Date   
Re: Lens-shaped bolt nuts

James Alton
 

Gerhard,

   These same nuts are used all over my Maramu, many thanks for posting a source.  I will add this to my file.

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 12, 2019, at 6:46 AM, Gerhard Mueller via Groups.Io <carcode@...> wrote:

I don't know if Amel has used these lens-shaped bolt nuts for their other or later boats but I have them found at several places in my Sharki.
After searching for a long time I have found them at this seller and they sell them in small quantities also: See attachment.

--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece <Linsenmutter-VS8453.PDF>

Re: Cracks on bow sprit

Jarek Zemlo
 

Thank you very much for all feedback re. crack at the bow. Once I get feedback from AMEL will share with all.

Best regards

--
Jarek Zemlo

Re: Desperate plea for an alternator/charging problem - Amel Euros 41, 1976, MD21a engine

Andrew Eaves
 

Good to know on that also re the 24V.

Re: Down wind pole corrosion damage

Thomas Kleman
 

Bill- thanks as always for your info and speculation. The rivets all over the pole are quite brittle with heads falling out so I'm concerned water ingress and corrosion played a large part. I found the damage as I was preparing to fix several broken rivets. When the welder and I do the autopsy we will know the cause.  The pole been rigged correctly the handful of times I've had occasion to use them. Not sure how long this damage has been here as it was mostly under the wear guard and thus hidden. The pole is of simple 3 part construction so no big deal.....but I might add some corrosion protection or sealant to the joint and rivet areas.

Tom and Kirstin
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422

Deck Repairs to Amel Mango

Ian Bone
 

Hello all,
I am contemplating the repair of the decks of my Amel Mango. The cracks seem to go down some way.
I was wondering if anyone had any experience with repairs of this nature and what process and products they used for the job.
Any advice and insights would be gratefully received.
Ian Bone
Amel Mango Hull #63


Lens-shaped bolt nuts

Gerhard Mueller
 

I don't know if Amel has used these lens-shaped bolt nuts for their other or later boats but I have them found at several places in my Sharki.
After searching for a long time I have found them at this seller and they sell them in small quantities also: See attachment.

--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Volvo D3 110i-A raw water pump and damper

ngtnewington Newington
 

Regarding replacing the Raw water pump Volvo 21141637

It looks like there is also the option  of the Johnson pump VP0030DA as a replacement that is about half the price of the Volvo one. Thanks for that info Arno.

I reckon that the lip seal must have worn a slight groove in the shaft as Gerhard suggests, because 500 hours is not that much…..

So now we narrow it down to buying the new shaft kit and /or the Johnson pump if I can find it in the UK.

Given how important this is I think I will buy a new Johnson pump and a new kit for the existing Volvo, the full service kit that includes a new shaft. Then I can replace the old with the new and rebuild the old and keep it ready to go.

I am gradually building up my spare parts for the Volvo D3. As I have some extensive cruising plans. 

I am a keen reader of this forum, as many of us are. It is very useful and interesting. There is lots of knowledge and experience out there and I am delighted to tap into it…

On that note, DAMPER PLATES. My engine hours are roughly 2600. I notice a gentle “clunk” when I engage forward gear. It is quite normal for most boats but I get the feeling it is slightly more pronounced than it used to be. It is not silky smooth, such that you do not even notice going into gear. What should I expect?

This is on my "keep an eye on it" list.

Does anyone know when it is typical in terms of engine hours that the damper rubbers need changing?  I have done this job on a 50hp Kubota whilst the engine was out of the boat and it was not difficult. However on the Amel, I would rather leave the engine where it is but notice that since the C drive is pretty much fixed and best left alone that means sliding the engine aft. It looks like this is realistic, one could use a halyard to lift say 90% of the weight then  pull the bolts from the mounts and slide it aft on the steel frame, without mucking up the adjustments on the flexible mounts. Has anyone experience doing this on the 54? 

Nick

S/Y Amelia 
AML 54-019

wiring of the genset fan

eric freedman
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: eric <kimberlite@...>
To: Amel Owners <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Date: November 11, 2019 at 10:13 PM
Subject: wiring of the genset fan

Bill,

The Load (the fan )  is connected to the to  the capacitor as well as the brown wire both being in parallel are then connected to the other side of the fuse.

The black wire is hooked up to the other side of the capacitor.

If the load was connected in series with  the capacitor, it would be the brown wire connected to the capacitor and then the other side of the capacitor connected to  the fuse–Which they are not.

Fair Winds,

Eric


 

Re: wiring of the genset fan

eric freedman
 


On November 11, 2019 at 10:13 PM eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Bill,

The Load (the fan )  is connected to the to  the capacitor as well as the brown wire both being in parallel are then connected to the other side of the fuse.

The black wire is hooked up to the other side of the capacitor.

