Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

eric freedman
 

I would try Rust Bullet,

That stuff is amazing. It is available in small cans .

I can will fix you up for a very very long time. Used by the US Navy.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:28 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

 

 

Two part epoxy paint, maybe 4 coats one after the other once the paint is tacky. Of course, clean first. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

 

On Oct 4, 2017 20:22, "john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 

 

                      Regards,  John

 

John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines [3 Attachments]

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Two part epoxy paint, maybe 4 coats one after the other once the paint is tacky. Of course, clean first. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Oct 4, 2017 20:22, "john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 


                      Regards,  John


John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City



Re: Olivier

Paul Osterberg
 

Oliver will be in Georgetown Sassafras the 12 of Oktober 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 Annapolis 


Engine exhaust hull fitting and copper water lines

John Clark
 

When I bought my SM last December the surveyor caught evidence of a small water leak under the engine exhaust hose where it is attached to the hull.  He was deeply concerned that the hose was failing and exhaust fumes could be dangerous.  We didn’t see and significant water or fumes.   I bought a new hose, but the job kept getting postponed.  I’m now at a sheltered marina with almost no wave action and the temperature is perfect this week so I thought this was a great opportunity to eliminate that one job I have been dreading.

 

 

As we know the exhaust on the Amels is a bit funky.  On my boat the hose does not attach directly to the hull.  In fact at the hull there is nothing to clamp onto…at least not that I can see so far.  What I have is a stainless steel insert that fits snugly into a fiberglass stub at the waterline.  There is no flapper valve inside this insert.  The exhaust hose goes inside the wider end of the insert which is siliconed and pushed into the hull fitting.  My hull fitting/hose/insert were all coated in silicone.   To remove the hose I simply disconnected the rope hangers and pulled.  It was a good pull, but not super hard and the hose and insert disconnected from the hull.  On deck I did the same to remove the inert from the hose.    I am going to look into fabricating a brace to lock that hose/insert in place better than the rope hanger set up.

I found the insert had a small patch of pitting type of corrosion and was the source of the leak. The hose was also in poor condition as the surveyor suspected, I was able to tear it by hand. 

 

My vessel was originally delivered from Amel with a Perkins engine, but she was repowered with a TMD 22 by the original owner many years ago.  I have read here that Volvo recommends a 90mm exhaust hose for the TMD22 instead of the 75mm that was used on the Perkins.  I had 90mm hose so I think the insert, I found was the method used during the repower to increase the hose size.  I am repairing the insert and will reinstall it with the new hose.  I attached photos so others with early hull numbers can see what is hidden in that aft corner.

 

The concern I have now is the two fresh water lines that run under the exhaust fitting.  They are copper and where the sea water leak occurred, there is flaky blue corrosion.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how to address the copper corrosion without replacing the lines?   I don’t want to cut the lines because they are in one of the hardest places to access, and not someplace I want to bring a soldering torch.  I am hoping someone knows some sort of chemical treatment to stop the corrosion and protect the lines. 


                      Regards,  John


John Clark

SV Annie  SM 37

Morehead City



Olivier

eric freedman
 

Do you know where Olivier will be on the east coast ?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

 

 

I forgot to include his email address: olivierbeaute@...

He will be on the east coast of the USA next week.

Mark McGovern
SM#440 Cara


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

eric freedman
 

John,

That is exactly what happened to me. The engine overheat buzzer never went on.

Fortunately I had a spare muffler. Mine is now metal.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 2:19 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

 

 

Last March when we left Martinique shortly after purchasing our SM, unbeknownst to us, the seawater inlet hose leading to the seawater pump on the engine developed a crack allowing the pump to suck air instead of water.  I discovered this during the passage when the wind died and I started the engine.  After starting the engine, I immediately thought it sounded wrong….more like a Harley Davidson than a sedate sailing yacht. I opened the engine hatch and found smoke everywhere and smell of hot rubber and plastic, of course this happened in the middle of the night.  Obviously I shut down the engine and woke up the rest of the crew.  We investigated and found no SW flow, checked impeller, found it trashed.  We replaced the impeller, still no flow.  Checked some more and found the hose issue.  Fixed the hose, got water flow….right onto the floor of the engine room!  Found that the plastic Vetus muffler had melted…well by then wind had picked up and I said we will deal with this in the morning and I went to bed.  Next morning I took the muffler off and looked at it closely with my “McGuver glasses.”  I got a piece of plywood and a tube of 5200….and a big bunch of hose clamps and patched over the melted portion, reinstalled and presto back in business before lunchtime.  We got a new muffler in St. Martin , but I kept the old patched one as a spare!  This failure happened so quick, less than 2 minutes, that the engine never overheated.  The only indication was that the exhaust sounded wrong.  I will eventually install an exhaust temp alarm, for this exact reason.   I understand that Amel installed stainless steel mufflers, but the hoses and other fittings can also be damaged quickly when there is no cooling water in the exhaust.

 

(FYI: My SM was repowered by her first owner changing out the original Perkins for the Volvo TMD22, I expect that was when the plastic Vetus was installed.)

 

John Clark

SV Annie SM 37

Morehead City NC


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

eric freedman
 

Bill,

The Borel unit has saved my bacon twice.

You can order it in either the 12 volt or 24 volt version. . If you do ask for a 20 foot length of wire on the unit. I have mine mounted on the port side of the companionway next to the Amel nameplate.

The unit is so simple you do not have to make it more complicated. There is a thermocouple that mounts to the exhaust hose. When the hose is not too hot the thermocouple is open and draws no current. Thus the alarm will not sound.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 10:23 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

 

 

 

Bob,

 

There is already a 12V supply that is active only when the main engine is on...  it runs the blowers.

 

I'll second the what Bill R said about the Onan generator already being protected this way.  Doubling up really doesn't buy you anything except more wires and complexity. But a useful addition to the main drive engine.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Back Creek, Annapolis, MD



---In amelyachtowners@..., <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote :

Has anyone installed a Vetus exhaust temp alarm?  http://www.defender.com/pdf/xh_exhaust_alarm.pdf   https://www.vetus.com/en/search/?q=exhaust+alarm  I know owners have used a Borel alarm.... but this seems to be a good idea also and the price is right.  It has a sound and visual alarm and Vetus says 2 sensors could be attached to one unit so an owner could protect both the engine and generator.  There are 12V and 24V versions and I am curious as to whether there is a convenient way to wire a 12V so it is activated only when either the generator or engine is operating.

 

Bob, KAIMI On the hard in Malta

 


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Thanks everyone, Gary


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

olivierbeaute@ gmail dot com


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

I forgot to include his email address: olivierbeaute@gmail.com

He will be on the east coast of the USA next week.

Mark McGovern
SM#440 Cara


Re: Olivier Beaute Contact Information

mfmcgovern@...
 

Olivier BEAUTE / ATLANTIC YACHT SURVEY
10 allée du Bout dehors
17000 LA ROCHELLE
Tel: +33 546 522 147 Mob: +33 674 028 243
http://atlanticyachtsurvey.com


Olivier Beaute Contact Information

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Does someone have Olivier's contact information?


Thanks,  Gary Silver   SM #335


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Vetus Alarm

Porter McRoberts
 

You guys are awesome!!

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Oct 4, 2017, at 5:13 PM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi John,

We had same meltdown of Vetus plastic muffler last year. Cause was worn drive adapter on cam shaft that turns in the slot of the sea water pump (Perkins M50). Fixed similar to you with pieces of neoprene, 4200, a piece of Katherine's plastic cutting board and lashing with a Spanish windlass. Had spare water pump. 
Yes, surprising how quickly the Vetus plastic melts with no water flow - definitely an argument to have an exhaust temp sensor as waiting for the engine overheat alarm was too long for both of us.
Stay cool,
Craig Briggs, SN#68 Sangaris, underway south of Coinjock, VA


Re: Vetus Alarm

Craig Briggs
 

Hi John,
We had same meltdown of Vetus plastic muffler last year. Cause was worn drive adapter on cam shaft that turns in the slot of the sea water pump (Perkins M50). Fixed similar to you with pieces of neoprene, 4200, a piece of Katherine's plastic cutting board and lashing with a Spanish windlass. Had spare water pump. 
Yes, surprising how quickly the Vetus plastic melts with no water flow - definitely an argument to have an exhaust temp sensor as waiting for the engine overheat alarm was too long for both of us.
Stay cool,
Craig Briggs, SN#68 Sangaris, underway south of Coinjock, VA


