Date   

Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Matt Salatino
 

Firefly had a production issue a couple of years ago, when moving production from the US to India. They lost the recipe in India. It took a while, testing every battery extensively before shipping, for a while. Certainly, during that time, they shipped some defective batteries. I believe they worked out the issues a year or more ago. When did you get your batteries?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt Salatino, s/v Speed of Life, A50#27

On Dec 1, 2020, at 7:09 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

Alex,

Yes, I am still a fan of Firefly batteries, but a caveat or two is worth mentioning.  Like any relationship, there has been a bump or two in the road.

Twice we have had a battery develop an internal short.  The first time we discovered it quickly, and it was immediately replaced by Firefly.  The second time, our monitoring system wasn't good enough to catch the issue, and we developed a chronic imbalance where half the bank was overcharged, and the rest undercharged.  By the time the issue was apparent, permanent damage was done to all the batteries.  Firefly stepped up an replaced the whole bank within the terms of the warrantee--keeping us happy.

We learned. It is quite likely that if we had seen the issue early on a minor change in charging procedure might have alleviated the issue, but we'll never know for sure. We have since significantly upgraded our electrical system monitoring system, and a minor imbalance is not going to sneak up on us again.

As for running A/C from the batteries, sure it's possible.  One of our A/C units draws about 850 watts when running. That's about 4 times our normal house load.  That is easily supplied by our 8 battery bank and 3kW inverter. In the absence of any solar power, we'd need to run the generator twice a day for 3 hours instead of once a day for 90 minutes.    It is important to remember that it doesn't matter what kind of batteries you have or the size of the bank.  Batteries do not make power they just store it.  A bigger bank means you can reduce the number of times you start the generator, but your total run time will be about the same.

All that said, in 5 years of full time cruising we have run the A/C units while away from shore power exactly once, so it was not a priority in our design decisions.  If your plan is to run A/C units regularly off the grid, a larger system than we have might be needed.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Karen Smith
 

Alex,

Yes, I am still a fan of Firefly batteries, but a caveat or two is worth mentioning.  Like any relationship, there has been a bump or two in the road.

Twice we have had a battery develop an internal short.  The first time we discovered it quickly, and it was immediately replaced by Firefly.  The second time, our monitoring system wasn't good enough to catch the issue, and we developed a chronic imbalance where half the bank was overcharged, and the rest undercharged.  By the time the issue was apparent, permanent damage was done to all the batteries.  Firefly stepped up an replaced the whole bank within the terms of the warrantee--keeping us happy.

We learned. It is quite likely that if we had seen the issue early on a minor change in charging procedure might have alleviated the issue, but we'll never know for sure. We have since significantly upgraded our electrical system monitoring system, and a minor imbalance is not going to sneak up on us again.

As for running A/C from the batteries, sure it's possible.  One of our A/C units draws about 850 watts when running. That's about 4 times our normal house load.  That is easily supplied by our 8 battery bank and 3kW inverter. In the absence of any solar power, we'd need to run the generator twice a day for 3 hours instead of once a day for 90 minutes.    It is important to remember that it doesn't matter what kind of batteries you have or the size of the bank.  Batteries do not make power they just store it.  A bigger bank means you can reduce the number of times you start the generator, but your total run time will be about the same.

All that said, in 5 years of full time cruising we have run the A/C units while away from shore power exactly once, so it was not a priority in our design decisions.  If your plan is to run A/C units regularly off the grid, a larger system than we have might be needed.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA


Re: Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

eric freedman
 

Hi Vladimir,

Did I sent the switch to you?

I have them here.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of eric freedman
Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2020 5:46 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Hi Vladimir,

Please send me a check for $34.00 for 1 switch.

The switches are on the way to me and I will send 1 to you

as soon as they arrive.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

Eric Freedman

345 New York Ave

Huntington, NY 11743

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of VLADIMIR SONSEV
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 9:11 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Onan Generator exhaust temperature switch - great price.

