Date   

Re: Cruise and Max RPM #solution

Bill Shaproski
 

Hi Frank,
Thanks for getting back to me with your very comprehensive and well written explanation.  I'll definitely check my HE when I return to Florida.  
Best Regards
Bill Shaproski

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020, 7:07 AM Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill, I also have an Amel about the same age as yours, and it too has the TMD22a. My engine would also run hot if I ran it much over 1800 rpm , at 2500 rpm for a few minutes I was seeing 217 degrees . I replaced the impeller ,insured water supply was unrestricted and cleaned the heat exchanger several times over a couple of years and yet still had overheating. I finally discovered my problem, and probably yours. The rubber caps on either end of the heat exchanger needed to be replaced and while ordering them online , on the side bar it showed a rubber washer/seal . I had no idea what it was for ,but bought it as well. I found a illustration showing this washer around the H/E core , when I took the core out and looked into the H/E housing ,towards the back I saw what I would call a small round  bulkhead built into the housing ,slightly larger in diameter than the core itself. The seal closes off the opening forcing the cooling water to flow thru the core rather than much of it  bypassing to core . So at low rpms the cooling was adequate to keep temps low ,but couldn't cool the water efficiently enough at higher rpms.
The washer had deteriorated and fallen off the core before I ever first took it apart, thus I never knew it existed ,I found small remnants of it later in the housing. So take your core out and see if the washer is on the core,I will bet it is gone, or pushed back too far and not sealing the opening. When you replace it ,slip it over the far end but not so far that it does not come into contact with the bulkhead opening  ,let the bulkhead push it into its proper position as you slide the core into place. 
One last tip to save a couple of hundred dollars. Buying the rubber end caps from any Volvo supplier was going to cost about $350. I found that if I ordered the caps for a Perkins M80 ,same caps ,it only cost about $55. ,the seal/washer was only a couple of dollars.
I hope this ends your overheating issues, I think it will.
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans #123
Sassafras River ,Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jul 5, 2020 7:31 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Cruise and Max RPM #solution

I have a 1995 Amel SM with a TMD22A and a MaxProp.  I used a max cruising speed of 2,000 RPM when doing my circumnavigation, but usually tried to keep it at 1800RPM.  I have cruised at 2600 RPM plus in an emergency for about 30 minutes, but the engine did get very hot.  Hope this helps.  I arrived at the 2,000RPM number by listening to the prior owner's advice.  

Regards,
Bill Shaproski
S/v Pacific Cool
206-375-2787

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:10 AM JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:
Hello Amelians!  I am in the process of learning my boat.  The engine is a Volvo TMD22, with autoprop h6 propeller.
I found some threads here on the forum related to this topic, but none conclusive about what is the ideal cruise rpm regime, and what is the maximum rpm?  I can't get more than 2100 rpm!
 Any suggestion?

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

Bill Shaproski
 

Hi Kent,
Thanks for the followup.  Useful to know.
Regards
Bill

On Mon, Jul 6, 2020, 8:20 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The heavy oil was what was put in it by Amel, and lasted some 21 years, so that's what I used. If you go with grease, I think it should be looked at every 2 years or so. I may look at mine every 5 years if it doesn't leak oil.
Kent

On Jul 5, 2020 8:12 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Bamar EJF Furler

 

Tom, the EJF is the forestay furler on your Maramu but was not the original furler.


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 9:46 AM amel46met <onboardaphrodite@...> wrote:
Hi Bill
The Barmar EJF is the forestay furler.
Tom Deasy 
Maramu #125 1983


On Jul 5, 2020, at 5:07 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Are you referring to your Genoa furler or your main sail furler?  If it's the main sail furler, is it the outhaul motor/gearbox that stops or the furler motor/gearbox that stops?  If it's the main sail furler, were you able to get it back by manually cranking it in?  I suspect you're referring to the Genoa furler, but just wanted to confirm.  
Regards.
Bill Shaproski
S/V Pacific Cool

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 12:43 PM amel46met <onboardaphrodite@...> wrote:
Hello Group
Tom Deasy APHRODITE Maramu 1983 #125
I am having a problem with my electric furler, four years old and several thousand miles.It will unroll about 2 feet and stop it will not roll back up. Is it possible for me to disassemble to see the problem could it be the brushes or possibly corrosion with the paws or the electrical brake system any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Tom Deasy





--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Bamar EJF Furler

amel46met
 

Hi Bill
The Barmar EJF is the forestay furler.
Tom Deasy 
Maramu #125 1983


On Jul 5, 2020, at 5:07 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Are you referring to your Genoa furler or your main sail furler?  If it's the main sail furler, is it the outhaul motor/gearbox that stops or the furler motor/gearbox that stops?  If it's the main sail furler, were you able to get it back by manually cranking it in?  I suspect you're referring to the Genoa furler, but just wanted to confirm.  
Regards.
Bill Shaproski
S/V Pacific Cool

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 12:43 PM amel46met <onboardaphrodite@...> wrote:
Hello Group
Tom Deasy APHRODITE Maramu 1983 #125
I am having a problem with my electric furler, four years old and several thousand miles.It will unroll about 2 feet and stop it will not roll back up. Is it possible for me to disassemble to see the problem could it be the brushes or possibly corrosion with the paws or the electrical brake system any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Tom Deasy





--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

karkauai
 

The heavy oil was what was put in it by Amel, and lasted some 21 years, so that's what I used. If you go with grease, I think it should be looked at every 2 years or so. I may look at mine every 5 years if it doesn't leak oil.
Kent

On Jul 5, 2020 8:12 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Cruise and Max RPM #solution

karkauai
 

Thank you Marco.  I still have the old Hurth transmission that was on the old Volvo.  I'll have to check its gearbox ratio.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Jul 5, 2020 5:40 PM, Marco Mancini <marcomancini61@...> wrote:
Kent, we are using the same h6 was setted up by amel for the previuos TMD22 without modification. I discussed for a while with the Autoprop dealer for the defintion of the 2,3 gearbox ratio  becouse I thought in the beginning to use the same gearbox ratio of the other yanmar 100 cv installed on the SM . But this new version ( 110cv) run at maximum only at 3200 rpm instead of the 3800 rpm so we needed a smaller ratio.  The engine at its maxum reach all the 3200 rpm . Indeed the boat runs to above 9,2 Knots but she goes above her  critical velocity that with the usual formula is  8,7  knots . From what my brother is describing to me  ( I leave in Milan ) there are not vibration and the engine is very silent . 
cheers 
marco 



Il giorno 05 lug 2020, alle ore 20:09, karkauai via groups.io <karkauai@...> ha scritto:

Hi Marco,
Are you still using the AutoProp H6 with the new engine?  If yes, did you have it modified in any way?

Thanks,
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Jul 5, 2020 1:18 PM, Marco Mancini <marcomancini61@...> wrote:
dears,

the TMD22 with the mechanical gearbox (2,8 reduction factor) and the autoprop h6 was probably  never reached in our 20 years of SM  more than 2500 2600 rpm ,
The TMD22 engine characteristic curve show that the 78 hp ( the max power) is obtained at 3500 - 4200 rpm  but at 2500 the curve show 40 hp and the boat has never reached more than 7.5 knots 
Now we have moved to the yanmar 110 cv,  the new version of the yanmar 100) with gearbox with 2.3 rduction factor   (midway betwenn the 1.97 of amel 54 with 110 volvo and  2.8 of the yanmar 100 )  that is  the new version  of the well known  Yanmar 100 cv  installed by Amel  after the TMD22. In Italy due to a severe restrictions of  omologation certificate we had also to afford the cost of new homologation certificate but we hare happy with this change . indeed the boat seems to go much better, it has a cruise speed of 8,5  at 2300 rpm over 3200rpm ( max engine regime)  and also in the manoeuvres she is more prompt than before . 
cheers and good wind . 
marco mancini 
SM 304 




Il giorno 25 giu 2020, alle ore 16:55, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> ha scritto:

This is question without a definitive answer. 
We also have the TMD22. When we bought our boat (about 4 years used), we could get almost 3,000 rpm at max throttle. Our local diesel guy suggested cruising at 80% of max, or 2,400. Our max started to lessen within about a year. 
Ever since then, we have usually not been able to max out at 3,000. Usually max is 2,400 to 2,600, so we cruise at 80% of that.
Issues affecting max cruise rpm include bottom, prop (even one barnacle can make a difference), turbo condition, and countless others. 
I suppose that, just like me, the Volvo has also lost a little mojo as it has aged. 

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

with its tiny keyboard

On Jun 25, 2020, at 10:10 AM, JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:

Hello Amelians!  I am in the process of learning my boat.  The engine is a Volvo TMD22, with autoprop h6 propeller.
I found some threads here on the forum related to this topic, but none conclusive about what is the ideal cruise rpm regime, and what is the maximum rpm?  I can't get more than 2100 rpm!
 Any suggestion?

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain





Re: Cruise and Max RPM #solution

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, I also have an Amel about the same age as yours, and it too has the TMD22a. My engine would also run hot if I ran it much over 1800 rpm , at 2500 rpm for a few minutes I was seeing 217 degrees . I replaced the impeller ,insured water supply was unrestricted and cleaned the heat exchanger several times over a couple of years and yet still had overheating. I finally discovered my problem, and probably yours. The rubber caps on either end of the heat exchanger needed to be replaced and while ordering them online , on the side bar it showed a rubber washer/seal . I had no idea what it was for ,but bought it as well. I found a illustration showing this washer around the H/E core , when I took the core out and looked into the H/E housing ,towards the back I saw what I would call a small round  bulkhead built into the housing ,slightly larger in diameter than the core itself. The seal closes off the opening forcing the cooling water to flow thru the core rather than much of it  bypassing to core . So at low rpms the cooling was adequate to keep temps low ,but couldn't cool the water efficiently enough at higher rpms.
The washer had deteriorated and fallen off the core before I ever first took it apart, thus I never knew it existed ,I found small remnants of it later in the housing. So take your core out and see if the washer is on the core,I will bet it is gone, or pushed back too far and not sealing the opening. When you replace it ,slip it over the far end but not so far that it does not come into contact with the bulkhead opening  ,let the bulkhead push it into its proper position as you slide the core into place. 
One last tip to save a couple of hundred dollars. Buying the rubber end caps from any Volvo supplier was going to cost about $350. I found that if I ordered the caps for a Perkins M80 ,same caps ,it only cost about $55. ,the seal/washer was only a couple of dollars.
I hope this ends your overheating issues, I think it will.
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans #123
Sassafras River ,Md.


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...>
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jul 5, 2020 7:31 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Cruise and Max RPM #solution

I have a 1995 Amel SM with a TMD22A and a MaxProp.  I used a max cruising speed of 2,000 RPM when doing my circumnavigation, but usually tried to keep it at 1800RPM.  I have cruised at 2600 RPM plus in an emergency for about 30 minutes, but the engine did get very hot.  Hope this helps.  I arrived at the 2,000RPM number by listening to the prior owner's advice.  

Regards,
Bill Shaproski
S/v Pacific Cool
206-375-2787

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:10 AM JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:
Hello Amelians!  I am in the process of learning my boat.  The engine is a Volvo TMD22, with autoprop h6 propeller.
I found some threads here on the forum related to this topic, but none conclusive about what is the ideal cruise rpm regime, and what is the maximum rpm?  I can't get more than 2100 rpm!
 Any suggestion?

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain


--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Slap Silencer

eric freedman
 

Hi Steve,
I see your hull number is very close to mine. Forward of the Calpeda AC Pump close to the bilge and the engine stringer should be a small white box with holes drilled in the top ad slats in the side. It is the high water alarm switch. Do you have this switch? If you do, is there a maker or model number on it?
If you could also send me photos and measurements , it would be greatly appreciated.
Are you the original owner?
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 KImberlite

On July 6, 2020 at 2:01 AM "Steve Bell s/y Dusk SM378 via groups.io" <stevect@...> wrote:

Hi All .
An alternative to the noodle is to go to your local plumbing store and purchase  copper pipe insulation.

These are the same as a noodle but with a hole already through it, the material also seemed more dense than a common swiming pool noodle.

We did this on our previous boat and puy some light chain through the insualtion for weight.

I havent tried it on Dusk yet but will get around to it sometime in the future but it worked on our previous yacht although not a 100% it certainly reduced the slapping.

Regards

Steve
s/y Dusk
sm #378




 


Re: Slap Silencer

eric freedman
 

Hi Steve,
I see your hull number is very close to mine. Forward of the Calpeda AC Pump close to the bilge and the engine stringer should be a small white box with holes drilled in the top ad slats in the side. It is the high water alarm switch. Do you have this switch? If you do, is there a maker or model number on it?
If you could also send me photos and measurements , it would be greatly appreciated.
Are you the original owner?
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 KImberlite

On July 6, 2020 at 2:01 AM "Steve Bell s/y Dusk SM378 via groups.io" <stevect@...> wrote:

Hi All .
An alternative to the noodle is to go to your local plumbing store and purchase  copper pipe insulation.

These are the same as a noodle but with a hole already through it, the material also seemed more dense than a common swiming pool noodle.

We did this on our previous boat and puy some light chain through the insualtion for weight.

I havent tried it on Dusk yet but will get around to it sometime in the future but it worked on our previous yacht although not a 100% it certainly reduced the slapping.

Regards

Steve
s/y Dusk
sm #378




 


Re: Slap Silencer

Steve Bell s/y Dusk SM378
 

Hi All .
An alternative to the noodle is to go to your local plumbing store and purchase  copper pipe insulation.

These are the same as a noodle but with a hole already through it, the material also seemed more dense than a common swiming pool noodle.

We did this on our previous boat and puy some light chain through the insualtion for weight.

I havent tried it on Dusk yet but will get around to it sometime in the future but it worked on our previous yacht although not a 100% it certainly reduced the slapping.

Regards

Steve
s/y Dusk
sm #378




Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Was indeed referring to Bonfiglioli 

For the manual furler, fresh water rinse works fine for me. 

Cheers

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM007, Opua, NZ


On 6/07/2020, at 5:22 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Hi JP,
I think you are referring to the Bonfiglioli Gearbox.  If not, are you saying that tapping a grease nipple into the mainsail MANUAL furler is acceptable?  This is the one installed above the Bonfiglioli gearbox and mating with the mainsail extrusion.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:00 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
In order to grease the gearboxes, you must install grease nipples

I drilled mine, tapped in my nipples, and voila...

Cheers

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, Opua NZ


On 6/07/2020, at 12:13 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

Bill Shaproski
 

Hi JP,
I think you are referring to the Bonfiglioli Gearbox.  If not, are you saying that tapping a grease nipple into the mainsail MANUAL furler is acceptable?  This is the one installed above the Bonfiglioli gearbox and mating with the mainsail extrusion.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 9:00 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
In order to grease the gearboxes, you must install grease nipples

I drilled mine, tapped in my nipples, and voila...

Cheers

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, Opua NZ


On 6/07/2020, at 12:13 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Switch on Bilge Float Tube

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

I am now back in Germany in have your parcel.

Thanks for that. But there is no manual and no installation pdf. Can you sent me one.

Best regarts Heinz

 

Von: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Diego de Miguel (Sailing Living Lab) Amel Sharki
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 22. April 2020 10:55
An: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Switch on Bilge Float Tube

 

Hello Heinz,

Thank you very much for your interest into the IDN system.
Could you please send an e-mail to me at: diego.demiguel@... ? then I will reply your e-mail with more detailed info, technichal specifications, and will add to Alejando Samaniego (CEO of IDN) in copy. Thus he will be able to add more info if needed.
Thanks again for you interest mate!

Best Regards,

Diego.


Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

In order to grease the gearboxes, you must install grease nipples

I drilled mine, tapped in my nipples, and voila...

Cheers

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, Opua NZ


On 6/07/2020, at 12:13 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:


Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: eRe: sm 53 vs 54

james Hosford
 

Thanks again everyone for their reply’s 


On Jul 5, 2020, at 7:34 PM, Gary Wells <gary@...> wrote:

My wife and I were faced with a fairly similar decision when we were weighing the money vs. size vs. age vs. condition of a Maramu and a Mango and a Super Maramu.

Between the three there was over $100k difference in pricing so we just studied and studied and visited and made estimates of refit and operating costs and it seemed to never get any simpler.

Finally we decided on the super Maramu and I can truly say I think we made the right call.  Each if the boats had it's merits and detractors but after our first year in the SM it became apparent that we did the best ~for us~.

I totally agree with all the posters who say that it's be hard to give up this boat for another, regardless up up/down scale and comparative factors because we are so heavily invested in having learned, tweaked, adjusted and discovered all the ups and downs of the boat we have.

My only comparison has been to sit and share time 54 owners.  Of course it's natural to compare notes and that's pretty much the end of objectivity right there. One 54 owner Bates the flush-top deck lockers lockers because they leak. Mine are raised and don't leak .. but the reason they went to flush is because you can trip on them. 
I love out handhold-to-handhold movement below deck. On another (older) SM my wife nearly took a fall on the companionway reaching for an expected handhold that hadn't been invented yet on that boat.
The 54's hard top is a great advantage .. unless you like flipping the canvas down for the air.
And yes, I'd love the extra speed, extra foresail, different stateroom layout and newer gadgetry on a 54, but I'm also really happy with what I am familiar with; and from what I  hear, a smidge less.comexity and easier access to some mechanicals on the SM.

It's just got to come down to your evaluation of wants and needs.  I've done a fair amount of single handing on a Super Maramu and it's easy enough. The 54 I conceptually the same so I can't see how it's be any different.  Crew accommodation is excellent on both, maybe the 54 has an edge with more hatches when it's miserably calm somewhere, but then .. more chances for leaky gaskets.  You see what I'm driving at :)
Hope you have a great "hunt" and eventually find the "one" that fits best.

Gary W

SM 209, Adagio
Deltaville, VA USA





eRe: sm 53 vs 54

Gary Wells
 

My wife and I were faced with a fairly similar decision when we were weighing the money vs. size vs. age vs. condition of a Maramu and a Mango and a Super Maramu.

Between the three there was over $100k difference in pricing so we just studied and studied and visited and made estimates of refit and operating costs and it seemed to never get any simpler.

Finally we decided on the super Maramu and I can truly say I think we made the right call.  Each if the boats had it's merits and detractors but after our first year in the SM it became apparent that we did the best ~for us~.

I totally agree with all the posters who say that it's be hard to give up this boat for another, regardless up up/down scale and comparative factors because we are so heavily invested in having learned, tweaked, adjusted and discovered all the ups and downs of the boat we have.

My only comparison has been to sit and share time 54 owners.  Of course it's natural to compare notes and that's pretty much the end of objectivity right there. One 54 owner Bates the flush-top deck lockers lockers because they leak. Mine are raised and don't leak .. but the reason they went to flush is because you can trip on them. 
I love out handhold-to-handhold movement below deck. On another (older) SM my wife nearly took a fall on the companionway reaching for an expected handhold that hadn't been invented yet on that boat.
The 54's hard top is a great advantage .. unless you like flipping the canvas down for the air.
And yes, I'd love the extra speed, extra foresail, different stateroom layout and newer gadgetry on a 54, but I'm also really happy with what I am familiar with; and from what I  hear, a smidge less.comexity and easier access to some mechanicals on the SM.

It's just got to come down to your evaluation of wants and needs.  I've done a fair amount of single handing on a Super Maramu and it's easy enough. The 54 I conceptually the same so I can't see how it's be any different.  Crew accommodation is excellent on both, maybe the 54 has an edge with more hatches when it's miserably calm somewhere, but then .. more chances for leaky gaskets.  You see what I'm driving at :)
Hope you have a great "hunt" and eventually find the "one" that fits best.

Gary W

SM 209, Adagio
Deltaville, VA USA





Re: Lubrication of the Mechanism That Drives The Main Sail Furling Unit

Bill Shaproski
 

Hi Ken and Iris,
Thanks for the clarification.  It's helpful.  Also, I note that Ken from Aquarius recommended grease to lubricate the furler, but you are recommending oil.  Is the choice a matter of preference or what?  Thanks again for your help.  
Regards
Bill Shaproski


On Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 3:35 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
Yes, I'm referring to the manual furler that the winch handle goes in.
I don't know how you could add oil with it in place. Mine had never been serviced, and hearing about the shearing off of the foil, I wanted to remove it to check that anyway.  Mine had holes that were elongated to about 15mm, so I cut it off and drilled new holes.

There was still oil in the gearbox, but only a cup or so, and it was black.  After dismantling it and cleaning it up, I reassembled it and with it lying on the bench with the opening where the drive shaft goes in facing up, I poured in the oil and then finished assembling.
Hope that helps,
Kent


On Jun 30, 2020 2:24 PM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
Hi Kent and Iris,
Thanks much for the info.  I just want to confirm that when you say you serviced the manual furler you are referring to the unit at the bottom of the main sail where you insert the winch handle to manually furl or unfurl the main when the electric system has failed.  If yes, were you able to lubricate the inside of the unit with the unit in place. If so, how was this accomplished?  I reviewed a YouTube video from Ken on Aquarius where he explains how to completely rebuild the unit which looks reasonably challenging.  So if there's a way to lube it without disassembly I'd prefer that.  

Thanks for your interest.

Regards
Bill Shaproski
Pacific Cool  

On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 8:00 AM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill.
I just serviced my manual furler for the main. It is filled with a very heavy gear oil.  I found only one place (in England) that sold it by the liter, otherwise it is sold in very large quantities and is very expensive. It was shipped to me in the USA in about a week at a reasonable price. A liter is enough to service it 2-3 times.
 It is Shell Oil Omala S4 WE320

After reinstalling it there was a small amount of oil on the deck the next day or two. It stopped leaking after a few days and hasn't been leaking for two weeks including furling and unfurling several times.
What specifically did you want to know?
Kent & Iris
SM243
Kristy


On Jun 18, 2020 9:00 AM, Bill Shaproski <bill.shaproski@...> wrote:
I did find a group of messages from 2012 that address my question.  But I would like to find someone who has done this recently to ask some specific questions.  
Regards,
Bill Shaproski



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Bamar EJF Furler

Bill Shaproski
 

Are you referring to your Genoa furler or your main sail furler?  If it's the main sail furler, is it the outhaul motor/gearbox that stops or the furler motor/gearbox that stops?  If it's the main sail furler, were you able to get it back by manually cranking it in?  I suspect you're referring to the Genoa furler, but just wanted to confirm.  
Regards.
Bill Shaproski
S/V Pacific Cool

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 12:43 PM amel46met <onboardaphrodite@...> wrote:
Hello Group
Tom Deasy APHRODITE Maramu 1983 #125
I am having a problem with my electric furler, four years old and several thousand miles.It will unroll about 2 feet and stop it will not roll back up. Is it possible for me to disassemble to see the problem could it be the brushes or possibly corrosion with the paws or the electrical brake system any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks Tom Deasy





--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Boar speed om Amel SM200

Bill Shaproski
 

I have a 1995 SM and changed out the B&G instruments for Raymarine instruments.  Relatively straightforward replacement except for running the wiring to the mast head for the wind instrument.  The wires for all instruments, run in a completely accessible channel on the starboard side at the ceiling intersection.   

Regards
Bill Shaproski
S/V Pacific Cool
206-375-2787

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 1:33 PM Slavko Despotovi <slavko@...> wrote:

Hello,

I just become the owner of SM 2000 hull nr. 279. Name Bonne Anse. Boat speed is not working. Surveyer Oliver said that problem is in sensor. Any experince if I would change with sensor for depth, temperature and speed sensor?

Thank you,

Slavko
SM 2000 279



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787


Re: Cruise and Max RPM #solution

Bill Shaproski
 

I have a 1995 Amel SM with a TMD22A and a MaxProp.  I used a max cruising speed of 2,000 RPM when doing my circumnavigation, but usually tried to keep it at 1800RPM.  I have cruised at 2600 RPM plus in an emergency for about 30 minutes, but the engine did get very hot.  Hope this helps.  I arrived at the 2,000RPM number by listening to the prior owner's advice.  

Regards,
Bill Shaproski
S/v Pacific Cool
206-375-2787

On Thu, Jun 25, 2020 at 8:10 AM JOSE PRIETO <prietomd11@...> wrote:
Hello Amelians!  I am in the process of learning my boat.  The engine is a Volvo TMD22, with autoprop h6 propeller.
I found some threads here on the forum related to this topic, but none conclusive about what is the ideal cruise rpm regime, and what is the maximum rpm?  I can't get more than 2100 rpm!
 Any suggestion?

--
Jose Prieto
SV Wayag, SM 323
Currently Alicante, Spain



--
Bill Shaproski
Cell:  +1-206-375-2787