Date   

Re: Good Service In Marmaris Turkey

greatketch@...
 

Ian,
Very helpful comments on your service experience.  Thanks a lot for the information about what worked for you. It is always good to hear about boat projects gone right!

You comment in you post that you are added an extra 140 m of chain to "get the stripes parallel to the water".  They are not supposed to be!  The design of the boat is to have them sweep upward toward the bow.  This looks better (to many eyes) than a rigorously horizontal stripe, and it brings the bottom paint up to cover the area of the hull that is constantly covered by the bow wave when sailing. The Amel SM has a rather straight shear line, and a bit of curve lightens her appearance. But looks are not the real issue.

If you were to put so much weight into the bow that bow stripe was approaching horizontal, you would be seriously compromising the sailing performance of the boat.  Adding weight to the bow, and to a lesser extent the stern, causes the boat to "hobbyhorse" in choppy seas, increases weather helm and leeway, slows her down in light winds, and in general puts the boat out of balance.  For a boat to do well, she really needs to be sailed on the lines as she was designed.

There is no way that your boat requires almost a half tonne of extra weight (140 M of 10 mm chain)  added to the bow to get her trim right! You are adding weight to the boat in the worst possible place to do so.

When I first bought Harmonie she was as close to her light ship weight as she has ever been since she first splashed in La Rochelle.  I noted, as you did,  that the boot stripe appeared higher at the bow than the stern, and wondered if she was right on her lines.  I took one of Amel's scale drawings that came in her paperwork, and measured from the rail to the design waterline at the bow and stern.  She was exactly where she was supposed to be. I have since learned not to be surprised by such precision in design and construction.  When we loaded her up with all our worldly possessions she lost about a centimeter of freeboard all round.

Signed,
The Weight Nazi, aka,
Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine.


On 6 Aug 2017, at 21:34, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Last month there were three SuperMaramu 2000's in the Marmaris area, all 
looking for a haul out, repair work, polish and antifouling. One went to 
Gocek, one went to Yat Marina in Marmaris Bay and I went to Netsel 
Marina Marmaris. One owner had OK service but suffered a lack of 
attention to detail, another had a total disaster, and I struck lucky 
with with a result that exceeded my expectations by a long way. I would 
like to share my good experiences with other Amel owners who might need 
work done in Turkey.

Having sailed this area for the past 13 years with my Amel and before 
that with chartered yachts, I can safely say that I have established who 
really does a good job in this area. The purpose of this trip was to 
make my SM look good again. The red stripe had faded and could not be 
restored by others who tried at the previous haul out and the port side 
rub rail had suffered some damage from a large steel boat that broke 
it's mooring lines during a storm in Larnaca marina.

Two years ago I met Serdar Ak who runs Poseidon Yacht Service based at 
Netsel Marina Marmaris. You could not wish to meet a nicer man who 
really wants to do his best for you and his English is excellent. For 17 
years Serdar worked for Jeaneau Turkey specializing in gelcoat and 
painting. The locals assured me that he was the very best and so I 
booked a haul out and asked him to make Crusader look good again. Serdar 
also has a carbon fibre moulding company. Of the items he makes there 
are carbon fibre flag staffs and carbon fibre gangplanks with the yachts 
name embossed. Tempting! For those who might think that Netsel is 
expensive, you would be right except that if you leave it to Serdar, he 
will get you a rate better than Yat Marina. A two way haul out and 10 
days in a cradle on the hard cost €955.

Within a few minutes of work on the red boot top stripes they looked 
like new. So good in fact that we decided not to move the stripes to 
make them parallel to the water. Instead we added a further 30M of 
chain(now 140M), which has helped, but it is still not enough.

The whole boat was finished and polished so well that it looks like 
brand new. Serdar's workforce of three were unbelievably conscientious, 
and worked tirelessly until Serdar was completely satisfied with the 
result. All of them are perfectionists. There is no sign of any damage 
now and all the gel coat colours used match perfectly. When the 
anti-fouling was rubbed down, it was all done carefully by hand using a 
special abrasive cloth from Finland. The paint was sprayed on by Serdar 
using a very impressive piece of kit, the same way Amel do. The ballast 
keel was renovated and treated against rust spots. I have uploaded 
photos of the excellent results.

Whilst on the hard I ran into a snag removing the mainsail out-haul 
gearbox. Surprise surprise. The drive shaft was refusing to tap out of 
the gearbox, which was disappointing as I make a point of greasing it 
every six months. Serdar suggested help from a man named Mustafa who 
runs a company called M2 Rigging and Yacht Services. First impressions 
of Mustafa were that he seemed a little too keen to help me, but I soon 
found out that it is just his manner, and that he is very familiar with 
servicing Amels.His business is well respected by the local yacht owners.

After also failing to remove the shaft, he said the way that he had 
previously solved the problem several times was to cut the shaft in two 
with a hack saw, take the gearbox to his workshop where he has a decent 
press, then machine up a new shaft and weld it to the original top piece 
that the locking bolt passes through. This he did and not many hours 
later the new shaft was made and back on board. The magic of Marmaris! 
In the meantime Serdar was doing a proper paint job on the gearboxes. I 
am wondering if it might be worthwhile to have the shaft machined to 
take top and bottom O-rings to help keep seawater out, or at least have 
a top hat made up to shelter the shaft to gearbox bearing area? Has 
anyone done this?

Seeing that Mustafa owned a rigging company, I mentioned that it was 
time I changed my standing rigging. He offered me an ACMO SuperMaramu 
kit but using wire from Denmark for €7000 plus €1000 labour including 
all taxes. Two days later the job was done by his very experienced team 
of riggers. He reckons the Danish wire is better than the wire ACMO use. 
A full set of certifications and guaranty's was supplied. Richard 
Piller, please note that I have decided not to replace the plastic wire 
sheaths, as per your advice! New wire looks great anyway and one less 
thing to worry about as the Med sun turns the plastic to powder. He also 
replaced the lower rail lifelines as they were beginning to degrade. 
After sailing hard for a week I brought Crusader back to M2 for a check 
over and minor adjustments to the rig. All at no further charge.

My other renovation was to have all new cockpit and aft deck cushions 
made, and also the steering wheel, companion way, stair rail, and head 
protector leather replaced. For this I used Yasin Karabulut who runs 
Swarzewolke Upholstery near Netsel Marina . Yasin made me an excellent 
cockpit bimini two years ago which is a huge improvement on the original 
that came with the boat. Once again he did a top quality job and and I 
am very pleased with the work. His next task will be to make more 
attractive curtains and maybe a full winter cover. Again photos of his 
work in the photos section.

Whilst on the hard I serviced my transmission which has a stainless seal 
bush and my bow thuster which is lubricated with lithium graphite 
grease. I will post on my findings after 7 years of doing this later. 
However, I had a spare stainless bush made up whilst in Marmaris by 
Erinox Marine for €80. I have included their business card in the photo 
section. Tragically Ergun, the owner of Erinox, was killed the very next 
morning after I gave him the parts to copy, in a motorcycle accident. 
The company continues with his two partners, though they do not speak 
English well like Ergun did. R.I.P. You were a good man.

