Date   

Re: Bow Thruster Travel Sensors H, B, and SP

Paul Stascavage
 

Tom Shook from TSII got back to me and told me that FFV-807A6X has been replaced by FFV-810C6R.

You can only currently order them by contacting Tom by email <tsiiinc@...> or calling (330-755-8500).  The website was recently compromised and cannot currently be used to place orders.  Tom indicated it has been such a bad experience he may decide not to bring it live again for ordering.

I installed the sensors I ordered (FFV-810C6R) today and that took care of my problem.  The sensors labeled H and SP were defective.  H is responsible for stopping the actuator motor when raising the Bow Thruster (BT) and SP is responsible for inactivating the BT motor when the unit is in the up position.

Thanks to all who posted in this thread.  The knowledge provided enabled me to complete yet another project successfully as well as learn a great deal along the way.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Currently exploring Brunswick, GA

www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Lance Leonard
 

I was hoping to get rid of the topping lift as well. Lots to think about. Thanks for the information.


Re: main sheet winch service

Bill Kinney
 

Eloi,

You can reach the back of the mainsheet winch through a panel in the aft head next to the mirror over the sink.  It is a very tight fit, and access is difficult, but possible.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Lance Leonard
 

Thanks Bill, That makes sense. I had completely left the traveler out of the equation.


Re: replacement rigging

Drew Gaffney
 

Pantaenius cancelled our insurance as they were leaving the US market about 18mo ago.  As EU residents, we requested coverage for for our boat in the Med.  They refused as our boat is USCG flagged and they said they would not cover USCG flagged boats.  I know many Amels are not US flagged, and for them, it's a good choice.  If US flagged, I wouldn't waste my time...
Drew
Revelation SM390
Lying Carloforte, Sardinia

On Thu, Nov 11, 2021 at 11:50 AM Bartłomiej Czarciński <bartek@...> wrote:

Dear Jose,
maybe you need to think to change the insurance company. In Pantaenius we need only rigger checking between 10-15 years old standing rigging. 

Bartek Czarciński 


Re: replacement rigging

Joan Blaas
 

Hi Jose,

My insurance just requires a rigging check from a respectable rigger. My rigging is 10 years and that isn't any problem.

Regards,

Joan 
Caconano
Amel 55-05


Re: replacement rigging

Bartłomiej Czarciński
 

Dear Jose,
maybe you need to think to change the insurance company. In Pantaenius we need only rigger checking between 10-15 years old standing rigging. 

Bartek Czarciński 


Re: replacement rigging

Jose Alegria
 

Craig hi

Just  insurance company requires this to minimize their risk exposure.
For me don´t make any sense, all visible standing rigging is perfect !.... but they insist ..... 10 years....
Regards


José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37




On Thu, 11 Nov 2021 at 14:13, Craig Briggs via groups.io <sangaris=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi José,
I am curious as to why you think 10 years is time to replace your rigging.
Some common reasons may include:
  • Your insurance company arbitrarily requires this to minimize their risk exposure.
  • You have been in the tropics for years.
  • You have inspected the rigging (or had it done) and have found corrosion/cracking/whatever.
  • You are about to undertake some serious ocean passages and want the added peace of mind new rigging may bring, notwithstanding cost.
10 years, imho, is needlessly conservative (and costly) for boats in moderate climates not being sailed full time.

I would definitely recommend ACMO - especially if you're in Europe. I did 1992 Santorin at 18 years (2010) when an aft lower mizzen broke at the lower swage while sailing off Sicily. Used ACMO and did the work myself - only about $6,000 US. 
Eleven years later (2021) I did it again after a mizzen backstay broke, also at the lower swage; this time it was just sitting at the dock!  Used US riggers in Ft Lauderdale, Nance and Underwood, who used a variety of suppliers, Hayne, Sta-loc, etc. and I had them provide the labor - cost $12,000 US. Used all Sta-loc fittings on lower end of stays (except headstay, of course). 

If you use ACMO, I would recommend paying a modest upcharge to have them supply mechanical fittings (at least on the bottoms) instead of all swaged. They have their own proprietary mechanical fittings, which are quite similar to the Norseman brand (which I believe is no longer in business).

Craig


SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

Gary Wells
 

Had a salty RO guy advise me to just get ahold of a couple of gallons.of RV type (potable-pink) anti-freeze.
No chlorine, usually a 50/50 premix with purified water and the glycol prevents growth without harming the membrane.
Only downside, if you're already hauled, will be how to handle the bypass solution. ... and, if you're in a non-freezing area it's hard to find. 
.
If you are hauled and are really serious about a long-term pickling, then you could remove the membrane and store it in a PVC pipe container (or even in a real heavy-duty plastic bag) for several months without worry.
.
I was successful with the RV AntiFreeze for about 5 years.  Just remember to run low pressure for a while at re-start till it's flushed out.

Cheers!
Gary W.
Former Owner, SM209 "Adagio"


Re: replacement rigging

Craig Briggs
 

Hi José,
I am curious as to why you think 10 years is time to replace your rigging.
Some common reasons may include:
  • Your insurance company arbitrarily requires this to minimize their risk exposure.
  • You have been in the tropics for years.
  • You have inspected the rigging (or had it done) and have found corrosion/cracking/whatever.
  • You are about to undertake some serious ocean passages and want the added peace of mind new rigging may bring, notwithstanding cost.
10 years, imho, is needlessly conservative (and costly) for boats in moderate climates not being sailed full time.

I would definitely recommend ACMO - especially if you're in Europe. I did 1992 Santorin at 18 years (2010) when an aft lower mizzen broke at the lower swage while sailing off Sicily. Used ACMO and did the work myself - only about $6,000 US. 
Eleven years later (2021) I did it again after a mizzen backstay broke, also at the lower swage; this time it was just sitting at the dock!  Used US riggers in Ft Lauderdale, Nance and Underwood, who used a variety of suppliers, Hayne, Sta-loc, etc. and I had them provide the labor - cost $12,000 US. Used all Sta-loc fittings on lower end of stays (except headstay, of course). 

If you use ACMO, I would recommend paying a modest upcharge to have them supply mechanical fittings (at least on the bottoms) instead of all swaged. They have their own proprietary mechanical fittings, which are quite similar to the Norseman brand (which I believe is no longer in business).

Craig


SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

 

Bill,

Extremely well explained. Thanks.

I still want to know why the management of Amel decided to have nothing on the 54. It must have been a Henri vs Us situation. I think I know who won those arguments before Henri retired. You can see that the attachment points on the A54 boom and mast are there, but the Vang/Kicker is not.
image.png
Bill


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar

On Wed, Nov 10, 2021 at 7:07 PM Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:
Lance,

What you are seeing is the original design from Amel.  A traditional boom vang is of very limited utility on an Amel.

On an Amel, the traveler is so long, and so effective, that the traditional vang is not needed.  You  should use the traveler to adjust the angle of the sail to the wind, and the mainsheet to adjust the height of the boom and the twist of the sail.  The length of the traveler on the Amel design ensures that you have total control of the position of the boom over a VERY wide range of sailing angles without the need for a vang.  When you are VERY far off the wind, you use the tackle on the rail to pull the boom down and control twist. 

Do NOT install a traditional vang from the base of the mast to the boom. It will apply MUCH higher loads downward on the boom in a place where it was not designed for.  This is a VERY dangerous idea.  Breaking or bending your boom is absolutely possible.

So what is the purpose of that three strand line?  It is (primarily) there to prevent the boom from rising too high when you are unfurling the sail.  There is no reason to have an adjustable vang. It is not a control used when sailing, it just allows the sail to unfurl without issue.  On a "normal" boat the vang has to be adjusted "just right" to have a mast furled sail unfurl properly.  This simple fixed line is one of the under-appreciated reasons that the Amel main sail furling system is so reliable.

Moral of the story here:  Use your traveler!  It will give you much better control of sail shape and angle than you'll get from a vang and mainsheet alone.  Remember, most racing boats really only use their traveler when close hauled, becasue they are so short.  They NEED a vang to control twist.  You have an awesome traveler system that controls twist without the high stress loadings from a vang.  I have seen a lot of broken booms.  EVERY single one was at the vang attachment point.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

Nick Newington
 

I use sodium metabisulfite and water from whatever source so long as it does not smell or taste of chlorine, and have been for twenty years on various boats with no damage to the membranes. 

If the water is good and clean then I fill the tanks with it. 
If you are worried just buy distilled water or catch rain…to pickle but in my opinion it does not matter.
Nick
Amelia 
AML54-019
Leros


On 11 Nov 2021, at 05:28, Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Ellen,

It depends a bit on exactly what you mean by "pickling."  If your pickling chemical is sodium metabisulfite (SMBS) then chlorine is not at all a problem.  It is destroyed by SMBS.  Other pickling agents might behave differently.

It is a not a good idea to leave stagnant seawater in the membranes for extended periods.  

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

Bill Kinney
 

Ellen,

It depends a bit on exactly what you mean by "pickling."  If your pickling chemical is sodium metabisulfite (SMBS) then chlorine is not at all a problem.  It is destroyed by SMBS.  Other pickling agents might behave differently.

It is a not a good idea to leave stagnant seawater in the membranes for extended periods.  

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill, 

in total agreement with you.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 11 November 2021 at 14:07 Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Lance,

What you are seeing is the original design from Amel.  A traditional boom vang is of very limited utility on an Amel.

On an Amel, the traveler is so long, and so effective, that the traditional vang is not needed.  You  should use the traveler to adjust the angle of the sail to the wind, and the mainsheet to adjust the height of the boom and the twist of the sail.  The length of the traveler on the Amel design ensures that you have total control of the position of the boom over a VERY wide range of sailing angles without the need for a vang.  When you are VERY far off the wind, you use the tackle on the rail to pull the boom down and control twist. 

Do NOT install a traditional vang from the base of the mast to the boom. It will apply MUCH higher loads downward on the boom in a place where it was not designed for.  This is a VERY dangerous idea.  Breaking or bending your boom is absolutely possible.

So what is the purpose of that three strand line?  It is (primarily) there to prevent the boom from rising too high when you are unfurling the sail.  There is no reason to have an adjustable vang. It is not a control used when sailing, it just allows the sail to unfurl without issue.  On a "normal" boat the vang has to be adjusted "just right" to have a mast furled sail unfurl properly.  This simple fixed line is one of the under-appreciated reasons that the Amel main sail furling system is so reliable.

Moral of the story here:  Use your traveler!  It will give you much better control of sail shape and angle than you'll get from a vang and mainsheet alone.  Remember, most racing boats really only use their traveler when close hauled, becasue they are so short.  They NEED a vang to control twist.  You have an awesome traveler system that controls twist without the high stress loadings from a vang.  I have seen a lot of broken booms.  EVERY single one was at the vang attachment point.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Bill Kinney
 

Lance,

What you are seeing is the original design from Amel.  A traditional boom vang is of very limited utility on an Amel.

On an Amel, the traveler is so long, and so effective, that the traditional vang is not needed.  You  should use the traveler to adjust the angle of the sail to the wind, and the mainsheet to adjust the height of the boom and the twist of the sail.  The length of the traveler on the Amel design ensures that you have total control of the position of the boom over a VERY wide range of sailing angles without the need for a vang.  When you are VERY far off the wind, you use the tackle on the rail to pull the boom down and control twist. 

Do NOT install a traditional vang from the base of the mast to the boom. It will apply MUCH higher loads downward on the boom in a place where it was not designed for.  This is a VERY dangerous idea.  Breaking or bending your boom is absolutely possible.

So what is the purpose of that three strand line?  It is (primarily) there to prevent the boom from rising too high when you are unfurling the sail.  There is no reason to have an adjustable vang. It is not a control used when sailing, it just allows the sail to unfurl without issue.  On a "normal" boat the vang has to be adjusted "just right" to have a mast furled sail unfurl properly.  This simple fixed line is one of the under-appreciated reasons that the Amel main sail furling system is so reliable.

Moral of the story here:  Use your traveler!  It will give you much better control of sail shape and angle than you'll get from a vang and mainsheet alone.  Remember, most racing boats really only use their traveler when close hauled, becasue they are so short.  They NEED a vang to control twist.  You have an awesome traveler system that controls twist without the high stress loadings from a vang.  I have seen a lot of broken booms.  EVERY single one was at the vang attachment point.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Brunswick, GA, USA


Re: How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

Ellen Cahill
 

Ann-Sofie,

We are in Marina Portimao boatyard. Some water maker water would be amazing! My details are below if you can give me a call/WhatsApp/email.

