Date   

Electronic technician to Repair Onan PCBs

 

Wanted for all Amel Owners: Board-level PCB electronics technician to diagnose and repair Onan Printed Circuit Board, Control (PCB). As some of you know, the company that designed and manufactured Onan Electronic Control Boards has closed permanently due to COVID. There are many different models of this PCB, sometimes different PCBs within the same model numbers. These PCBs do not last forever. Do you know someone and can share contact information?

image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


Re: Bonding and Solar Power System

Adam Body
 

Bill, thank you for your valuable and very welcome input. Just a couple of further questions: what is the optimum RF ground circuit for VHF, AIS etc? and, lightning protection: what circuit does/should a lightning strike surge utilise? We are still undertaking repairs since a strike early last year!

 
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994


Mounting of the 175 amp alternator on a Yanmar

eric freedman
 

I just finished installing a new Yanmar in Kimberlite.

However I forgot to note how the spacers were for the feet of the big alternator in the photo above.

Would someone please send me a photo from the side of your mounted alternator .

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 


Re: Looking for a buyers broker.

Courtney Gorman
 

Talk with Joel Potter he’ll know if there are any good boats on the west coast 
Cheers 


On Mar 14, 2021, at 1:23 PM, Alex BAIZEAU <alexandre.baizeau@...> wrote:

Greetings everyone,

My partner Emma and I are looking for a reputable buyer’s broker in Europe, for a Maramu or Santorin.

We got in touch with Michel Charpentier but unfortunately he retired. 

We are both Francophone but live in Squamish British Columbia.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Have a great day

Alex 


Looking for a buyers broker.

Alex BAIZEAU
 

Greetings everyone,

My partner Emma and I are looking for a reputable buyer’s broker in Europe, for a Maramu or Santorin.

We got in touch with Michel Charpentier but unfortunately he retired. 

We are both Francophone but live in Squamish British Columbia.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Have a great day

Alex 


Re: Main sheet tackle broken catch

 

I am not sure if you are asking me, but my answer is always in those circumstances. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse 
Amel Owners Yacht School
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com 
Yacht School Calendar: www.preparetocastoff.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


   

On Sat, Mar 13, 2021, 3:54 PM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Absolutely correct Bill....but sometimes things happen.....
So, why did they change that block arrangement to the weldment on the 54?
Maybe because those blocks are a real pain to remove, if you ever have to.
I just think the weldment is a much better solution and those blocks disappeared forever when the SM was out of production.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Galley sink drain

Alan Leslie
 

Thanks Nick,

Could you post some photos, I don;t quite understand how your system works.

Thanks
Alan
Elyse SM437  


Re: Main sheet tackle broken catch

Alan Leslie
 

Absolutely correct Bill....but sometimes things happen.....
So, why did they change that block arrangement to the weldment on the 54?
Maybe because those blocks are a real pain to remove, if you ever have to.
I just think the weldment is a much better solution and those blocks disappeared forever when the SM was out of production.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Bonding and Solar Power System

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Adam,

the "bonding" at the rudder that connects the zincs with all pieces of metal that have contact with salt water is to protect these metals (avoiding galvanic problems). It is not to be used as "electrical ground" or earth connection. Therefore you should not connect any ground/earth connection from any electrical device to this grounding point.

in addition to that, imho, there is no need for connecting the ground of your solar panels, they will work fine if not grounded :-)

fair winds, herbert
KALI MERA, SN120, back in Mazatlan NCB


Re: Main sheet tackle broken catch

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill. With you on this. II would add use the preventer when running with eased sheets. I also agree with you about weak points. If the boom attachment fails it is an easy fix. Broken boom or rig?, Oh boy. So if the boom attachment fails and we beef it up perhaps we are advised to modify technique. 

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 13 March 2021 at 18:18 Bill Kinney <cruisingconsulting@...> wrote:

Just a couple of general observations on the mainsheet to boom attachment on Super Maramus.  I do not think this part is underdesigned.  I think the issue is that boats are sometimes sailed in ways that the designer did not anticipate or allow for.  

