Date   

SSB Backstay antenna

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi to all,
We had a backstay antenna fitted by Amel at the time of production,
mainly because the whip would have interfered with the davits we
wanted to install. In 5+ years, we have had no problems with SSB
communications, and often find that we receive and transmit better
than neighboring boats. However, we have not done side-by-side
comparisons with a SM with a whip.
Regards, Roy


Volvo TMD 22 Turbo: Lessons Learned

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

During the past summer, I learned a lot about the TMD22 Volvo diesel
engine and its turbocharger. Let me share some of that with those
who helped me solve my problems.
My symptoms were:
• Increasing amounts of black exhaust soot on the side of the boat,
to the point where I had to clean it after just a few hours of
running.
• Inability to run the engine over 2100 RPM under load, although it
would run to 4000 RPM in neutral.

I checked all the obvious: no restrictions on the air intake, clean
prop, clean fuel and filters (Racor & engine), good throttle
linkage. Then I had the injectors cleaned, and they had quite a bit
of carbon build-up. But that didn't change anything. So the only
other possible source of the problem was the turbo.

I talked to some other sailors, including two South Africans who
happened to be diesel mechanics – one on a submarine(!), and the
other a Caterpillar engine mechanic. They explained the turbo to me,
and ultimately told me how to remove it, clean it, and re-install it.
The turbo runs all the time, not just at high RPMs, as some have
suggested. Its role is to force more air into the engine than normal
aspiration would provide. It runs by using the exhaust gas to turn a
turbine, which is on the same shaft as a compressor on the intake
end. The turbo also has a wastegate built into the exhaust side, so
that at very high power settings, some of the exhaust gases bypass
the turbine, preventing the compressor from overpowering the engine
intake.
Now, since the turbo is in the exhaust flow, it receives all the
carbon that is normally in the exhaust gas of a diesel. That is why
it is a good idea to run the Volvo TMD22 at max RPM once in a while,
to burn off the carbon in the exhaust stream. Otherwise, the carbon
will build up and start clogging the turbine and the wastegate
valve. In extreme cases, the whole turbo will seize up, requiring
replacement or major repair.
In my case, after 1600 hours of motoring around the Med, I had a lot
of carbon build-up, but the turbo still turned. However, the
wastegate was partially clogged open, so that even at low RPMs, some
of the exhaust gases were bypassing the turbine. As a result, the
compressor wasn't running at correct speed, and the engine wasn't
getting enough air. Thus, the black exhaust. Also, at high RPMs,
the boost compensator on the fuel rack wasn't receiving enough
pressure from the compressor to open, so the engine wasn't revving
above 2100 RPMs. Basically, the fuel rack wasn't feeding more fuel
to the engine, even though the throttle called for it.
The solution: Remove the turbo (explained in the shop manual, and
very easy), and clean the carbon from the exhaust side. Also clean
the exhaust pipe leading the muffler/mixer. I took the turbo to a
specialist shop in Arrecife, Lanzarote, who cleaned it for 40 Euros.
Problem solved.
Any questions, let me know if I can clarify any of this.
Good sailing to all, Roy Benveniste


Awning idea

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

We designed and built a very practical sun awning for the cockpit
that we now use almost all the time. Its main advantage over the
dodger extension is that it lets lots of fresh air into the cockpit.
As a prerequisite, we installed zippers in the dodger frames, to
facilitate installation and removal. First, we fold the dodger up,
and unzip the aft-most frame (this works for all dodger models, old
and new). The awning uses this frame as its forward end, and the
mizzen stays and mizzen mast as the other attachment points. The aft-
most dodger frame is about 6 inches above the top of the dodger when
the awning is in place. Forward tension is provided by lines running
from the frame to the blocks on the edges of the mainsheet
traveller. So you have an awning that runs from the dodger (with a 6
inch air gap) to the mizzen mast, out to the edges of the cockpit.
It can be used under sail (in nice conditions) or at anchor. It will
not replace the dodger in rain or heavy windward sailing, but it sure
is cooler the rest of the time.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu 2000 Dodgers

lionel_marais <lionel_marais@...>
 

I am not an Amel Yacht owner yet, but I have been aiming for several
years at becoming a Super Maramu owner, one of the very few boats I
would consider changing to from our beloved Endurance 35. As decision
time comes closer (meaning as cumulative savings make it feasible to
consider a jump from dream world to reality) one has to consider in
details advantages and drawbacks of various options within the
limited selection of boats and within the possible specifications for
each model. This is obviously not the purpose of the amelyachtowners
site, but I am glad to find here feedback from more enthusiastic
owners with years of sailing experience than I could ever meet.

The dodger/bimini/awning question keeps creeping back when comparing
boats, and it is apparently one question for which some Super Maramu
owners have found various solutions with various degrees of
satisfaction. Amel themselves have altered the design raising the
back, and offering to cut clear windows in the vinyl… but these
alterations come short of offering a real alternative to the fully
open cockpit with temporary vinyl-canvas shelter. Other boat builders
like Hallberg Rassy (http://www.hallberg-rassy.se) (see Hallberg
Rassy yachts 53 and 62) offer a choice, for the same model: either
dodger / bimini or hard top / dog house. Whichever you choose I feel
that you are more likely to live happily with it when it is your
deliberate choice. Furthermore if experience or time have you change
your mind, the option remains, down the line, to replace
these "appendices".