Ellen
SV Saol Nua
Amel Mango 
+353876691899 or saolnuairl@...


Re: Dehumidifier Drain Outlet

Dean Gillies
 

Hi Nick,
Safe travels home.

The holding tanks are a bit too high to be useful and I'm not too keen on T-ing into the toilet thru hulls/risers, although as you say it would work with a gravity feed.  I started investigating and checking my bilge alarm sensor and discovered that the alarm buzzer is not working and while I was mucking around the red light gave up the ghost too.  Now looking for replacements for those.

My main way forward at the moment is to hook up the bilge high-water alarm sensor to my CerboGX system which is on-line all the time. This allows me to know if a highwater alarm occurs (if my bilge pump fails) and then get something done about it.  Given its just a dehumidifier filling the bilge, nothing happens too quickly that I cant respond and get someone on board. That's the theory at least!

Cheers
Dean

SV Stella
A54-154
 


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Dennis Johns
 

Hi Lance,

First thing you do is get rid of your topping lift if you haven't already.  Then install a Boomkicker (https://www.boomkicker.com/) plus a regular boom vang with a jamb cleat.  They have a picture of my installation: 7 photos down on the right.  They specify their K1500 product for boats up to 38' but that equates to the main sail of the 46 ketch just fine.

I've had it installed for about 15 years with no signs of fatigue.

Dennis Johns
Libertad
Maramu #121

On Wed, Nov 10, 2021 at 10:36 AM Lance Leonard <Elscubano@...> wrote:
It looks like the previous owner of Minerva may have removed the boom vang and replaced it with a short piece of 3/4” triple braid. A preventer maybe? It seems like the purchase for the mainsheet is pretty far aft. I have decent sail shape until I get to about a broad reach. As I start to run the boom rises and the sail shape goes to hell.I was wondering if the boat was originally delivered with a boom vang (1983, before in-mast furling). Normally I would just take her out sailing, play with the mainsheet attachment points on the boom or kludge together a temporary boom vang. Unfortunately the boat is on the hard with the rig off for the winter.


Re: Boom vang on a Maramu

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi, It is not the racing yachtsman boom vang I found it strange for a start but as with all things Amel it works. I would caution against fitting a powerful, non flexible vang. Rigidity leads to breakage. The three strand nylon has a good stretch under shock load preventing this shock load being transferred to the mast and rig. In storm conditions this is critical, because with the best will in the world things go wrong and that is when these design features matter.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl 

On 11 November 2021 at 07:50 CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

A lot of us call it a Boom Vang but is more accurately described as a downwind kicker.
20mm 3-strand nylon L = 145cm eye center to eye center
image.png
 


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
 
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
View My Training Calendar

On Wed, Nov 10, 2021 at 12:36 PM Lance Leonard < Elscubano@...> wrote:
It looks like the previous owner of Minerva may have removed the boom vang and replaced it with a short piece of 3/4” triple braid. A preventer maybe? It seems like the purchase for the mainsheet is pretty far aft. I have decent sail shape until I get to about a broad reach. As I start to run the boom rises and the sail shape goes to hell.I was wondering if the boat was originally delivered with a boom vang (1983, before in-mast furling). Normally I would just take her out sailing, play with the mainsheet attachment points on the boom or kludge together a temporary boom vang. Unfortunately the boat is on the hard with the rig off for the winter.

 

 


Re: How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

Ann-Sofie, S/Y Lady Annila
 

Where in Algarve are you? We might be able to help with watermaker water.

Regards
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM 232, 1998
Present in Portimão


Skickat från min iPhone

10/11/2021 kl. 18:23 skrev Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...>:



We only flush and sterilize the membranes with our fresh water tank, which is only filled with only desalinated water. In your situation, I would most likely purchase and use distilled water to sterilize with. We try to avoid the risk of exposure of membranes to unknown chemicals in unknown source of water.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ellen Cahill via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, November 10, 2021 10:00 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] How to Pickle a membrane after lift out

 

Long story, but I have hauled out for 6 months and did not pickle the membrane before hand. I do not have unchlorinated water to mix with the pickling solution. 
1 - Can I picklr with tap water or will the chlorine be detrimental to the membrane?
2 - would I be better to leave the sea water in it?
The boat is in the Algarve, so no risk of freezing just growth.

Any other suggestions? 

Thanks in advance!!

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