We had Harmonie for over two years before I first heard about this issue on another SM.  I saw the damage, and pretty quickly afterwards heard of another boat with the same issue.  I realized I hadn't looked at this part closely on our boat, so put that on the checklist.  A detailed inspection showed that it looked exactly as it did when it left the factory.  This after 22 years sailing on two circumnavigations, and accumulating well over 100,000 sea miles. Based on what I saw, there was no reason to replace or change anything. So the idea that the design was faulty or fragile didn't seem to make sense.

It took me a week of thinking why this disparity might be before the light bulb lite up and the connection was made.  A rigger with a lot of Amel experience confirmed the answer:  Accidental gybes.  They can put a HUGE load on all the parts of the rig, especially the mainsheet attachment.  Everybody has them, (hopefully rarely!)  but with the way the SM is set up we can really reduce, or completely eliminate, damage done if we sail the boat "right".

The key to reducing the shock load on the boom is to ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS move the traveler to the side of the boat where the boom is eased out.  That minimizes the length of the sheet, and hence the swing of the boom and the peak velocity of the boom during a gybe. NEVER sail the boat with the boom eased far out over the rail using only the sheet while keeping the traveler centered.  It is very inefficient in terms of sail shape, but much more importantly it is potentially risking damage to many parts of the rig if things go wrong.

I am convinced you can beef up this part all you want, but it you have a full flying gybe, stuff can still break.  I have seen booms snapped in half, and rigs taken down by accidental gybes. The forces can be darn close to irresistible, so everything that can be done to reduce those forces, should be done, and done every time we turn downwind.


Re: Bonding and Solar Power System

 

Adam, In my experience, many marine electricians have difficulty explaining this to you. I am not a marine electrician, but let me help you, at least, I hope, somewhat. I really hope that this does not sound like a lecture as all I want to do is share some experience with you which will hopefully cause you to research this issue more.

You wrote, "It seems that these wires should and must be connected to an earthing point."  This is probably technically true, but probably only if the DC voltage is above 50VDC. The purpose would be to protect you from an electrical shock. Almost everyone agrees that DC electrical shock protection is not needed below 30VDC. Some solar panel installations have been done in series with potential voltages of 3 panels reaching 70VDC. If a wire chafes against the arch, the arch could potentially deliver an electrical shock if you are somehow grounded. The solar controllers I have seen do not have an Earth connection. BUT, even though there may be some risk from these very remote things unless you are connected to shore power you really do not have any available protection from an Earth circuit. However, this may be a reason to wire solar panels in a parallel circuit rather than in series.
image.png

Earth is not Bonding. 

Earth is a safety circuit used on AC current systems. An AC "Earth" circuit is used to protect you from an electric shock. It does this by providing a path (a protective conductor) for a fault current to flow to earth, which is literally a copper bar driven into the earth. Earth is also needed in a GFI circuit to switch off the electric current to the circuit that has a fault. Earth is for AC circuits, not DC circuits. In the US earth wires are green. In the EU, and elsewhere earth wires are yellow/green. Amel's bonding system also uses yellow/green wires.

Bonding is connecting all of the items that may be in contact with raw water together and terminating at an underwater anode. The purpose of bonding is to reduce corrosion and electrolysis caused by stray-current and galvanic corrosion. Normally bonding connections are made to all metal items that may be in contact with raw water. Amel takes bonding to the next level and connects even those metal items that are in the freshwater system which are electrically in contact with raw water via the watermaker.

SSB Ground Plane: Amel built your boat with a Ground Plane for an SSB radio. The Ground Plane is connected to boding if you do not have an SSB.
image.png

Isolated Ground is used by Amel on main engines and generators, which is a method of disconnecting the 12-volt negative from the engine block.
DC Ground: Circuits powered by batteries do not have an Earth circuit. Batteries do not have a connection to the physical earth. So most DC-powered circuits, especially by batteries, have a floating ground, not Earth. There are 2 DC Ground circuits on your Amel, 12-volt (starting) and 24-volt (house). The negatives of these should not be connected and they should be isolated. Some owners have used a 24-volt to 12-volt converter to charge the starting battery from the house bank. An "Isolated Converter" should be used in this case.