The most recent Amel design appears to have reached an optimum for
the dodger/bimini solution, in terms of balance between visibility
through the windows and above, headroom… leaving little hope of
finding, on that route, any cure for the inherent drawbacks you
mentioned together with a few others like blocking the view forward
when you stand in the cockpit and you are not way above 2 meters tall…

The dimensions of the Super Maramu cockpit seem to present a perfect
base for a hard top solution taking advantage in full of the head
room available in the cockpit below the main sail boom.
This would allow three large windows as you suggest, thus greatly
improving the view forward. (Modern materials have allowed boat
builders to design windows much larger than these, and still able to
withstand battering from the sea in more exposed positions on multi-
hulls)
To add strength and because of the proximity of the main sail sheet,
I would have the middle window not opening. (Your windshield wiper
could be installed on it).
The opening of the other two windows may be along a horizontal axis
at the middle of the windows if a hinge at the top has the windows
protruding too much forward and interfering with the main sail sheet
and its pulley block. (You may even have to cut the windows in half
with only the upper half opening, which would not be as good).
The lateral windows could be half opening (sliding).
In addition to being a much better support for larger clear top
windows/openings as you suggest, a hard top extending all the way to
the mizzen mast could me made very strong with some attachment to the
mast, without the need for thick reinforcement. (We seek shelter from
the sun but would also like to keep as much shelter as possible in
bad weather when vinyl-canvas extensions may have to be taken down).
A complete cockpit hard top cover would improve safety (no weird
angle) when going in and out of the cockpit. There is plenty of
height, as can be experienced with the present bimini, for a
continuous hard top not to present any significant hindrance: hand-
rails properly positioned on top would even help when moving about.
This roof could be a good support for solar panels.
Complete closure of the cockpit would certainly be easier to design
and attach on a fix structure, adding a proper temporary deck saloon
to the living space.
This hard top being an added piece could be removed without too much
additional fuss, if need be, for engine or generator removal.
Having done some touch up on drawings and photos, I think the overall
silhouette could be quite pleasant.

I would be very interested to know whether and how you bring your
ideas to fruition or if you give up, why you give up.

--- In amelyachtowners@y..., Anne-Sophie Schmitt <nearlynothing@y...>
wrote:
Thank you for the suggestion. I want something more
substantial however. Perhaps it is the fact that I
sail in cold seas as well as warm. Thanks again.
Claude Roessiger
--- hollambyuk <hollamby@c...> wrote:
Since 1989 we have lived and cruised as far as
Australia in our old
boat,an Oyster 435 from which we switched Bali Hai
No 319 early last
year,this was a vast improvement over the slow leaky
Oyster. Since
then we have sailed to the Med and been in a force
10 storm with no
problems.
We have no problems with the windscreen design.A
piece of wood one
inch by two inches by six will prop the window open
as required.
So far as the bimini top is concerned Amel
retrofitted (welded) clear
panels in the front and centre sections of the
Vynil.If we had known
this would have been a free or low cost item but
there is a lot of
time involved in taking the frame off.We then made
up a white plastic
patch which is attached to the underside with Velcro
so that it can
be removed as necessary. It works very well.



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience
http://launch.yahoo.com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Awnings

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

Dear Luc,

I am sure that the awning will satisfy you. I do not believe that you need
something else but I will be glad to hear from you afterwards.

Regarding the internet site I used Microsoft FrontPage. During the trip I
used a Sony video camera PC9E for the videos and also the photos. The Sony
camera can be very easily connected to the laptop PC (XP Home edition
operating system) we used onboard. In Italy and Greece we had very fast
internet connection so it was easy to send all this information.

Best Regards

Dimitris Krassopoulos
S/Y Alma Libre

-----Original Message-----
From: Luc Lussier [mailto:pll@...]
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2002 11:59 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Awnings


Dear Dimitris,

I have also ordered this from Amel , but have heard that for extended trips
(i.e. 5 months) in the sun, it is better to get a larger area covered, and
that these are found in Antigua in the caribbean.

I liked your website. How difficult was it to design it ? I'd like to do
something similar for our trip. Please let me know which program you
recommend to design the website.

Cheers,
Luc
----- Original Message -----
From: "Krassopoulos Dimitris" <dkra@...>
To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2002 2:24 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Awnings


Dear Luc,

We are sailing our SM2000 in Greece which is also very sunny. We have the
Amel extension to the cockpit awning and found it very usefull and easy to
setup. We do not know why they do not recommend it but I ordered and
received it ater two days by DHL. You can even motor or motorsail with the
awning because it is very well designed.

Best Regards
Dimitris
S/Y Almalibre
www.almalibre.gr <http://www.almalibre.gr <http://www.almalibre.gr> >

-----Original Message-----
From: Luc Lussier [mailto:pll@...]
Sent: Thursday, October 17, 2002 8:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Awnings


Hi,

I'm planning to sail to Guadeloupe in December (from La Rochelle) and
would like to know if anyone has a recommendation for awnings for a
SM-2000.

As we will be spending 6 months in the sunny caribbean, we are looking
for a good protection and practical design for easy assembly &
disassembly.


Luc Lussier






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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu 2000 Dodgers

Anne-Sophie Schmitt <nearlynothing@...>
 

After considerable thought I have chosen a simpler
solution. Of course a complete new unit can be well
built, and aesthetically designed. But, to do it
right, it is a very expensive proposition, by my
estimates USD 20,000. minimum, likely more. And, there
are various fit issues which develop from almost any
"100% hardtop" solution chosen. So, I have a proposal
from a sailmaker/awningmaker to make a new extensible
dodger, retaining the Amel windscreen and hard dodger
portion. The new dodger will:
1. Be much more rigid, "taught" if you will.
2. Continue the windscreen line directly, by fitting a
new attachment extrusion at the forward line of the
windscreen.
3. Rise up immediately to the full dodger height--only
attained in the aftmost bow on the Amel design--and
incorporate two narrow horizontal windows above the
Amel windscreen windows, giving improved forward
visibility.
4. Incorporate a mainsail sight window in the roof
with a sun shade.
5. Allow the collapsing of this new dodger almost as
completely as the Amel design, although it will of
necessity collapse above the point of the Amel dodger.
6. Fit a much stronger aft bow, as the Amel aft bow no
doubt suffices for the dodger but not for the habit of
people to use it to hang on to at sea.
7. Of necessity fit a new "forward-most" bow to
support the more forward position of the new dodger.
8. Be made of double-layer canvas.
This will be done for about USD 2500., and I believe
it will give 80% of what a hard dodger conversion
might have given. Moreover, if I wish to return the
boat to "factory original" it will be an easy thing.
This leaves the window problem. I think I will solve
it very simply, as Amel had already solved it on the
Maramu/Mango, with a "window within the window" which
allows visibility and ventilation.
If the details are unclear please let me know and I'll
be glad to clarify them. Best regards, Claude
Roessiger
--- lionel_marais <lionel_marais@...> wrote:
I am not an Amel Yacht owner yet, but I have been
aiming for several
years at becoming a Super Maramu owner, one of the
very few boats I
would consider changing to from our beloved
Endurance 35. As decision
time comes closer (meaning as cumulative savings
make it feasible to
consider a jump from dream world to reality) one has
to consider in
details advantages and drawbacks of various options
within the
limited selection of boats and within the possible
specifications for
each model. This is obviously not the purpose of the
amelyachtowners
site, but I am glad to find here feedback from more
enthusiastic
owners with years of sailing experience than I could
ever meet.

