Date   

Re: HATCH DOOR REPAIR WITHOUT REMOVING THE HATCH

 

Eric,

Did you use 3M pre-glued and prefinished peel & stick veneer?

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 6:24 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:
This is how I did it on Kimberlite.
I felt it was not necessary to replace the veneer where it cannot be seen.
I just raised the door to its maximum height and removed the old veneer.
Quite simple but takes a bit of time.
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376








Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

michael winand
 

Hi Scott,  in the early days of producing them there were a few issues, these could have been from those. 
I am running a set of 8 g31 in the super maramu. Just coming up to 2 years. Would say around 300 cycles down to 60 to 70 percent. We use around 150amps overnight  
1 freezer. 2 fridge's. 
Recent additions of  1kw of solar see them topped off around 3pm.
Main battery charger is a 120amp quattro.
Alternator is a 150 amp electrodyne  going through a balmar 624.
I have the victron battery balancers. 

They charge fast  i have seen the Alternator put 165amps into the bank. 
You will need to program the charger and Alternator regulator to suit. 
Very low discharge,  left disconnected for 4 months, put the small 15 amp charger on each battery to top off and 15min was all required. 

Like any battery system. It needs to be set-up, monitored, understood. 
Any type can be damaged. 
Lithium  needs low voltage disconnect. 
So far they are going well, probably know if they are living up to their claims in another year of full time cruising. 
Food for thought 
Michael Nebo sm251 



On Tue, 24 Nov 2020 at 2:58 pm, Scott SV Tengah
<Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Michael,

I am not sure if they are worse. Given that Jamie was getting below 24 volts overnight after only a year, that sounds pretty bad though. Even our old gel batteries weren't that bad.

My concern with Firefly was that the sales pitch was that you could run them down to low SOC without damaging the battery, but if the voltage sags so much, the batteries may not get damaged, but your boat will not like the low voltage. Therefore the ability to take it to low SOC is only academic.



On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 10:48 AM michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Scott,  would you suggest that the firefly batteries are worse than other lead batteries regarding their voltage drop curve?
I would think that the state of change would have been important to know. 
Thanks  Michael  Nebo sm251 



On Tue, 24 Nov 2020 at 2:23 am, Scott from SV Tengah
Arno,

I think it would be best if Jamie could chime in. He replaced his Fireflies precisely because he experienced severe voltage drop under load, one of the "hidden" downsides of carbon foam. As always, there could have been other confounding factors. That said, I would be careful trusting specs. The Victron Battery Protect should have worked fine on my system but instead melted within a day. 

Regarding gen usage during BT, I spent about a year diagnosing and fixing my BT, so learned a bit more than I ever wanted to know. My understanding is an Amel54 owner experienced a solenoid that melted closed because ohm's law tells us that when voltage drops, amps have to increase to compensate. That owner spun like a top in the marina. That's why Amel suggested that I install an emergency stop switch.  My understanding is that repeated use (think 30 knots on the beam in a tricky marina) will result in cumulative voltage drops so the genset/charger is supposed to help the batteries recover a bit between uses, not replace the batteries.

I considered carbon foam as a cheaper, easier upgrade than lifepo4, but decided against them for the voltage drop issues. 
If you look at the firely SOC vs. voltage curves, you will see that the main benefit of being able to deeply discharge and also not fully recharge is negated by the fact that voltage drops to unacceptable levels at low SOC.

Here's another guy who took the baby step and then ended up going all the way. That said, I understand your use case is primarily marina life, so in your case, I would not get lithium either. Just wanted to make the info available to people who live full time off the grid who think Fireflies are lithium like:
https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f14/firefly-oasis-voltage-sag-225444.html#post3002627

Perhaps you will have better success with respect to voltage drops than others who have tried. 



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: SM 2000 autopilot

Rob Smith
 

Thank you Germain


On Mon, 23 Nov 2020, 08:26 Germain Jean-Pierre, <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hi Rob,

Disregard the mess... tiny leak now fixed. 

Start with a ss base plate with the bolts welded onto it as per the hydraulic ram base plate. Epoxy the plate to the hull; build up grp layers as shown. 

