Date   

Re: Turbo Rebuild

philipp.sollberger@...
 

Hi Paul,

I had the problem with my old turbo charger that it didn't activate because it was seized.
I asked the technician from Secodi in La Rochelle.
They tried to rebuild it but unfortunately they couldn't because the turbo was totally full of solid carbon and we couldn't change the rotor wheel.
As last solution they have searched for a new one and they installed it.
Since then I'm happy with my new turbo charger.

To rebuild a turbo by a technichian is possible, but I think, it is only successful, if you realize the non function just at the first time and you deinstall  it and rebuild it by a engine marine turbo specialist.

I have the same pn from perkins installed this early summer and I paid for the whole turbo charger reparation round 1 K€ with VAT.

How is the situation in the states I don't know. But I'm sure that they can deliver it also from Europe to USA  or Caribbean.

Good luck and fair winds.
I have deep feelings for all the damaged people and yachts by hurricane Irma and Maria.

Philipp
Félicie SM124  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maitenance

JOHN HAYES
 

Hi from ST Petersberg

Well without the benefit of recent emails I tipped a couple of litres of bleach down each shower sump which got rid of the smell for a few days but it returned.....

So then got hold of some liquid clothes washing soap and tipped a couple of litres down each shower sump. This has dealt to the issue for 8 months now.

Best 

John Hayes (normally in NZ)

On 20/09/2017, at 4:36 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

It is impossible to stop the bilge from smelling, but it is easy to keep the smell out of the boat.


The previous owner of Harmonie came up with this one, so I can not claim credit, but it is the best kind of idea, simple, low tech, and totally effective.

Where the hoses drain into the bilge, use three elbows and three short lengths of hose to make little "U" traps.   Works a charm.  Best if you make them so they are easily removable for easier access when it is time to clean the bilge.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Feedback

karkauai
 

Hi Thomas,
I don't have the GO, but use my Iridium phone with AxcessPoint gadget that creates a wifi hotspot similar to the GO.  I found that Signal was frequently lost and erratic.  I'm just adding a permanent antenna on my new arch, will report on its efficacy.
Kent
SM243
Kristy



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maitenance

Aldo Roldan
 

Have you tried vinegar (disolved with water in various proportions)?  It works for cleaning, for glass, mirrors for mold, for musty wood, and for odors.  For many applications it beats the manufactured supermarket type products.  We have become great fans of this humble traditional product.


On Sep 20, 2017, at 6:28 AM, jhe1313@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

thanks much for everyone's input.  I'm surprised nobody is using something to cut down on the smell.  3 days after a thorough cleaning with wetvac and all, it started smelling again.  The smell comes back up through the hoses in the galley and heads.  We're very "careful" with what goes down the sink but let's face it, something will always go down and it seems there should be a solution that keeps the smell away.  I've been experimenting with various products - I found a bilge cleaner in a small harbor in Italy that worked pretty well but it's used up now and I can't buy it again.  Cheers Joerg


Re: Bilge maitenance

greatketch@...
 

It is impossible to stop the bilge from smelling, but it is easy to keep the smell out of the boat.

The previous owner of Harmonie came up with this one, so I can not claim credit, but it is the best kind of idea, simple, low tech, and totally effective.

Where the hoses drain into the bilge, use three elbows and three short lengths of hose to make little "U" traps.   Works a charm.  Best if you make them so they are easily removable for easier access when it is time to clean the bilge.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Patrick McAneny
 

Paul. I am dealing with a turbine that is not spinning freely , and started the previous thread . I would be taking  the turbo off this week to clean ,if possible , if not send it out to rebuild. I am reluctant to remove it now as Hurricane Maria may approach the east coast next week and I want to be able to move my boat. We are planning to leave on a trip down the C Bay in about a week and won't have time to rebuild before we leave . I was wondering if we did not push the throttle beyond 2000 rpm (top rpm now) if it would be safe to operate the boat without doing any damage to the engine. I had this turbo rebuilt three years ago at a cost of aprox. $ 800.00 . I am presently looking for the name of the turbo shop , to use again if needed .
Good Luck ,
Pat
SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Sep 19, 2017 5:25 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 
Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  

