Date   
Re: Folding Prop

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Volker,

If you have the shaft alternator installed I would keep the fixed prop. The shaft alternator on the SN is excellent for cruising.

Fair winds and have fun with your SN

Herbert, SN120, Kali Mera, Mazatlan

Re: Lashing the helm on a Super Maramu

rossirossix4
 
Edited

Yes it is a really nice piece of gear and allows you to clamp the helm firmly and quickly in any position and easily re-position anywhere except exactly over the 3 spokes.  In 15 years of use (8 by us) there is not a mark on the leather of the helm from its use and yes, we have used it in heaving to.  Not sure why Amel could not whip up some more units....seems like there could be lots of takers--and not just Super Maramus.

I became curious and checked my pdf records--on the invoice it is "Systeme blocage barre a roue" which translates to "steering wheel lock system".  In our rarefied sense of costs it was "0.2 BOAT Units" (BOAT=Break Out Another Thousand)  https://photos.app.goo.gl/vcenCvZ9e7wBq6iN9
No problem at all from the fuel dock incident but I do think about it every time we dock or get fuel.
Bob
KAIMI SM429

Re: Folding Prop

Matt Salatino
 

A feathering prop has better control at only a minimal increase in drag over a folding prop.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 16, 2019, at 11:18 PM, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> wrote:

Hello Santorin Owners,

I just bought a Santorin (Hull # 027) and playing with the Idea of having a folding prop instead of the fixed one - does anyone having experience with this. 

Volker
SY Aquamarine
Santorin 027

Folding Prop

Volker Hasenauer
 

Hello Santorin Owners,

I just bought a Santorin (Hull # 027) and playing with the Idea of having a folding prop instead of the fixed one - does anyone having experience with this. 

Volker
SY Aquamarine
Santorin 027

Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

david bruce
 

Thanks for sharing this Miles, helpful to those of us who have yet to experience such conditions and or are relative novice Amel owners. 

Best, 
Dave 
Liesse
SN006



On Nov 16, 2019, at 2:11 PM, Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique

Re: Contract done..boat bought

Volker Hasenauer
 

Thanks Jeremy for your welcome email! 

Volker
SY Aqumarine
Santorin #027
Langkawi/Malaysia



On Sat, Nov 16, 2019 at 4:23 AM mr_hermanns <jeremy@...> wrote:
Congrats Volker!!! Welcome to the Amel Family ;)
--
Jeremy Hermanns - "Jer"
SVCerulean.com
Maramu #105
Marina Del Rey, CA

Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Aldo Roldan
 

Thank you, Miles.  When you are back I Newport, we can hopefully sail together and get Araucaria to heave to.  In the meantime, have a great time in Martinique!

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian Townsend
Sent: Saturday, November 16, 2019 5:28 PM
To: Ian Townsend <townsend.ian.michael@...>; main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Miles <milesbid@...>

Date: 2019-11-16 17:11 (GMT-05:00)

Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

 

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique

Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Ian Townsend
 





Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: Miles <milesbid@...>
Date: 2019-11-16 17:11 (GMT-05:00)
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique

Re: Raymarine autopilot

ngtnewington Newington
 

Maybe I should just stick with what I got and not worry about it?

If it ain’t broke .....
Nick

S/Y Amelia
AML 54-019

On 16 Nov 2019, at 18:38, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece


Re: Heaving-to experiences/advice, and Jordan series drogue use

Miles
 

Hi Aldo,

After some new periods of heaving to, I thought I would share my experiences with the group and repeat the stories that I have told to you—please be patient, it is not all old.

The first time was in Hurricane Mitch which had crossed Florida back into the Atlantic, become a hurricane again, and was moving a 30 mph.   I had about two hours warning on my SSB (no satellite connections back then).  I prepared two drogues at the stern and a huge sea anchor at the bow.  The sea anchor was attached with 100 meters of big line, 20 meters of heavy chain, and another 100 meters of line.  I had the drogues and the sea anchor in the cockpit ready to be deployed.

When the storm arrived, I didn’t use the drogues because some of the waves were breaking and turning around didn’t seem to be a good idea; and before deploying the sea anchor, I wanted to see how long I could heave to.  I had about half the main out and a very small amount of jib, backed.  I have a big eye bolt about 2 feet under the engine controls for tying the wheel.  I used a heavy bungee that lets the wheel move some with the forces.  I tied the wheel so that the boat would head into the wind somewhat until a big wave landed on it and pushed it more sideways, after which it would head up for the next wave.  I had backed the jib because I was afraid the boat would tack through the wind.  It never came close.  The wind increased into the 60s and then the 70s.  The boat just kept doing the same thing and never felt in danger.  At some speed, the sails would have to have come down.  I was amazed that I didn’t feel this with the winds in the 70s.  The worst part was the noise.  Ear plugs would have helped.

Since then I have hove to in much less wind using just the main.  I have used this for repairs or for just a nice meal.   I find it remarkable how the sea appears to be more calm and the motion decreased when hove to. 

I had occasion to do a serious heaving to two weeks ago, on the way from Newport to Bermuda, I tried to race a storm across the Gulf Stream.  The storm won.  I hove to when the wind was in the thirties.  The wind increased into the forties and sometimes into the fifties.  I hove to under about half the main and the wheel tied with a very heavy bungee so that the boat would head up at about 2+ knots to about 40 degrees and then fall off to about 60-70 degrees and then head up again.  We averaged about 2 k forward speed.  As soon as I hove to, the commotion, the crashing into and off waves, and the waves washing over the boat simply stopped. Nothing landed in the cockpit.  The wind direction slowly changed and after 4-5 hours, I was able to add a little jib and sail out of the GS.  I think that the forereaching protects the rudder.  If the boat were to be thrown backwards by a wave, the forces on the rudder would be very great.

That is my experience. There is no “right way” to heave to.  I strongly recommend that everyone contemplating going off shore spend some time experimenting with different amounts of sail and rudder angles.  There will be some combination that feels best to you and to the boat. 

 

Regards,

Miles

s/y Ladybug, sm 216, resting at the dock at Le Marin, Martinique

Re: Raymarine autopilot

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Nick,
We have both the linear drive on the quadrant and a rotary drive , both Raymarine , with a switch over . Not missed a beat in 19 years and 63,000 miles . Pochon in Hyeres ( v. good ) took both off the boat after about 55,000 miles and serviced them but said but said both were in good condition

Ian and Judy , Pen Azen SM 302 Kilada

On 16 Nov 2019, at 18:38, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Efector Anchor Chain Counter Sensor

Thomas Peacock
 

I also replaced the sensor. I was concerned that I would have to install another relay to invert the signal, but that was not necessary. The replacement unit works well. 

Tom Peacock
SM Aletes #240
Martinique 


On Nov 8, 2019, at 11:53 AM, "heinz@..." <heinz@...> wrote:

Hallo 
I have the same one I get it 2 years ago and it works well. 

HEINZ Sm 2000, 292

Am 09.11.2019 um 03:09 schrieb Keith Tice <amel@...>:

My chain counter recently stopped counting.
Before it stopped it was counting when we weren't looking and not counting when the anchor was moving.  
I found that the Efector IB5076 induction sensor is no longer produced, but that the IB5096 is available.
The only difference in the data sheet is that the signal NPN for IB5076 is PNP for IB5096. https://www.ifm.com/ch/en/product/IB5076 
https://www.ifm.com/ch/en/product/IB5096   
Should this be a plug compatible replacement?  
I mean, one is on a lot and turns off and the other is off a lot and turns on. It is pulsing and the counter should just be counting pulses.  
What is the opinion here?
Keith
Bikini SM 282

Re: Important Update Re: No steering parts, rack & pinion, cables, from Amel

 

I am sure you can rely on Amel, Thierry, & Maud. In 15 years they have never disappointed me. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sat, Nov 16, 2019, 11:46 AM Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222 <Bijorka@...> wrote:
Good evening.
Yesterday, I spoke to Maud on the Ultrfex Control thing.
Maud assured me that Amel is in the process of settling the matter in the Amelowner's Iteresse . If Ultrafex no longer delivers Amel will find another manufacturer.
Maud was a good thing that will be found by the end of December .
After this conversation I decided to rely on Amel spare parts service as always to leave Amel. I'm always good with that.
Let's wait till Jan. If it's supposed to be different again, it's probably not a witch's work to make it look like we're just gonna have to have a pattern.

Best Elja Röllinghoff
SM Balu 222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet



Re: Auto pilot gear bolt

Mike Ondra
 

Here’s what it looks like on SM#240. Washer and Allen headed bolt. Mike
image1.jpeg

On Nov 16, 2019, at 12:36 PM, John Clark <john.biohead@...> wrote:

Hi Bob, 
   The retaining bolt is on the side of the gear.  It's an Allen head or hex head.  

John

Annie SM 37
Brunswick. GA

On Sat, Nov 16, 2019, 9:13 AM Bob Ross via Groups.Io <tuwhiti=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day,

On a 2002 SM2K in the autopilot area above the galley sink I think this smaller gear should have a  key retaining bolt or similar in the middle of the shaft.
Having never seen it I am not sure what it looks like nor its dimensions.
Can anyone share a picture of it or any size data?

User question: is this a correct way to share a photo or is there another  preferred way?
Thanks
Bob
SV Nomad #362, Trinidad

<auto pilot gear.jpg>

Re: Raymarine autopilot

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi,

I installed an ACP 400 with hydraulic ram directly on the bell crank of the rudder.

Far smoother than the electric one which is still on tthe he helm.

In the event of a major steering failure, I can steer the boat through. The AP controls after disconnecting the offending rack and pinion... without resorting to hand steering for days on end.  

System is like Paul on Kerpa.

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, NZ




On 17 Nov 2019, at 08:00, Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:


We installed the kit you referring to about 18 month ago, I still have my old Autohelm installed, Installed a switch for swapping between them. I am not totally sold on the new Raymarine had expect it to perform better. Very good up wind, but as soon as you get the wind aft of the beam it start to swing from side to side, after some tweaking and upgrade of software it is now better but fare from excellent.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259

Re: Lashing the helm on a Super Maramu

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Bob and Suzanne,
That item looks perfect for the job. Thanks for sharing. I will see if any are still available from Amel. Hopefully no issues with your rudder slam, always something keeping us on our toes!

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV Trilogy, SM23


On Sat, Nov 16, 2019, 12:43 PM rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:
Hi Mike and Hannah,
Don't know if this is helpful, but the photos in this link show what Amel provided on some SMs (it is on the original invoice for our SM 429). I am away from our boat re: dimensions, etc.--maybe someone else has one.   Don't know if Maud has these but would be an easy bolt on,  Amel reversed the leather on the device for gripping and it is very tight and tenacious and may prevent the travel that could add to teeth wear.  You can see the design and construction is classic "Amelian" Click on image for larger view  https://www.dropbox.com/sc/jag81gnnw41e8o5/AABXwWbF5T2N5l52d9lQt5GRa

BTW we were at a fuel dock in Italy, stern to stern with a good sized power boat.  Guy departed, evidently at near full throttle and violently slammed our (hearty) rudder to the stop--add that to the never ending procedure list we boaters have!

Cheers, Bob and Suzanne KAIMI

Re: Raymarine autopilot

Paul Osterberg
 

We installed the kit you referring to about 18 month ago, I still have my old Autohelm installed, Installed a switch for swapping between them. I am not totally sold on the new Raymarine had expect it to perform better. Very good up wind, but as soon as you get the wind aft of the beam it start to swing from side to side, after some tweaking and upgrade of software it is now better but fare from excellent.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259

Re: Raymarine autopilot

Matt Salatino
 

The clutch went out on our first Raymarine linear drive unit, after 17 years and 3 Atlantic crossings. The second was trouble-free, up to the time I sold the boat, 12 years later. I did carry a spare.
~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 16, 2019, at 1:38 PM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I  delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece



Raymarine autopilot

ngtnewington Newington
 

I delighted with my Raymarine Autopilot. It has been great but it is now 13 years old. Having done a lot of hand steering on my first boat, we only had a servo pendulum windvane, I know how tedious it can be. I would much rather be light on crew but have autopilot back up.
So how reliable do other owners find these Raymarine autopilots? Am I just lucky?

To that end I am thinking of buying a spare to have on board, including a new linear drive unit.

The new Raymarine would be the obvious choice;
Exactly same linear drive unit
New fancy heading sensor EV1
ACU400 drive
P70 control

Does anyone have any thoughts.

Nick
Amelia AML54-019
Ashore Kilada Greece

Re: Important Update Re: No steering parts, rack & pinion, cables, from Amel

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

Good evening.
Yesterday, I spoke to Maud on the Ultrfex Control thing.
Maud assured me that Amel is in the process of settling the matter in the Amelowner's Iteresse . If Ultrafex no longer delivers Amel will find another manufacturer.
Maud was a good thing that will be found by the end of December .
After this conversation I decided to rely on Amel spare parts service as always to leave Amel. I'm always good with that.
Let's wait till Jan. If it's supposed to be different again, it's probably not a witch's work to make it look like we're just gonna have to have a pattern.

Best Elja Röllinghoff
SM Balu 222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet