement
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Friday, July 2, 2010, 7:29 PM


 



The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re-posted: Any Amels for sale in South East Asia or South Pacific?

jloosehoe
 

Hello All

I am looking for my next yacht and Amels are on the list.

Does anyone have an SM, Santorin or late model Maramu for sale now or in theforseeable future in the South Pacific or environs?

Email jloosehoe AT yahoo DOT com DOT au

(If you can, please leave a message on this board to alert me that you have emailed.)

Regards
Jack


Re: [Amel] topping lift replacement

kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
 

I have replaced mine twice.

On Kimberlite I just opened up the end of the boom and you will see the
attachment points to the line that makes up the topping lift. I believe I
used hog rings to replace the bungee cord.

At the mast end of the boom there is a pocket cut into the underside of the
boom and the cord just hooks up on to a bracket inside the boom. The trick
is to figure out how long the bungee cord should be. I pulled a line down
the boom and attached it to the mast end of the cord and had someone pull on
it. You just have to play with the length. There is quite a bit of tension
required on the bungee to keep the boom up.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Friday, July 02, 2010 7:30 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] topping lift replacement





The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke
recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the
procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right
direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark


topping lift replacement

Mark Hayden
 

The elastic line attached to the topping lift in my SM2K's boom broke recently. I can't find any information on appropriate line to use and the procedure for replacing it. I'd appreciate being pointed in the right direction or finding if there are any gotchas I should be aware of.

Thanks in advance, Mark


Re: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Eric when we installed new wheels we found that due to their s
Rough surface they caused high wear to occurred on the sheets. Keep an eye on them.
Safe sailing. Richard SM 209

On Jul 1, 2010, at 8:22 PM, kimberlite <kimberlite@...> wrote:

John,

We just replaced our port wheel with one supplied by Amel.

Roberto had to saw the old one apart as it was frozen together with the s/s
screws. I could not find one anywhere else.

Fair Winds

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of john martin
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 6:06 PM
To: Amel YAHOO GROUP
Subject: [Amel] portlight "drip guard" & genoa track wheel

Hello All,

Most SM's (as well as other Amel models) seem to have the galley portlight
equipped with a plastic drip guard. Ours is starting to chip and degrade. It
works very nicely and I'd like to have one for the aft head port as well.
The Amel parts department just told me they no longer carry them in stock,
and did not offer any advice about an alternative source. I have never seen
one on another type boat. There is nothing similar on the Goiot web site.
Does anyone know of a source for a similar device ?

Similarly, the black line wheel at the aft end of one of our genoa track
systems has cracked and no doubt the other one will crack soon too. These
are stamped Amel; Amel can provide them for 133 Euros each + shipping to the
US. Does anyone know of an alternate source ?

Thanks

Ruth

MOON DOG

SM #248

__________________________________________________________
Hotmail has tools for the New Busy. Search, chat and e-mail from your inbox.
http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:W
L:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_1

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Furler maintenance

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Kent,

I'd be interested in what you find about the hi-tech line as a standing rigging spare. By the way, on your other post about the out-haul line - do go with the hi-tech-lo-stretch. We got Amel's standard Kevlar core from them for a surprisingly low cost (we were in La Rochelle so no $$ shipping.) Had used XLS before and it was way too stretchy (but is now a great dinghy painter.)

I've seen the quote from the Amel manual before, saying the jib furler is "maintenance free" - imho that's in the same category as "military intelligence" and "telephone service". T'ain't nothin' that's maintenance free forever and I can send you photos of the horribly corroded and worn guts from my furler.

And, while the electric motor lives inside its own cast metal housing, that's sealed by a simple gasket with a finite life. Also, the electric wire entrance just has a rubber compression seal - all subject to deterioration over time. And, btw, while I guess there's a possibility of the furler grease liquifying in hot temps (although it's basically axle grease that's formulated for hi friction temps - oh well) - I'll betcha dollars-to-donuts it's coming out of the gearbox and may well be an emulsion of some sea water and grease.

Maintenance for the electric motors is so simple and inexpensive, I can't see why one wouldn't do it, especially if you're going tran-Pac. If nothing else, just replace the brushes, burnish the commutator and clean out the carbon - you'll guanrantee continued fault-free operation. Then you can replace the seals on the cover and you'll be "maintenance-free" until the next time it's time for maintenance.

Fair winds,
Craig Briggs, s/v Sangaris, Santorin #68, along the Dalmation coast


Re: [Amel] Re: Outhaul

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Further to the Earlier email. If you get enough air to load that line to breaking load roll up the main and hove two.
Regards

Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 3:51 PM, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Thanks, Richard, good tip.
Kent

--- On Wed, 6/30/10, Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

From: Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Outhaul
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 2010, 8:39 PM



Kent when you replace the line no matter which you choose leave some slack on one end AFTER the knot so you can take any strech after some use. Once we did that we have had good success
Good luck. Richard on SM 209

Sent by Richard Piller

On Jun 30, 2010, at 17:40, "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi again, everyone,
I'm going to replace the outhaul line and jibcar lines on KRISTY and was lookin back over this thread from a year ago. Eric recommended 3/8" Endura Braid by NE Ropes and Richard said he used 7/16 XL by Samson and that it worked well too. I've been searching the net and have found that the Endura Braid in 3/8" (10mm) is $2.50+/foot, while the Samson 7/16 XLS is $.94 /ft. I was amazed to see this much difference in the two lines. Unless someone has a good reason not to go with the Samson XLS I think I've made my choice.
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Modifications

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Thanks for the info. One question how much clearance did you plan between the shaft and bushings? Metal to metal ss to ss normally does not work well. If they touch they will Gaul as the bronze is used as a bearing surface. It may be that the bearing pack is stiff enough to hold the shaft from moving/touching. I guess time will tell.
Regards
Sent by Richard Piller

On Jul 1, 2010, at 5:55 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I read recently that owners modifications can be detrimental to the
original concept. Maybe so, but here are three modifications that have
definitely improved my boat.

Three and a half years ago I replaced the bronze main engine prop shaft
bush with one made of high grade stainless steel. I recently hauled for
the first time since fitting it and there was absolutely no wear
whatsoever on the bush. Just a very slight polishing of the surface
where the lip seals mate to the bush. There was no noticeable wear to
the seals either after 600 hours of motoring, but I changed them anyway.
This contrasts markedly to the normal wear experienced on the standard
bush. I believe that the maintenance interval is now much longer with
the stainless bush, and there is a worthwhile long term cost saving too.

I replaced the 70M of chain supplied by Amel with 90M. There was a
noticeable improvement in the boats motion particularly in short seas.
The boat pitches less, hardly ever slams any more and because of this
maintains a higher average speed. I also have 10M of chain and 100M of
rope for my second anchor stored in the forward locker together with my
two Fortress anchors, so in reality, I have the equivalent of 100M of
10mm chain in bow. The extra weight forward certainly seems to be for
the better.

I decided to try and improve the lubrication of the bow thruster, which
seems to have more sea water inside it than oil most of the time. The
arrangement of a single lip seal over a rough fibre shaft is hardly
conducive to keeping the sea water out. I removed the shaft and had it
machined down to accept a thin stainless sleeve for the lip seal to run
on. I then replaced the three open ball race bearings, which were all
rusty, with sealed bearings running in their own grease. Of course this
prevents you pouring the oil in via the top of the tube, so I decided to
not use oil to lubricate the bevel gears, but instead use water
repellent grease.

This was packed into the gearbox housing before the back plate was
refitted, leaving a small gap to allow for expansion, and grease was
also placed between the outside of the outer bearing and the lip seal.
This was done about four months ago, and the bow thruster has never
sounded sweeter. Gone is the awful sound of bearings running is a sea
water emulsion, and there does not seem to be any loss in power either.
Time will tell, and I shall remove the bow thruster this winter to see
if the modifications have had any adverse effects on the gears, but it
is my guess that the life of the seal, bearings and bevel gears will be
considerably increased.

As they say, cruising is fixing things on water. Anything that reduces
wear and subsequent failure must be for the better.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Foredeck Light

Giovanni TESTA
 

HI,
I had the same problem : the lock ring lost and the lamp crashed sailing on the deck !
Aquasignal has now a new version but I wrote to Kohlhoff Thea <Kohlhoff@...> ,very kind International sales manager, and sent me a spare lock ring of old version.
....after I purchased a new unit at Budget marine, now very expensive spare part !
Buon Vento
Gianni
SV EUTIKIA n 428

----- Original Message -----
From: kimberlite
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 8:10 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Foredeck Light



Hi,

Thanks, that is the fixture on the mizzen mast The foredeck light is
different.

Do you have any idea who makes that one. It has a retaining ring that holds
in the same bulb as the mizzen mast light.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of johnabo2003
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 8:54 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: Foredeck Light

I think it is Aquasignal. Check out Budget Marine under Mast Flood Lights.

John
SM 391
--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , kimberlite <kimberlite@...>
wrote:
>
> Does anyone know the manufacturer of the foredeck light mounted just below
> the steaming light?
>
> Fair Winds
>
> Eric
>
> Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite
>
>
>
>
>
>
>








------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Nessun virus nel messaggio in arrivo.
Controllato da AVG - www.avg.com
Versione: 8.5.439 / Database dei virus: 271.1.1/2975 - Data di rilascio: 07/01/10 06:35:00


Masthead Stobe anti-collision light

drew_gaffney <drew.gaffney@...>
 

Our strobe light has stopped working. Has anyone had a problem or found a replacement?
Thanks,
Drew
SM 390 Revelation,
Currently lying Neiafu, Tonga


[Amel] Re: Foredeck Light

drew_gaffney <drew.gaffney@...>
 

Eric,
It's made by AquaSignal. I called their US importer and was told that I'd have to buy a whole new unit, as the missing ring holding the lower light is not available. I was subsequently told that WestMarine may have them. Their HQ in Germany might help as well. We're in Tonga and can't do too much tracking right now.
Drew
SM390 Revelation

--- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Hi,

Thanks, that is the fixture on the mizzen mast The foredeck light is
different.

Do you have any idea who makes that one. It has a retaining ring that holds
in the same bulb as the mizzen mast light.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of johnabo2003
Sent: Thursday, July 01, 2010 8:54 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: Foredeck Light





I think it is Aquasignal. Check out Budget Marine under Mast Flood Lights.

John
SM 391
--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , kimberlite <kimberlite@>
wrote:

Does anyone know the manufacturer of the foredeck light mounted just below
the steaming light?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]