So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  

Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  

Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  

And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  

So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  

OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  

Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120

Paul
SM215
SV Trillium



Re: Bilge maitenance

jhe1313@...
 

thanks much for everyone's input.  I'm surprised nobody is using something to cut down on the smell.  3 days after a thorough cleaning with wetvac and all, it started smelling again.  The smell comes back up through the hoses in the galley and heads.  We're very "careful" with what goes down the sink but let's face it, something will always go down and it seems there should be a solution that keeps the smell away.  I've been experimenting with various products - I found a bilge cleaner in a small harbor in Italy that worked pretty well but it's used up now and I can't buy it again.  Cheers Joerg


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Raymarine or B&G

Ron Hynes <riffhynes@...>
 

Last Summer I had trouble with my B&G Autopilot.  I called their service department in the UK but due to overflow I was told routed to Germany.  A very helpful tech ran me through a few tests and told me my Rudder Indicator had failed.  I obtained a new one for about 385 Euros.  Installed and no change in the operation.  Again, I called tech support in the UK.  This time I was asked for my "Installation Certificate Number".  I called the dealer where I bought the autopilot, radar, wind and speed, VHF, etc. (boat had been struck by lightning), but there was no answer.  I had remembered the previous year that the dealer shutdown for a 2-week vacation and although I didn't remmember the specific dates, thought this might be the reason.  I again called the UK to relay the fact that my dealer was not answering and that I had no idea what an ICN was.  They too called the dealer and confirmed he wasn't answering.

BUT all the information was in their computer.  They knew the serial number of my unit and when it had been purchased.

I learned that B&G markets their products at retail through normal marine supply houses but also has certified installers who have paid 2500 Euros to attend training.  The difference for the consumer is that in the event of a warranty issue, if you have a ICN, the service is done on your vessel at no charge.  For those that simply purchased the equipment from a retailer, you are on the hook for labor, travel, shipping, etc.

Since my problem was obviously the Autopilot computer (I could activate the mechanism, the rudder indicator was new and that's the entire system aside from the display and the keypad), I said why not take my credit card number and charge it for the computer and when I return the defective unit credit me back the charge.  Oh no, we can't do that.  We can only ship the replacement unit to a qualified dealer who will then make an appointment with you to install the computer.  I was to pay the dealer independently for his time.  I ended up paying just over 200 Euros and as it turns out was worth every penny as the tech from Dahlberg in Palma de Marjorca was excellent and adjusted the AP so that it worked better than it ever had before.

I'm a little miffed, however, over the entire episode.  How is a consumer supposed to know that there are retailers and there are certified installers?  Both display the same B&G banner in their stores.  The UK tech guy told me I should have gone to the B&G website and learned which are certified??  Interestingly, when I did go to the website and look, I learned that indeed they did have different symbols for certified installers but there was no legend to identify them.

On Tue, Sep 19, 2017 at 8:17 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul


I stayed with B&G brand instruments.

I think it is important to remember that B&G is no longer the independent company doing it's own thing the way it used to be.  For some time now it has been just one more brand in the Navico stable of products.  It is the brand name used to sell to sailboat owners the same products that Lawrence sells to fisherman, and Simrad sells to powerboaters.

Why I stayed with B&G:  I was used to them.  I had them on my old boat, and back when I made that selection, a long time ago, I felt that the B&G line was better suited to a cruising sailboat.  

The original equipment installed on any of the Super Marmus is dated enough that you really will have very little benefit in connecting them to a current Raymarine as opposed to another brand.

In a modern network, pretty much everything talks on the same protocol, even if they use different plugs.  On our boat we have a Raymarine AIS that came with the boat that we connected into our NMEA2000 network with a simple adapter, and the B&G MFD understands it just fine.  With a little work, our original Autohelm works side by side with our new B&G AC42 autopilot, and they both share the use of either Raymarine drive.

There are some things that Navico clearly does better, and some things that Raymarine does better.  I am pretty sure either will work for anybody.

A very few times I have had to use the Navico/B&G tech service to sort out a problem. Invariably, the knowledge of the phone support staff was truly exceptional.  And that isn't something I say very often.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD

---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, wrote :

Hello!

We thinking of replace the old B&G system, the ultrasonic speed sensor got smashed when we grounded.

The B&G system is old and probably anyhow on the end of it's lifespan.

We have a Raymarine plotter just two years old (The old Garmin was more user friendly) , we are very pleases with our old Autohelm Autopilot, but need redundancy so we will planning to install the Raymarine EV 400, and keep the two original drive units, keep the old control head and computes as spare.

To us it make sense to use Raymarine i the rest of the instrumentation wind speed depth etc.

Hopefully we do not need to adress his issues any more during our ownership of Kerpa, so we like to do the right thing.

You who have this set up, which I guess there are a few, are you satisfied with the Raymarine equipment's?

You who choose to stay with B&G what was the main reason for that?


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259 Mill Creek next stop St Michels







--
Regards,
Ron Hynes
954.319.0944


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

Jean Boucharlat
 

One more thing about turbos, which I hate as most everyone else: without a turbo you will run afoul of European emissions regulations (US, I don’t know). This might be a problem at the time of resale.

In the normal course of things you will never be chased on the high seas by the Coastguard to check on your emissions but, some day, they may become more strict.

 

Jean Boucharlat

Formerly SM 232

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: mercredi 20 septembre 2017 05:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

 

 

As bad as hitting the turbo with high power right away is shutting the engine off without letting the turbo spool down and cool off in its oil bath. Turbos run at up to 300 thousand RPM and when shut down without oil to cool them down, they quickly bake the existing oil on to the bearings and you’ll go through turbos like oil filters. After running in the band where the turbo was engaged, let it idle for a few minutes to let the engine oil cool it down gently before shutting the engine down.   Same goes for your car if it doesn’t have a supplementary electric oil pump. 

Brent Cameron 

Future Amel Owner

 


On Sep 19, 2017, at 9:13 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...

 

Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

 

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

 

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  



You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.



If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

 

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

 

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160,  Harmonie

Annapolis, Md

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

Brent Cameron
 

As bad as hitting the turbo with high power right away is shutting the engine off without letting the turbo spool down and cool off in its oil bath. Turbos run at up to 300 thousand RPM and when shut down without oil to cool them down, they quickly bake the existing oil on to the bearings and you’ll go through turbos like oil filters. After running in the band where the turbo was engaged, let it idle for a few minutes to let the engine oil cool it down gently before shutting the engine down.   Same goes for your car if it doesn’t have a supplementary electric oil pump. 

Brent Cameron 
Future Amel Owner


On Sep 19, 2017, at 9:13 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...


Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  

You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.

If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, Md


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi. I have a near new tmd22 turbo sitting in my cupboard. As part of my attempts to get my engine going I bought and installed. Shortly there after I gave up and bought a new motor. I also have a fully reconditioned injector pump.
If you or anyone else is interested contact me at simms@...
Regards
Danny
SM299 Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 20 Sep 2017 09:25, "pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium




Re: Turbo Rebuild

greatketch@...
 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...

Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  

You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.

If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, Md


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

paul schofield <pwschofield@...>
 

Thank you for your advice.  I will definitely exercise the engine at high RPMs regularly once I get this sorted. 

 

Alexandre, my best wishes to you.  Hang in there. 

 

Paul

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 6:31 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Good evening Paul,

In the 5 years I owned NIKIMAT, I replaced twice the turbo.
According to the 2 different mechanics, it was not reparable, so put a new one.
Things I did not do, was to push to 90% of power every 10 hours…

According to the latest diesel mechanic (Diesel of America in Fort Lauderdale, FL - which ripped me off of over $8000) you need the turbo. Personally I doubt that.
As my engine has provided me 2250 rpm (without working turbo).

If you can not exceed 2000 rpm, you might want to check if your propeller is clean, this will have a tremendous effect on your rpm.

Good luck to you.

Sincerely, Alexandre
NIKIMAT

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 9/19/17, pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 4:25 PM


 









Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a
thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had
with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I
had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear
that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were
confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  
So now I look at my options.  My
current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many
sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective
brain.  
Has anyone had any
experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off
of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?
 
Does anyone know a source
for a new turbo?  
And if
you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that
I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me
preface the question with a couple observations.  1. 
Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of
associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat
this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to
Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well
and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot
exceed 2000rpm.  
So
here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing
the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot
or two?  
OK, putting on my
Kevlar underwear.  
Turbo
part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120
PaulSM215SV
Trillium





 


Re: Turbo Rebuild

Paul Osterberg
 

When we bought our SM the turbo was sized, 
We just left it to the local VP service shop who send it to A "specialist" in fixing Turbos. Total cost was around 650 euro including take it of and put the turbo back again.
Would not recommend to take the turbo away. With some headwind and waves against you and some fouling on both the bottom and the prop you need all the hp you can get. We have the 75 hp TMD22, and sometimes wished we had the 105 hp Yanmar.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good evening Paul,

In the 5 years I owned NIKIMAT, I replaced twice the turbo.
According to the 2 different mechanics, it was not reparable, so put a new one.
Things I did not do, was to push to 90% of power every 10 hours…

According to the latest diesel mechanic (Diesel of America in Fort Lauderdale, FL - which ripped me off of over $8000) you need the turbo. Personally I doubt that.
As my engine has provided me 2250 rpm (without working turbo).

If you can not exceed 2000 rpm, you might want to check if your propeller is clean, this will have a tremendous effect on your rpm.

Good luck to you.

Sincerely, Alexandre
NIKIMAT




--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 9/19/17, pwschofield@live.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 4:25 PM


 









Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a
thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had
with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I
had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear
that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were
confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  
So now I look at my options.  My
current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many
sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective
brain.  
Has anyone had any
experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off
of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?
 
Does anyone know a source
for a new turbo?  
And if
you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that
I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me
preface the question with a couple observations.  1. 
Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of
associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat
this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to
Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well
and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot
exceed 2000rpm.  
So
here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing
the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot
or two?  
OK, putting on my
Kevlar underwear.  
Turbo
part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120
PaulSM215SV
Trillium


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Paul,

I had this issue twice on 2 different TMD22.  In each case, the turbo was rebuilt as it was not seized badly. Make it a point to give your engine an Italian tune up often. I run the engine at least 30-40 minutes at near Max power every 10 hours or so.  I make a note of it in the ship’s log too. 

When leaving the boat for a long period, remove the exhaust tube entirely and spray wd 40 into the turbo.  With a small wooden piece, spin it.  LEAVE THE EXHAUST OFF.  The cause of the seizure is salt water condensation in the turbo.

Your turbo is not Perkins.  You have a Volvo and Volvo changed enough things to make you tear your hair out.  Don’t ask….

Good luck

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM007

On 19 Sep 2017, at 17:25, pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

paul schofield <pwschofield@...>
 

Thank you Mark.  The running high RPMs periodically is something I’ve always done on previous boats for the exact reason you mention.  Wasn’t sure though if that practice was turbo related or over-all engine related. 

 

The one internet source I’ve found which I haven’t verified through phone contact, is over $1800.  Probably $2000 after tax and freight.

 

Still searching.

 

Paul

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 6:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Paul,

 

Do a Google search for a local shop that rebuilds turbos (are you in the USA?). If it is too badly corroded it  will not be repairable and you will have to get a new one. Also, Try Google Maps for a local shop. You can talk to just about any marine or car mechanic for a reference to a shop. Or you can mail it to someone like: http://www.certifiedturbo.com/

 

Rebuilding is usually about half the price of a new one.

 

I would imagine the marine Volvo dealer will have your turbo in stock and can quote you a price. Prepare for a shock!

 

As to you last question, if you continue to always run the engine at low rpms you will slowly kill it. You will experience massive carbon buildup and the long term repair will be …. well…. you’ll be thinking about buying a new engine or a complete rebuild. Besides, your fuel economy will suck and we’ll all be able to see you because of the black smoke you are blowing out J

 

When making long runs under power at a continual speed, the engine should be taken to full power for one or two minutes every hour. This will blow out the carbon and keep your engine clean inside. This is probably in your engine manual.

 

Hope this helps

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 5:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  

 

So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  

 

Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  

 

Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  

 

And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  

 

So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  

 

OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  

 

Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120

 

Paul

SM215

SV Trillium

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Mark Erdos
 

Paul,

 

Do a Google search for a local shop that rebuilds turbos (are you in the USA?). If it is too badly corroded it  will not be repairable and you will have to get a new one. Also, Try Google Maps for a local shop. You can talk to just about any marine or car mechanic for a reference to a shop. Or you can mail it to someone like: http://www.certifiedturbo.com/

 

Rebuilding is usually about half the price of a new one.

 

I would imagine the marine Volvo dealer will have your turbo in stock and can quote you a price. Prepare for a shock!

 

As to you last question, if you continue to always run the engine at low rpms you will slowly kill it. You will experience massive carbon buildup and the long term repair will be …. well…. you’ll be thinking about buying a new engine or a complete rebuild. Besides, your fuel economy will suck and we’ll all be able to see you because of the black smoke you are blowing out J

 

When making long runs under power at a continual speed, the engine should be taken to full power for one or two minutes every hour. This will blow out the carbon and keep your engine clean inside. This is probably in your engine manual.

 

Hope this helps

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 5:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  

 

So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  

 

Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  

 

Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  

 

And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  

 

So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  

 

OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  

 

Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120

 

Paul

SM215

SV Trillium

 

 


Turbo Rebuild

pwschofield@...
 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium




Re: Raymarine or B&G

greatketch@...
 

Paul

I stayed with B&G brand instruments.

I think it is important to remember that B&G is no longer the independent company doing it's own thing the way it used to be.  For some time now it has been just one more brand in the Navico stable of products.  It is the brand name used to sell to sailboat owners the same products that Lawrence sells to fisherman, and Simrad sells to powerboaters.

Why I stayed with B&G:  I was used to them.  I had them on my old boat, and back when I made that selection, a long time ago, I felt that the B&G line was better suited to a cruising sailboat.  

The original equipment installed on any of the Super Marmus is dated enough that you really will have very little benefit in connecting them to a current Raymarine as opposed to another brand.

In a modern network, pretty much everything talks on the same protocol, even if they use different plugs.  On our boat we have a Raymarine AIS that came with the boat that we connected into our NMEA2000 network with a simple adapter, and the B&G MFD understands it just fine.  With a little work, our original Autohelm works side by side with our new B&G AC42 autopilot, and they both share the use of either Raymarine drive.

There are some things that Navico clearly does better, and some things that Raymarine does better.  I am pretty sure either will work for anybody.

A very few times I have had to use the Navico/B&G tech service to sort out a problem. Invariably, the knowledge of the phone support staff was truly exceptional.  And that isn't something I say very often.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD

---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Hello!

We thinking of replace the old B&G system, the ultrasonic speed sensor got smashed when we grounded.

The B&G system is old and probably anyhow on the end of it's lifespan.

We have a Raymarine plotter just two years old (The old Garmin was more user friendly) , we are very pleases with our old Autohelm Autopilot, but need redundancy so we will planning to install the Raymarine EV 400, and keep the two original drive units, keep the old control head and computes as spare.

To us it make sense to use Raymarine i the rest of the instrumentation wind speed depth etc.

Hopefully we do not need to adress his issues any more during our ownership of Kerpa, so we like to do the right thing.

You who have this set up, which I guess there are a few, are you satisfied with the Raymarine equipment's?

You who choose to stay with B&G what was the main reason for that?


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259 Mill Creek next stop St Michels