Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

Alan Leslie
 

Ok Colin..I'll get in the next few minutes
AND yes it is correct that the wearing ring turns with the shaft, that's why it wears where it is in contact with the lip seals...there's previously been a lot of discussion here about stainless units and push over stainless covers, but the reality is that every two years to replace it is not such a big deal I don't think. 
Trust it is all going well
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

islandpearl2_sm2k332
 

Alan

If you have ready access to that file I would be most appreciative in getting a copy. Just been going through the site and come up with many related topics but can't find Bill's one. Thanks
Colin, Island Pearl II

On Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at 1:51 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Colin,


Yes they screw on to the shaft...the wearing ring (Bague d'usure) turns with the shaft inside the seals.
Bill Rouse has posted very good information on the drive seal replacement in the files section. If you can't find it, email me and I'll send you a copy.
Very important that once you have pushed the 3 new seals in place, push in the wearing ring over the shaft, through the seals as far as it will go and THEN pull it out 1-2 mm and then tighten the two grub screws onto the shaft. 
Very important also that the seals are filled with grease, grease the inside and outside of the wearing ring before you push it in....its all in Bill's Info..
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

islandpearl2_sm2k332
 

Alan and Eric

Thanks, I have it in now but will go back and pull it a little back from the seals then. I will look for Bill's post now, I had previously found a step by step instruction with pictures on the French Amel owners site which was quite handy for the overall replacement procedure but it does not get into the same detail as Bill's. 

So am I correct in assuming that the wearing out bearing spins with the shaft then? 

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II, Amel 53 #332
Gold Coast, Australia


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dual/articulating whisker poles

karkauai
 

It's great Jacob!  Easier than a Spinnaker, you can sail as much as 20d or so off dead downhill, roll the two sails up together to reef quickly, or swing the ballooner over behind the Genoa if you have to turn up into the wind in a pinch.  When I bought Kristy she had a Spinnaker on board, but I've never used it.  It's hard to douse singlehanded, but not hard to put up.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Jan 22, 2017, at 9:24 PM, jacob jacob.champness@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all.  

Are the dual articulating whisker poles really awesome or not really all that useful?  We're looking at a couple Maramus-- one, from 1983, seem to have come before that was introduced and has only one pole and is lacking the framework in the shrouds.  The other, from 1986, has dual pole setup.  Is that a huge advantage, or no?  I've seen the Delos crew use them and it definitely looks like it would be great for a long downwind run, but I wonder what others think.

Thanks for you thoughts!
Jacob


Amel surveyors in the Caribbean

Jacob Champness
 

Next question:  Would anyone have any recommendations for a good Amel surveyor in Martinique?

Thanks again!
jacob


Dual/articulating whisker poles

Jacob Champness
 

Hi all.  

Are the dual articulating whisker poles really awesome or not really all that useful?  We're looking at a couple Maramus-- one, from 1983, seem to have come before that was introduced and has only one pole and is lacking the framework in the shrouds.  The other, from 1986, has dual pole setup.  Is that a huge advantage, or no?  I've seen the Delos crew use them and it definitely looks like it would be great for a long downwind run, but I wonder what others think.

Thanks for you thoughts!
Jacob


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

eric freedman
 

HI Colin.

The wearing out bearing just screws down to the shaft after you mount the 3 lip seals.

You then pull the bearing a few MM away from the seals. The bearing rotates inside the seals.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2017 10:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

 

 

I'm just replacing our wearing bearing and looking at the 2 x little screw in keys (that hold the bronze wearing bearing in place?) which are screwed in with a #3 allen key, it puzzles me as to what these screw onto?

 

Do they screw up against the rotating shaft? (surely not?) or what do they screw into as I do not see a natural spot for them to go in?

 

Thanks

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II

Amel 53 #332. Gold Coast, Australia.


Re: Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Colin,

Yes they screw on to the shaft...the wearing ring (Bague d'usure) turns with the shaft inside the seals.
Bill Rouse has posted very good information on the drive seal replacement in the files section. If you can't find it, email me and I'll send you a copy.
Very important that once you have pushed the 3 new seals in place, push in the wearing ring over the shaft, through the seals as far as it will go and THEN pull it out 1-2 mm and then tighten the two grub screws onto the shaft. 
Very important also that the seals are filled with grease, grease the inside and outside of the wearing ring before you push it in....its all in Bill's Info..
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Super Maramu "Wearing Bearing" - quick question?

islandpearl2_sm2k332
 

I'm just replacing our wearing bearing and looking at the 2 x little screw in keys (that hold the bronze wearing bearing in place?) which are screwed in with a #3 allen key, it puzzles me as to what these screw onto?


Do they screw up against the rotating shaft? (surely not?) or what do they screw into as I do not see a natural spot for them to go in?


Thanks

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II

Amel 53 #332. Gold Coast, Australia.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Duane,

I had the same issue with the solenoid. I took it apart and rebuilt it...it was only a wire connection inside that had corroded.
But in the meantime I bought a couple of these as spares :

NEW Continuous Duty SWITCH RELAY SOLENOID 24 Volt, 4-Terminal Heavy Duty | eBay

 



Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

Thanks for the reply.  There is voltage between the blue and green/white wires, after I realized I have to also turn on the 24V motor breaker.  That's apparently where the Dessalator panel gets power for the switch.  So the Dessalator 24V switch must be ok.  I jumped the positive power supply over the solenoid and the motor ran.  So... it must the solenoid!

Thanks again!
Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Duane Siegfri
 

Olivier,

I jumped the A to the B and the motor ran fine.  

I rechecked the voltage and continuity between the blue and green/white wires and now find 24.7V and continuity, with the Dessalator switch on, AND the motor 24V breaker on.  I now realize this is where the 24V panel must get it's 24V power.  

It must be the solenoid!

Thanks for your help, and the help of all the other people who replied to my post.  I've learned quite a bit abouot solenoids and how to diagnose electrical problems.  I'm a hands-on kind of guy and some time in the engine room goes a long way.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

Now, looking for a good solenoid switch.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Beaute Olivier
 

Hi Duane,

I prefer your new diagram!!
No power at the solenoid input (between green/white and blue wires) means the switch at the galley control panel does not do its job or a fuse is blown in the electric box behind the galley panel.
Same information if you turn it on and check the continuity between the brown and the blue wire: no continuity means the switch does not close or a fuse is blown.
You could also bring 24V where the blue and green/white connect to the solenoid : bring 24V positive where the blue wire connects (yes, I know it's a blue positive!), 24V negative is already connected to the green/white terminal.
With the main breaker OFF, you should hear the solenoid clicking. No clicking means the solenoid is dead.
You may have both issues: a fuse blown and a faulty solenoid...

Good luck.

Olivier.


On Sunday, January 22, 2017 2:13 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Duane,
I apologize that I have not read all of this thread (poor internet here) and maybe you have already checked or considered the following possibility:
If there is no voltage going to the Low amperage activation side of the solenoid, the issue is "upstream" of the solenoid.
Maybe there is a fuse blown on the Dessalator PCB. There are several automotive type glass fuses on the PCB of the 160 liter and I imagine the same is true on the DUO.
I would consider momentarily applying voltage (+&-) to the activation side of the solenoid, and/or opening the Dessalator control box and checking the glass automotive type fuses.
Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On Jan 21, 2017 8:55 PM, "sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Olivier,

I will post a revised wiring diagram.  You are right, the red is positive, and the breaker is on the red.  

I did not have to disconnect any wiring to replace the one-way bearings on the cat pump, just had to remove the belts, and the motors have a great little tensioning system that does not require and wiring to be dismounted.  

When we turn the Dessalator control panel switch to 24V, there is no sound from the solenoid.  We made sure the engine room forward bulkhead mounted Breaker is on.  We repeated several times, no sound.

With the Dessalator switch on, and the breaker on, I checked voltage between the green/white and blue wires - zero volts, and also no continuity.  Same for between green/white and brown.   Between the blue and brown there is 24 volts.  With the Dessalator switch off, there is zero volts between the blue and br own wires.

Probably the Solenoid?  Would you recommend jumping the positive to the motor to check that the motor will run if given power?

Thanks,
Duane





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Duane,

I apologize that I have not read all of this thread (poor internet here) and maybe you have already checked or considered the following possibility:

If there is no voltage going to the Low amperage activation side of the solenoid, the issue is "upstream" of the solenoid.

Maybe there is a fuse blown on the Dessalator PCB. There are several automotive type glass fuses on the PCB of the 160 liter and I imagine the same is true on the DUO.

I would consider momentarily applying voltage (+&-) to the activation side of the solenoid, and/or opening the Dessalator control box and checking the glass automotive type fuses.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


On Jan 21, 2017 8:55 PM, "sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Olivier,


I will post a revised wiring diagram.  You are right, the red is positive, and the breaker is on the red.  

I did not have to disconnect any wiring to replace the one-way bearings on the cat pump, just had to remove the belts, and the motors have a great little tensioning system that does not require and wiring to be dismounted.  

When we turn the Dessalator control panel switch to 24V, there is no sound from the solenoid.  We made sure the engine room forward bulkhead mounted Breaker is on.  We repeated several times, no sound.

With the Dessalator switch on, and the breaker on, I checked voltage between the green/white and blue wires - zero volts, and also no continuity.  Same for between green/white and brown.   Between the blue and brown there is 24 volts.  With the Dessalator switch off, there is zero volts between the blue and br own wires.

Probably the Solenoid?  Would you recommend jumping the positive to the motor to check that the motor will run if given power?

Thanks,
Duane



Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Duane Siegfri
 

Olivier,

I will post a revised wiring diagram.  You are right, the red is positive, and the breaker is on the red.  

I did not have to disconnect any wiring to replace the one-way bearings on the cat pump, just had to remove the belts, and the motors have a great little tensioning system that does not require and wiring to be dismounted.  

When we turn the Dessalator control panel switch to 24V, there is no sound from the solenoid.  We made sure the engine room forward bulkhead mounted Breaker is on.  We repeated several times, no sound.

With the Dessalator switch on, and the breaker on, I checked voltage between the green/white and blue wires - zero volts, and also no continuity.  Same for between green/white and brown.   Between the blue and brown there is 24 volts.  With the Dessalator switch off, there is zero volts between the blue and brown wires.

Probably the Solenoid?  Would you recommend jumping the positive to the motor to check that the motor will run if given power?

Thanks,
Duane



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 60

karkauai
 

You e gotten good advice here Duane.  The solenoid may just be stuck in the open position.  When that happened on mine, I tapped on the solenoid a few times with a wrench and the motor started right up.  It kept working until i could get a new solenoid.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Jan 21, 2017, at 3:51 AM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Duane,


Actually the 24v reading from A to B indicates the solenoid is Open. When closed it is simply like a wire conducting electricity and any two points along it will have no potential difference. To confirm, switch your multimeter to continuity testing (Ohms) and you should see 0 ohms (or very low) from A to B, indicating, again, an open circuit. 

Shift over to looking at the solenoid. The GW control wire is + and always hot, since it's connected to the battery +. (Confirm that with your multimeter) The Bl appears to be providing - to the low voltage coil which activates the solenoid. I'm assuming you're certain of how the wires were attached and you've got them back correctly.

Suggest you check voltage between Bl and GW  on the solenoid with the switch off, then on.  If you do not get 24v when switched on then investigate the switch. If you do get 24v, then disconnect BL and touch a jumper between A and BL connector on the solenoid.  The solenoid should close with a good click (and the motor start). 

You may also want to try a large wire jumper (like a battery jumper) between A and B on the solenoid. It will be a little exciting with a spark, but should start the motor and confirm the solenoid is kaput.

Good luck,
Craig, SN#68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

The 24 volt motor won't start on the Duo 60.  I'm a little suspicious of the cause since I was replacing the one-way bearings on the Cat Pump.  It worked up to that point, and then when the bearing problem was solved, would not start.

I posted photos of the motor and the start solenoid with a wiring diagram.  Referring to the diagram I tested it for voltage with the Dessalator switched to 24V, and the breaker on, and get 24.7 volts between A (bat neg on the source side of the solenoid)  and B (bat neg on the load side of the solenoid), and A and C (bat pos on the motor), but zero between B and C.  For the motor to run there has to be voltage between B and C.  Since I get 24 volts between A and B, it seems the solenoid is closed (contact is made) so the solenoid is good???  But when I switch off the Dessalator 24 volt selector switch, I get the exact same readings.

I have no experience with solenoids, so I will be the first to admit I don't know what I'm doing.  Does this make sense to anyone out there?  And does it tell you anything about the solenoid?

I've already cleaned up all the contact points, which looked ok to start with.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dessalator Duo 60

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello again Duane,

I just read John and Craig posts.

If you get a voltage between A and B on the solenoid switch, you have a big problem.
DON'T try to connect jumper cables from the batteries to terminals A and B on the solenoid switch. These terminals ONLY handle positive.

Please answer my questions before testing anything.

Olivier



On Saturday, January 21, 2017 3:15 PM, Beaute Olivier wrote:


Hello Duane (from freezing La Rochelle/France),

a solenoid-switch is a switch (that connects two big cables) operated by a solenoid fed from small wires.
When you turn on the water-maker at the control panel, you should hear a click noise from the solenoid-switch. Can you hear it?
If you can't hear it, this means:
A. the solenoid is not or wrongly connected
B. the solenoid is dead

On your drawing, the main breaker for the unit is on the negative cable (blue). Originally, it is on the positive cable coming from the main terminal at the front bulkhead, and the the cable goes to the input big terminal (you call A) of the solenoid-switch. Are you sure your drawing is correct?
In fact, throughout your SM, the red wires/cables are positive and the blue ones are negative.
On your pictures, it seems that the blue big cable is feeding the motor directly. This cable should come directly from the bulkhead terminal. This is correct.

You say you get 24V between terminals A and B. Ouh la la !!! You shouldn't get any voltage there. This is only a switch that should bring 24V positive to the motor's B terminal.
It is normal that you get 24V between A and C, even if the switch is not on at the control panel.
Having no voltage between B and C means the solenoid switch does not close.
The solenoid switch should close/open the positive circuit: when it closes, it gives 24V positive to one of the motor's terminal (B).
When you worked on the CAT pump, did you disconnect any wire/cable?

In other words, you should have:
-The big blue cable bringing 24V NEGATIVE to motor's terminal C
-The big red cable coming from the bulkhead positive terminal, through the big breaker, to the A terminal of the solenoid switch
-The big black cable going from terminal B on the solenoid switch to terminal B on the motor
-The blue control wire bringing 24V positive from the brown control wire, through the switch at the galley control panel, to the solenoid
-The green/white wire bringing 24V neg from motor's terminal C to the solenoid



If the big red and blue cables have been swapped at the bulkhead's terminal (like on your drawing), the system cannot work. Check this first.
If this is only a mistake on your drawing, then the wiring is fine.
This means probably that the solenoid is dead.

The dangerous thing is that you get 24V between terminals A and B of the solenoid switch. If this switch closes, you will get a straight short-circuit that will trip the breaker.

Check this and revert.

Bon courage.

Olivier



On Saturday, January 21, 2017 11:41 AM, "sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
The 24 volt motor won't start on the Duo 60.  I'm a little suspicious of the cause since I was replacing the one-way bearings on the Cat Pump.  It worked up to that point, and then when the bearing problem was solved, would not start.

I posted photos of the motor and the start solenoid with a wiring diagram.  Referring to the diagram I tested it for voltage with the Dessalator switched to 24V, and the breaker on, and get 24.7 volts between A (bat neg on the source side of the solenoid)  and B (bat neg on the load side of the solenoid), and A and C (bat pos on the motor), but zero between B and C.  For the motor to run there has to be voltage between B and C.  Since I get 24 volts between A and B, it seems the solenoid is closed (contact is made) so the solenoid is good???  But when I switch off the Dessalator 24 volt selector switch, I get the exact same readings.

I have no experience with solenoids, so I will be the first to admit I don't know what I'm doing.  Does this make sense to anyone out there?  And does it tell you anything about the solenoid?

I've already cleaned up all the contact points, which looked ok to start with.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dessalator Duo 60

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Duane (from freezing La Rochelle/France),

a solenoid-switch is a switch (that connects two big cables) operated by a solenoid fed from small wires.
When you turn on the water-maker at the control panel, you should hear a click noise from the solenoid-switch. Can you hear it?
If you can't hear it, this means:
A. the solenoid is not or wrongly connected
B. the solenoid is dead

On your drawing, the main breaker for the unit is on the negative cable (blue). Originally, it is on the positive cable coming from the main terminal at the front bulkhead, and the the cable goes to the input big terminal (you call A) of the solenoid-switch. Are you sure your drawing is correct?
In fact, throughout your SM, the red wires/cables are positive and the blue ones are negative.
On your pictures, it seems that the blue big cable is feeding the motor directly. This cable should come directly from the bulkhead terminal. This is correct.

You say you get 24V between terminals A and B. Ouh la la !!! You shouldn't get any voltage there. This is only a switch that should bring 24V positive to the motor's B terminal.
It is normal that you get 24V between A and C, even if the switch is not on at the control panel.
Having no voltage between B and C means the solenoid switch does not close.
The solenoid switch should close/open the positive circuit: when it closes, it gives 24V positive to one of the motor's terminal (B).
When you worked on the CAT pump, did you disconnect any wire/cable?

In other words, you should have:
-The big blue cable bringing 24V NEGATIVE to motor's terminal C
-The big red cable coming from the bulkhead positive terminal, through the big breaker, to the A terminal of the solenoid switch
-The big black cable going from terminal B on the solenoid switch to terminal B on the motor
-The blue control wire bringing 24V positive from the brown control wire, through the switch at the galley control panel, to the solenoid
-The green/white wire bringing 24V neg from motor's terminal C to the solenoid



If the big red and blue cables have been swapped at the bulkhead's terminal (like on your drawing), the system cannot work. Check this first.
If this is only a mistake on your drawing, then the wiring is fine.
This means probably that the solenoid is dead.

The dangerous thing is that you get 24V between terminals A and B of the solenoid switch. If this switch closes, you will get a straight short-circuit that will trip the breaker.

Check this and revert.

Bon courage.

Olivier



On Saturday, January 21, 2017 11:41 AM, "sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
The 24 volt motor won't start on the Duo 60.  I'm a little suspicious of the cause since I was replacing the one-way bearings on the Cat Pump.  It worked up to that point, and then when the bearing problem was solved, would not start.

I posted photos of the motor and the start solenoid with a wiring diagram.  Referring to the diagram I tested it for voltage with the Dessalator switched to 24V, and the breaker on, and get 24.7 volts between A (bat neg on the source side of the solenoid)  and B (bat neg on the load side of the solenoid), and A and C (bat pos on the motor), but zero between B and C.  For the motor to run there has to be voltage between B and C.  Since I get 24 volts between A and B, it seems the solenoid is closed (contact is made) so the solenoid is good???  But when I switch off the Dessalator 24 volt selector switch, I get the exact same readings.

I have no experience with solenoids, so I will be the first to admit I don't know what I'm doing.  Does this make sense to anyone out there?  And does it tell you anything about the solenoid?

I've already cleaned up all the contact points, which looked ok to start with.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477




Re: Dessalator Duo 60

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Duane,

Actually the 24v reading from A to B indicates the solenoid is Open. When closed it is simply like a wire conducting electricity and any two points along it will have no potential difference. To confirm, switch your multimeter to continuity testing (Ohms) and you should see 0 ohms (or very low) from A to B, indicating, again, an open circuit. 

Shift over to looking at the solenoid. The GW control wire is + and always hot, since it's connected to the battery +. (Confirm that with your multimeter) The Bl appears to be providing - to the low voltage coil which activates the solenoid. I'm assuming you're certain of how the wires were attached and you've got them back correctly.

Suggest you check voltage between Bl and GW  on the solenoid with the switch off, then on.  If you do not get 24v when switched on then investigate the switch. If you do get 24v, then disconnect BL and touch a jumper between A and BL connector on the solenoid.  The solenoid should close with a good click (and the motor start). 

You may also want to try a large wire jumper (like a battery jumper) between A and B on the solenoid. It will be a little exciting with a spark, but should start the motor and confirm the solenoid is kaput.

Good luck,
Craig, SN#68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailor63109@...> wrote :

The 24 volt motor won't start on the Duo 60.  I'm a little suspicious of the cause since I was replacing the one-way bearings on the Cat Pump.  It worked up to that point, and then when the bearing problem was solved, would not start.

I posted photos of the motor and the start solenoid with a wiring diagram.  Referring to the diagram I tested it for voltage with the Dessalator switched to 24V, and the breaker on, and get 24.7 volts between A (bat neg on the source side of the solenoid)  and B (bat neg on the load side of the solenoid), and A and C (bat pos on the motor), but zero between B and C.  For the motor to run there has to be voltage between B and C.  Since I get 24 volts between A and B, it seems the solenoid is closed (contact is made) so the solenoid is good???  But when I switch off the Dessalator 24 volt selector switch, I get the exact same readings.

I have no experience with solenoids, so I will be the first to admit I don't know what I'm doing.  Does this make sense to anyone out there?  And does it tell you anything about the solenoid?

I've already cleaned up all the contact points, which looked ok to start with.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477



Re: Dessalator Duo 60

John Clark
 

Hi Duane,
   referring back to your diagram,  If there is voltage between the points A and B on the solenoid then I believe that would indicate that the solenoid is open rather than closed, meaning there is no electrical connection between points A and B. When the solenoid is energized and it's contact is closed, and A and B should have little or no voltage across them.

Before you do anything below make sure you have the unit turned off/depowered so you don't cause an arc while disconnecting wires.

It appears the blue and the brown control wires are the power to the coil in the solenoid which when energized closes the contact inside the solenoid.  I would disconnect one of the blue or brown wires and check to see if you have continuity between the blue wire and brown wire when you are calling for the motor to run.   This will test the switch.   If you have continuity and the blue wire has 24V between it and point A then the control switch is working correctly.

You can test the solenoid by disconnecting B terminal black wire and then calling for the the motor to start.  This should close the contact in the solenoid.   There should be continuity between points A and B on the solenoid.  

The points C and B on the motor should have voltage across them when the motor is energized to run, but no voltage when it is not running.  This will tell you if the motor is getting power. 

      Hope this helps,  John

John Clark
Vent de Soleil  SM 037
Martinique