If the load was connected in series with  the capacitor, it would be the brown wire connected to the capacitor and then the other side of the capacitor connected to  the fuse–Which they are not.

Fair Winds,

Eric


 

wiring of the genset fan

eric freedman
 

Bill,

The Load (the fan )  is connected to the to  the capacitor as well as the brown wire both being in parallel are then connected to the other side of the fuse.

The black wire is hooked up to the other side of the capacitor.

If the load was connected in series with  the capacitor, it would be the brown wire connected to the capacitor and then the other side of the capacitor connected to  the fuse–Which they are not.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Re: Wave slap / banging under the stern

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Matt;

 

We’re not on board. Will look through photos to see if I have one to post.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Salatino via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2019 8:48 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Wave slap / banging under the stern

 

Mohammed, photos?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


On Nov 11, 2019, at 10:53 AM, Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hello Stefan;

 

After the first season aboard Kokomo about 5 years ago, we started looking for a solution for the “banging” you refer to. After a few iterations of trying different solutions, we came up with our final solution that we affectionately refer to as the “slap slap device”.

 

It basically consists of two layers of mesh fabric (the same material cargo straps are made of), strengthened by 1 inch mesh straps sewed in both directions every 18 inches. The two layers are then sewed together forming several pockets that we have inserted 2 mm waterproof foam for floatation and sound insulation. This is custom made to fit the entire stern from the trailing edge of the rudder to the back of the transom and all the way to the sides about 12 inches above the water line. It has several long straps for attachment to the lifelines/stanchions.

 

We simply deploy from the stern and slip it under the stern from the sides. We just attach four of the straps to the lifelines (just at the forward/rudder end) and let the rest happily float and move up and down with the water movement, under the stern. This provides an insulated barrier between the water line and the hull, where the hull rises out of the water at the stern and the sound originates from.

 

It takes one person about 5 minutes to deploy and retrieve. We simply fold and hang on the life lines, after retrieval, to dry.

 

This will handle almost all conditions that we typically anchor in, where the boat is facing the wind and waves. It does not do as well when larger waves are coming from the stern, but does help to dampen the sound (this is not a common condition). We also deploy her at marinas/harbors where small wavelets are present. As soon as deployed, it transforms the master cabin from a drum machine, into a quiet place to rest and relax. It is on extremely rare occasions that we have to move to the forward cabin due to sound.

 

We have now utilized our slap slap device for 5 seasons in the Med. It has been used in all conditions from 2-3 knot currents to 35-40 knot winds. She is almost like new and should last for a few more years. It has made a huge difference for us, as the master cabin was one of the major selling points of the 54 and we could not imagine, not being to utilize it.

 

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stefan Schaufert via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2019 5:48 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Wave slap / banging under the stern

 

Hello to all,

today a less technical issue.
Do somebody got a (temporarily) solution against the banging (and often really annyoing) waves under the stern/ owners bed of the AMEL 53/ 54/ 55 - when on anchor?

Best regards
Stefan
A54 119 Lady Charlyette - Porto Santo

Re: Antal 120x18 Composite Fibre jib block

Duane Siegfri
 

Thanks for the replies. I soaked and rinsed and they have improved markedly.  I plan on adding a lube as well. 

Re: Raw water pump on Volvo D3

Arno Luijten
 

Or but this: https://bigblueoceanmarine.com/jpr-vp0030da-jmp-marine-volvo-penta-replacement-engine-cooling-pump-replaces-volvo-penta-21141637/

I bought one and could not see the difference with the VP version. 

It will start its job tomorrow. 

Re: Antal 120x18 Composite Fibre jib block

Arnold Mente
 

Hi,

I grase my cars and blocks with "Harken one Drop" it is excellent!

Arnold 

SY Zephyr
SM 203

Am 11.11.2019 um 23:06 schrieb Joerg Esdorn via Groups.Io <jhe1313@...>:

I asked Antal how to service the blocks on my boat.  They said rinsing with fresh water and a little grease.  


joerg esdorn
A55 Kincsem




--
SY Zephyr SM203

Re: Antal 120x18 Composite Fibre jib block

Joerg Esdorn
 

I asked Antal how to service the blocks on my boat.  They said rinsing with fresh water and a little grease.  


joerg esdorn
A55 Kincsem

Re: Wave slap / banging under the stern

sbmesasailor
 

We use swimming noodles as well (cut into smaller pieces so they closely follow the curvature of the hull).

Dennis
Libertad
Maramu 121

Re: Victron Quattro charger/inverter installation

rossirossix4
 
Edited

Hi James,
You may want to consider a 3 position high capacity rotary switch.  This is what we did when we added an inverter.  Our inverter had an internal transfer switch which we did not use.  Easiest to explain by looking at photos first.   https://photos.app.goo.gl/xoac3UQCHckm7TPN8    It is pretty straight forward although it may sound a bit complicated here.  We knew what we wanted but we used a knowledgeable electrician at Manoel Island Yacht Yard (one of the best yards in Europe, IMHO) to make sure that everything was safe and correct. Where it enters the "220V white box" above the sink, we disconnected the wire that comes from the Amel automatic transfer switch--this leaves the Amel auto shorepower/generator function intact.  The wire was shortened and connected to the 3 way rotary switch--1,5 9 on the table.  The inverter was wired to the batteries at the 100amp charger with an appropriately sized 24v breaker (ABYC requirement and a good idea).  The 220V output then goes to an RCD as soon as it exits the inverter (this our electrician insisted upon even though there is an RCD at the "white box".  (RCD provides shock safety for 220V European much like GFIs in the US but by measuring current return discrepancies vs ground fault).  Then the inverter output goes to the rotary switch--3,7,11 on the rotary switch wiring table.  This gives total electrical isolation between the gen/shorepower and the inverter.  Whether you choose to switch the ground as well can be discussed with your electrician--switching the ground allows total isolation, while keeping it continuous is usually code (to guard against ground failure).  The corresponding outputs (2,6,10) and (4,8,12) go to the "white box" via 2-3 conductor wires OR, as we did by 1 wire after shunting 2-4;6-8;10-12 with a single 3 conductor exit wire to the white box.

Advantages of the 3 way rotary switch, in our opinion and experience are: 1)complete isolation between gen/shorepower and inverter  2)total disconection when switching between between sources--NO connection as you pass through 0 position, and zero connections if you place the switch in the center position--which we do before starting the generator or plugging to shore power  3)simplicity of operation 4)allows you to use devices--which we do--such as inverter powering the water heater OR washing machine.  We heat water when we have excess solar and can do clothes washing with the inverter (specially handy when motoring without robbing your battery bank--you can even do a 30 minute express wash while you de-anchor and exit an anchorage or enter an anchorage and complete anchoring) 5)controls--generator, inverter, and selector switch can be located together. 6)safety features with 24V breaker and RCD and high (63amp) capacity of switch and wire used.  Despite its capacity it is reasonably sized and selector does not look out of place.

In our case the watermaker may not be operated as it exceeds our inverter capacity and we don't run the hotwater heater and the washing machine together, or say a hair dryer and microwave.  In the future, with lithium batteries we may swap out for a larger inverter.  If capacity is exceeded  either the inverter and the 24V breaker that feeds it will shut down.

Switch is relatively inexpensive and made for this type of application https://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Rotary-Changeover-Switch-SZW26-63-660V-63A-3-Position-Phase/233337561113?epid=1056139592&hash=item365400a019:g:DXEAAOSwAfVdxE4X
also Amazon or search for SZW26 63 660V 63A  .  Priced so that you can carry a spare.  Blue Sea makes a similar version that does not require output shunting but is significantly more expensive https://www.bluesea.com/products/9019/AC_Rotary_Switch_-_OFF_%2B_2_Positions_240V_AC_65A

The only complication we encountered was extending the length of the selector stem to go through the plywood--the guys at Manoel did not want to risk high temps by welding and used a tube and JB weld or similar as I recall.  Don't forget to cover the back of the rotary switch--even though it is up and out of the way like the generator switch and behind a baffle.

Again pics are at https://photos.app.goo.gl/xoac3UQCHckm7TPN8  one of the photos show both 24V breaker (waterproof) and RCD box (probably could have been more compact, I think it was for a double)

Let us know if you have questions.

Bob and Suzanne, SM 429 KAIMI

Re: Down wind pole corrosion damage

 

The black rubber thing you removed is the chafing shoulder where the short pole rides on the main mast rigging. My guess is that sometime during the life of your Amel and while sailing with this pole, the yellow "down guy" was too loose, broke, or the operator failed to rig it. I think a temporary repair is risky because I don't believe any of us know the "design load." The aluminum tube should probably be replaced.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 10:54 AM Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:
A small crack emerged from under the black cover on the inner down wind pole. I drilled out the cover's retaining rivets and saw the full damage. Visiting the local welder to discuss options. Glad I found this prior to February's Panama City to Marquesas passage. 

Tom and Kirstin 
SM2K 422
SV L'ORIENT

Re: Raw water pump on Volvo D3

Gerhard Mueller
 

Hard to say without inspecting the pump. Often a lip seal makes a groove in the shaft after some times. Then it is time to change for a new shaft also.
However when the surface of the shaft at the lip seal area is OK, only changing the lip seal is sufficient.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Re: Wave slap / banging under the stern

Thomas Kleman
 

Have to agree with Mark and the others. Having cruised for a while now, during sleep your sailing brain seems to segregate normal noises (waves, wind, shrimp, rain, thunder, etc) from noises you shouldn't hear (like voices for example) and will get you out of bed when necessary. I'd wait a while before making an investment here.

Tom and Kirstin
S V L'ORIENT
SM 2K 422