Other stuff:
Although American Boat & Yacht Council (ABYC) requires DC Negative, AC Earth, and the Bonding System to be connected as one, I personally think that they are wrong and I know of serious issues caused by the connection to DC ground to Bonding. The Amel Bonding system is connected to the AC Earth circuit.

Back to your arch: I am not sure of a need to connect the arch to Bonding, but I assume that it could be argued that it should be connected for the same reason that Amel, beginning with the 54,  connected the masts and rigging to bonding. I assume that this was an effort to reduce corrosion. I personally think that it might have had the reverse effect. I have often noticed the increase in paint bubbling on the rig of 54s and later models and the increase of corrosion of the rails and standing rigging. Some people point to other reasons. I simply do not know, but I believe it is coincidently suspicious.

It is not as simple as some people make it out to be.

I hope this helps.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 10:09 PM Adam Body <adamgcbody@...> wrote:
This post is a continuation of the recent discussion about the rudder post and galvanic protection system. I have discovered that the two green wires that had been disconnected from Flora's bonding system (at the rudder post) are the earth wires from the solar array/panel frame at the stern and from the solar charge-controller/battery charger.  It seems that these wires should and must be connected to an earthing point, so I am at  loss as to why they would be disconnected.  Was it an oversight? Does anyone have some experience on earthing their solar array frame and the associated controller? 
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994


Re: Housing for Climma Switch assembly

Peter de Groot
 

Thanks Ryan and Kelly and Bill.
Coastal Climate Control is working on it.  We’re trying to determine the best substitute control module that will fit.

Peter


Re: Main sheet tackle broken catch

Bill Kinney
 

Just a couple of general observations on the mainsheet to boom attachment on Super Maramus.  I do not think this part is underdesigned.  I think the issue is that boats are sometimes sailed in ways that the designer did not anticipate or allow for.  

We had Harmonie for over two years before I first heard about this issue on another SM.  I saw the damage, and pretty quickly afterwards heard of another boat with the same issue.  I realized I hadn't looked at this part closely on our boat, so put that on the checklist.  A detailed inspection showed that it looked exactly as it did when it left the factory.  This after 22 years sailing on two circumnavigations, and accumulating well over 100,000 sea miles. Based on what I saw, there was no reason to replace or change anything. So the idea that the design was faulty or fragile didn't seem to make sense.

It took me a week of thinking why this disparity might be before the light bulb lite up and the connection was made.  A rigger with a lot of Amel experience confirmed the answer:  Accidental gybes.  They can put a HUGE load on all the parts of the rig, especially the mainsheet attachment.  Everybody has them, (hopefully rarely!)  but with the way the SM is set up we can really reduce, or completely eliminate, damage done if we sail the boat "right".

The key to reducing the shock load on the boom is to ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS move the traveler to the side of the boat where the boom is eased out.  That minimizes the length of the sheet, and hence the swing of the boom and the peak velocity of the boom during a gybe. NEVER sail the boat with the boom eased far out over the rail using only the sheet while keeping the traveler centered.  It is very inefficient in terms of sail shape, but much more importantly it is potentially risking damage to many parts of the rig if things go wrong.

I am convinced you can beef up this part all you want, but it you have a full flying gybe, stuff can still break.  I have seen booms snapped in half, and rigs taken down by accidental gybes. The forces can be darn close to irresistible, so everything that can be done to reduce those forces, should be done, and done every time we turn downwind.


Bonding and Solar Power System

Adam Body
 

This post is a continuation of the recent discussion about the rudder post and galvanic protection system. I have discovered that the two green wires that had been disconnected from Flora's bonding system (at the rudder post) are the earth wires from the solar array/panel frame at the stern and from the solar charge-controller/battery charger.  It seems that these wires should and must be connected to an earthing point, so I am at  loss as to why they would be disconnected.  Was it an oversight? Does anyone have some experience on earthing their solar array frame and the associated controller? 
--
Adam Body "Flora"   SM128 Annee 1994


Re: Galley sink drain

Nick Fowle SM 404 Rascal <svrascal@...>
 

This is still the case on Rascal. Small grey water tank is still there  under the floorboards under the galley sink. The pump is mounted in the engine room and  so far it all works pretty well. I am still careful about what goes into it with regards waste etc (no coffee grounds and as little as possible with regards fine particles etc so not sure what difference it really makes to the overall grey water management across the two bilges. 