The dodger/bimini/awning question keeps creeping
back when comparing
boats, and it is apparently one question for which
some Super Maramu
owners have found various solutions with various
degrees of
satisfaction. Amel themselves have altered the
design raising the
back, and offering to cut clear windows in the
vinyl but these
alterations come short of offering a real
alternative to the fully
open cockpit with temporary vinyl-canvas shelter.
Other boat builders
like Hallberg Rassy (http://www.hallberg-rassy.se)
(see Hallberg
Rassy yachts 53 and 62) offer a choice, for the same
model: either
dodger / bimini or hard top / dog house. Whichever
you choose I feel
that you are more likely to live happily with it
when it is your
deliberate choice. Furthermore if experience or time
have you change
your mind, the option remains, down the line, to
replace
these "appendices".

The most recent Amel design appears to have reached
an optimum for
the dodger/bimini solution, in terms of balance
between visibility
through the windows and above, headroom leaving
little hope of
finding, on that route, any cure for the inherent
drawbacks you
mentioned together with a few others like blocking
the view forward
when you stand in the cockpit and you are not way
above 2 meters tall

The dimensions of the Super Maramu cockpit seem to
present a perfect
base for a hard top solution taking advantage in
full of the head
room available in the cockpit below the main sail
boom.
This would allow three large windows as you suggest,
thus greatly
improving the view forward. (Modern materials have
allowed boat
builders to design windows much larger than these,
and still able to
withstand battering from the sea in more exposed
positions on multi-
hulls)
To add strength and because of the proximity of the
main sail sheet,
I would have the middle window not opening. (Your
windshield wiper
could be installed on it).
The opening of the other two windows may be along a
horizontal axis
at the middle of the windows if a hinge at the top
has the windows
protruding too much forward and interfering with the
main sail sheet
and its pulley block. (You may even have to cut the
windows in half
with only the upper half opening, which would not be
as good).
The lateral windows could be half opening (sliding).
In addition to being a much better support for
larger clear top
windows/openings as you suggest, a hard top
extending all the way to
the mizzen mast could me made very strong with some
attachment to the
mast, without the need for thick reinforcement. (We
seek shelter from
the sun but would also like to keep as much shelter
as possible in
bad weather when vinyl-canvas extensions may have to
be taken down).
A complete cockpit hard top cover would improve
safety (no weird
angle) when going in and out of the cockpit. There
is plenty of
height, as can be experienced with the present
bimini, for a
continuous hard top not to present any significant
hindrance: hand-
rails properly positioned on top would even help
when moving about.
This roof could be a good support for solar panels.
Complete closure of the cockpit would certainly be
easier to design
and attach on a fix structure, adding a proper
temporary deck saloon
to the living space.
This hard top being an added piece could be removed
without too much
additional fuss, if need be, for engine or generator
removal.
Having done some touch up on drawings and photos, I
think the overall
silhouette could be quite pleasant.

I would be very interested to know whether and how
you bring your
ideas to fruition or if you give up, why you give
up.

--- In amelyachtowners@y..., Anne-Sophie Schmitt
<nearlynothing@y...>
wrote:
Thank you for the suggestion. I want something
more
substantial however. Perhaps it is the fact that I
sail in cold seas as well as warm. Thanks again.
Claude Roessiger
--- hollambyuk <hollamby@c...> wrote:
Since 1989 we have lived and cruised as far as
Australia in our old
boat,an Oyster 435 from which we switched Bali
Hai
No 319 early last
year,this was a vast improvement over the slow
leaky
Oyster. Since
then we have sailed to the Med and been in a
force
10 storm with no
problems.
We have no problems with the windscreen design.A
piece of wood one
inch by two inches by six will prop the window
open
as required.
So far as the bimini top is concerned Amel
retrofitted (welded) clear
panels in the front and centre sections of the
Vynil.If we had known
this would have been a free or low cost item but
there is a lot of
time involved in taking the frame off.We then
made
up a white plastic
patch which is attached to the underside with
Velcro
so that it can
be removed as necessary. It works very well.



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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu 2000 Dodgers

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

It is very interesting to receive e-mail from non Amel owner but believe me
that you first to sail in an Amel to understand the boat.
No there is no need for a hard top on the SM 2000. The design is absolute ok
depending ofcource of your sail area. If you planning to sail in the
Antarctica it is necessary but as a comprise for the main sailing
destinations is the optimum. The Hallberg Rassy hard top is necessary for
Scandinavian sailing but not for mediteranean or tropical conditions. When
you install the two new designed side screens is absolutely dry even with
high seas and comfortable as a hardtop and ofcource foldable when the
conditions allow it.The handles installed on the hard part are very useful
to step out. The awning extension for sun protection is very well designed
and very easily installed.
My only suggestion to Amel would be to make the second windscreen also
openable as the drivers windscreen I really do not understand why they do
not make the design symmetrical.

Best Regards

Dimitris Krassopoulos
S/Y Alma Libre
www.almalibre.gr <http://www.almalibre.gr>

-----Original Message-----
From: lionel_marais [mailto:lionel_marais@...]
Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:28 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu 2000 Dodgers


I am not an Amel Yacht owner yet, but I have been aiming for several
years at becoming a Super Maramu owner, one of the very few boats I
would consider changing to from our beloved Endurance 35. As decision
time comes closer (meaning as cumulative savings make it feasible to
consider a jump from dream world to reality) one has to consider in
details advantages and drawbacks of various options within the
limited selection of boats and within the possible specifications for
each model. This is obviously not the purpose of the amelyachtowners
site, but I am glad to find here feedback from more enthusiastic
owners with years of sailing experience than I could ever meet.

The dodger/bimini/awning question keeps creeping back when comparing
boats, and it is apparently one question for which some Super Maramu
owners have found various solutions with various degrees of
satisfaction. Amel themselves have altered the design raising the
back, and offering to cut clear windows in the vinyl... but these
alterations come short of offering a real alternative to the fully
open cockpit with temporary vinyl-canvas shelter. Other boat builders
like Hallberg Rassy (http://www.hallberg-rassy.se)
<http://www.hallberg-rassy.se)> (see Hallberg
Rassy yachts 53 and 62) offer a choice, for the same model: either
dodger / bimini or hard top / dog house. Whichever you choose I feel
that you are more likely to live happily with it when it is your
deliberate choice. Furthermore if experience or time have you change
your mind, the option remains, down the line, to replace
these "appendices".

The most recent Amel design appears to have reached an optimum for
the dodger/bimini solution, in terms of balance between visibility
through the windows and above, headroom... leaving little hope of
finding, on that route, any cure for the inherent drawbacks you
mentioned together with a few others like blocking the view forward
when you stand in the cockpit and you are not way above 2 meters tall...

The dimensions of the Super Maramu cockpit seem to present a perfect
base for a hard top solution taking advantage in full of the head
room available in the cockpit below the main sail boom.
This would allow three large windows as you suggest, thus greatly
improving the view forward. (Modern materials have allowed boat
builders to design windows much larger than these, and still able to
withstand battering from the sea in more exposed positions on multi-
hulls)
To add strength and because of the proximity of the main sail sheet,
I would have the middle window not opening. (Your windshield wiper
could be installed on it).
The opening of the other two windows may be along a horizontal axis
at the middle of the windows if a hinge at the top has the windows
protruding too much forward and interfering with the main sail sheet
and its pulley block. (You may even have to cut the windows in half
with only the upper half opening, which would not be as good).
The lateral windows could be half opening (sliding).
In addition to being a much better support for larger clear top
windows/openings as you suggest, a hard top extending all the way to
the mizzen mast could me made very strong with some attachment to the
mast, without the need for thick reinforcement. (We seek shelter from
the sun but would also like to keep as much shelter as possible in
bad weather when vinyl-canvas extensions may have to be taken down).
A complete cockpit hard top cover would improve safety (no weird
angle) when going in and out of the cockpit. There is plenty of
height, as can be experienced with the present bimini, for a
continuous hard top not to present any significant hindrance: hand-
rails properly positioned on top would even help when moving about.
This roof could be a good support for solar panels.
Complete closure of the cockpit would certainly be easier to design
and attach on a fix structure, adding a proper temporary deck saloon
to the living space.
This hard top being an added piece could be removed without too much
additional fuss, if need be, for engine or generator removal.
Having done some touch up on drawings and photos, I think the overall
silhouette could be quite pleasant.

I would be very interested to know whether and how you bring your
ideas to fruition or if you give up, why you give up.

--- In amelyachtowners@y..., Anne-Sophie Schmitt <nearlynothing@y...>
wrote:
Thank you for the suggestion. I want something more
substantial however. Perhaps it is the fact that I
sail in cold seas as well as warm. Thanks again.
Claude Roessiger
--- hollambyuk <hollamby@c...> wrote:
Since 1989 we have lived and cruised as far as
Australia in our old
boat,an Oyster 435 from which we switched Bali Hai
No 319 early last
year,this was a vast improvement over the slow leaky
Oyster. Since
then we have sailed to the Med and been in a force
10 storm with no
problems.
We have no problems with the windscreen design.A
piece of wood one
inch by two inches by six will prop the window open
as required.
So far as the bimini top is concerned Amel
retrofitted (welded) clear
panels in the front and centre sections of the
Vynil.If we had known
this would have been a free or low cost item but
there is a lot of
time involved in taking the frame off.We then made
up a white plastic
patch which is attached to the underside with Velcro
so that it can
be removed as necessary. It works very well.



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
LAUNCH - Your Yahoo! Music Experience
http://launch.yahoo.com <http://launch.yahoo.com>


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questions from new Amel owner

David Crisp
 

Hi All,

Bought a 1995 Super Maramu three months ago. AM hoping some of you
experienced owners cananswer some questions I have.

(1) Fuel Consumption - engine (TMD22)
What is the recommended motoring speed and engine RPM for the Super
Maramu? What is the fuel consumption at this cruising speed?

(2) Fuel consumption - generator
What is the normal fuel consumption of the generator? I have an
Onan 6.5KVA

(3) Battery Charger
The boat house batteries are not fully recharging after use.
I have reset the battery management system.
After one cycle of use (to 65% discharge) the battery management
system is indicating recharge to about 92-95% capacity after 4 hours
of charging (this is a long time it seems to me). After one week on
220V shore power with battery charger always on the system is
showing 98% charge.
The battery bank has 400AHrs at 24V total capacity.
I have checked the battery bank voltage with charger off, all load
removed and after one hour stabilization the voltage is 26.50V.
With battery charger on voltage is 28.05V

I am concerned that as I cycle the batteries more I will
progressively loose capacity as they sulphate through incomplete
recharging. A new set of batteries were installed one year ago.
Can antone advise me what to do or who to speak to?
What further checks should I make?

(4) Depth SOunder.
What is the depth offset for the depth sounder to display actual
water depth? (ie distance from sensor to water level)

(5) I notice there is an orange light or plastic dome on the top of
the main mast. Can you tell me what this is for? It has a grey
wire running from it down the mast.