Remove the bell rank and design a lower L shape lip   Attach the business end of the ram. Install the pump somewhere convenient 

Sorry for the delay

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ






On 20/11/2020, at 10:40 AM, Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:


Thanks for the speedy reply. Some photos would be great. 


On Thu, 19 Nov 2020, 21:38 Germain Jean-Pierre, <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hi Rob,

I installed a Raymarine ACP 400 with hydraulic drive through Lecomte & Schmidt hydraulic rams. Works superbly and has been my primary AP for the last 5 years. My 7000 is a backup only. Hydraulic is far smoother. 

One small limitation... due to restrictions of space, the rams only give 22 degrees steering angle to bot P & S. In reality, had no effect on operations. 

I can perhaps send photos...

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ



On 20/11/2020, at 10:05 AM, Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:


Hello I am somebody can help me, I have a Sm #152 and I would like to fit another autopilot directly onto the quadrant. Can anybody help with this? I'd like to know what systems are used on the SM2000.

Regards

Rob Smith
S/Y FORESIGHT 
SM #152


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Scott SV Tengah
 

Michael,

I am not sure if they are worse. Given that Jamie was getting below 24 volts overnight after only a year, that sounds pretty bad though. Even our old gel batteries weren't that bad.

My concern with Firefly was that the sales pitch was that you could run them down to low SOC without damaging the battery, but if the voltage sags so much, the batteries may not get damaged, but your boat will not like the low voltage. Therefore the ability to take it to low SOC is only academic.



On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 10:48 AM michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Scott,  would you suggest that the firefly batteries are worse than other lead batteries regarding their voltage drop curve?
I would think that the state of change would have been important to know. 
Thanks  Michael  Nebo sm251 



On Tue, 24 Nov 2020 at 2:23 am, Scott from SV Tengah
Arno,

I think it would be best if Jamie could chime in. He replaced his Fireflies precisely because he experienced severe voltage drop under load, one of the "hidden" downsides of carbon foam. As always, there could have been other confounding factors. That said, I would be careful trusting specs. The Victron Battery Protect should have worked fine on my system but instead melted within a day. 

Regarding gen usage during BT, I spent about a year diagnosing and fixing my BT, so learned a bit more than I ever wanted to know. My understanding is an Amel54 owner experienced a solenoid that melted closed because ohm's law tells us that when voltage drops, amps have to increase to compensate. That owner spun like a top in the marina. That's why Amel suggested that I install an emergency stop switch.  My understanding is that repeated use (think 30 knots on the beam in a tricky marina) will result in cumulative voltage drops so the genset/charger is supposed to help the batteries recover a bit between uses, not replace the batteries.

I considered carbon foam as a cheaper, easier upgrade than lifepo4, but decided against them for the voltage drop issues. 
If you look at the firely SOC vs. voltage curves, you will see that the main benefit of being able to deeply discharge and also not fully recharge is negated by the fact that voltage drops to unacceptable levels at low SOC.

Here's another guy who took the baby step and then ended up going all the way. That said, I understand your use case is primarily marina life, so in your case, I would not get lithium either. Just wanted to make the info available to people who live full time off the grid who think Fireflies are lithium like:
https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f14/firefly-oasis-voltage-sag-225444.html#post3002627

Perhaps you will have better success with respect to voltage drops than others who have tried. 



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Dean Gillies
 

Bill Kinney, maybe you could also 'chime in' regarding Firefly batteries. Are you still happy with them after 2-3 years?
Dean
SV Stella
A54-154


Re: Silicone BT seals

eric freedman
 

I usually keep the anchor untied until we get to sea.

You never know when the stuff hits the fan.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Barry Connor via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, November 07, 2020 6:47 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals

 

Hi, this was on our 2006 Amel 54 when we bought in 2015. 

We thought it was a standard attached by Amel at build. Was very helpful when we first sailed but we do more checks now.

Very Best 

 

Barry and Penny

“SV Lady Penelope II”

Amel 54. #17

Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique 



On Nov 6, 2020, at 20:33, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?

-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular



On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

 

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429

 


Dessalator 230v 160 LPH watermaker fault I had the same problem and finally found the fault

eric freedman
 

From the time of delivery of Kimberlite I had a similar problem. I attributed it to many things. I finally found the problem.

In the AC panel there is a bus bar that connects all the circuit breakers. There is a small fitting that sits on the bus bar and connects to the circuit breaker. It is held on to the bus bar by tension. Upon careful examination I found that the fitting for the watermaker which connected to the breaker  was loose on the bus bar. I removed it. It was corroded due to heat of a bad connection. I carefully filed it with a jewelers file. I then re-tensioned the fitting and installed it. My  watermaker finally runs for hours with no further faults.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mohammad Shirloo
Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2020 12:01 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Dessalator 230v 160 LPH watermaker fault

 

Hello Dan;

 

We have the same water maker aboard Kokomo. However, I’m not sure if it is the same or a later design. Going through your procedure, I have one recommendation. I see that you state that you increase the high pressure until you are just below the green zone on your HP gauge. The system will go into a fault status and stop, if the pressure does not pass a certain threshold within a certain amount of time  after the HP pump kicks on. I do not know what these thresholds are or how they are measured.  Also, in talking to Dessalator support, Martin Dee Jong, on several issues over the years, he has always recommended to keep the pressure of the HP pump on the high side of green, just shy of the red zone. He stated the reasoning as the unit is very capable of handling this pressure setting 24x7x365 and there is no reason to lower the pressure and reduce the amount if water being produced. We have followed this advice for the past 5 years and currently have over 600 hours on our original 11 year old membranes that still put out water in the 250 PPM range. As a side note, he also stated that there’s no need to back flush, as long as you are producing water at least once a week, which we always do, when on board.

 

I would recommend trying to increase the HP pump setting in the mid to upper range of the green zone. It may be that the sensitivity of the sensors that gauge the pressure and time may have changed over time.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Carlson via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2020 8:34 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Desallator 230v 160 LPH watermaker fault

 

Good morning all,   On sv BeBe, SM#387,  I have the original Dessalator 230v 160LPH water-maker. 

Today was the first time I this season that I have tried to run the water maker (as we were in the muddy Chesapeake Bay with  ready access to decent city water..).  The membranes had been auto-flushed with fresh water for 2 minutes, twice per week while away and I had tested that both the low and HP pumps were functional through the initial start-up sequence. 

I started up the water-maker according to procedure with the pressure control valve initially all the way anti-clockwise (no pressure) and the  product water diverted to a sink faucet.   The low pressure pump kicked on and the low pressure gauge read the typical 12 o-clock reading.  After the typical delay the high pressure pump kicked on and the low pressure guage dropped slightly to about 10:30 (as typical).   After the "green" light came on I began to very slowly increase the pressure with the needle valve.   I stopped when I just reached just below the green zone on the HP gauge and product water began to come out of the faucet.   During this time the product quality lights had gone from green to amber when water began to flow and then back to green after a few seconds of product flow.   I began my usual 30 second count after the product quality light turns green before sampling and testing the water quality with my tongue and TDS meter, before I would then divert the water to the fresh water tank.  All during this time I was watching both the high and low pressure gauges for any fluctuation and none was seen.  I had given the water a taste test and was about to pull the sample for the TDS check when the water-maker shut down with the red "alarm" light.  I turned off the water-maker switch, and the 230v breaker, re-set the pressure control valve, and  checked for any obvious leaks or ? in the engine room.   After those checks I went through the same sequence and had the exact same shutdown approximately 30 seconds after the water quality light went back to green.   On the third try when I turned the water-maker switch back on it went directly to alarm mode. 

After searching the Amel Desallator manuals on-board, and searching this forum I also performed the following troubleshooting: 
1) removed the panel in the locker and checked for any noticeable corrosion, 
2) I checked the fuse in the Desallator control box and it was tight and did not appear to be blown, 
3) checked for any tripped breakers or appearance of any burning around the relays,
3) I checked for any corrosion around the TDS probe and it appeared in good condition. 
4) There is a reference in the Desallator manual to an adjustment screw on the HP switch but neither of the switches in the manual resembled the switch on the back of the panel.   There is a screw in the back of this switch and I made a small attempt to turn it but did not force any movement.  (Picture attached)  Does anyone know if this HP Switch can be adjusted?   Or if it is recommended to remove it and possible clean it out?   Or further tests. 