The tank is very easy to clean and maintain. Being the new owner I am unable to comment on the impact on the main grey water bilge, but having cleaned out both bilges over the past month, I know which one I would rather clean out on a regular basis.

I understand the concerns about the integrity of the bulkheads and ho this could be jeopardised if the installation was not structurally sound. 

Happy to send photos of the set up if required, and I am sure that previous owners will have their own opinions, as will other SM owners with far more experience of ownership than myself, but for me, for now it stays...

Nick
SM 404
SV Rascal
Antigua



‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Thursday, March 11, 2021 1:32 PM, Paul Guenette via groups.io <paulguenette@...> wrote:

Hi Alan,

I was onboard Rascal SM-404 a few years ago. One of the previous owners had installed a grey water sump kit, (like an off the shelf marine shower / grey water sump kit), under the galley sink which then was plumbed into a Y installed prior to hull the exit point of the main through hull. It was a simple set up which seemed to work well and did not require adding another through hull. 

Paul
Aramis SM-444
Comox, BC, Canada


Re: What is this?

hanspeter baettig
 

This are encaps for the
Membranes of the Desal Watermaker
Hanspeter
Tamango 2
SM16
Dom Rep

------ Original Nachricht ------
Am Donnerstag, 11. Mär, 2021 um 14:18, Martin Birkhoff schrieb:

Hallo to the group,

recently I found to pieces of POM but I have no idea what they are made for.
Any idea?

Thanks

Martin Birkhoff

Mago del Sur - 54#40


Re: Main sheet tackle broken catch

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Matti,

We have had this issue in the past...the original is not a very good solution to a simple issue.
On the 54 they didn't use this system but had a plate welded to the underside of the boom.
When our last piece broke, our rigger made up a custom alloy plate and welded it into the slot underside of the boom.
He used a dyneema soft shackle to attach the block to this plate...much better!

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437 


Re: replacement relais for sidepower bowthruster on an 54

Martin Birkhoff
 

Bill,
 
thanks for the page. I am happy to see that we did renew the seals exactly the way you describe.
 
Martin 
 
-----
Martin und Anke Birkhoff
SY Mago del Sur

Basin des Chalutiers, Vieux Port
17000 La Rochelle
France
(0)173-2351308 (please add +49 calling from non German net)
mbirkhoff@... / ankebirkhoff@...
sy-magodelsur.de
 
 
Gesendet: Freitag, 12. März 2021 um 13:51 Uhr
Von: "CW Bill Rouse" <brouse@...>
An: "main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Notification" <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] replacement relais for sidepower bowthruster on an 54
Martin,
 
I am not sure that Lior's seal information is complete. Amel installs neoprene seals externally and internally on this bow thruster's lower unit 60mm tube. Here is a page from my Amel Book which illustrates the seals that Amel SAV will ship you for your bow thruster.
 
Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
 
+1 832-380-4970 | brouse@...
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
View My Training Calendar

 
On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 5:42 AM Martin Birkhoff <mbirkhoff@...> wrote:

Dear Bill, dear Lior,

thank you for pic and information! 

Martin

Mago del Sur 54#40

 

 


Re: List of Amels

Brent Cameron
 

I have uploaded all of the brochures available on the Amel Web Site (some of them were buried down where they are't visible from the main page) into the files section of this forum here:

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/files/Amel%20Brochures

A lot of them are French only but there are some are in English, German and Russian versions also.  
--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Communication Service Clients AMEL / Communication about AMEL Customer service

Brent Cameron
 

It shows up in their "Story" on their web page.  I have uploaded that to the files section here.  https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/files/Amel%20Brochures/Our%20story%20-%20AMEL.pdf
--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

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