(6) When motoring under power at night regulations state you should
show red and green navigation lights in the bow, a white stern light
and a second white light showing forwards over an arc of 225 degrees
("steaming light") about half way up the mast. On my Amel there is
no "steaming light" half way up the mast. In my experience of the
Super Maramu so far Amel appear to think of everything! Can anyone
explain why Amel has not fitted one? I believe I need to fit a
steaming light but perhaps I have misunderstood the regulations.

(7) The B&G Hydra system has no flux gate compass. Can I hook the
B&G system up to the Autohelm system via NMEA in order to share
compass data from the Autohelm? Likewise can you link the GPS and
radar? How do you do such things?

FYI am currently in Mahon, Menorca. We hope to leave for Gibraltar
in a few days. From there onto the Canaries and Caribbean. Not
doing the ARC but would love to be in touch with any other Amel
owners crossing this winter.

Regards
David Crisp
'Gallant of Fowey'


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] questions from new Amel owner

Anne-Sophie Schmitt <nearlynothing@...>
 

--- davidcrisp <david@...> wrote:
Hi All,

Bought a 1995 Super Maramu three months ago. AM
hoping some of you
experienced owners cananswer some questions I have.

(1) Fuel Consumption - engine (TMD22)
What is the recommended motoring speed and engine
RPM for the Super
Maramu? What is the fuel consumption at this
cruising speed? I AM REPLYING ONLY TO THAT QUESTION
FOR WHICH I FEEL I CAN GIVE RELIABLE INFORMATION: This
is tricky as there has been a great deal of incomplete
information about, not to say erroneous. But I now
have concurring opinions from Amel (Mr. Selo), from
Joel Potter, and from several technically minded
owners. This engine will run most smoothly and
agreeably somewhere between 2200-2400 RPM, depending
on your particular engine. However it is important to
run it up at "max" for 10-15 minutes every 10 hours or
so, to prevent glazing of the cylinder wall, assuming
the former owner was also careful. Above approximately
2500 RPM the fuel consumption doubles or even trebles,
so it is an RPM range used only when maximum power is
required, and then not long, although it does in no
way damage the engine. It is not good on the other
hand to idle the engine for long periods due to carbon
build up. In fact when you warm up the engine, you
should always take care to set the idle above 1200
RPM. And, when you shut down the engine, you should
idle it again at 1200 RPM for 5 minutes before
stopping it. Finally, it is good to vary engine speed,
so you do not always run the engine at the same RPM.
Mr. Selo at Amel can give you chapter-and-verse on
this, but I think the above is faithful to the
recommendations. As to fuel consumption, I think
something around 6-7 liters/hour at 2200-2300 RPM is
about it. Incidentally, in reasonable conditions this
RPM range will give you 8 knots. There was a
suggestion once not to run between 1500-2000 RPM for
extended running, but that seems now to be considered
incorrect. You can run without harm to the engine or
the turbo between 1200-3000 RPM.
An owner did contribute a very useful suggestion
recently, to clean the turbo and waste gate, to
eliminate carbon build up. This apparently can limit
RPM, and many may suffer some limitation on this
account without being aware. In the same vein I can
tell you that the smallest (literally a single
barnacle) irregularity on the folding propeller can
cause vibration and limit your potential RPM. If you
can get 3000 RPM in reverse or neutral, but not in
forward, this can be the problem. Any fault in the
propeller can cause this. You must be very careful
about the lubricant used for the folding prop as most
lubricants will not stay in the prop more than a few
turns; it is a super-sticky lubricant for folding
props which must be used.
>
(2) Fuel consumption - generator
What is the normal fuel consumption of the
generator? I have an
Onan 6.5KVA

(3) Battery Charger
The boat house batteries are not fully recharging
after use.
I have reset the battery management system.
After one cycle of use (to 65% discharge) the
battery management
system is indicating recharge to about 92-95%
capacity after 4 hours
of charging (this is a long time it seems to me).
After one week on
220V shore power with battery charger always on the
system is
showing 98% charge.
The battery bank has 400AHrs at 24V total capacity.
I have checked the battery bank voltage with
charger off, all load
removed and after one hour stabilization the voltage
is 26.50V.
With battery charger on voltage is 28.05V

I am concerned that as I cycle the batteries more I
will
progressively loose capacity as they sulphate
through incomplete
recharging. A new set of batteries were installed
one year ago.
Can antone advise me what to do or who to speak to?
What further checks should I make?

(4) Depth SOunder.
What is the depth offset for the depth sounder to
display actual
water depth? (ie distance from sensor to water
level)

(5) I notice there is an orange light or plastic
dome on the top of
the main mast. Can you tell me what this is for?
It has a grey
wire running from it down the mast.

(6) When motoring under power at night regulations
state you should
show red and green navigation lights in the bow, a
white stern light
and a second white light showing forwards over an
arc of 225 degrees
("steaming light") about half way up the mast. On
my Amel there is
no "steaming light" half way up the mast. In my
experience of the
Super Maramu so far Amel appear to think of
everything! Can anyone
explain why Amel has not fitted one? I believe I
need to fit a
steaming light but perhaps I have misunderstood the
regulations.

(7) The B&G Hydra system has no flux gate compass.
Can I hook the
B&G system up to the Autohelm system via NMEA in
order to share
compass data from the Autohelm? Likewise can you
link the GPS and
radar? How do you do such things?

FYI am currently in Mahon, Menorca. We hope to leave
for Gibraltar
in a few days. From there onto the Canaries and
Caribbean. Not
doing the ARC but would love to be in touch with any
other Amel
owners crossing this winter.

Regards
David Crisp
'Gallant of Fowey'









__________________________________________________
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http://webhosting.yahoo.com/


Re: questions from new Amel owner

asm283 <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@y..., Anne-Sophie Schmitt <nearlynothing@y...>
wrote:
Congradulations on your SM she is a wonderfull yacht. I will only
answer questions that I have some knowledge of.

1-You can intephase the B&G instuments with the Autopilot. On my
SM2000 I have the Hydra 2000 and tha Autohelm 7000. I was able to get
apparent wind information to the autopilot so that I can have the
vessel steer to an apparent wind angle. I was also able to use the
controll unit of the A7000 as a repeater for gps info and more
importantly depth readings in meters and feet. You will see that the
B&G analog depth are useless in low depth situations. I need to do a
little more programing but I am sure that I can get the boat to steer
to a waypoint. There was an exellent post on this site about this.
2-As far as I know the offset on the depthsounder is 7 ft.

