Date   

Re: Canvassing for ideas: removing motor housing A54 “MAT” foiling motor.

Mark Erdos
 

Porter,

 

Sorry, I can’t help with your issue but, if in your hunt for a solution you happened to find a shop who repairs electric motors, please let me know. I have a couple of spares I would like to have serviced.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Porter McRoberts via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 3:33 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Canvassing for ideas: removing motor housing A54 “MAT” foiling motor.

 

Dear Amelians: 

I beg any insight if you would. This is a 1.5 year old motor and housing from Amel for the main sail foil furling motor.  The last one, seal was damaged and the whole unit unsalvageable. This is a “new” 1.5 year old replacement. Now not working. Relays and switches all fine. Motor gotten progressively more “tired”  and now has stopped rotating. 

 

I have removed the base and look in and see no corrosion. But I think I need to remove the whole motor assembly from the housing which mean also removing the top cap. The bottom cap slipped off with mild to moderate traction. The black top cap will neither rotate with respect to the white housing nor slide out from it. 

 

Aggressive traction I think will bend the bolts. I’ll get more aggressive if I know the top cap comes off the housing. Does it?  There are screws I removed that seem to indicate the cap would pop off/out. 

 

Tapping on base of motor: I’ve done gentle tapping. No movement. Might I damage motor by more aggressive tapping?

 

Of course I can disconnect and take off the boat and to town to search for a technician, but it would be so much easier to sort it here in the boat. 

 

Some photos below illustrate the situation. 

 

Many thanks in advance. 

Porter McRoberts 

S/V IBIS A54-152. 

Tahiti

WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206

Www.fouribis.net

 

 


Canvassing for ideas: removing motor housing A54 “MAT” foiling motor.

Porter McRoberts
 

Dear Amelians: 
I beg any insight if you would. This is a 1.5 year old motor and housing from Amel for the main sail foil furling motor.  The last one, seal was damaged and the whole unit unsalvageable. This is a “new” 1.5 year old replacement. Now not working. Relays and switches all fine. Motor gotten progressively more “tired”  and now has stopped rotating. 

I have removed the base and look in and see no corrosion. But I think I need to remove the whole motor assembly from the housing which mean also removing the top cap. The bottom cap slipped off with mild to moderate traction. The black top cap will neither rotate with respect to the white housing nor slide out from it. 

Aggressive traction I think will bend the bolts. I’ll get more aggressive if I know the top cap comes off the housing. Does it?  There are screws I removed that seem to indicate the cap would pop off/out. 

Tapping on base of motor: I’ve done gentle tapping. No movement. Might I damage motor by more aggressive tapping?

Of course I can disconnect and take off the boat and to town to search for a technician, but it would be so much easier to sort it here in the boat. 

Some photos below illustrate the situation. 

Many thanks in advance. 

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152. 
Tahiti
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net




Re: Amel 55 hatch door cannot be locked from inside

Billy Newport
 

So I just un"blocked" it. Looking at the door from inside the boat. I moved the right hand sliding lock slightly to the left until the nub can be moved down. It's as if it's over too far or something and jamming the nub from moving down. As I moved the sliding lock to the left I pressed on the nub and suddenly after 1-2mm of lock bar going left, the nub went down and then it went back to normal. Go figure but I'll take it. So, the theory is somehow the right hand lock bar jammed the nub somehow. It's back to normal for now.

I tried removing that access panel but the nub prevents it from being removed and I didn't know whether to pull the nub off or unscrew it off etc so I couldn't remove the panel.