Re: Vetus Alarm

John Clark
 

Last March when we left Martinique shortly after purchasing our SM, unbeknownst to us, the seawater inlet hose leading to the seawater pump on the engine developed a crack allowing the pump to suck air instead of water.  I discovered this during the passage when the wind died and I started the engine.  After starting the engine, I immediately thought it sounded wrong….more like a Harley Davidson than a sedate sailing yacht. I opened the engine hatch and found smoke everywhere and smell of hot rubber and plastic, of course this happened in the middle of the night.  Obviously I shut down the engine and woke up the rest of the crew.  We investigated and found no SW flow, checked impeller, found it trashed.  We replaced the impeller, still no flow.  Checked some more and found the hose issue.  Fixed the hose, got water flow….right onto the floor of the engine room!  Found that the plastic Vetus muffler had melted…well by then wind had picked up and I said we will deal with this in the morning and I went to bed.  Next morning I took the muffler off and looked at it closely with my “McGuver glasses.”  I got a piece of plywood and a tube of 5200….and a big bunch of hose clamps and patched over the melted portion, reinstalled and presto back in business before lunchtime.  We got a new muffler in St. Martin , but I kept the old patched one as a spare!  This failure happened so quick, less than 2 minutes, that the engine never overheated.  The only indication was that the exhaust sounded wrong.  I will eventually install an exhaust temp alarm, for this exact reason.   I understand that Amel installed stainless steel mufflers, but the hoses and other fittings can also be damaged quickly when there is no cooling water in the exhaust.

 

(FYI: My SM was repowered by her first owner changing out the original Perkins for the Volvo TMD22, I expect that was when the plastic Vetus was installed.)

 

John Clark

SV Annie SM 37

Morehead City NC


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Halyard & Genoa Sheet Length

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Bill
Thanks for your response.
I couldn't get the link to work but found it under the files section.
Comment in red duly noted.

Best wishes
Soraya

On 2 October 2017 at 18:36, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Go to the FILES section and find "Running Rigging Measurements Super Maramu French & English.xls," or click on this link for a direct downlaod.


Remember that Amel designed the mainsail and mizzen sail halyards to be less than full length...they are designed to be used with small line attached to lower and raise the main and mizzen. 



On Mon, Oct 2, 2017 at 10:13 AM, SV Garulfo svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hello,
If you happen to have the information at hand or have recently replaced yours, could you please let us know the recommended length for the Halyards and Genoa sheet?

Many thanks

Soraya & Thomas 
Garulfo 
Amel 54 #122
Currently in La Linea de la Concepcion, Spain 




Re: Vetus Alarm

greatketch@...
 


Bob,

There is already a 12V supply that is active only when the main engine is on...  it runs the blowers.

I'll second the what Bill R said about the Onan generator already being protected this way.  Doubling up really doesn't buy you anything except more wires and complexity. But a useful addition to the main drive engine.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Back Creek, Annapolis, MD


---In amelyachtowners@..., <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote :

Has anyone installed a Vetus exhaust temp alarm?  http://www.defender.com/pdf/xh_exhaust_alarm.pdf   https://www.vetus.com/en/search/?q=exhaust+alarm  I know owners have used a Borel alarm.... but this seems to be a good idea also and the price is right.  It has a sound and visual alarm and Vetus says 2 sensors could be attached to one unit so an owner could protect both the engine and generator.  There are 12V and 24V versions and I am curious as to whether there is a convenient way to wire a 12V so it is activated only when either the generator or engine is operating.


Bob, KAIMI On the hard in Malta

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Vetus Alarm

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Bob,

I assume that some relays would work, but you may overcomplicate things and set up a reason for failure. And, more importantly, remember the Onan already has an exhaust temperature alarm which shuts the generator OFF. I think it is a good idea to install an alarm on the main engine.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 4:53 AM, rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Has anyone installed a Vetus exhaust temp alarm?  http://www.defender.com/pdf/xh_exhaust_alarm.pdf   https://www.vetus.com/en/search/?q=exhaust+alarm  I know owners have used a Borel alarm.... but this seems to be a good idea also and the price is right.  It has a sound and visual alarm and Vetus says 2 sensors could be attached to one unit so an owner could protect both the engine and generator.  There are 12V and 24V versions and I am curious as to whether there is a convenient way to wire a 12V so it is activated only when either the generator or engine is operating.


Bob, KAIMI On the hard in Malta

 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] some ideas (2)

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Themos,

Thanks,

I checked the signature setup and it is correct, and I checked the outgoing email above and it was correct. But, somehow, it was changed by Yahoo, removing a "dot" between "www" and "amelschool.com."

It never ceases to amaze me what may happen in the world of YAHOO!

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 4:29 AM, themos.tsikas@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello Bill, 


You might want to fix your signature links. The second one has a bad URL. Luckily, I persevered. 

Themos Tsikas



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] some ideas (2)

Olaf RENOS at Yahoo <olaf_renos@...>
 

Hi Bill,

 

That’s really good to know. I thought ABC islands are save while hurricane season.

 

Thanks so much for that important info.

 

BR

Olaf

 

MIA-AMARA, SN No. 135, Martinique

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: 03 October 2017 20:35
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] some ideas (2)

 

 

JP, 

 

You have risk where you are located in Curacao.

 

We experienced 2 hurricanes while in the ABCs in 2007. Hurricane Dean and Felix. 

 

Hurricane Felix turned north and missed us by about 50 miles while we were in Curacao, but Hurricane Dean came close enough to us in Bonaire that 48 hours before landfall, we ran south about 90 miles to Golfo de Cuare near Chichiriviche, Venezuela.

 

You need a hurricane plan while in the ABCs.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

 

 

 

 

 

On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 8:27 AM, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Jean-Pierre,

I agree with you that the best option is avoidance of risk.

That said, when you consider that the coastal areas affected by potential hurricane impact encompass vast areas of the Caribbean, Gulf, and Atlantic coasts, you should count yourself as fortunate to have the opportunity to lie in Curacao during the Hurricane season. Many owners, for various reasons are within the hurricane zone, and don't have the opportunity to move their boats back and forth, to avoid risk. That said, the prudent mariner, if faced with an approaching storm, does have options that can help to avoid serious damage to their boat. 

 

Best Regards,

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

On Sat, Sep 30, 2017 at 09:49 AM, Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Hi Jeff,

 

Totally agree with your math.  The best option is avoidance of the risk.

 

Hence why I’m in Curacao for the Hurricane season.

 

Fair winds,

 

Jean-Pierre Germain

SY Eleuthera, SM 007

 

 

 

On 30 Sep 2017, at 08:28, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Stay In Town:

There are 2 forces acting on a boat tied or anchored.

1:

Force the boat exerts due to it's own mass 

F=ma. m=mass of boat a=(v2-v1)/(t2-t1). What that means is as your boat moves, and tugs on your lines, the harder the wind blows, and the faster it swings and bobs, more force is exerted on your lines. 

2:

Force of the wind on your boat 

F=APCd. a=area, P=(a coefficient)v2  where v=velocity of the wind  Cd are coeficients.

SO...force is equal to the square of the wind velocity.

A 30mph wind exerts a 900unit force.

A 70mph wind exerts a 4900unit force 

A 100mph wind exerts a 10000unit force

Bobbing and tugging more drastically, along with double the wind force, it's easy to see why a hurricane with winds of 100mph will exert TWICE the combined forces on your boat as tropical storm force winds of 70mph would.

 

You need to counteract these forces obviously.

At anchor:

Winds will swing counterclockwise (backing) as the storm passes (assuming the storm passes from east to west). As a result, your boat will swing with it. You need to deploy anchors at angles to account for this.

Most harbors and bays bottom sediment is either sand, mud, clay, or a combo of this, but generally on the soft side. I prefer an anchor that will present a perpendicular surface on it's flukes, driving them into the bottom, and presenting maximum resistance to the pull of the anchor line

I used a combination of a dansforth  (which held) and a plow (which dragged) while Spirit was tied up and also anchored between piers at the marina to weather Irma's tropical force winds.

 

I plan to buy a fortress anchor. Look them up.

 

In the marina: Between piers, NEVER in a slip.

Anticipate the wind shift and tie up so you will have enough lines holding you as this occurs.

Get some tires. Slip them over the pilings you plan to tie to. Wrap a piece of chain around the tire, and tie up to the chain. The tires will flex, and dampen the motion, lessening the force on the lines (see F=ma)

 

I plan to buy some spectra line to supplement my line inventory. Expensive, but light and easy to store. 

I was lucky that Jose Mendes (owner of Marina Pescaderia) had enough heavy nylon line for me to purchase to tie Spirit up to weather Irma. Damn lucky. Get it now, so you have it when you need it, you might not be so lucky. 400 feet of Spectra would take up less space then 100 feet of good nylon line. 

 

Next up...Get out of Dodge. But not today.

I hope this stuff is helpful to someone. 

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14