3-The disc on top of the mast with the orange light is probably a TV
antena.

I hope this helps

Vito Ciaravino
ASM283
Wanderer
--- davidcrisp <david@f...> wrote:
Hi All,

Bought a 1995 Super Maramu three months ago. AM
hoping some of you
experienced owners cananswer some questions I have.

(1) Fuel Consumption - engine (TMD22)
What is the recommended motoring speed and engine
RPM for the Super
Maramu? What is the fuel consumption at this
cruising speed? I AM REPLYING ONLY TO THAT QUESTION
FOR WHICH I FEEL I CAN GIVE RELIABLE INFORMATION: This
is tricky as there has been a great deal of incomplete
information about, not to say erroneous. But I now
have concurring opinions from Amel (Mr. Selo), from
Joel Potter, and from several technically minded
owners. This engine will run most smoothly and
agreeably somewhere between 2200-2400 RPM, depending
on your particular engine. However it is important to
run it up at "max" for 10-15 minutes every 10 hours or
so, to prevent glazing of the cylinder wall, assuming
the former owner was also careful. Above approximately
2500 RPM the fuel consumption doubles or even trebles,
so it is an RPM range used only when maximum power is
required, and then not long, although it does in no
way damage the engine. It is not good on the other
hand to idle the engine for long periods due to carbon
build up. In fact when you warm up the engine, you
should always take care to set the idle above 1200
RPM. And, when you shut down the engine, you should
idle it again at 1200 RPM for 5 minutes before
stopping it. Finally, it is good to vary engine speed,
so you do not always run the engine at the same RPM.
Mr. Selo at Amel can give you chapter-and-verse on
this, but I think the above is faithful to the
recommendations. As to fuel consumption, I think
something around 6-7 liters/hour at 2200-2300 RPM is
about it. Incidentally, in reasonable conditions this
RPM range will give you 8 knots. There was a
suggestion once not to run between 1500-2000 RPM for
extended running, but that seems now to be considered
incorrect. You can run without harm to the engine or
the turbo between 1200-3000 RPM.
An owner did contribute a very useful suggestion
recently, to clean the turbo and waste gate, to
eliminate carbon build up. This apparently can limit
RPM, and many may suffer some limitation on this
account without being aware. In the same vein I can
tell you that the smallest (literally a single
barnacle) irregularity on the folding propeller can
cause vibration and limit your potential RPM. If you
can get 3000 RPM in reverse or neutral, but not in
forward, this can be the problem. Any fault in the
propeller can cause this. You must be very careful
about the lubricant used for the folding prop as most
lubricants will not stay in the prop more than a few
turns; it is a super-sticky lubricant for folding
props which must be used.
>
(2) Fuel consumption - generator
What is the normal fuel consumption of the
generator? I have an
Onan 6.5KVA

(3) Battery Charger
The boat house batteries are not fully recharging
after use.
I have reset the battery management system.
After one cycle of use (to 65% discharge) the
battery management
system is indicating recharge to about 92-95%
capacity after 4 hours
of charging (this is a long time it seems to me).
After one week on
220V shore power with battery charger always on the
system is
showing 98% charge.
The battery bank has 400AHrs at 24V total capacity.
I have checked the battery bank voltage with
charger off, all load
removed and after one hour stabilization the voltage
is 26.50V.
With battery charger on voltage is 28.05V

I am concerned that as I cycle the batteries more I
will
progressively loose capacity as they sulphate
through incomplete
recharging. A new set of batteries were installed
one year ago.
Can antone advise me what to do or who to speak to?
What further checks should I make?

(4) Depth SOunder.
What is the depth offset for the depth sounder to
display actual
water depth? (ie distance from sensor to water
level)

(5) I notice there is an orange light or plastic
dome on the top of
the main mast. Can you tell me what this is for?
It has a grey
wire running from it down the mast.

(6) When motoring under power at night regulations
state you should
show red and green navigation lights in the bow, a
white stern light
and a second white light showing forwards over an
arc of 225 degrees
("steaming light") about half way up the mast. On
my Amel there is
no "steaming light" half way up the mast. In my
experience of the
Super Maramu so far Amel appear to think of
everything! Can anyone
explain why Amel has not fitted one? I believe I
need to fit a
steaming light but perhaps I have misunderstood the
regulations.

(7) The B&G Hydra system has no flux gate compass.
Can I hook the
B&G system up to the Autohelm system via NMEA in
order to share
compass data from the Autohelm? Likewise can you
link the GPS and
radar? How do you do such things?

FYI am currently in Mahon, Menorca. We hope to leave
for Gibraltar
in a few days. From there onto the Canaries and
Caribbean. Not
doing the ARC but would love to be in touch with any
other Amel
owners crossing this winter.

Regards
David Crisp
'Gallant of Fowey'









__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Y! Web Hosting - Let the expert host your web site
http://webhosting.yahoo.com/


red/orange light on tyop of mast

jjmartin24 <jjmartin24@...>
 

the little light on top of the mast is the t v antenna. there is an
on and off switch under the small box that is suposed to ajust the
picture. the box also has a red light on it. it should be close to
the t v set. the switch is round and the same color as the box.
john martin sm248 moon dog


Re: questions from new Amel owner

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@y..., "davidcrisp" <david@f...> wrote:
Hi All,

Bought a 1995 Super Maramu three months ago. AM hoping some of you
experienced owners cananswer some questions I have.

(1) Fuel Consumption - engine (TMD22)
What is the recommended motoring speed and engine RPM for the Super
Maramu? What is the fuel consumption at this cruising speed?
Hi David, I normally cruise at 1950-2050 RPM, which gives me 7
knots, and burns 3.8 - 4.0 liters/hour. I find that cruising at 2200
or higher burns a lot more fuel.
(2) Fuel consumption - generator
What is the normal fuel consumption of the generator? I have an
Onan 6.5KVA
In my experience, the Onan uses 1.5 - 2.0 lit/hr, depending on load.
(3) Battery Charger
The boat house batteries are not fully recharging after use.
I have reset the battery management system.
After one cycle of use (to 65% discharge) the battery management
system is indicating recharge to about 92-95% capacity after 4
hours
of charging (this is a long time it seems to me). After one week
on
220V shore power with battery charger always on the system is
showing 98% charge.
The battery bank has 400AHrs at 24V total capacity.
I have checked the battery bank voltage with charger off, all load
removed and after one hour stabilization the voltage is 26.50V.
With battery charger on voltage is 28.05V

I am concerned that as I cycle the batteries more I will
progressively loose capacity as they sulphate through incomplete
recharging. A new set of batteries were installed one year ago.
Can antone advise me what to do or who to speak to?
What further checks should I make?
This requires a long answer, but basically, the battery meter you
have installed is probably set to 97% or 95% recharge. Thus, no
matter how much you recharge, you'll never get back to 100%. It's
just an artificial computation. Don't pay attention to it. The
critical measure is voltage a few hours after recharge. If you're
above 25.5, you're doing fine. My batteries lasted 5 years, and I
only changed them because I was able to buy new ones at a good price
in France.
(4) Depth SOunder.
What is the depth offset for the depth sounder to display actual
water depth? (ie distance from sensor to water level)

(5) I notice there is an orange light or plastic dome on the top
of
the main mast. Can you tell me what this is for? It has a grey
wire running from it down the mast.

(6) When motoring under power at night regulations state you
should
show red and green navigation lights in the bow, a white stern
light
and a second white light showing forwards over an arc of 225
degrees
("steaming light") about half way up the mast. On my Amel there is
no "steaming light" half way up the mast. In my experience of the
Super Maramu so far Amel appear to think of everything! Can anyone
explain why Amel has not fitted one? I believe I need to fit a
steaming light but perhaps I have misunderstood the regulations.
Most boats have one, but ask Amel about this.
(7) The B&G Hydra system has no flux gate compass. Can I hook the
B&G system up to the Autohelm system via NMEA in order to share
compass data from the Autohelm? Likewise can you link the GPS and
radar? How do you do such things?

FYI am currently in Mahon, Menorca. We hope to leave for Gibraltar
in a few days. From there onto the Canaries and Caribbean. Not
doing the ARC but would love to be in touch with any other Amel
owners crossing this winter.
We're in Lanzarote, crossing in late november. Send me an e-mail
if you're coming this way.
Regards, Roy Benveniste, SM Excalibur #195 roybentcg@...
Regards
David Crisp
'Gallant of Fowey'


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] questions from new Amel owner

Erick M. <maramu@...>
 

Hi David
I'm the happy owner of a 1995 SM as you.
GENSET
The hourly consumption that you can expect is in the range of three liters per hour at full load(A lot of information are available in the Onan operating book).
Why I say at full load is because running the genset only for the purpose of supplying AC to the battery charger is not very good for the engine. The generator load is very little and this could lead to glazed the cylinder. As such it is recommended to run either the aircond or the heaters depending on the season as well as the water maker which will maintain a substantial load on the battery charger (turn on the water maker only after your batteries management system indicate a charge in the range of 20 amp, as turning it on too early would slow down the charging process by the amount of intensity sucked up by the water maker which if I'm not wrong is in the range of 23 to 25 amp.
Navigation Lights
Amel think about.......... almost everything. You got the navigation light regulation right, but it seems that Amel has a different reading and to my knowledge the lights which are fitted on the SM are not compliant with the regulation. However I must stress that I have never been fined for that.........I believe that while being seen is very important, to keep a thorough watch while sailing or motoring is more important
Batteries charging
The batteries charging is one of the favorite topic of discussion among Amel owners.A full encyclopedia may not be big enough to cover the topic. However in order for you to get a good understanding of the batteries charging process I would recommend you to take a look at Victon web site which covers very comprehensively the topic.
Furthermore I'm sure that many owners are better experienced and qualified than me to cover the topic http://www.onboardpower.com/pdfs/ElectricityonBoard.PDF

Have a good and safe crossing
Best regards
Erick MEJEAN









----Original Message Follows----
From: "davidcrisp" <david@...>
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@...
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] questions from new Amel owner
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 08:14:14 -0000

Hi All,

Bought a 1995 Super Maramu three months ago. AM hoping some of you
experienced owners cananswer some questions I have.

(1) Fuel Consumption - engine (TMD22)
What is the recommended motoring speed and engine RPM for the Super
Maramu? What is the fuel consumption at this cruising speed?

(2) Fuel consumption - generator
What is the normal fuel consumption of the generator? I have an
Onan 6.5KVA

(3) Battery Charger
The boat house batteries are not fully recharging after use.
I have reset the battery management system.
After one cycle of use (to 65% discharge) the battery management
system is indicating recharge to about 92-95% capacity after 4 hours
of charging (this is a long time it seems to me). After one week on
220V shore power with battery charger always on the system is
showing 98% charge.
The battery bank has 400AHrs at 24V total capacity.
I have checked the battery bank voltage with charger off, all load
removed and after one hour stabilization the voltage is 26.50V.
With battery charger on voltage is 28.05V

I am concerned that as I cycle the batteries more I will
progressively loose capacity as they sulphate through incomplete
recharging. A new set of batteries were installed one year ago.
Can antone advise me what to do or who to speak to?
What further checks should I make?

(4) Depth SOunder.
What is the depth offset for the depth sounder to display actual
water depth? (ie distance from sensor to water level)

(5) I notice there is an orange light or plastic dome on the top of
the main mast. Can you tell me what this is for? It has a grey
wire running from it down the mast.

(6) When motoring under power at night regulations state you should
show red and green navigation lights in the bow, a white stern light
and a second white light showing forwards over an arc of 225 degrees
("steaming light") about half way up the mast. On my Amel there is
no "steaming light" half way up the mast. In my experience of the
Super Maramu so far Amel appear to think of everything! Can anyone
explain why Amel has not fitted one? I believe I need to fit a
steaming light but perhaps I have misunderstood the regulations.

(7) The B&G Hydra system has no flux gate compass. Can I hook the
B&G system up to the Autohelm system via NMEA in order to share
compass data from the Autohelm? Likewise can you link the GPS and
radar? How do you do such things?

FYI am currently in Mahon, Menorca. We hope to leave for Gibraltar
in a few days. From there onto the Canaries and Caribbean. Not
doing the ARC but would love to be in touch with any other Amel
owners crossing this winter.

Regards
David Crisp
'Gallant of Fowey'










_________________________________________________________________
Get a speedy connection with MSN Broadband. Join now! http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/freeactivation.asp


Battery informations

sardinaux <maramu@...>
 

Dear all.
Further to my previous answer I'm attaching some battery links which
I found very interesting, specially, for those like me who want to
understand better how these quite hidden but indispensable "crew"
work, and how to take better care of them
Good wind.
Erick MEJEAN
http://www.uuhome.de/william.darden/carfaq.htm
http://www.marinebatteries.com/faq.html#4


Battery Equalization

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi to all,
Since we've raised the subject of batteries, I would like to share
my experiences with equalization, which I have found very useful in
extending the life of the Delphi/Delco Freedom batteries installed on
board Super Maramus.
Equalization is a high-voltage charge applied to fully charged
batteries (at low amperage), which serves to remove sulphation from
the plates, stir up the electrolyte, and "rejuvenate" the batteries.
There is a lot written about this in the literature, I don't need to
repeat it here.
I have a Heart Interface Inverter/charger on board, 220V/24V,
rated at 2500W, which also has a 60Amp charger. I use this to apply
an equalization charge to all 8 batteries at once, about once a
season. The equalization session is programmed by the charger. It
lasts about 8 hours, and runs at about 29 volts. Everything must be
disconnected from the batteries downstream. I find it restores the
performance of the batteries remarkably.
Any questions, please e-mail me.
Regards, Roy


Exhaust stain

svladysadie <no_reply@...>
 

It is very difficult to keep the hull clean because of the exhaust
fumes on the port side. Has anyone come up with a good answer to
this problem. Bill on s/v Lady Sadie


Re: Exhaust stain

sm2000299 <g4ljf@...>
 

Hi Bill,

I agree it's a pain to keep the hull clean. I had a meeting with
Jacques Carteau recently and suggested that the exhausts be routed to
the underside of the transom. He said that this would cause
unacceptable noise in the aft cabin, though I doubt that it would be
often that you are trying to sleep and run the generator or engine.
At sea, not that I motor, I sleep in the companionway berth.

I did purchase a cleaner called Purple Blaster which is from FL. It's
pretty good at getting the stains off, and oil slicks too. I wonder
if it's the old 'Swipe' repackaged?

As you probably heard, I am not sailing at present, but hope to be
before too long.

Regards

Ian

Crusader


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Exhaust stain

Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@...>
 

Hi Bill,

I hope you and Sara are both well and happy.

Minimizing the soot on your portside requires a two prong attack.

First, since your Volvo engine is more prone to produce soot than the later
YANMAR engines, the mechanical health of the engine is very important. When
at idle in a marina, look at the exhaust outlets, if you see evidence of a
sheen on the water (like when you spill gas or diesel onto the water) your
injectors probably need servicing. There is a lot of controversy regarding
servicing versus replacing the injectors. You will generally have better
luck replacing them.

Your turbocharged engine needs special treatment. 1 hour out of each 10 (or
15 minutes out of each 2 1/2 hours, which is actually better) the engine
must be run HARD at 2600 RPM or more. THIS WILL NOT HURT THE ENGINE. To
make a long story short, this helps preclude "COKING" the turbocharger or
coating the inside with carbon. If the engine smokes a lot at high power,
the injectors or injector fuel distribution pump needs servicing. Worse
case is extreme mechanical wear which is a prelude to an overhaul but this
is unlikely at under 5000 hours unless the engine has had abuse, poor
maintenance, or has been severely overheated.

Even the most perfect diesel motor will make some soot, which is today now
called particulate matter and the cause of considerable scientific debate
regarding health issues and even global warming. I digress.

To minimize the effect of these particles, wash then polish the hull at and
after the exhaust port. It's hard work, as you know, but get it perfectly
clean. Next, polish the gel coat again with a proprietary gel coat polish
with a small amount of polish/grit in it. This smoothes the pores of the
gel coat. Finally apply several THIN COATS of a marine carnuba wax with
silicone or, better yet, TEFLON. Eight thin coats, such as when wiping the
wax on with a water damp sponge containing some wax are much much better
than one or two or three thick coats as you polish/wipe off all but a thin
layer with each application. In the Caribbean, you need to re-wax every
other month. It's a pain in the keester but not as bad as removing the
black soot stripe.

I hope this helps.

All the best,
Joel


How To Post

closereach <no_reply@...>
 

Over the past couple of months there's been a fair amount of posts
that haven't made their way on to the site. I think many of the posts
are spam but some may be from amelyachtowners members that are having
trouble getting messages posted.

You can post messages one of two ways:
Via loging in to the amelyachtowners site and posting from there, or
via email.

Via email

To send a message to other group members, create an email and address
it to amelyachtowners@.... Group names are not case
sensitive.

Note: you can only post to groups you've joined, and only from email
addresses registered with Yahoo! Groups. If you misspell the name of
a group, or attempt to send an email from an account other than the
one you joined under, your message will not be delivered. If you
receive a failure notice, check your email addresses and try again.

Via the Yahoo! Groups Web Site

After you've signed in, go to the group you wish to post to, and
click Post, write your message, and then click Send Message.

Note: Yahoo! Groups restricts messages to 1 megabyte in size to
prevent abuse.

Hope this helps.

Richard


How To Post, part 2

closereach <no_reply@...>
 

One last thing:

If you choose NOT TO disclose your email address to the
group, you cannot post to this group via email.

Richard