Re: deck leak

James Alton
 

Arno,. You are correct, the Divinycell won't rot if water gets in. For a boat with a teak deck that has fastener holes I would prefer the Divinycell since with that many holes water is going to get in.  I have been in the boat repair business for more than 40 years and I have dug out a lot of rotten plywood and balsa core and you are correct it is a huge nasty job to do right.  The Amel design thankfully has very few deck and cabin penetrations so it is not that big of a job to decore each and every hole, fill with epoxy, redrill and seal.  From that point forward if a fastener leaks the water cannot get into the core.  The increase in compressive strength of the balsa will create a more Ridgid structure and the increase in the bonding to the fiberglass skins (assuming the layup was done correctly) also adds strength.  So this means that with a weaker core you probably need to to build the boat a bit heavier to have the same strength.  Are the HR's heavier than a comparable Amel?  I have worked with the Divinycell on sailplanes and I will say that it the the best foam type core that I have worked with.  Some of the planes were 20 plus years old and the core was still healthy.  I have seen many other types of foam used for core material break down.   So to distill yes on a boat where I feel that I can keep the core dry, I would much prefer to have balsa core such as my Amel.  On a boat where there is a high probability of water intrusion such as a deck or cabin with a lot of screw holes, a non organic core such as Divinycell would be preferable.  Best to you.  

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Sep 21, 2020 11:49 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:
Hi James,

I'm aware of the differences between balsa and Divinycell, particularly the difference in adhesion to polyester. However Hallberg Rassy and many others have been using Divinycell since the eighties and correct me if I'm wrong, I've never heard of a soggy deck on a Halberg-Rassy. I used to own a 1992 model and the deck was solid, even with the gazillion holes because of the teak deck. Not that I would ever want a teak laid boat anymore, but that is another story. My previous boat had no teak deck but did carry a Divinycell cored deck and hull (above the waterline). Not a single problem manifested itself. I sold her when she was 16 years old.
The compression strength is something you can take into account when doing the structural calculations on the boat and should not be a problem.

So although there are some advantages to balsa I find it a poor choice for cored decks simply because water-ingress can be very hard to spot/monitor until it's at an advances state. There is a YouTube channel (Sail Life) that can illustrate the crazy amount of work it can be to rectify the problem once the balsa starts rotting.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Amel 55 hatch door cannot be locked from inside

John Clanton
 

Billy,

 

I have never experienced what you are describing.  I have always wished that when the interior lock nub is moved into the locked position, it would have a tactile or audible click assuring that it is actually locked.  Since it doesn’t, I can’t help but test the handles each time to make sure they don’t slide open.

 

I haven’t been on the boat for 11 months and 15 days thanks to the Covid, but seem to recall an access port around the interior locking mechanism???

 

Please update the group when you find the issue and solution so that we can have that in the knowledge base.

 

 

 

John W. Clanton

Devereux, A55, No. 65

Hopefully still in Antibes, France



Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, dissemination, distribution, copying or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon this information is strictly prohibited.


Amel 55 hatch door cannot be locked from inside

Billy Newport
 

Anyone seen this. The companion way door locks and unlocks normally with the key. If locked with the key then you can unlock using the inside "knob". But, I cannot lock it from inside. The "knob" is like locked in place but when i lock with the key, it does slide down just fine. This was working fine until this week, I'm been lock/unlocking it from inside since getting the boat.

Is there a child safety thing which has a mode disabling locking from inside the boat possibly that I accidentally enabled?

Amel 55#56.


Re: In case you missed the QSails ZOOM

Alain Blanchard
 

Dear Bill and all,

Thank you for the video. That was very interresting and useful for me as a near future owner of a Super Maramu.
Anyway the Group activity is fantastic.

Best regards 
Alain

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 22 sept. 2020 à 21:30, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> a écrit :


If you missed the QSails ZOOM meeting, it is now posted.

Use this link:

Bill 
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Denis Foster
 

Thank s Paul,

i have already seen this Swedish company. Very interesting in the DIY Winston Thundersky  cell assembly. They will balance the cells before delivery that are from the same batch. Looks like a more cost efficient alternative to Lithionics.

The website is more in Swedish than English.

They have to 24v 400Ah cell packs One with 8 cells the other with 16 cells not as tall.

one interesting features seems to be in case one prismatic cells fail apparently they can be exchanged at moderate cost and the whole setup can be rebalanced. Maybe more useful than a theoretical 10 year guarantee.

progressing towards the truth of lithium and following Oliver of Nautica Vela who has engineering skills I lack.

regards

Denis

 


In case you missed the QSails ZOOM

 

If you missed the QSails ZOOM meeting, it is now posted.

Use this link:

Bill 
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Elja Röllinghoff Balu SM 222
 

Hi Denis
i agree with you , the last 8 weeks have been dealing with Licium batteries , but it was not happy that too many complex questions are still open to me ,
then I have co2 and carbon
batteries are busy, not matured on sailing boats at the moment

Now the decision is probably on AGM Victron super cycle with it I get to the SM battery compartment about 580 AH /24 V

ich hoffe damit die nächsten 5-10 Jahre zu überstehen und dann schaue ich mal neu

Greetings Elja
SM Balu
222

Von meinem iPhone gesendet


Spare electric controle box M61037 #spares

Steven Nieman
 

Hi, does anyone have  A spare electrical black box M61037 for sale for the airco Compact 9 EH - Cod. M60018 unit?


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Paul Osterberg
 

I looking into this BMS which I will probably go for, expensive but I got confidence in my contact, he provided a lot of valuable information 
http://www.bestlithiumbattery.com/
Paul on sykerpa SM 259 


Re: Manual Bilge Pump

Gerhard Mueller
 

In Greece I have received the service kit some weeks ago from:

Alex Karademiris 
 Marine Accessories Sales 
ZOIS EFSTATHIOU S.A. - Imports of Yacht Accessories & Marine Engines
57 Posidonos Ave. - 183 44 MOSCHATO - GREECE
Tel +30 2109409828
Fax +30 2109409112
Email: 
alex_karademiris@...
URL: 
www.zois.gr

They have the Whale service kit AK8050 in stock.
Retail price: 38.63€+VAT
ACS courier transport 4.5€+VAT to Kalamata and received the next day.

--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Manual Bilge Pump

Cathy & Guillaume
 

Many thanks for your help. I have just ordered a new pump and will service my current one to keep as spare/mobile unit ready for emergencies.

Guillaume
Carpathia III, SM2K #293
Now in Athens


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

eric freedman
 

Hi Alan,
Thank you so much.
Fair Winds,
Eric

On September 21, 2020 at 11:53 PM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

Hi Eric,

I drilled the hole in the bottom of the U section...this is the part that supports the stove top grating. I omitted to say that I cut a slot in each side of the U section to match the grating.
The U section sits on a short piece of stainless tube and the screw goes through the U section through the tube piece and into the stove top.
It replicates the original plastic things that eventually melt.

Like this



Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437

 

 


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Denis Foster
 

Hi Arno,

The Kaiken Flash seems to be permanent equalizing.

That said sometimes I have the same feeling as you about Lithium. The maturity for the cruising yacht market doesn t seem that established leading to complex not fail safe systems probably impossible to fix in remote places.

For the moment we have a system that works with Gel batteries (9 years old) religiously maintained and strangely still working. I haven t excluded the possibility of replacing them by the same brand and model. I was also attracted by the Firefly carbon foam AGM. And spending the money saved on a high quality Solar installation that would be ready when Lithium will be at maturity for our specific needs. I know the industrial research on energy storage by Lithium batteries is very active now and the results will pass one day to our little niche market.

Robust, reliable and easy to fix systems have there attraction....

Regards

Denis


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Dennis,

This is one of the problems I have with many BMS systems, if not all. They use passive top-balancing, meaning they can only balance the cells when full and do this by dissipating the energy of the fullest cells.
It seems that the one you found is more clever. It does not say if it uses active balancing as far as I can see.
Some time ago I found this system that does it all: https://enerstone.fr/en/
However this also needs some additional logic to protect the batteries for under/over voltage. I sort of gave up on the Lithium stuff because if you want to do this right it is immensely complex and you will have to come up with a bespoke solution that I find undesirable on a sailing yacht.
Fact is that the market for lithium systems on yachts is quite small compared to other markets so not many companies develop specialized solutions for it.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Eric,

I drilled the hole in the bottom of the U section...this is the part that supports the stove top grating. I omitted to say that I cut a slot in each side of the U section to match the grating.
The U section sits on a short piece of stainless tube and the screw goes through the U section through the tube piece and into the stove top.
It replicates the original plastic things that eventually melt.

Like this



Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: deck leak

Arno Luijten
 

Hi James,

I'm aware of the differences between balsa and Divinycell, particularly the difference in adhesion to polyester. However Hallberg Rassy and many others have been using Divinycell since the eighties and correct me if I'm wrong, I've never heard of a soggy deck on a Halberg-Rassy. I used to own a 1992 model and the deck was solid, even with the gazillion holes because of the teak deck. Not that I would ever want a teak laid boat anymore, but that is another story. My previous boat had no teak deck but did carry a Divinycell cored deck and hull (above the waterline). Not a single problem manifested itself. I sold her when she was 16 years old.
The compression strength is something you can take into account when doing the structural calculations on the boat and should not be a problem.

So although there are some advantages to balsa I find it a poor choice for cored decks simply because water-ingress can be very hard to spot/monitor until it's at an advances state. There is a YouTube channel (Sail Life) that can illustrate the crazy amount of work it can be to rectify the problem once the balsa starts rotting.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: deck leak

James Alton
 

Bill,

   I am glad that you pointed out the concern of leakage into the core from cracks as this does happen.  Not all cracks are the same, some are a concern and some aren’t and telling the difference is sometimes difficult.  Here are a  couple general things that I have learned.

1.  Cracks that occur near a high load areas where hardware is attached usually extend into the glass laminate.  

2.  Cracks that form on an open deck area such as what we commonly see in the simulated teak decks should only be in the gelcoat so there is no path for water to leak into the core.

3.  You can get some idea of whether a particular crack is serious by how much displacement there is on the surface.  Is the top of the crack level or is one edge raised?  If level, odds are pretty good that the laminate is still ok.  If you can catch your fingernail on a raised edge, the crack likely extends into the laminate at least some.  

3.  Your advice to fix damage caused by dropping something heavy and fracturing the glass laminate is really good advice.  An amazing amount of water can enter through even a small crack or hole over time and it is a one way trip since it is pretty much impossible to remove short of using vacuum pump.  

James 





   

On Sep 21, 2020, at 10:09 AM, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Bill & Karen and everyone,

I love your sketch and simple explanation of potentially a serious issue. I will add a word of caution. Small cracks in the gelcoat of any Amel can possibly lead to a serious core moisture problem. 

How many of us have walked past a tiny crack without thinking through the potential of a serious repair? If you choose to do nothing, one day you might regret it. I suggest that at the very least, temporarily seal that crack until gelcoat repair can be done. The most common areas that I see cracks that will cause moisture penetration is near the aft lazarette and on the cockpit seats where something heavy has hit the area with force. The most common cause is damage from the bottom fin of an outboard engine. 

If you have created a small crack, don't wish for the best, do something.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Sep 20, 2020 at 7:41 PM Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Amelians,

Here are our thoughts about this deck leak!

Any deck leak, no matter how small, in the main cabin of a Super Maramu is a serious issue that needs to be addressed RIGHT AWAY.  
This is the voice of painful experience. A TINY little salt line was all that alerted us to one of the biggest jobs we have had to do to our boat.

Here is why...

From the aft edge of the hatch in the main saloon forward, the deck is pretty standard balsa cored deck. 
Right behind the hatch, the deck surface rises about 3 inches, while the cabin ceiling height does not change. 
 
The cabin ceiling here is thin (4-6mm plywood) and there is an empty space between the cabin ceiling and the structural underside of the deck. 
If there is ANY leak into this space, the water is free to roll around, and will find a place to drip down probably quite remote from the actual source.

What makes this situation so serious, is the back edge of the balsa core on the forward deck is not sealed, and is exposed into this space. It will soak up that water, and rot.  This is a big expensive repair to do right.  

Leaks into this space can come from the traveler, but more likely is from the hatch in the main cabin.  

There is a hardwood frame around the hatch opening, and the hatch frame is screwed into this with wood screws.  
 A lot of force is applied to the screws that secure the hinge side of the frame.  
If one of these starts to leak, the wood saturates, and water is then deposited into that empty space between the sailing and the deck, and problems start. 

Karen Smith & Bill Kinney
SM #160
Annapolis, MD




2441 - 2460 of 56830