I have also included photos of the business cards of these four 
companies plus the card of a very helpful and pleasant agent who will 
get you checked out of Turkey for €50.

I hope that this will be useful to anyone passing this area who needs 
work done. By the way, for those who believe the 'fake news', I have 
been in Turkey for six weeks and everything has been totally calm and 
normal. There are less foreign registered yachts about this year, no 
doubt some put off by the exaggerations of the press. It's still a great 
cruising area.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 (2003) Crusader Lindos Rhodes



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Modified SM Prop Shaft Seal Bush

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ian, All, and especially newbies;

Most of you know that I have been and will always be the person in this group that warns everyone about changing an Amel design. It is nothing personal. I love all things Amel and I take it as my responsibility; so, because of that responsibility, I will offer the other side of CRUSADER's report and recommendation...nothing personal, but I am the self-appointed protector of all things Amel, and will always be the one to point out the RISK vs the REWARD in changing an Amel design.

<<<>>>
I am certainly no expert, but I believe that stainless steel comes in at least 5 types and also different hardnesses; and the Nitrile Buna-N seals are made in different hardnesses. Although I personally do not need the answer to the following questions, I believe anyone attempting to follow your recommendation should know: What type of stainless steel and hardness you used? What was the hardness of the seals? What were the engine hours between servicing?

I would guess that to obtain different results than the Amel-proven system, you have to either scientifically solve the wear issue to achieve a different balance between wear of the seal and wear of the bushing, or use a trial and error method. I assume that your method was trial and error, which resulted in changing the balance of wear between the wear bushing and the wear on the lips of the seals; which extended your haulout interval - your goal. 

We must remember that there will be wear between the lips of the seal and the wear bushing on the C-Drive. It is obvious to anyone who has serviced an Amel C-Drive that with the current Amel design the wear bushing appears to wear more than the seal lips. 

I would assume that one could scientifically change the balance to increase the interval of haulouts. However, it makes sense to me that unless a scientific approach is used, we would be playing Russian roulette with a very expensive part of our boat.

Don't take what I am saying as criticism. I am happy that you achieved your goal. My goal was to haul out every 2 years for more reasons than C-Drive maintenance.

I would urge all readers of this message to stick with proven Amel supplied parts and procedures, rather than changing something that you do not completely understand. I do not have the metallurgical and mechanical engineering expertise to develop a better system than Amel's wear bushing and seals, nor do I believe any of us have that knowledge. 

And, I will take this a step further: Many of the Amel systems that I have been exposed to, obviously take into consideration the required maintenance and the level of experience and knowledge of the person performing the job. When I managed new product development, I used the term "child proof." When I asked my staff if the new product was "child proof," they knew that I was asking if it would pass the test of the most ignorant user. I never met Henri Amel, but from my experience with his boats, I believe he also used my term, or one similar.

Until recently, I had no idea that the Nitrile Buna-N seals are available in a hardness range from 40-90, and I do not know the hardness of the Nitrile Buna-N lip seals that Amel uses. We all know that bronze, brass, and Naval brass are available in different hardnesses. I suspect that none of us know the hardness of the wear bushing that Amel uses, nor do we know the percent of copper, tin, and zinc . Without this information, I believe that changing the balance of wear between the bushing and the seal should not be attempted, unless you understand the huge risk for what, I believe, is very little reward.

Ian, it is very good to have you return to this forum. I have missed you and your posts. Probably none of us have more miles in a Super Maramu than you have.

​Best,​

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: refinishing the sole

Ryan Meador
 

This is great info! I'll have to study the sole more closely to see if it was oiled or varnished, and then I'll pick a path forward. That a great tip about not needing to walk on any of the pieces that can't be removed. I'll likely be back with more questions once I get the boat home.

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration (ex Monarae)
Under way North of Block Island, RI

On Aug 4, 2017 11:10 AM, "muynckrich@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

What we do, is once a year, rinse the teak floor thoroughly with "Pledge (Johnson) laminate cleaner". After drying a thin  layer of "Premium Golden Teak oil (Starbrite)". Not to much of this, otherwise you will see footprints. After 17 years our wooden sole is like new, even with two Jack Russle's aboard.

Good luck

Richard and Marie Jeanne
Silence
SM 206


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Advise on buying 1978 Maramu

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ton,

The number 1 thing that you should do before closing on this Maramu is get in touch with Olivier Beaute <olivierbeaute@...> in France. Olivier has more experience with Amels and Surveying Amels than anyone in the world. Have Olivier survey the Maramu.

​Best,​

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550


On Mon, Aug 7, 2017 at 1:20 AM, Thomas Nienkemper thomas.nienkemper@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

 

Dear Amel Community,

 

I have been an active reader of this group for quite a while as I am planning to buy a Maramu 46 for a circumnavigation in 2 years. I have visited 3 boats and am seriously considering to buy #9 (1978) which is located in south of France.

 

The current owner retired from owning a small boat yard, bought #9 from a customer and spent 2015+2016 refitting the boat for himself until he got health problems and could not continue with his plans. 

 

Everything substantial seems to be done. This includes:

*Hull epoxy treated in 2015

*New engine Lombardi Marine  LD W 2204 M

*New gearbox, shaft but old prop

*New bowthruster (fix in tunnel)

*New batteries

*New sails incl. spinnaker (no in mast furling, manual furling genoa)

*New standing rigging (mast+mizzen)

*New teak deck

*Chart plotter Garmin GPX1020xs

*New Garmin radar

*New Liferaft

*New Dinghy (but old outboard)

*New Autopilot

 

He got his diagnosis before he could finish the refit, so the interior of the boat is pretty much untouched and gives room for customization.

 

This is where I’m asking for your advise:

  1. Does anybody know about the history of #9?
  2. Is there anything particular I need to look at on these older Maramu models? I’ve heard they have a shorter mast, but does this affect sailing performance a lot?
  3. He is asking 89’500 EUR - what would be a fair offer?
  4. There is a French survey report from 2015, would you still do a full re-survey or save the cost?

 

I am not in a hurry to buy as departure is planned in August 2019, so if anybody in this group has plans to sell please get in touch with me :)

 

Best,

Tom

Future Maramu owner

Zürich



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Good Service In Marmaris Turkey

Peter Forbes
 

Ian,

That is brilliant data on service in Turkey - but I couldn’t get the contact details - can you send them somehow.

Peter
Peter Forbes
0044 7836 209730
Carango  Sailing Ketch
Amel 54 #035
In a Hurricane cradle in Grenada

On 6 Aug 2017, at 21:34, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Last month there were three SuperMaramu 2000's in the Marmaris area, all 
looking for a haul out, repair work, polish and antifouling. One went to 
Gocek, one went to Yat Marina in Marmaris Bay and I went to Netsel 
Marina Marmaris. One owner had OK service but suffered a lack of 
attention to detail, another had a total disaster, and I struck lucky 
with with a result that exceeded my expectations by a long way. I would 
like to share my good experiences with other Amel owners who might need 
work done in Turkey.

Having sailed this area for the past 13 years with my Amel and before 
that with chartered yachts, I can safely say that I have established who 
really does a good job in this area. The purpose of this trip was to 
make my SM look good again. The red stripe had faded and could not be 
restored by others who tried at the previous haul out and the port side 
rub rail had suffered some damage from a large steel boat that broke 
it's mooring lines during a storm in Larnaca marina.

Two years ago I met Serdar Ak who runs Poseidon Yacht Service based at 
Netsel Marina Marmaris. You could not wish to meet a nicer man who 
really wants to do his best for you and his English is excellent. For 17 
years Serdar worked for Jeaneau Turkey specializing in gelcoat and 
painting. The locals assured me that he was the very best and so I 
booked a haul out and asked him to make Crusader look good again. Serdar 
also has a carbon fibre moulding company. Of the items he makes there 
are carbon fibre flag staffs and carbon fibre gangplanks with the yachts 
name embossed. Tempting! For those who might think that Netsel is 
expensive, you would be right except that if you leave it to Serdar, he 
will get you a rate better than Yat Marina. A two way haul out and 10 
days in a cradle on the hard cost €955.

Within a few minutes of work on the red boot top stripes they looked 
like new. So good in fact that we decided not to move the stripes to 
make them parallel to the water. Instead we added a further 30M of 
chain(now 140M), which has helped, but it is still not enough.

The whole boat was finished and polished so well that it looks like 
brand new. Serdar's workforce of three were unbelievably conscientious, 
and worked tirelessly until Serdar was completely satisfied with the 
result. All of them are perfectionists. There is no sign of any damage 
now and all the gel coat colours used match perfectly. When the 
anti-fouling was rubbed down, it was all done carefully by hand using a 
special abrasive cloth from Finland. The paint was sprayed on by Serdar 
using a very impressive piece of kit, the same way Amel do. The ballast 
keel was renovated and treated against rust spots. I have uploaded 
photos of the excellent results.

Whilst on the hard I ran into a snag removing the mainsail out-haul 
gearbox. Surprise surprise. The drive shaft was refusing to tap out of 
the gearbox, which was disappointing as I make a point of greasing it 
every six months. Serdar suggested help from a man named Mustafa who 
runs a company called M2 Rigging and Yacht Services. First impressions 
of Mustafa were that he seemed a little too keen to help me, but I soon 
found out that it is just his manner, and that he is very familiar with 
servicing Amels.His business is well respected by the local yacht owners.

After also failing to remove the shaft, he said the way that he had 
previously solved the problem several times was to cut the shaft in two 
with a hack saw, take the gearbox to his workshop where he has a decent 
press, then machine up a new shaft and weld it to the original top piece 
that the locking bolt passes through. This he did and not many hours 
later the new shaft was made and back on board. The magic of Marmaris! 
In the meantime Serdar was doing a proper paint job on the gearboxes. I 
am wondering if it might be worthwhile to have the shaft machined to 
take top and bottom O-rings to help keep seawater out, or at least have 
a top hat made up to shelter the shaft to gearbox bearing area? Has 
anyone done this?

Seeing that Mustafa owned a rigging company, I mentioned that it was 
time I changed my standing rigging. He offered me an ACMO SuperMaramu 
kit but using wire from Denmark for €7000 plus €1000 labour including 
all taxes. Two days later the job was done by his very experienced team 
of riggers. He reckons the Danish wire is better than the wire ACMO use. 
A full set of certifications and guaranty's was supplied. Richard 
Piller, please note that I have decided not to replace the plastic wire 
sheaths, as per your advice! New wire looks great anyway and one less 
thing to worry about as the Med sun turns the plastic to powder. He also 
replaced the lower rail lifelines as they were beginning to degrade. 
After sailing hard for a week I brought Crusader back to M2 for a check 
over and minor adjustments to the rig. All at no further charge.

My other renovation was to have all new cockpit and aft deck cushions 
made, and also the steering wheel, companion way, stair rail, and head 
protector leather replaced. For this I used Yasin Karabulut who runs 
Swarzewolke Upholstery near Netsel Marina . Yasin made me an excellent 
cockpit bimini two years ago which is a huge improvement on the original 
that came with the boat. Once again he did a top quality job and and I 
am very pleased with the work. His next task will be to make more 
attractive curtains and maybe a full winter cover. Again photos of his 
work in the photos section.

Whilst on the hard I serviced my transmission which has a stainless seal 
bush and my bow thuster which is lubricated with lithium graphite 
grease. I will post on my findings after 7 years of doing this later. 
However, I had a spare stainless bush made up whilst in Marmaris by 
Erinox Marine for €80. I have included their business card in the photo 
section. Tragically Ergun, the owner of Erinox, was killed the very next 
morning after I gave him the parts to copy, in a motorcycle accident. 
The company continues with his two partners, though they do not speak 
English well like Ergun did. R.I.P. You were a good man.

I have also included photos of the business cards of these four 
companies plus the card of a very helpful and pleasant agent who will 
get you checked out of Turkey for €50.

I hope that this will be useful to anyone passing this area who needs 
work done. By the way, for those who believe the 'fake news', I have 
been in Turkey for six weeks and everything has been totally calm and 
normal. There are less foreign registered yachts about this year, no 
doubt some put off by the exaggerations of the press. It's still a great 
cruising area.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 (2003) Crusader Lindos Rhodes



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy way to remove the end caps on the desalator membranes

Mark Erdos
 

If no vise is available, connecting the high pressure hose to the tube once out of the mount works well. Once connected, hold the tube over a bucket in the engine room with a towel over the top to stop spray. Have someone turn on the water maker and place your thumb over the hole. The end will immediately pop off into the bucket.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 6, 2017 9:37 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy way to remove the end caps on the desalator membranes

 

 

It has always been a difficult job to remove the end caps with a strap wrench and a big set of cannel lock pliers.

This time I was working alone and I found it impossible to remove the end caps.
I went to the shop in the marina and clamped the end cap in the bench vise.

It had a set of nylon jaws. I tightened down the vise and twisted the tube and in less that 30 seconds the cap was off. I think I did all 4 in 3 minute.

Great solution for a difficult project.

Fair Winds
Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Digest Number 5179

Ian Tyler
 

Dear All,

Many apologies for my weird email. It wasn't meant to go to the Amel group at all and I'm not quite sure how I managed it as I was proof reading an email reply for my daughter - Hopefully it won't happen again!
 
Ian
---
Ian Tyler


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Digest Number 5179

Ian Tyler
 

Reading it! NEVER say Yeah it sounds sneery and very unfriendly when you read it! Let's talk when you get back. Ian
---
Ian Tyler
(phone) +44(0)1400 250 268 (voicemail only)+44(0)1400 250 171
(mobile)+44(0)7710 978 668

Support the Campaign to Save The Thorold Arms Pub in Marston

From: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, 7 August 2017, 2:28
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Digest Number 5179

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13 Messages
Digest #5179 1 Maintenance Apps? by "Rick Grimes" rickgrimes1 2a Maintenance Apps by rickgrimes1 2b Re: Maintenance Apps by "Mark Erdos" markerdos 2c Re: Maintenance Apps by bill_9895 3a Thomson Washer major water flooding !!! by jgvenegas 3b Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!! by bill_9895 3c Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!! by "Mark Erdos" markerdos 4a New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore... by bill_9895 4b Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore... by kimberlite1212 4c Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore... by "Microsoft Office User" 4d Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore... by alan_leslie_sv_elyse 5 Good Service In Marmaris Turkey by "Ian Shepherd" sv_crusader 6a Re: Our new Amel and a little light problem by svperegrinus
Messages

1

Maintenance Apps?

Sun Aug 6, 2017 10:17 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Rick Grimes" rickgrimes1
Does anyone have any experience with any of the yacht maintenance apps? Yes, almost everything is on our computer already but we're in an endless struggle to keep organized our maintenance records, spreadsheets, photos of parts (including before and after fixes), trip logs, parts inventory, manuals, etc. ShipShape Pro looks promising but no reviews.

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2a

Maintenance Apps

Sun Aug 6, 2017 10:23 am (PDT) . Posted by:

rickgrimes1


Does anyone have any experience with any of the yacht maintenance apps? Yes, almost everything is on our computer already but we're in an endless struggle to keep organized our maintenance records, spreadsheets, photos of parts (including before and after fixes), trip logs, parts inventory, manuals, etc. ShipShape Pro looks promising but no reviews.



Rick Grimes
S/V Rascal SMK2 (#404)
Seru Boca Marina
Curacao

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2b

Re: Maintenance Apps

Sun Aug 6, 2017 10:55 am (PDT) . Posted by:

"Mark Erdos" markerdos
We use MS Outlook. Tasks can be scheduled as repeat tasks (weekly, daily, every Sunday etc,) Files can be attached to task so excel sheets, pdf of instructions or pictures pop up when the task is due and opened. The search feature really makes it easy to find a specific future task or a repair from the past.

A quick look at the calendar feature tells us what is due, when and by who.

For trip logs we use paper. The Nobeltec navigation software we use records an electronic log automatically but we back this up with paper.

With best regards,

Mark

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 6, 2017 1:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Maintenance Apps

Does anyone have any experience with any of the yacht maintenance apps? Yes, almost everything is on our computer already but we're in an endless struggle to keep organized our maintenance records, spreadsheets, photos of parts (including before and after fixes), trip logs, parts inventory, manuals, etc. ShipShape Pro looks promising but no reviews.

Rick Grimes

S/V Rascal SMK2 (#404)

Seru Boca Marina

Curacao

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2c

Re: Maintenance Apps

Sun Aug 6, 2017 11:39 am (PDT) . Posted by:

bill_9895
I use ShipSHape Pro, and definitely have a love/hate relationship with it.

On the plus side, it does everything you ask and quite a bit more. It works as designed, well and smoothly. Easy to save pictures, descriptions and costs, and it lets you keep track of routine maintenance and repairs in a way that makes sense. If you are the OCD type, you can even use it to inventory all the storage spaces on your boat. You can easily back it up, and create human readable reports with useful levels of detail.

On the downside, it was designed by database experts--and looks like it. I feel like if I had never had exposure to the structure of a relational database I'd never have figured out the logic of how it works.


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine.







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3a

Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Sun Aug 6, 2017 11:36 am (PDT) . Posted by:

jgvenegas
The last time we tried to use the washer, it worked fine until the rinsing cycle and after a few minutes it started to dump water to the floor. It was not just a small leak it was a major flood!!!. When I turned the electricity off, the leak continued for a while and then stoped but the drum was full of water (about 2/3 of the top). Today I removed the enclosure and repeated the operation. The white drain hose is not obstructed but I was unable to see if water was being pumped out. I checked pump in the front and it did not seem to have any thing stoping the rotor from spinning. My thought is that perhaps the pump is not working and the water from the first was does not drain. So when the second rinsing water is introduced it fills it all the way, eventually getting out.



Any thoughts? How could I see if the pump is working?


Thanks a lot


Jose Venegas
Ipanema SM200 278,
Boston


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3b

Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Sun Aug 6, 2017 11:52 am (PDT) . Posted by:

bill_9895
If the drum is 2/3 full I would start by checking the level switch and its circuit. The drum should NEVER bee that full. I am betting the problem is with too much water coming IN rather than not enough going out.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine.


---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, <jvenegas@ ...> wrote :

The last time we tried to use the washer, it worked fine until the rinsing cycle and after a few minutes it started to dump water to the floor. It was not just a small leak it was a major flood!!!. When I turned the electricity off, the leak continued for a while and then stoped but the drum was full of water (about 2/3 of the top). Today I removed the enclosure and repeated the operation. The white drain hose is not obstructed but I was unable to see if water was being pumped out. I checked pump in the front and it did not seem to have any thing stoping the rotor from spinning. My thought is that perhaps the pump is not working and the water from the first was does not drain. So when the second rinsing water is introduced it fills it all the way, eventually getting out.



Any thoughts? How could I see if the pump is working?


Thanks a lot


Jose Venegas
Ipanema SM200 278,
Boston




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3c

Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

Sun Aug 6, 2017 1:02 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

"Mark Erdos" markerdos
Jose,

I think you could run the unit with the panel off so you can access the workings of the washer. The pump is easy to spot and replace. During the rinse cycle you could feel the pump with your hand to see if it is operational. If not: <http://www.espares.co.uk/product/es1087464/universal-washing-machine-drain-pump> http://www.espares.co.uk/product/es1087464/universal-washing-machine-drain-pump

With best regards,

Mark

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 6, 2017 2:37 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

The last time we tried to use the washer, it worked fine until the rinsing cycle and after a few minutes it started to dump water to the floor. It was not just a small leak it was a major flood!!!. When I turned the electricity off, the leak continued for a while and then stoped but the drum was full of water (about 2/3 of the top). Today I removed the enclosure and repeated the operation. The white drain hose is not obstructed but I was unable to see if water was being pumped out. I checked pump in the front and it did not seem to have any thing stoping the rotor from spinning. My thought is that perhaps the pump is not working and the water from the first was does not drain. So when the second rinsing water is introduced it fills it all the way, eventually getting out.

Any thoughts? How could I see if the pump is working?

Thanks a lot

Jose Venegas

Ipanema SM200 278,

Boston

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4a

New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

Sun Aug 6, 2017 12:55 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

bill_9895
This is strictly a question to satisfy my curiosity and further my nautical education, it has no practical utility for me. But curiosity has always killed the cat...



My understanding (which might be hopelessly out of date, or just plain wrong!) is that private vessels with NZ registry must have a Category 1 Offshore certification issued by a local inspector as per the regulations issued by Yachting New Zealand before they can be issued an outbound customs clearance.


Has anyone ever had an Amel certified as a Category 1 vessel in New Zealand? So many of the requirements in the YachtingNZ rules are written with "traditional&q uot; boat design in mind, it seems almost impossible that an Amel could be brought into an exact and literal compliance with the rules as they are written. Is there a lot of wiggle room in interpretation? Do they accept the Amel CE Cat 1 classification in lieu of a NZ inspection? Is there some other workaround?


Despite the fact that the design does not comply with of the several rules, I can't imagine any serious person arguing that an Amel is not a safe and capable offshore vessel...


Curious minds want to know...


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine
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4b

Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

Sun Aug 6, 2017 1:11 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

kimberlite1212
Are the New Zealand Cat 1 the same as ORC cat 1?
If so I sail with am ORC inspector at times. He noted at least a dozen deficiencies with our boats.
Fair winds,
eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

----- Original Message -----
From: "greatketch@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Sunday, August 6, 2017 3:55 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

This is strictly a question to satisfy my curiosity and further
my nautical education, it has no practical utility for me. But
curiosity has always killed the cat...



My understanding (which might be hopelessly out of date, or
just plain wrong!) is that private vessels with NZ registry must
have a Category 1 Offshore certification issued by a local
inspector as per the regulations issued by Yachting New Zealand
before they can be issued an outbound customs clearance.


Has anyone ever had an Amel certified as a Category 1 vessel in
New Zealand? So many of the requirements in the YachtingNZ
rules are written with "traditional&q uot; boat design in mind, it
seems almost impossible that an Amel could be brought into an
exact and literal compliance with the rules as they are written.
Is there a lot of wiggle room in interpretation? Do they accept
the Amel CE Cat 1 classification in lieu of a NZ inspection? Is
there some other workaround?


Despite the fact that the design does not comply with of the
several rules, I can't imagine any serious person arguing that
an Amel is not a safe and capable offshore vessel...


Curious minds want to know...


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine
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4c

Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

Sun Aug 6, 2017 1:16 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

"Microsoft Office User"
Hi Bill
Your understanding is pretty much correct. I think Danny of Ocean Pearl has
secured cat 1. I have Cat 2 for Nga Waka and there is little difference
except the certificate is valid for 2 years. The sort of stuff they check is
hull integrity, rigging, flare dates storm jib etc etc your supposed to have
a storm trisail which is not easy to sort on my boat. One of the issues is
that the Cat 1 cert has to be completed in the point of departure. I rn into
a fellow earlier in the year who left Lyttleton for Tonga but dropped into
Napier ŠŠŠŠŠcost him $1000 to redo the cat 1 cert. His work around was to
remove his yacht (not an Amel) from the NZ register to the Irish register.
He now comes and goes as he pleases.

Best

John Hayes
Nga Waka
Wellington
From: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of "greatketch@yahoo.com
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, 7 August 2017 at 7:55 AM
To: <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

This is strictly a question to satisfy my curiosity and further my nautical
education, it has no practical utility for me. But curiosity has always
killed the cat...

My understanding (which might be hopelessly out of date, or just plain
wrong!) is that private vessels with NZ registry must have a Category 1
Offshore certification issued by a local inspector as per the regulations
issued by Yachting New Zealand before they can be issued an outbound customs
clearance.

Has anyone ever had an Amel certified as a Category 1 vessel in New Zealand?
So many of the requirements in the YachtingNZ rules are written with
"traditional&q uot; boat design in mind, it seems almost impossible that an Amel
could be brought into an exact and literal compliance with the rules as they
are written. Is there a lot of wiggle room in interpretation? Do they
accept the Amel CE Cat 1 classification in lieu of a NZ inspection? Is there
some other workaround?

Despite the fact that the design does not comply with of the several rules,
I can't imagine any serious person arguing that an Amel is not a safe and
capable offshore vessel...

Curious minds want to know...

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Bar Harbor, Maine

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4d

Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

Sun Aug 6, 2017 2:37 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

alan_leslie_sv_elyse
Some years ago I had a NZ registered boat that required the Cat 1 inspection before departing for bluewater destinations. I changed the registration to British so I didn't need to go through that every time I went anywhere and also because every few years they change the rules. I think in my time it went for example from 2 buckets to 4 buckets....don; t know why that was necessary when there were only two of us. There are a number of NZ Cat 1 rules that our Amel wouldn't comply with, but when it comes down to it, it all depends on the inspector. Some can be real pricks but most take a realistic view and if they can see that the vessel is sound and has all the safety gear, the captain seems to know what he is doing etc, they will pass it.
Danny, I know you have an interesting arrangement with the NZ authorities, do you have to get Cat 1 every time you go away? (Danny is on his way to New Caledonia as we speak).
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
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5

Good Service In Marmaris Turkey

Sun Aug 6, 2017 1:34 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

"Ian Shepherd" sv_crusader
Last month there were three SuperMaramu 2000's in the Marmaris area, all
looking for a haul out, repair work, polish and antifouling. One went to
Gocek, one went to Yat Marina in Marmaris Bay and I went to Netsel
Marina Marmaris. One owner had OK service but suffered a lack of
attention to detail, another had a total disaster, and I struck lucky
with with a result that exceeded my expectations by a long way. I would
like to share my good experiences with other Amel owners who might need
work done in Turkey.

Having sailed this area for the past 13 years with my Amel and before
that with chartered yachts, I can safely say that I have established who
really does a good job in this area. The purpose of this trip was to
make my SM look good again. The red stripe had faded and could not be
restored by others who tried at the previous haul out and the port side
rub rail had suffered some damage from a large steel boat that broke
it's mooring lines during a storm in Larnaca marina.

Two years ago I met Serdar Ak who runs Poseidon Yacht Service based at
Netsel Marina Marmaris. You could not wish to meet a nicer man who
really wants to do his best for you and his English is excellent. For 17
years Serdar worked for Jeaneau Turkey specializing in gelcoat and
painting. The locals assured me that he was the very best and so I
booked a haul out and asked him to make Crusader look good again. Serdar
also has a carbon fibre moulding company. Of the items he makes there
are carbon fibre flag staffs and carbon fibre gangplanks with the yachts
name embossed. Tempting! For those who might think that Netsel is
expensive, you would be right except that if you leave it to Serdar, he
will get you a rate better than Yat Marina. A two way haul out and 10
days in a cradle on the hard cost €955.

Within a few minutes of work on the red boot top stripes they looked
like new. So good in fact that we decided not to move the stripes to
make them parallel to the water. Instead we added a further 30M of
chain(now 140M), which has helped, but it is still not enough.

The whole boat was finished and polished so well that it looks like
brand new. Serdar's workforce of three were unbelievably conscientious,
and worked tirelessly until Serdar was completely satisfied with the
result. All of them are perfectionists. There is no sign of any damage
now and all the gel coat colours used match perfectly. When the
anti-fouling was rubbed down, it was all done carefully by hand using a
special abrasive cloth from Finland. The paint was sprayed on by Serdar
using a very impressive piece of kit, the same way Amel do. The ballast
keel was renovated and treated against rust spots. I have uploaded
photos of the excellent results.

Whilst on the hard I ran into a snag removing the mainsail out-haul
gearbox. Surprise surprise. The drive shaft was refusing to tap out of
the gearbox, which was disappointing as I make a point of greasing it
every six months. Serdar suggested help from a man named Mustafa who
runs a company called M2 Rigging and Yacht Services. First impressions
of Mustafa were that he seemed a little too keen to help me, but I soon
found out that it is just his manner, and that he is very familiar with
servicing Amels.His business is well respected by the local yacht owners.

After also failing to remove the shaft, he said the way that he had
previously solved the problem several times was to cut the shaft in two
with a hack saw, take the gearbox to his workshop where he has a decent
press, then machine up a new shaft and weld it to the original top piece
that the locking bolt passes through. This he did and not many hours
later the new shaft was made and back on board. The magic of Marmaris!
In the meantime Serdar was doing a proper paint job on the gearboxes. I
am wondering if it might be worthwhile to have the shaft machined to
take top and bottom O-rings to help keep seawater out, or at least have
a top hat made up to shelter the shaft to gearbox bearing area? Has
anyone done this?

Seeing that Mustafa owned a rigging company, I mentioned that it was
time I changed my standing rigging. He offered me an ACMO SuperMaramu
kit but using wire from Denmark for €7000 plus €1000 labour including
all taxes. Two days later the job was done by his very experienced team
of riggers. He reckons the Danish wire is better than the wire ACMO use.
A full set of certifications and guaranty' s was supplied. Richard
Piller, please note that I have decided not to replace the plastic wire
sheaths, as per your advice! New wire looks great anyway and one less
thing to worry about as the Med sun turns the plastic to powder. He also
replaced the lower rail lifelines as they were beginning to degrade.
After sailing hard for a week I brought Crusader back to M2 for a check
over and minor adjustments to the rig. All at no further charge.

My other renovation was to have all new cockpit and aft deck cushions
made, and also the steering wheel, companion way, stair rail, and head
protector leather replaced. For this I used Yasin Karabulut who runs
Swarzewolke Upholstery near Netsel Marina . Yasin made me an excellent
cockpit bimini two years ago which is a huge improvement on the original
that came with the boat. Once again he did a top quality job and and I
am very pleased with the work. His next task will be to make more
attractive curtains and maybe a full winter cover. Again photos of his
work in the photos section.

Whilst on the hard I serviced my transmission which has a stainless seal
bush and my bow thuster which is lubricated with lithium graphite
grease. I will post on my findings after 7 years of doing this later.
However, I had a spare stainless bush made up whilst in Marmaris by
Erinox Marine for €80. I have included their business card in the photo
section. Tragically Ergun, the owner of Erinox, was killed the very next
morning after I gave him the parts to copy, in a motorcycle accident.
The company continues with his two partners, though they do not speak
English well like Ergun did. R.I.P. You were a good man.

I have also included photos of the business cards of these four
companies plus the card of a very helpful and pleasant agent who will
get you checked out of Turkey for €50.

I hope that this will be useful to anyone passing this area who needs
work done. By the way, for those who believe the 'fake news', I have
been in Turkey for six weeks and everything has been totally calm and
normal. There are less foreign registered yachts about this year, no
doubt some put off by the exaggerations of the press. It's still a great
cruising area.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 (2003) Crusader Lindos Rhodes

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6a

Re: Our new Amel and a little light problem

Sun Aug 6, 2017 4:08 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

svperegrinus
This won't help address your specific problem, but may be an idea for future:

I've found that the nav lights I have for the dinghy, which are the Navisafe Navilight TriColor 2NM and the Navi light All-round white RB 2NM make excellent instant jury-rig replacement for the sailboat' s lower-level nav lights, for two reasons:


1. The tri-color can be set with a couple of clicks to be a proper red-only or green-only, or combo red+green, with the correct degrees of spread, or it can be set to be your stern nav light.


2. These are US Coast Guard-approved for 2-mile duty


3. Battery-powered, troubleshooting of your light system can be left for later, just attach the Navisafes and go.


For example, a few months ago we were navigating the canals in Venice, IN FOG, when I noticed my red had burn out with no prior warning! –––the dinghy's Navisafe, quickly set up forward, saved the day in just a few seconds.


Cheers,


Peregrinus
SM2K N. 350 (2002)
At anchor, Delos

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Are Tri-Radial Cut Sails Best?

Ian Shepherd
 

My tri-radial cut genoa is showing signs of degradation on one of the leech panels. I have replaced it with a genoa made by SuperSails of Florida which I purchased as a spare when over there. The SuperSails sail was made for a SM but it is not tri-radial cut. The panels are parallel slabs slanted upwards from the luff to the leech at about 30 degrees. The shape is beautiful, though it's not made as strongly as my North Sails Israel sail made of Radian.

What I have found is that I can sail a full 6 degrees closer to the wind even in light conditions than the tri-radial sail. This is a very much appreciated improvement especially on the SM with it's sheet tracks so far outboard. 39 degrees is now the norm.

It therefor begs the question, are tri-radial cut sails the best choice for our boat? Can anyone comment?

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 (2003) Crusader Zambiko Rhodes


Modified SM Prop Shaft Seal Bush

Ian Shepherd
 

About 8 years ago I met the late Dr Heinrich who owned SM Antigua. We discussed problem areas with our boats and one problem was the wear rate of the bronze seal bush that fits over the prop shaft. Excessive wear will allow sea water ingress and a resulting mayonnaise mix that can lead to the need to haul out between scheduled antifouling renewals. He suggested replacing the bush with one made from 316 stainless. He had new bushes made up and sent me one which I fitted 7 years ago.

4 years ago I hauled out and inspected the bush and the seals. There was no wear on the bush and the seals looked good, so I left them in place as an experiment to see how long they would last. Only the oil was changed.

Last month I hauled out again. This time there was still no water in the oil though the bush was showing slight signs of wear and the outer seal was looking like it needed replacing. There was still no water in the oil. There was some evidence that the bush may have turned slightly so I had a replacement bush manufactured for €80 with 4 grub screws instead of the 3 that Heinrich recommended. I have uploaded photos of the used bush and a new one.

Conclusion:

There were those who said that you cannot put a stainless bush on a stainless prop shaft without encountering serious corrosion problems. I assembled the seal bush using Corrosion Block grease and there was no corrosion at all and the bush slid off easily.

The modified bush wore far less quickly than a bronze one and lasted 7 years without letting seawater into the transmission. 7 years far exceeds the normal haul out schedule and if you go stainless you will not be faced with an unexpected haul out.

The experiment was a total success.Many thanks Heinrich. Bless you for suggesting this worthwhile modification. You have saved me time, money, worry and kept my transmission in better shape. RIP my friend.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 Crusader (2003) Zamiki Rhodes


Advise on buying 1978 Maramu

Thomas Nienkemper
 

 

Dear Amel Community,

 

I have been an active reader of this group for quite a while as I am planning to buy a Maramu 46 for a circumnavigation in 2 years. I have visited 3 boats and am seriously considering to buy #9 (1978) which is located in south of France.

 

The current owner retired from owning a small boat yard, bought #9 from a customer and spent 2015+2016 refitting the boat for himself until he got health problems and could not continue with his plans. 

 

Everything substantial seems to be done. This includes:

*Hull epoxy treated in 2015

*New engine Lombardi Marine  LD W 2204 M

*New gearbox, shaft but old prop

*New bowthruster (fix in tunnel)

*New batteries

*New sails incl. spinnaker (no in mast furling, manual furling genoa)

*New standing rigging (mast+mizzen)

*New teak deck

*Chart plotter Garmin GPX1020xs

*New Garmin radar

*New Liferaft

*New Dinghy (but old outboard)

*New Autopilot

 

He got his diagnosis before he could finish the refit, so the interior of the boat is pretty much untouched and gives room for customization.

 

This is where I’m asking for your advise:

  1. Does anybody know about the history of #9?
  2. Is there anything particular I need to look at on these older Maramu models? I’ve heard they have a shorter mast, but does this affect sailing performance a lot?
  3. He is asking 89’500 EUR - what would be a fair offer?
  4. There is a French survey report from 2015, would you still do a full re-survey or save the cost?

 

I am not in a hurry to buy as departure is planned in August 2019, so if anybody in this group has plans to sell please get in touch with me :)

 

Best,

Tom

Future Maramu owner

Zürich


Re: Replacing Sonic Speed Log

greatketch@...
 

Adam,

I have done almost exactly what you ask about.  I put a CS4500 in the old depth transducer hole (the hole will need to be enlarged a little), and used a P79 to supply depth data.

I did not connect the CS4500 to the Hydra, but rather it feeds data into my NMEA2000 network. 

I have nothing bad to say about the CS4500.  It works as well as the sonic speed sensor, and is much less susceptible to electrical interference.  Our sonic speed goes bonkers if we turn on the inverter, for example.  The only time I had any inaccuracy with the CS4500, was because there was some growth on the hull just in front of it which diverted the water flow from the sensor.  If you put some transducer paint on it, it requires minimal routine cleaning--unlike a paddlewheel.  You can find many negative comments about the CS4500 online, but few of those commenters actually have used one, they are just repeating boatyard scuttlebutt.

The P79 works well for navigation depth data, I got good readings down to 150 to 200 feet.  On my old boat I got much better results from a P79.  A different hull thickness/composition probably.  I do a lot of fishing, so I have found the performance of the P79 as a fishfinder to be marginal on the Amel, but it works fine to keep me off the rocks.

Paddlewheels, the CS4500, and the sonic speed sensor all use the same standard protocol to transmit speed and distance data.  They send so many "pulses per mile", (like a spinning paddle wheel) the exact number I have forgotten, but you can find it in Airmar technical literature if you want to know.  (40,000 sticks in my mind, but don't count on it!)

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Bar Harbor, Maine.

---In amelyachtowners@..., <coastalseas@...> wrote :

Hi 


I have a SM2000 with a faulty (read dead) B&G sonic speed sensor.


I am looking to replace it with another sonic speed sensor, my questions for the forum are:

1. Has anyone used a CS4500 airmar transducer in the 2001 vintage B&G through hull depth fitting? 

2. Any negative experiences with the CS4500? 

3. Will the original B&G Hydra 2000 accept the signal from the CS4500 without additional interface parts etc. 


To avoid drilling another hole in the hull, I am looking into using a second in hull depth transducer "P79" to provide basic depth data.  


Many of you are using a Tri sensor (speed/depth/temp) in the original depth fitting, but these have a paddle. There is a new DX900 sonic tri sensor being promoted but it's not cheap.  Hence my interest in the CS4500.


Regards


Adam 

Lady Annabelle Hull #339






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Maintenance Apps

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Rick;
 
We use shipshaePro and it does well for the most part. It is not 100% intuitive, but you get the hang of it over time.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad & Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 06, 2017 10:55 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Maintenance Apps

 

We use MS Outlook. Tasks can be scheduled as repeat tasks (weekly, daily, every Sunday etc,) Files can be attached to task so excel sheets, pdf of instructions or pictures pop up when the task is due and opened. The search feature really makes it easy to find a specific future task or a repair from the past.

A quick look at the calendar feature tells us what is due, when and by who.

For trip logs we use paper. The Nobeltec navigation software we use records an electronic log automatically but we back this up with paper.

With best regards,

Mark

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, August 6, 2017 1:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Maintenance Apps

 

Does anyone have any experience with any of the yacht maintenance apps? Yes, almost everything is on our computer already but we're in an endless struggle to keep organized our maintenance records, spreadsheets, photos of parts (including before and after fixes), trip logs, parts inventory, manuals, etc. ShipShape Pro looks promising but no reviews.

Rick Grimes

S/V Rascal SMK2 (#404)

Seru Boca Marina

Curacao


Re: Replacing Sonic Speed Log

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Adam,

I am in the same situation and will fit an Airmar CS4500.
It does work with the B&G Hydra 2000.
There are three sets of connections on the Hydra processor for boat speed :
Paddle wheel, Sonic, Ultrasonic.
The CS4500 connects to Ultrasonic, whereas the sensor you have now is connected to Sonic.
The CS4500 comes with an interface box that connects the sensor to the Hydra 2000.
You cannot use the P79 in hull sensor with the B&G Hydra 2000. The frequencies don't match.
If you want to use the P79, you need another display such as Garmin or Raymarine.
I am going to make another hole in the hull, just offset from the depth transducer, for the CS4500 when we haul for antifoul in November. 

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Replacing Sonic Speed Log

Adam Carpenter
 

Hi 


I have a SM2000 with a faulty (read dead) B&G sonic speed sensor.


I am looking to replace it with another sonic speed sensor, my questions for the forum are:

1. Has anyone used a CS4500 airmar transducer in the 2001 vintage B&G through hull depth fitting? 

2. Any negative experiences with the CS4500? 

3. Will the original B&G Hydra 2000 accept the signal from the CS4500 without additional interface parts etc. 


To avoid drilling another hole in the hull, I am looking into using a second in hull depth transducer "P79" to provide basic depth data.  


Many of you are using a Tri sensor (speed/depth/temp) in the original depth fitting, but these have a paddle. There is a new DX900 sonic tri sensor being promoted but it's not cheap.  Hence my interest in the CS4500.


Regards


Adam 

Lady Annabelle Hull #339






Easy way to remove the end caps on the desalator membranes

eric freedman
 


Re: Our new Amel and a little light problem

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

This won't help address your specific problem, but may be an idea for future:

I've found that the nav lights I have for the dinghy, which are the Navisafe Navilight TriColor 2NM and the Navi light All-round white RB 2NM make excellent instant jury-rig replacement for the sailboat's lower-level nav lights, for two reasons:

1.  The tri-color can be set with a couple of clicks to be a proper red-only or green-only, or combo red+green, with the correct degrees of spread, or it can be set to be your stern nav light.

2.  These are US Coast Guard-approved for 2-mile duty

3.  Battery-powered, troubleshooting of your light system can be left for later, just attach the Navisafes and go.

For example, a few months ago we were navigating the canals in Venice, IN FOG, when I noticed my red had burn out with no prior warning! –––the dinghy's Navisafe, quickly set up forward, saved the day in just a few seconds.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K N. 350 (2002)
At anchor, Delos
 


Re: New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

Alan Leslie
 

Some years ago I had a NZ registered boat that required the Cat 1 inspection before departing for bluewater destinations. I changed the registration to British so I didn't need to go through that every time I went anywhere and also because every few years they change the rules. I think in my time it went for example from 2 buckets to 4 buckets....don;t know why that was necessary when there were only two of us.
There are a number of NZ Cat 1 rules that our Amel wouldn't comply with, but when it comes down to it, it all depends on the inspector. Some can be real pricks but most take a realistic view and if they can see that the vessel is sound and has all the safety gear, the captain seems to know what he is doing etc, they will pass it.
Danny, I know you have an interesting arrangement with the NZ authorities, do you have to get Cat 1 every time you go away? (Danny is on his way to New Caledonia as we speak).
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Good Service In Marmaris Turkey

Ian Shepherd
 

Last month there were three SuperMaramu 2000's in the Marmaris area, all looking for a haul out, repair work, polish and antifouling. One went to Gocek, one went to Yat Marina in Marmaris Bay and I went to Netsel Marina Marmaris. One owner had OK service but suffered a lack of attention to detail, another had a total disaster, and I struck lucky with with a result that exceeded my expectations by a long way. I would like to share my good experiences with other Amel owners who might need work done in Turkey.

Having sailed this area for the past 13 years with my Amel and before that with chartered yachts, I can safely say that I have established who really does a good job in this area. The purpose of this trip was to make my SM look good again. The red stripe had faded and could not be restored by others who tried at the previous haul out and the port side rub rail had suffered some damage from a large steel boat that broke it's mooring lines during a storm in Larnaca marina.

Two years ago I met Serdar Ak who runs Poseidon Yacht Service based at Netsel Marina Marmaris. You could not wish to meet a nicer man who really wants to do his best for you and his English is excellent. For 17 years Serdar worked for Jeaneau Turkey specializing in gelcoat and painting. The locals assured me that he was the very best and so I booked a haul out and asked him to make Crusader look good again. Serdar also has a carbon fibre moulding company. Of the items he makes there are carbon fibre flag staffs and carbon fibre gangplanks with the yachts name embossed. Tempting! For those who might think that Netsel is expensive, you would be right except that if you leave it to Serdar, he will get you a rate better than Yat Marina. A two way haul out and 10 days in a cradle on the hard cost €955.

Within a few minutes of work on the red boot top stripes they looked like new. So good in fact that we decided not to move the stripes to make them parallel to the water. Instead we added a further 30M of chain(now 140M), which has helped, but it is still not enough.

The whole boat was finished and polished so well that it looks like brand new. Serdar's workforce of three were unbelievably conscientious, and worked tirelessly until Serdar was completely satisfied with the result. All of them are perfectionists. There is no sign of any damage now and all the gel coat colours used match perfectly. When the anti-fouling was rubbed down, it was all done carefully by hand using a special abrasive cloth from Finland. The paint was sprayed on by Serdar using a very impressive piece of kit, the same way Amel do. The ballast keel was renovated and treated against rust spots. I have uploaded photos of the excellent results.

Whilst on the hard I ran into a snag removing the mainsail out-haul gearbox. Surprise surprise. The drive shaft was refusing to tap out of the gearbox, which was disappointing as I make a point of greasing it every six months. Serdar suggested help from a man named Mustafa who runs a company called M2 Rigging and Yacht Services. First impressions of Mustafa were that he seemed a little too keen to help me, but I soon found out that it is just his manner, and that he is very familiar with servicing Amels.His business is well respected by the local yacht owners.

After also failing to remove the shaft, he said the way that he had previously solved the problem several times was to cut the shaft in two with a hack saw, take the gearbox to his workshop where he has a decent press, then machine up a new shaft and weld it to the original top piece that the locking bolt passes through. This he did and not many hours later the new shaft was made and back on board. The magic of Marmaris! In the meantime Serdar was doing a proper paint job on the gearboxes. I am wondering if it might be worthwhile to have the shaft machined to take top and bottom O-rings to help keep seawater out, or at least have a top hat made up to shelter the shaft to gearbox bearing area? Has anyone done this?

Seeing that Mustafa owned a rigging company, I mentioned that it was time I changed my standing rigging. He offered me an ACMO SuperMaramu kit but using wire from Denmark for €7000 plus €1000 labour including all taxes. Two days later the job was done by his very experienced team of riggers. He reckons the Danish wire is better than the wire ACMO use. A full set of certifications and guaranty's was supplied. Richard Piller, please note that I have decided not to replace the plastic wire sheaths, as per your advice! New wire looks great anyway and one less thing to worry about as the Med sun turns the plastic to powder. He also replaced the lower rail lifelines as they were beginning to degrade. After sailing hard for a week I brought Crusader back to M2 for a check over and minor adjustments to the rig. All at no further charge.

My other renovation was to have all new cockpit and aft deck cushions made, and also the steering wheel, companion way, stair rail, and head protector leather replaced. For this I used Yasin Karabulut who runs Swarzewolke Upholstery near Netsel Marina . Yasin made me an excellent cockpit bimini two years ago which is a huge improvement on the original that came with the boat. Once again he did a top quality job and and I am very pleased with the work. His next task will be to make more attractive curtains and maybe a full winter cover. Again photos of his work in the photos section.

Whilst on the hard I serviced my transmission which has a stainless seal bush and my bow thuster which is lubricated with lithium graphite grease. I will post on my findings after 7 years of doing this later. However, I had a spare stainless bush made up whilst in Marmaris by Erinox Marine for €80. I have included their business card in the photo section. Tragically Ergun, the owner of Erinox, was killed the very next morning after I gave him the parts to copy, in a motorcycle accident. The company continues with his two partners, though they do not speak English well like Ergun did. R.I.P. You were a good man.

I have also included photos of the business cards of these four companies plus the card of a very helpful and pleasant agent who will get you checked out of Turkey for €50.

I hope that this will be useful to anyone passing this area who needs work done. By the way, for those who believe the 'fake news', I have been in Turkey for six weeks and everything has been totally calm and normal. There are less foreign registered yachts about this year, no doubt some put off by the exaggerations of the press. It's still a great cruising area.

Ian Shepherd SM2K 414 (2003) Crusader Lindos Rhodes


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

JOHN HAYES
 

Hi Bill
Your understanding is pretty much correct.  I think Danny of Ocean Pearl has secured cat 1. I have Cat 2 for Nga Waka and there is little difference except the certificate is valid for 2 years. The sort of stuff they check is hull integrity, rigging, flare dates storm jib etc etc your supposed to have a storm trisail which is not easy to sort on my boat.  One of the issues is that the Cat 1 cert has to be completed in the point of departure. I rn into a fellow earlier in the year who left Lyttleton for Tonga but dropped into Napier ……………cost him $1000 to redo the cat 1 cert. His work around was to remove his yacht (not an Amel) from the NZ register to  the Irish register. He now comes and goes as he pleases. 

Best

John Hayes 
Nga Waka
Wellington
From: <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Monday, 7 August 2017 at 7:55 AM
To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Zealand Cat 1 Offshore...

 

This is strictly a question to satisfy my curiosity and further my nautical education, it has no practical utility for me.  But curiosity has always killed the cat...


My understanding (which might be hopelessly out of date, or just plain wrong!) is that private vessels with NZ registry must have a Category 1 Offshore certification issued by a local inspector as per the regulations issued by Yachting New Zealand before they can be issued an outbound customs clearance.


Has anyone ever had an Amel certified as a Category 1 vessel in New Zealand?  So many of the requirements in the YachtingNZ rules are written with "traditional" boat design in mind, it seems almost impossible that an Amel could be brought into an exact and literal compliance with the rules as they are written. Is there a lot of wiggle room in interpretation?  Do they accept the Amel CE Cat 1 classification in lieu of a NZ inspection? Is there some other workaround?


Despite the fact that the design does not comply with of the several rules, I can't imagine any serious person arguing that an Amel is not a safe and capable offshore vessel...


Curious minds want to know...


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Bar Harbor, Maine