 

Hi Eric,

 

I want to buy one. Please provide instructors for payment.

 

Vladimir

202 258 1916

 

SM 345 " LIFE IS GOOD"

On Tue, Jul 28, 2020, 8:37 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

I have broken a few of these switches over the years. I have done this by reaching over the generator to retrieve something stored behind the genset.

I received a quote from my Onan dealer and on Amazon for around $90- plus tax which is ridiculous.

I tracked down the OEM manufacturer and the cost is about $23- plus a one time set up fee of about $50- I plan on ordering 2 of these. They stated that they make this for ONAN. If anyone is interested please let me know and I can order them for you $33- each plus USPS of about $8.00.

I will order the switches within a week.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite 


Re: BVI Fines for sailing I n BVI waters

Matt Salatino
 

Do you have an address? I’ll happily send the same sentiment. One of those boats is a close friend of mine.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Dec 1, 2020, at 4:22 PM, karkauai via groups.io <karkauai@...> wrote:

I have just learned of at least two cruising boats who were sttraying through BVI waters (with no intention of landing) who were stopped by BVI coast guard boats, escorted to a BVI port, and held in quarantine while charges were filed and $20,000 fines levied.  These boats were apparently detained until payment made. All in response to Covid laws prohibiting foreign vessels from entering.

I have written to the BVI to express my disgust at their draconian treatment of these people, the life's blood of the BVI.  I will not sail ir visit there again until and unless they apologize to those individuals and cruisers in general, the fines are rescinded, and their policy softened to allow for a simple warning for the first offense.

If you feel the same, I recommend that you let them know as well.

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

eric freedman
 

I just called Borel,

They are still in business and sell the alarm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2020 2:13 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

 

Hi all,

 

I had the Borel exhaust manifold alarm. Fortunately, I never needed it. I heard that Borel is no longer making them. 

 

But, anyway, if I had it to do over again, this is what I would buy:

image.png

This comes with 4 sensors and can be used to monitor exhaust temperature, as well as, battery temperature and alternator temperature. It comes with an external alarm and you program alarms for each sensor. With all of the battery issues caused by overcharging and boiling, if I were going to install a temperature alarm, this is what I would buy.

 

Image removed by sender.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.

 

View My Training Calendar

Image removed by sender.

 

 

On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 2:10 AM Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

I bought one from NASA, the boat instrument manufacturer. Cost @£82.00 including sensor which cable ties to the exhaust pipe. Easy to fit.
In Denmark last summer I neglected to turn the raw water seacock back on after cleaning out the strainer. Motored to fuel berth and filled up, started the engine again and within 15 seconds the exhaust alarm reminded me of my error! Saved my raw water pump impeller and seals plus a load more serious stuff. Should be a standard fitting for any boat especially in a weed prone area.

Ocean Hobo





Re: BVI Fines for sailing I n BVI waters

eric freedman
 

Hi Kent,

Would you please send me a copy of your letter and to whom it was addressed.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of karkauai via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 01, 2020 4:22 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] BVI Fines for sailing I n BVI waters

 

I have just learned of at least two cruising boats who were sttraying through BVI waters (with no intention of landing) who were stopped by BVI coast guard boats, escorted to a BVI port, and held in quarantine while charges were filed and $20,000 fines levied.  These boats were apparently detained until payment made. All in response to Covid laws prohibiting foreign vessels from entering.

I have written to the BVI to express my disgust at their draconian treatment of these people, the life's blood of the BVI.  I will not sail ir visit there again until and unless they apologize to those individuals and cruisers in general, the fines are rescinded, and their policy softened to allow for a simple warning for the first offense.

If you feel the same, I recommend that you let them know as well.