- At this point I believe that the indications are that there is probably an issue with the HP Switch, but I would like confirmation from others or suggestions of other troubleshooting steps.   
- are there further steps to  either adjust the HP switch or clean the HP switch? 
- In the forum there were comments that owners had disconnected and run the water-maker without the HP switch in the circuit, but I would also like a little more confirmation and advice on how to go about this before taking this next step.   
- Also, at this stage when I turn the water-maker on it goes directly to the Alarm state.  Is there a re-set button that I have not found? or is that indicative of a failed HP switch. 

As background:  twice last season I did have the water-maker shutdown in a similar manner.  Once after it has been running some time (45 minutes? ) and another time shortly after start-up.   In neither case was I immediately attending to the water-maker and it subsequently re-started with no issues and no root cause found at the time. 

Thanks and regards,  Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387


HATCH DOOR REPAIR WITHOUT REMOVING THE HATCH

eric freedman
 

This is how I did it on Kimberlite.
I felt it was not necessary to replace the veneer where it cannot be seen.
I just raised the door to its maximum height and removed the old veneer.
Quite simple but takes a bit of time.
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Jamie Wendell
 

Dean, I too have that issue, but the solution is to keep the fuel tank full. Maybe some lead bars behind the lithiums will do the trick?
I hope I did not cause anyone to second guess their own battery solutions, as everyone will have a different need, but I had to report my results as they are.
Jamie
Phantom, A54 #44


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Dean Gillies
 

Well that bursts the bubble of having batteries that are more capable than AGM at lower SOC for half the price of LFP AND don't cause the A54 to list more to port.
I can't believe my thought pattern at the moment, but if I could buy Lithium batteries that were as heavy as AGM's then my change to Lithium would be a fait-accompli.

I just don't like the thought of the boat listing even more to port!

Dean
SV Stella A54-154


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Jamie Wendell
 

Well I guess I should chime in here, so to speak. I installed Fireflys in my A54 a few years ago. They lasted about 3 years before the voltage drop started to cause problems for me. They were promoted as being "almost" as good as Lithiums for about half the price, so I thought why not.
I cannot say why they failed, but as we were yanking them out of the boat, we load tested all of them just to see how they had held up, thinking maybe 1 or 2 had simply died. Almost all of them showed significant degradation. I was able to salvage a couple of them to serve as starter batteries, but I was not a happy camper. I do have a very heavy electrical load. Perhaps the 12-volt in series configuration is not compatible unless you deliberately balance them out periodically. With 24-volt Lithiums, that is no longer a concern.

Despite the expense (2 times the Firefly technology), I am convinced that LiFePO4 is the way to go if you are looking for long-term serviceability. They hold their voltage levels even with extended bow thruster use, and I never get low-voltage alarms on my Maretron N2K bus any more. I used to get them all the time after the first year and had to wake up in the mornings to start the generator to quell the alarm. I had the alarm set to go off if the voltage dropped below 24 volts.

Sorry to put a bummer into the carbon-foam technology, as some may have had a good experience given the "better mousetrap approach," but they still are based on lead construction. I expect in the future LiFePO4 or some derivative will become the norm for our Amels.

Jamie
Phantom, A54 #44


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

michael winand
 

Hi Scott,  would you suggest that the firefly batteries are worse than other lead batteries regarding their voltage drop curve?
I would think that the state of change would have been important to know. 
Thanks  Michael  Nebo sm251 



On Tue, 24 Nov 2020 at 2:23 am, Scott from SV Tengah
<Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Arno,

I think it would be best if Jamie could chime in. He replaced his Fireflies precisely because he experienced severe voltage drop under load, one of the "hidden" downsides of carbon foam. As always, there could have been other confounding factors. That said, I would be careful trusting specs. The Victron Battery Protect should have worked fine on my system but instead melted within a day. 

Regarding gen usage during BT, I spent about a year diagnosing and fixing my BT, so learned a bit more than I ever wanted to know. My understanding is an Amel54 owner experienced a solenoid that melted closed because ohm's law tells us that when voltage drops, amps have to increase to compensate. That owner spun like a top in the marina. That's why Amel suggested that I install an emergency stop switch.  My understanding is that repeated use (think 30 knots on the beam in a tricky marina) will result in cumulative voltage drops so the genset/charger is supposed to help the batteries recover a bit between uses, not replace the batteries.

I considered carbon foam as a cheaper, easier upgrade than lifepo4, but decided against them for the voltage drop issues. 
If you look at the firely SOC vs. voltage curves, you will see that the main benefit of being able to deeply discharge and also not fully recharge is negated by the fact that voltage drops to unacceptable levels at low SOC.

Here's another guy who took the baby step and then ended up going all the way. That said, I understand your use case is primarily marina life, so in your case, I would not get lithium either. Just wanted to make the info available to people who live full time off the grid who think Fireflies are lithium like:
https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f14/firefly-oasis-voltage-sag-225444.html#post3002627

Perhaps you will have better success with respect to voltage drops than others who have tried. 



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Scott SV Tengah
 

Arno,

I think it would be best if Jamie could chime in. He replaced his Fireflies precisely because he experienced severe voltage drop under load, one of the "hidden" downsides of carbon foam. As always, there could have been other confounding factors. That said, I would be careful trusting specs. The Victron Battery Protect should have worked fine on my system but instead melted within a day. 

Regarding gen usage during BT, I spent about a year diagnosing and fixing my BT, so learned a bit more than I ever wanted to know. My understanding is an Amel54 owner experienced a solenoid that melted closed because ohm's law tells us that when voltage drops, amps have to increase to compensate. That owner spun like a top in the marina. That's why Amel suggested that I install an emergency stop switch.  My understanding is that repeated use (think 30 knots on the beam in a tricky marina) will result in cumulative voltage drops so the genset/charger is supposed to help the batteries recover a bit between uses, not replace the batteries.

I considered carbon foam as a cheaper, easier upgrade than lifepo4, but decided against them for the voltage drop issues. 
If you look at the firely SOC vs. voltage curves, you will see that the main benefit of being able to deeply discharge and also not fully recharge is negated by the fact that voltage drops to unacceptable levels at low SOC.

Here's another guy who took the baby step and then ended up going all the way. That said, I understand your use case is primarily marina life, so in your case, I would not get lithium either. Just wanted to make the info available to people who live full time off the grid who think Fireflies are lithium like:
https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f14/firefly-oasis-voltage-sag-225444.html#post3002627

Perhaps you will have better success with respect to voltage drops than others who have tried. 



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Amel original hard antifouling?

 

Scott,

I don't believe anyone can answer that except the person who owned her when it was applied. Possibly it is pealing because a primer was required between the new and the old. I gave you my experience which was Micron 66 on top of Micron 66, but the top layer had been seriously thinned during the application.

Good luck!

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 11:40 PM Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Bill, 

I guess I should have been more clear with my original question. 

I already have micron antifoul on hand but it seems the existing paint is peeling back to what appears to be a hard antifoul. As such I want to get some idea of what this hard antifoul might be to make sure it's compatible. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: A few questions while on the hard... SM23

Patrick McAneny
 

Mike, My boat is on the hard as well and I just filled the sonic hole with epoxy filler yesterday . I am not aware of any service required on the rudder hinges. You need to remove the third oil seal, there are many posts in the archives covering the installation of the oil seals . You should probably have a long look at the files and photos sections on the Amel site ,every subject concerning servicing every part of the SM has been covered ,and will answer many of  your questions. If not never hesitate to ask to group, there is hundreds of very knowledgeable owners more than willing to help you solve any issue you may have. 
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Nov 22, 2020 7:16 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] A few questions while on the hard... SM23

Hello everyone! Our 1990 SM#23 is on the hard and we are tackling some maintenance items for the first time. Naturally, a few questions have come up that I would like to ask the group.

1. Does the rudder hinge require any service or greasing while hauled out? There are two stainless screws on the middle hinge, anything to do there or just make sure they are tight?
 
2. I removed the plug on the sonic speed transducer on the keel. It revealed what looks like a crack right above the transducer (photo attached). Should this whole void just get epoxy filled? The sonic speed is not working and we have no intention of getting it working. No water is making it into the hull as far as I can tell.
 
3. We are servicing the C-drive shaft seals and wear bushing for the first time since taking ownership. After removing the bushing and two seals, we find a third, smaller seal that is very deep and perhaps sealed in place. This is the older aluminum C-drive unit, but I'm not sure this seal placement is Amel original. Has anyone else with an older SM seen this? Any advice or suggestions? I was under the impression I should be able to look into the C-drive after removing the wear bushing and the seals that ride on it.
 
Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM#23
Opua, NZ
 


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Scott,

According to the specs the CCA for the Firefly is 720 Amp. So the BT should be fine having 5*720=3600 startup amps available.
I don’t buy this generator story as your 100 amp battery charger cannot respond quick enough for the solenoid to make a difference. And besides it can only supply 100 amp where the startup current for the BT is probably closer to 1000 amp.
When running the BT takes about 450 Amp,, about 80 amp per battery. If your batteries cannot supply that, you need to replace them anyway...

Cheers,

Arno
SV Luna
A54-121


Re: SM 2000 autopilot

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Rob,

Disregard the mess... tiny leak now fixed. 

Start with a ss base plate with the bolts welded onto it as per the hydraulic ram base plate. Epoxy the plate to the hull; build up grp layers as shown. 

Remove the bell rank and design a lower L shape lip   Attach the business end of the ram. Install the pump somewhere convenient 

Sorry for the delay

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ






On 20/11/2020, at 10:40 AM, Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:


Thanks for the speedy reply. Some photos would be great. 


On Thu, 19 Nov 2020, 21:38 Germain Jean-Pierre, <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
Hi Rob,

I installed a Raymarine ACP 400 with hydraulic drive through Lecomte & Schmidt hydraulic rams. Works superbly and has been my primary AP for the last 5 years. My 7000 is a backup only. Hydraulic is far smoother. 

One small limitation... due to restrictions of space, the rams only give 22 degrees steering angle to bot P & S. In reality, had no effect on operations. 

I can perhaps send photos...

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ



On 20/11/2020, at 10:05 AM, Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:


Hello I am somebody can help me, I have a Sm #152 and I would like to fit another autopilot directly onto the quadrant. Can anybody help with this? I'd like to know what systems are used on the SM2000.

Regards

Rob Smith
S/Y FORESIGHT 
SM #152


Re: Lithium Batteries under Consideration

Scott SV Tengah
 

To continue the thread drift 😇, perhaps Jamie on phantom can chime in about his experience with carbon foam. 

He had fireflies before I think and experienced severe voltage drops under load to the point where his fridges started failing. 

I'd be a bit concerned about using the bow thruster with a battery that experienced severe voltage drop under load. I guess you could just run the generator when using the bt as amel recommended to avoid melting your solenoids.


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Amel original hard antifouling?

Scott SV Tengah
 

Bill, 

I guess I should have been more clear with my original question. 

I already have micron antifoul on hand but it seems the existing paint is peeling back to what appears to be a hard antifoul. As such I want to get some idea of what this hard antifoul might be to make sure it's compatible. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


A few questions while on the hard... SM23

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hello everyone! Our 1990 SM#23 is on the hard and we are tackling some maintenance items for the first time. Naturally, a few questions have come up that I would like to ask the group.

1. Does the rudder hinge require any service or greasing while hauled out? There are two stainless screws on the middle hinge, anything to do there or just make sure they are tight?
 
2. I removed the plug on the sonic speed transducer on the keel. It revealed what looks like a crack right above the transducer (photo attached). Should this whole void just get epoxy filled? The sonic speed is not working and we have no intention of getting it working. No water is making it into the hull as far as I can tell.
 
3. We are servicing the C-drive shaft seals and wear bushing for the first time since taking ownership. After removing the bushing and two seals, we find a third, smaller seal that is very deep and perhaps sealed in place. This is the older aluminum C-drive unit, but I'm not sure this seal placement is Amel original. Has anyone else with an older SM seen this? Any advice or suggestions? I was under the impression I should be able to look into the C-drive after removing the wear bushing and the seals that ride on it.
 
Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM#23
Opua, NZ