--
Kent & Iris

KRISTY

SM243


BVI Fines for sailing I n BVI waters

karkauai
 

I have just learned of at least two cruising boats who were sttraying through BVI waters (with no intention of landing) who were stopped by BVI coast guard boats, escorted to a BVI port, and held in quarantine while charges were filed and $20,000 fines levied.  These boats were apparently detained until payment made. All in response to Covid laws prohibiting foreign vessels from entering.

I have written to the BVI to express my disgust at their draconian treatment of these people, the life's blood of the BVI.  I will not sail ir visit there again until and unless they apologize to those individuals and cruisers in general, the fines are rescinded, and their policy softened to allow for a simple warning for the first offense.

If you feel the same, I recommend that you let them know as well.

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

 

Hi all,

I had the Borel exhaust manifold alarm. Fortunately, I never needed it. I heard that Borel is no longer making them. 

But, anyway, if I had it to do over again, this is what I would buy:
image.png
This comes with 4 sensors and can be used to monitor exhaust temperature, as well as, battery temperature and alternator temperature. It comes with an external alarm and you program alarms for each sensor. With all of the battery issues caused by overcharging and boiling, if I were going to install a temperature alarm, this is what I would buy.

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Dec 1, 2020 at 2:10 AM Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:
I bought one from NASA, the boat instrument manufacturer. Cost @£82.00 including sensor which cable ties to the exhaust pipe. Easy to fit.
In Denmark last summer I neglected to turn the raw water seacock back on after cleaning out the strainer. Motored to fuel berth and filled up, started the engine again and within 15 seconds the exhaust alarm reminded me of my error! Saved my raw water pump impeller and seals plus a load more serious stuff. Should be a standard fitting for any boat especially in a weed prone area.

Ocean Hobo






Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Alexander Ramseyer
 

Bill,

I’m in the process to order Firefly batteries right now. Are you still as excited as you were when you bought them? Also, I read from Scott that they re-wired their A/C, so that they can use it from their lithium battery bank. Given your experience, do you think that is also doable with 10 Firefly units (which I currently plan to buy but I could go up to 12)?

I went on the whisper power website and asked for a quote for the same unit (+ the part to support 24V board systems) to get an idea of the savings potential. My most critical part is the Bauer Junior dive compressor and I will have to find out how much starting/running power that system needs before I take decisions.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge,

Alex

 


Re: Volvo D3 110 INTERCOOLER

Peter Forbes
 

Nick,

Fascinating - thank you - i’m going to do a trial on mine when ever I can get on board.

Peter Forbes
Carango Amel 54 #035

On 1 Dec 2020, at 16:49, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:


Another snippet on the learning curve.

Back in September I noticed a hole in the bottom of the intercooler which was blowing air. I was convinced that it was a pin hole in the aluminium casting, and became worried by it.

Just to remind everyone the intercooler cools the compressed air from the turbo with sea water prior to combustion (Boyles law).

So I filled the hole with epoxy and ran the engine as normal and achieved full boost pressure. I then flew home to the UK and have been looking into this.

It turns out that in the past in very cold countries where there may be condensation, some water would build up in the intercooler and this could freeze and damage the intercooler. So Volvo decided to drill a  very small drain hole, never mind that it was mostly filled with paint, the pressure would blow that out and any moisture and some oil residue that would collect in the intercooler.

So it turns out that I do not have a fault and that I need to drill out the epoxy. I estimate that the hole is about 1mm diameter.

Further research has led me to some diesel engine performance orientated web chat rooms. Some people put a small screw in the drain hole as they achieve better performance with extra boost pressure. Not something that I need worry about, but clearly no short term harm done by filling it with epoxy.

So if when running the engine you run your hand over the intercooler and notice air blowing out of a very small hole it is normal and nothing to worry about.

Nick

S/Y Amelia AML 54-019 Leros


Volvo D3 110 INTERCOOLER

ngtnewington Newington
 

Another snippet on the learning curve.

Back in September I noticed a hole in the bottom of the intercooler which was blowing air. I was convinced that it was a pin hole in the aluminium casting, and became worried by it.

Just to remind everyone the intercooler cools the compressed air from the turbo with sea water prior to combustion (Boyles law).

So I filled the hole with epoxy and ran the engine as normal and achieved full boost pressure. I then flew home to the UK and have been looking into this.

It turns out that in the past in very cold countries where there may be condensation, some water would build up in the intercooler and this could freeze and damage the intercooler. So Volvo decided to drill a  very small drain hole, never mind that it was mostly filled with paint, the pressure would blow that out and any moisture and some oil residue that would collect in the intercooler.

So it turns out that I do not have a fault and that I need to drill out the epoxy. I estimate that the hole is about 1mm diameter.

Further research has led me to some diesel engine performance orientated web chat rooms. Some people put a small screw in the drain hole as they achieve better performance with extra boost pressure. Not something that I need worry about, but clearly no short term harm done by filling it with epoxy.

So if when running the engine you run your hand over the intercooler and notice air blowing out of a very small hole it is normal and nothing to worry about.

Nick

S/Y Amelia AML 54-019 Leros


Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Mike Ondra
 

Hi Bill,
Why does the Victron design with shore power feeding directly to the charger component need isolation while the previous scheme, also feeding only the charger, does not? It seems at least schematically that the isolation issue is the same in both configurations.
Mike Ondra
ALETES SM240



On Nov 30, 2020, at 10:59 PM, Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...> wrote:

This year we decided to bite the bullet and replace our Onan.  Not because of intrinsic reliability issues, but because of a lack of spare parts availability from Onan.  We had several major routine maintenance issues coming up, and it was clear that parts just were not going to be available.

We looked at deck mounted, "walk-on" solar panels, but at a cost of about $10 a watt (!) the cost was very unattractive for a solution that still wasn't sufficient to meet all our needs.

You can find a detailed description of our logic and design process here:

https://fetchinketch.net/boat-projects/power-to-the-people/

The short form answer:  We analyzed how we use our boat, and our electrical needs, and came up with what has seems to be a very good solution for us.  A DC generator from Whisper-Power.  It is smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than the Onan (Light enough that the permanent list to port is GONE!).  It is the last piece of a long, steady modernization of our boat's electrical system.

With the addition of this generator, and a Victron Cerbo GX monitoring system, we finally see our systems set for comfortable, simple, extended off dock cruising for the foreseeable future.

Maybe the next time we need batteries (in 8 to 10 years), we will jump to a Li system, but for now we are staying with our Firefly Batteries that seem to give us 90% of the benefit for 50% of the cost.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.


Re: engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

Ian Park
 

I bought one from NASA, the boat instrument manufacturer. Cost @£82.00 including sensor which cable ties to the exhaust pipe. Easy to fit.
In Denmark last summer I neglected to turn the raw water seacock back on after cleaning out the strainer. Motored to fuel berth and filled up, started the engine again and within 15 seconds the exhaust alarm reminded me of my error! Saved my raw water pump impeller and seals plus a load more serious stuff. Should be a standard fitting for any boat especially in a weed prone area.

Ocean Hobo


Re: engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

eric freedman
 

I did not bother to wire my sensor into the ignition switch, It is always on .

The photo attached was my motivation for installing the sensor.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: eric [mailto:kimberlite@...]
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 11:49 PM
To: 'main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io'
Subject: RE: [AmelYachtOwners] engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

 

Hi Miles,

Order one with both wires about 15 feet long, 24 volts. The stock setup comes with a short negative wire to be attached to normal engine wiring and a long positive wire.

I just ran mine along the wiring running across the forward end of the engine room with all the other wires and up into the port locker and along the back of the area where the rotary autopilot is usually mounted. I mounted the alarm enunciator in the wall of the companionway where the nameplate is mounted. There are plenty of places to pick up 24 volts near that position. If you hot wire it just put a small fuse in line with the unit. It’s a 1 hour project for 1 person.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

http://www.borelmfg.com/singraw.pdf

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Miles
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 4:29 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

 

Hi Eric,

 

I am sold on this and I am getting one.  Where did you take the power from?  Is yours 12V or 24 V (I guess that these questions have one answer).  Did you need a longer wire? 

 

As always, thanks.

 

Regards,

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug, sm 216,  in Le Marin, Martinique


Re: engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

eric freedman
 

Hi Miles,

Order one with both wires about 15 feet long, 24 volts. The stock setup comes with a short negative wire to be attached to normal engine wiring and a long positive wire.

I just ran mine along the wiring running across the forward end of the engine room with all the other wires and up into the port locker and along the back of the area where the rotary autopilot is usually mounted. I mounted the alarm enunciator in the wall of the companionway where the nameplate is mounted. There are plenty of places to pick up 24 volts near that position. If you hot wire it just put a small fuse in line with the unit. It’s a 1 hour project for 1 person.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

http://www.borelmfg.com/singraw.pdf

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Miles
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 4:29 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] engine exhaust high temp alarm Sea Chest Clog Alarm

 

Hi Eric,

 

I am sold on this and I am getting one.  Where did you take the power from?  Is yours 12V or 24 V (I guess that these questions have one answer).  Did you need a longer wire? 

 

As always, thanks.

 

Regards,

 

Miles

 

s/y Ladybug, sm 216,  in Le Marin, Martinique


Re: Ho to Remove motor-gearbox of Port sheet winch

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks Eric. However I got lucky. I blew all the rubbish out from around the brush assembly with an air gun. And it goes. I will check for tightness as you suggest.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 01 December 2020 at 17:35 eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Danny,

I had a different problem with my winch. However I had to remove it to repair it.

If you reach to the top of the gearbox you will feel a number of socket head screws at the top of the gearbox assembly.. You cannot see them.

If you loosen these the whole assembly will drop down.

 

In my case the screws sheared off and caused the whole assembly to bang back and forth until the motor came apart. I made new screws to hold the motor together and replaced the socket head screws with grade 10 (black) screws and installed them with locktite.

 

The real problem is to put the motor back. You have to align the assembly and then put in a few screws to get the mounting process started.

You will be doing this blind with the heavy assembly over your head. I found that impossible.

 

 

I finally cut the heads off of a couple of slightly longer bolts and ground the cut off end to be slightly  rounded.

This allowed me to install the motor and while holding it up have someone else start a couple of socket head screws. Works like a charm.

There is also a thin plastic washer (isolation shim) at the top of the gearbox assembly that should be replaced.

 

I would suggest anyone reading this to have someone operate the winch for a second or two. If the gearbox-motor assembly moves. It’s time to change the bolts and make sure they are very tight.

I found my other winch to also be loose.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 2:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Port sheet winch

 

Thanks Adam, I am expecting to be able to refurbish/repair my winch but I will keep your advice re replacement in reserve. 
Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 01 December 2020 at 08:14 Adam Body <adamgcbody@...> wrote:

I have just replaced the same motor and gear box. I sourced the replacement from Mauripro, at a good price and with excellent service.  The unit is heavy so be careful pulling it off.
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994

 



 


 


Re: Port sheet winch

eric freedman
 

Danny,

I had a different problem with my winch. However I had to remove it to repair it.

If you reach to the top of the gearbox you will feel a number of socket head screws at the top of the gearbox assembly.. You cannot see them.

If you loosen these the whole assembly will drop down.

 

In my case the screws sheared off and caused the whole assembly to bang back and forth until the motor came apart. I made new screws to hold the motor together and replaced the socket head screws with grade 10 (black) screws and installed them with locktite.

 

The real problem is to put the motor back. You have to align the assembly and then put in a few screws to get the mounting process started.

You will be doing this blind with the heavy assembly over your head. I found that impossible.

 

 

I finally cut the heads off of a couple of slightly longer bolts and ground the cut off end to be slightly  rounded.

This allowed me to install the motor and while holding it up have someone else start a couple of socket head screws. Works like a charm.

There is also a thin plastic washer (isolation shim) at the top of the gearbox assembly that should be replaced.

 

I would suggest anyone reading this to have someone operate the winch for a second or two. If the gearbox-motor assembly moves. It’s time to change the bolts and make sure they are very tight.

I found my other winch to also be loose.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 2:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Port sheet winch

 

Thanks Adam, I am expecting to be able to refurbish/repair my winch but I will keep your advice re replacement in reserve. 
Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 01 December 2020 at 08:14 Adam Body <adamgcbody@...> wrote:

I have just replaced the same motor and gear box. I sourced the replacement from Mauripro, at a good price and with excellent service.  The unit is heavy so be careful pulling it off.
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994


Ho to Remove motor-gearbox of Port sheet winch

eric freedman
 

Danny,

I had a different problem with my winch. However I had to remove it to repair it.

If you reach to the top of the gearbox you will feel a number of socket head screws at the top of the gearbox assembly.. You cannot see them.

If you loosen these the whole assembly will drop down.

 

In my case the screws sheared off and caused the whole assembly to bang back and forth until the motor came apart. I made new screws to hold the motor together and replaced the socket head screws with grade 10 (black) screws and installed them with locktite.

 

The real problem is to put the motor back. You have to align the assembly and then put in a few screws to get the mounting process started.

You will be doing this blind with the heavy assembly over your head. I found that impossible.

 

 

I finally cut the heads off of a couple of slightly longer bolts and ground the cut off end to be slightly  rounded.

This allowed me to install the motor and while holding it up have someone else start a couple of socket head screws. Works like a charm.

There is also a thin plastic washer (isolation shim) at the top of the gearbox assembly that should be replaced.

 

I would suggest anyone reading this to have someone operate the winch for a second or two. If the gearbox-motor assembly moves. It’s time to change the bolts and make sure they are very tight.

I found my other winch to also be loose.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Monday, November 30, 2020 2:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Port sheet winch

 

Thanks Adam, I am expecting to be able to refurbish/repair my winch but I will keep your advice re replacement in reserve. 
Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 01 December 2020 at 08:14 Adam Body <adamgcbody@...> wrote:

I have just replaced the same motor and gear box. I sourced the replacement from Mauripro, at a good price and with excellent service.  The unit is heavy so be careful pulling it off.
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994


Re: Port sheet winch

David Kurtz
 

Thanks, Mark!  Timing is perfect.  Winch maintenance is on my winter to-do list.
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Karen Smith
 

This year we decided to bite the bullet and replace our Onan.  Not because of intrinsic reliability issues, but because of a lack of spare parts availability from Onan.  We had several major routine maintenance issues coming up, and it was clear that parts just were not going to be available.

We looked at deck mounted, "walk-on" solar panels, but at a cost of about $10 a watt (!) the cost was very unattractive for a solution that still wasn't sufficient to meet all our needs.

You can find a detailed description of our logic and design process here:

https://fetchinketch.net/boat-projects/power-to-the-people/

The short form answer:  We analyzed how we use our boat, and our electrical needs, and came up with what has seems to be a very good solution for us.  A DC generator from Whisper-Power.  It is smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than the Onan (Light enough that the permanent list to port is GONE!).  It is the last piece of a long, steady modernization of our boat's electrical system.

With the addition of this generator, and a Victron Cerbo GX monitoring system, we finally see our systems set for comfortable, simple, extended off dock cruising for the foreseeable future.

Maybe the next time we need batteries (in 8 to 10 years), we will jump to a Li system, but for now we are staying with our Firefly Batteries that seem to give us 90% of the benefit for 50% of the cost.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA.