Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Correction Explosive episode

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Correction Explosive episode

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Correction Explosive episode

Ben and Gayle Super Maramu #347
 

Last year my Trojan T 105s overheated as a result of charger putting over 33 volts to them all night. Battery compartment outside wall was very warm to touch and slight smell of sulphuric acid.  When opened we could see batteries had expanded and boiled over and there is was overwhelming smell of sulphur.  My laser thermometer measured 151F degrees on external case.  When I removed fill caps and measured  fluid (what little was left) temperature. It was 178F.  

It was a mess to clean ( lots of baking soda) but no damage. I shudder to think what may have occurred if we were not on board.
Over the years I've heard a number of stories about battery charges running amuck and doing considerable damage.  Makes me think leaving boat plugged in and unattended not a good idea.
Ben

Ben and Gayle 
La Bella Vita
SM #347
St Martin 
6S


On Jun 15, 2017, at 2:15 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Jeff,

As a PS, I recall when our batteries boiled over, they were hot as hell for a long time and actually started to turn some of the bottom of the battery compartment brown from the heat. There was no damage to the lid or the compartment with 8 overheated batteries,

 

 

IN YOUR CASE

I think it was just a small hydrogen buildup without proper venting.

I would also check all the connections in the battery compartment, you needed a spark from somewhere.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 1:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Jeff,

Many battery chargers have a socket to plug in a temperature sensor. My Mastervolt does.

You can also buy some temperature sensors with digital readouts and mount it in the battery compartment and run the wire to the readout under the gasket. They are also good for your freezers and refrig.

 

My guess it was a hydrogen buildup without any heat  which blew the compartment lid off. I would check to see if the vent is clear maybe something built a nest in the exhaust pipe.

 

If there was a heat buildup, I believe there would have been a cracked battery case. One time we had a bad charger and the batteries boiled over leaving ¼ of an inch of battery acid in the compartment. Luckily I had a few boxes of baking soda on board.

I took the bad batteries out of the circuit and headed home 4 days later we arrived on 4 batteries.

 

You know we have motored for days sometimes and 1.4 amps on such a big bank will do no harm.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 4:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Bill,

Batteries looked fine. None were cracked. There was no leaked battery fluid.

There wasn't any excess heat at that point I checked them, but keep in mind, by then I had cleaned up the galley, made the omelets (good too), after which, I had first noticed that the compartment was askew. All the while the heat would have dissipated.

Using shore power with the charger on, I believe that the amperage in after a long charge, and the charger in float stage, is under 1amp, with .5 being a reasonable number (if my memory serves). After over 50 hrs motoring, I was averaging 1.4amps. I believe this could be too high of an incoming charge for an extended period. I will install a temperature sensor in the compartment (any recommedations ?) and check the venting line.

I am returning to Spirit in late July, so I have time to gather items for installation.

BTW....can you send me your contact info (off forum). Thanks

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Jeff,

 

Batteries release Hydrogen gas when charging...they release a lot when overcharging. I believe the only thing that would blow the hinges off of that compartment would be Hydrogen gas. I am guessing that the release of Hydrogen gas was caused by either a short in one or more of the batteries, or a charging device overcharging. Either condition would cause the the batteries to overheat.

 

What was the condition of the batteries after the explosion? Were any battery cases cracked or broken? 

 

What was the temperature of the batteries? Were some hot?

 

Have you inspected the vent hose and checked that it is clear to the outside?

 

Batteries can be bad when delivered new. I bought 12 new house batteries about 4 years ago and 2 of them never left the dock. I tested all before placing them on the boat...2 had internal shorts.

 

I think maybe you were recording Amps, not Amp/hour. If you were recording Amps, it seems that 1.5 is fine, however, I am guessing that if 150-175 amps poured into fully charged batteries for 30 minutes, you could boil the batteries, releasing Hydrogen...I am not sure of this, but your alternator has an output capability of at least 150 amps. I believe it is controled by a smart regulator, but maybe not on hull #14. Is there a Smart Regulator in a plastic electrical box on the aft firewall slightly above the engine height? 

 

I apologize for giving you more questions than answers.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse

Admiral, Texas Navy

Commander Emeritus

Amel School www.amelschool.com

720 Winnie St

Galveston Island, TX 77550

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 6:17 PM, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I was motorsailing for an extended period trying to make as much progress to the easterd as possible.

While making omlets for myself and my crew, there was an explosion in the galley. The big plastic bowl I was mixing the omlets in blew out of my hands, and landed in the sink. It was a big loud pop, not a puff that you might expect from an excess of propane due to a burner left on. It wasn't so much an explosion as a loud POP.

My initial reaction was to think it WAS excess propane. The dials for the stove are touchy on the 54, and I thought I had made the mistake of having a burner slightly on , but unlit, and when enough propane built up, it exploded.

I checked the engine compartment, All OK.

After cleaning up the mess (it wasn't bad), and making the omlets, I went to log in the hourly numbers at the nav station, and noticed that the sea berth mattress and the battery comp artment cover were blown askew, and the facing cabinets were blown open. Upon closer inspection, the battery compartment cover had blown the hinges off.

A couple of points of note:

Batteries were replaced 10/16..replacements were the.same batteries as were originally aboard (lead acid)

New batteries were never allowed to go below 70%. Never saw below 23.3 volts

During motorsailing the AH reading recorded at that point was approx. +1.4AH  at each hourly log entry

The engine was turning 1300rpm, and it's the d3-110 (top end around 3000rpm)

 

I realized that there was apparent contribution of gas (H?) from the battery compartment that appears to have, if nothing else, created an independent event, and possibly, primarily caused the galley event,

 

I'm wondering 2 things:

1. Do es the float stage of the engine alternator produce too high of an amperage flow at float stage, during an extended period of engine usage, producing too much of a charge, causing the excess creation of the gas from the charging process?

2. Is the battery compartment improperly vented in the 54? (I thought there was a discussion of this in the past on the forum. Apologies. I don't follow the forum regularly, and may have missed this discussion

I opened the compartment regularly after the episode after the event to be safe.

 

If there was some kind of a protocol I wasn't following, please, by all means, let me know.

If there is something I was remiss in, or should have done differently, again, please let me know.

 

There was ZERO evidence of any type of a burning from the explosion.

The only evidence in the sea berth was a slight marking on the wall where the cover pushed hard into the wall on the aft end.

 

Any educated thoughts on the episode would be appreciated.

I will be tied up for a few months in my latest port of call as I get to the bottom of this event, along with a few other repairs, a few of which I'll seek the forum's advise.

Thanks Amelians.

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Correction Explosive episode

eric freedman
 

 

 

Jeff,

As a PS, I recall when our batteries boiled over, they were hot as hell for a long time and actually started to turn some of the bottom of the battery compartment brown from the heat. There was no damage to the lid or the compartment with 8 overheated batteries,

 

 

IN YOUR CASE

I think it was just a small hydrogen buildup without proper venting.

I would also check all the connections in the battery compartment, you needed a spark from somewhere.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 1:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Jeff,

Many battery chargers have a socket to plug in a temperature sensor. My Mastervolt does.

You can also buy some temperature sensors with digital readouts and mount it in the battery compartment and run the wire to the readout under the gasket. They are also good for your freezers and refrig.

 

My guess it was a hydrogen buildup without any heat  which blew the compartment lid off. I would check to see if the vent is clear maybe something built a nest in the exhaust pipe.

 

If there was a heat buildup, I believe there would have been a cracked battery case. One time we had a bad charger and the batteries boiled over leaving ¼ of an inch of battery acid in the compartment. Luckily I had a few boxes of baking soda on board.

I took the bad batteries out of the circuit and headed home 4 days later we arrived on 4 batteries.

 

You know we have motored for days sometimes and 1.4 amps on such a big bank will do no harm.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 4:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Bill,

Batteries looked fine. None were cracked. There was no leaked battery fluid.

There wasn't any excess heat at that point I checked them, but keep in mind, by then I had cleaned up the galley, made the omelets (good too), after which, I had first noticed that the compartment was askew. All the while the heat would have dissipated.

Using shore power with the charger on, I believe that the amperage in after a long charge, and the charger in float stage, is under 1amp, with .5 being a reasonable number (if my memory serves). After over 50 hrs motoring, I was averaging 1.4amps. I believe this could be too high of an incoming charge for an extended period. I will install a temperature sensor in the compartment (any recommedations ?) and check the venting line.

I am returning to Spirit in late July, so I have time to gather items for installation.

BTW....can you send me your contact info (off forum). Thanks

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Jeff,

 

Batteries release Hydrogen gas when charging...they release a lot when overcharging. I believe the only thing that would blow the hinges off of that compartment would be Hydrogen gas. I am guessing that the release of Hydrogen gas was caused by either a short in one or more of the batteries, or a charging device overcharging. Either condition would cause the the batteries to overheat.

 

What was the condition of the batteries after the explosion? Were any battery cases cracked or broken? 

 

What was the temperature of the batteries? Were some hot?

 

Have you inspected the vent hose and checked that it is clear to the outside?

 

Batteries can be bad when delivered new. I bought 12 new house batteries about 4 years ago and 2 of them never left the dock. I tested all before placing them on the boat...2 had internal shorts.

 

I think maybe you were recording Amps, not Amp/hour. If you were recording Amps, it seems that 1.5 is fine, however, I am guessing that if 150-175 amps poured into fully charged batteries for 30 minutes, you could boil the batteries, releasing Hydrogen...I am not sure of this, but your alternator has an output capability of at least 150 amps. I believe it is controled by a smart regulator, but maybe not on hull #14. Is there a Smart Regulator in a plastic electrical box on the aft firewall slightly above the engine height? 

 

I apologize for giving you more questions than answers.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse

Admiral, Texas Navy

Commander Emeritus

Amel School www.amelschool.com

720 Winnie St

Galveston Island, TX 77550

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 6:17 PM, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I was motorsailing for an extended period trying to make as much progress to the easterd as possible.

While making omlets for myself and my crew, there was an explosion in the galley. The big plastic bowl I was mixing the omlets in blew out of my hands, and landed in the sink. It was a big loud pop, not a puff that you might expect from an excess of propane due to a burner left on. It wasn't so much an explosion as a loud POP.

My initial reaction was to think it WAS excess propane. The dials for the stove are touchy on the 54, and I thought I had made the mistake of having a burner slightly on , but unlit, and when enough propane built up, it exploded.

I checked the engine compartment, All OK.

After cleaning up the mess (it wasn't bad), and making the omlets, I went to log in the hourly numbers at the nav station, and noticed that the sea berth mattress and the battery comp artment cover were blown askew, and the facing cabinets were blown open. Upon closer inspection, the battery compartment cover had blown the hinges off.

A couple of points of note:

Batteries were replaced 10/16..replacements were the.same batteries as were originally aboard (lead acid)

New batteries were never allowed to go below 70%. Never saw below 23.3 volts

During motorsailing the AH reading recorded at that point was approx. +1.4AH  at each hourly log entry

The engine was turning 1300rpm, and it's the d3-110 (top end around 3000rpm)

 

I realized that there was apparent contribution of gas (H?) from the battery compartment that appears to have, if nothing else, created an independent event, and possibly, primarily caused the galley event,

 

I'm wondering 2 things:

1. Do es the float stage of the engine alternator produce too high of an amperage flow at float stage, during an extended period of engine usage, producing too much of a charge, causing the excess creation of the gas from the charging process?

2. Is the battery compartment improperly vented in the 54? (I thought there was a discussion of this in the past on the forum. Apologies. I don't follow the forum regularly, and may have missed this discussion

I opened the compartment regularly after the episode after the event to be safe.

 

If there was some kind of a protocol I wasn't following, please, by all means, let me know.

If there is something I was remiss in, or should have done differently, again, please let me know.

 

There was ZERO evidence of any type of a burning from the explosion.

The only evidence in the sea berth was a slight marking on the wall where the cover pushed hard into the wall on the aft end.

 

Any educated thoughts on the episode would be appreciated.

I will be tied up for a few months in my latest port of call as I get to the bottom of this event, along with a few other repairs, a few of which I'll seek the forum's advise.

Thanks Amelians.

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

eric freedman
 

Jeff,

As a PS, I recall when our batteries boiled over, they were hot as hell for a long time and actually started to turn some of the bottom of the battery compartment brown from the heat. There was no damage to the lid or the compartment with 8 overheated batteries, I think it was just a small hydrogen buildup without proper venting.

I would also check all the connections in the battery compartment, you needed a spark from somewhere.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 1:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Jeff,

Many battery chargers have a socket to plug in a temperature sensor. My Mastervolt does.

You can also buy some temperature sensors with digital readouts and mount it in the battery compartment and run the wire to the readout under the gasket. They are also good for your freezers and refrig.

 

My guess it was a hydrogen buildup without any heat  which blew the compartment lid off. I would check to see if the vent is clear maybe something built a nest in the exhaust pipe.

 

If there was a heat buildup, I believe there would have been a cracked battery case. One time we had a bad charger and the batteries boiled over leaving ¼ of an inch of battery acid in the compartment. Luckily I had a few boxes of baking soda on board.

I took the bad batteries out of the circuit and headed home 4 days later we arrived on 4 batteries.

 

You know we have motored for days sometimes and 1.4 amps on such a big bank will do no harm.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 4:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Bill,

Batteries looked fine. None were cracked. There was no leaked battery fluid.

There wasn't any excess heat at that point I checked them, but keep in mind, by then I had cleaned up the galley, made the omelets (good too), after which, I had first noticed that the compartment was askew. All the while the heat would have dissipated.

Using shore power with the charger on, I believe that the amperage in after a long charge, and the charger in float stage, is under 1amp, with .5 being a reasonable number (if my memory serves). After over 50 hrs motoring, I was averaging 1.4amps. I believe this could be too high of an incoming charge for an extended period. I will install a temperature sensor in the compartment (any recommedations ?) and check the venting line.

I am returning to Spirit in late July, so I have time to gather items for installation.

BTW....can you send me your contact info (off forum). Thanks

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Jeff,

 

Batteries release Hydrogen gas when charging...they release a lot when overcharging. I believe the only thing that would blow the hinges off of that compartment would be Hydrogen gas. I am guessing that the release of Hydrogen gas was caused by either a short in one or more of the batteries, or a charging device overcharging. Either condition would cause the the batteries to overheat.

 

What was the condition of the batteries after the explosion? Were any battery cases cracked or broken? 

 

What was the temperature of the batteries? Were some hot?

 

Have you inspected the vent hose and checked that it is clear to the outside?

 

Batteries can be bad when delivered new. I bought 12 new house batteries about 4 years ago and 2 of them never left the dock. I tested all before placing them on the boat...2 had internal shorts.

 

I think maybe you were recording Amps, not Amp/hour. If you were recording Amps, it seems that 1.5 is fine, however, I am guessing that if 150-175 amps poured into fully charged batteries for 30 minutes, you could boil the batteries, releasing Hydrogen...I am not sure of this, but your alternator has an output capability of at least 150 amps. I believe it is controled by a smart regulator, but maybe not on hull #14. Is there a Smart Regulator in a plastic electrical box on the aft firewall slightly above the engine height? 

 

I apologize for giving you more questions than answers.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse

Admiral, Texas Navy

Commander Emeritus

Amel School www.amelschool.com

720 Winnie St

Galveston Island, TX 77550

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 6:17 PM, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I was motorsailing for an extended period trying to make as much progress to the easterd as possible.

While making omlets for myself and my crew, there was an explosion in the galley. The big plastic bowl I was mixing the omlets in blew out of my hands, and landed in the sink. It was a big loud pop, not a puff that you might expect from an excess of propane due to a burner left on. It wasn't so much an explosion as a loud POP.

My initial reaction was to think it WAS excess propane. The dials for the stove are touchy on the 54, and I thought I had made the mistake of having a burner slightly on , but unlit, and when enough propane built up, it exploded.

I checked the engine compartment, All OK.

After cleaning up the mess (it wasn't bad), and making the omlets, I went to log in the hourly numbers at the nav station, and noticed that the sea berth mattress and the battery comp artment cover were blown askew, and the facing cabinets were blown open. Upon closer inspection, the battery compartment cover had blown the hinges off.

A couple of points of note:

Batteries were replaced 10/16..replacements were the.same batteries as were originally aboard (lead acid)

New batteries were never allowed to go below 70%. Never saw below 23.3 volts

During motorsailing the AH reading recorded at that point was approx. +1.4AH  at each hourly log entry

The engine was turning 1300rpm, and it's the d3-110 (top end around 3000rpm)

 

I realized that there was apparent contribution of gas (H?) from the battery compartment that appears to have, if nothing else, created an independent event, and possibly, primarily caused the galley event,

 

I'm wondering 2 things:

1. Do es the float stage of the engine alternator produce too high of an amperage flow at float stage, during an extended period of engine usage, producing too much of a charge, causing the excess creation of the gas from the charging process?

2. Is the battery compartment improperly vented in the 54? (I thought there was a discussion of this in the past on the forum. Apologies. I don't follow the forum regularly, and may have missed this discussion

I opened the compartment regularly after the episode after the event to be safe.

 

If there was some kind of a protocol I wasn't following, please, by all means, let me know.

If there is something I was remiss in, or should have done differently, again, please let me know.

 

There was ZERO evidence of any type of a burning from the explosion.

The only evidence in the sea berth was a slight marking on the wall where the cover pushed hard into the wall on the aft end.

 

Any educated thoughts on the episode would be appreciated.

I will be tied up for a few months in my latest port of call as I get to the bottom of this event, along with a few other repairs, a few of which I'll seek the forum's advise.

Thanks Amelians.

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

eric freedman
 

Jeff,

Many battery chargers have a socket to plug in a temperature sensor. My Mastervolt does.

You can also buy some temperature sensors with digital readouts and mount it in the battery compartment and run the wire to the readout under the gasket. They are also good for your freezers and refrig.

 

My guess it was a hydrogen buildup without any heat  which blew the compartment lid off. I would check to see if the vent is clear maybe something built a nest in the exhaust pipe.

 

If there was a heat buildup, I believe there would have been a cracked battery case. One time we had a bad charger and the batteries boiled over leaving ¼ of an inch of battery acid in the compartment. Luckily I had a few boxes of baking soda on board.

I took the bad batteries out of the circuit and headed home 4 days later we arrived on 4 batteries.

 

You know we have motored for days sometimes and 1.4 amps on such a big bank will do no harm.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 4:51 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

 

 

Bill,

Batteries looked fine. None were cracked. There was no leaked battery fluid.

There wasn't any excess heat at that point I checked them, but keep in mind, by then I had cleaned up the galley, made the omelets (good too), after which, I had first noticed that the compartment was askew. All the while the heat would have dissipated.

Using shore power with the charger on, I believe that the amperage in after a long charge, and the charger in float stage, is under 1amp, with .5 being a reasonable number (if my memory serves). After over 50 hrs motoring, I was averaging 1.4amps. I believe this could be too high of an incoming charge for an extended period. I will install a temperature sensor in the compartment (any recommedations ?) and check the venting line.

I am returning to Spirit in late July, so I have time to gather items for installation.

BTW....can you send me your contact info (off forum). Thanks

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Jeff,

 

Batteries release Hydrogen gas when charging...they release a lot when overcharging. I believe the only thing that would blow the hinges off of that compartment would be Hydrogen gas. I am guessing that the release of Hydrogen gas was caused by either a short in one or more of the batteries, or a charging device overcharging. Either condition would cause the the batteries to overheat.

 

What was the condition of the batteries after the explosion? Were any battery cases cracked or broken? 

 

What was the temperature of the batteries? Were some hot?

 

Have you inspected the vent hose and checked that it is clear to the outside?

 

Batteries can be bad when delivered new. I bought 12 new house batteries about 4 years ago and 2 of them never left the dock. I tested all before placing them on the boat...2 had internal shorts.

 

I think maybe you were recording Amps, not Amp/hour. If you were recording Amps, it seems that 1.5 is fine, however, I am guessing that if 150-175 amps poured into fully charged batteries for 30 minutes, you could boil the batteries, releasing Hydrogen...I am not sure of this, but your alternator has an output capability of at least 150 amps. I believe it is controled by a smart regulator, but maybe not on hull #14. Is there a Smart Regulator in a plastic electrical box on the aft firewall slightly above the engine height? 

 

I apologize for giving you more questions than answers.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse

Admiral, Texas Navy

Commander Emeritus

Amel School www.amelschool.com

720 Winnie St

Galveston Island, TX 77550

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 6:17 PM, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I was motorsailing for an extended period trying to make as much progress to the easterd as possible.

While making omlets for myself and my crew, there was an explosion in the galley. The big plastic bowl I was mixing the omlets in blew out of my hands, and landed in the sink. It was a big loud pop, not a puff that you might expect from an excess of propane due to a burner left on. It wasn't so much an explosion as a loud POP.

My initial reaction was to think it WAS excess propane. The dials for the stove are touchy on the 54, and I thought I had made the mistake of having a burner slightly on , but unlit, and when enough propane built up, it exploded.

I checked the engine compartment, All OK.

After cleaning up the mess (it wasn't bad), and making the omlets, I went to log in the hourly numbers at the nav station, and noticed that the sea berth mattress and the battery comp artment cover were blown askew, and the facing cabinets were blown open. Upon closer inspection, the battery compartment cover had blown the hinges off.

A couple of points of note:

Batteries were replaced 10/16..replacements were the.same batteries as were originally aboard (lead acid)

New batteries were never allowed to go below 70%. Never saw below 23.3 volts

During motorsailing the AH reading recorded at that point was approx. +1.4AH  at each hourly log entry

The engine was turning 1300rpm, and it's the d3-110 (top end around 3000rpm)

 

I realized that there was apparent contribution of gas (H?) from the battery compartment that appears to have, if nothing else, created an independent event, and possibly, primarily caused the galley event,

 

I'm wondering 2 things:

1. Do es the float stage of the engine alternator produce too high of an amperage flow at float stage, during an extended period of engine usage, producing too much of a charge, causing the excess creation of the gas from the charging process?

2. Is the battery compartment improperly vented in the 54? (I thought there was a discussion of this in the past on the forum. Apologies. I don't follow the forum regularly, and may have missed this discussion

I opened the compartment regularly after the episode after the event to be safe.

 

If there was some kind of a protocol I wasn't following, please, by all means, let me know.

If there is something I was remiss in, or should have done differently, again, please let me know.

 

There was ZERO evidence of any type of a burning from the explosion.

The only evidence in the sea berth was a slight marking on the wall where the cover pushed hard into the wall on the aft end.

 

Any educated thoughts on the episode would be appreciated.

I will be tied up for a few months in my latest port of call as I get to the bottom of this event, along with a few other repairs, a few of which I'll seek the forum's advise.

Thanks Amelians.

 

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Beko No. WMB51022YU Washing machine in Martinique

Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...>
 

Hi Bill,
YES, it is Darty. They are on the left side of the Highway when you drive from Le Marin to Ft. de France. Can't miss it!
The phone number of their customer service is: 0596 50 72 23.
Hope this helps!
Kind Regards,
Alex Ramseyer
SY NOSTRESS
AMEL54 #15


On Tuesday, June 13, 2017 11:31 PM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Bill,

Me too...I guess sarcasm didn't come through in my email.  It is unfortunate when someone says it's here, but never says where here is!


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Jun 13, 2017 9:14 PM, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
I'd hope he would share with all of us and not just "trade" for a book chapter.





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Options in Santorin

ste.dente
 

Ian, we installed last year the Sterling charger you're speaking about. We should now use the alternator of the motor AND the shaft alternator at the same time. In theory. In practice, we noticed that you loose control upon the charge process. We have the original DC4000 that gives us the amount of amp. going in and going out ; and gives us also informations about the % of charge of the batteries and the volt. Before this change, the DC was working very good. Now, it seems that our brand new batteries ( 5 AGM - Zenith-105 Amp each) could not been charged above the 65-69%. We are very confused and not happy. Let us know what you decide and the results you have. Good luck

Stefania # SN93 BoccadiMagra(IT)

Il giorno 15 giu 2017, alle ore 08:30, Ian Park oceanhobo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Eric
let me know what you do about the Sterling Alternator to Battery charger. I was looking at that as an alternative to changing to a larger alternator. It reads as if you could connect both the engine and shaft alternators to it (still working independently as originally designed) but would complete a better 4 stage charging regime and be adjustable for different battery types. Has anyone else out there installed one of these??
....and get plenty beers ready on the battery exchange - I've done it twice now and lost about 7lbs body weight in sweat each time. Next time I do it I'm going to sail somewhere cold first!!
I've currently got 2 x 75w solar panels on the aft side rails. They pivot easily at anchor and stack vertically inside the rails when sailing, but they are not enough to keep the fridge going during the day. I need around another 100 w of solar. I did buy a portable generator which I plug directly into the shore power socket. This works well for charging and giving some mains voltage in the boat provided you keep the total outgoing amps within the range of what's being produced. It means Linda is a happy girl because she can use her hair dryer etc when we're anchored - well worth it for a contented crew!!
Good luck with your installation.
Ian
'Ocean Hobo' SN96



On Wednesday, 14 June 2017, 23:34, "ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
Ian

We ended up going with the following


new batteries are purchased. 680 Amp hours at 12 volt. Also purchased an automated battery watering system with the batteries. Picking them up on Friday and installing on friday then beer. each batter was 250 MINUS the core (varies on type of battery) I originally wanted the L16 wich would give 840 Amp hours but figured the savings in money could buy another solar panel.









Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Right-sized washing machines for Amel 53' from Italy

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Stephanie,

If you haven't already done it, the right size and and voltage for a Super Maramu 2000 is available in Martinique at Darty's.

I do not have confirmed contact information for Darty. I have asked several people for that information and expect it soon. Alex Ramseyer, are you reading this?

I have this unconfirmed information: Darty's, 29 ZI Les Mangles Acajou, The Lamentin, Martinique, Hours :Open today · 10 AM-7PM, Phone : +596 596 50 72 23. I believe that this location is north of the airport at Fort du France on A1. 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550


On Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 9:45 AM, Stephanie DiBelardino stephiedib@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I never thought I would have a problem shipping the washing machine we purchased in Rome to Florida! What I learned is this: Genoa (called Savona in Italian ) is the only port that sends LTL to Florida. We are having our washer then shipped fr. Florida to Freeport. The total cost is about $450.

So, the lesson learned is this: before you buy you appliances in any country, find out about the best port to ship from and then buy you appliances in that city.

My local freight forwarder in Freeport has arranged all of this for me.

I also inquired about 4 day FedEx service from our home in Nettuno , still within the province of Rome, to Fort Lauderdale. Standard price was just under $ 1,300. Trade price to a commercial customer was about $750.

I hope this insight helps.

Stephanie DiBelardino
Freeport, BS
Amel SM 353 "Indecent"




Right-sized washing machines for Amel 53' from Italy

Stephanie DiBelardino <stephiedib@...>
 

I never thought I would have a problem shipping the washing machine we purchased in Rome to Florida! What I learned is this: Genoa (called Savona in Italian ) is the only port that sends LTL to Florida. We are having our washer then shipped fr. Florida to Freeport. The total cost is about $450.

So, the lesson learned is this: before you buy you appliances in any country, find out about the best port to ship from and then buy you appliances in that city.

My local freight forwarder in Freeport has arranged all of this for me.

I also inquired about 4 day FedEx service from our home in Nettuno , still within the province of Rome, to Fort Lauderdale. Standard price was just under $ 1,300. Trade price to a commercial customer was about $750.

I hope this insight helps.

Stephanie DiBelardino
Freeport, BS
Amel SM 353 "Indecent"


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Jeff,

You can contact me at brouse"at"gmail.com


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Jun 15, 2017 03:50, "JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,
Batteries looked fine. None were cracked. There was no leaked battery fluid.
There wasn't any excess heat at that point I checked them, but keep in mind, by then I had cleaned up the galley, made the omelets (good too), after which, I had first noticed that the compartment was askew. All the while the heat would have dissipated.
Using shore power with the charger on, I believe that the amperage in after a long charge, and the charger in float stage, is under 1amp, with .5 being a reasonable number (if my memory serves). After over 50 hrs motoring, I was averaging 1.4amps. I believe this could be too high of an incoming charge for an extended period. I will install a temperature sensor in the compartment (any recommedations ?) and check the venting line.
I am returning to Spirit in late July, so I have time to gather items for installation.
BTW....can you send me your contact info (off forum). Thanks

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Jeff,

Batteries release Hydrogen gas when charging...they release a lot when overcharging. I believe the only thing that would blow the hinges off of that compartment would be Hydrogen gas. I am guessing that the release of Hydrogen gas was caused by either a short in one or more of the batteries, or a charging device overcharging. Either condition would cause the the batteries to overheat.

What was the condition of the batteries after the explosion? Were any battery cases cracked or broken? 

What was the temperature of the batteries? Were some hot?

Have you inspected the vent hose and checked that it is clear to the outside?

Batteries can be bad when delivered new. I bought 12 new house batteries about 4 years ago and 2 of them never left the dock. I tested all before placing them on the boat...2 had internal shorts.

I think maybe you were recording Amps, not Amp/hour. If you were recording Amps, it seems that 1.5 is fine, however, I am guessing that if 150-175 amps poured into fully charged batteries for 30 minutes, you could boil the batteries, releasing Hydrogen...I am not sure of this, but your alternator has an output capability of at least 150 amps. I believe it is controled by a smart regulator, but maybe not on hull #14. Is there a Smart Regulator in a plastic electrical box on the aft firewall slightly above the engine height? 

I apologize for giving you more questions than answers.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550






On Wed, Jun 14, 2017 at 6:17 PM, jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

I was motorsailing for an extended period trying to make as much progress to the easterd as possible.

While making omlets for myself and my crew, there was an explosion in the galley. The big plastic bowl I was mixing the omlets in blew out of my hands, and landed in the sink. It was a big loud pop, not a puff that you might expect from an excess of propane due to a burner left on. It wasn't so much an explosion as a loud POP.

My initial reaction was to think it WAS excess propane. The dials for the stove are touchy on the 54, and I thought I had made the mistake of having a burner slightly on , but unlit, and when enough propane built up, it exploded.

I checked the engine compartment, All OK.

After cleaning up the mess (it wasn't bad), and making the omlets, I went to log in the hourly numbers at the nav station, and noticed that the sea berth mattress and the battery comp artment cover were blown askew, and the facing cabinets were blown open. Upon closer inspection, the battery compartment cover had blown the hinges off.

A couple of points of note:

Batteries were replaced 10/16..replacements were the.same batteries as were originally aboard (lead acid)

New batteries were never allowed to go below 70%. Never saw below 23.3 volts

During motorsailing the AH reading recorded at that point was approx. +1.4AH  at each hourly log entry

The engine was turning 1300rpm, and it's the d3-110 (top end around 3000rpm)


I realized that there was apparent contribution of gas (H?) from the battery compartment that appears to have, if nothing else, created an independent event, and possibly, primarily caused the galley event,


I'm wondering 2 things:

1. Do es the float stage of the engine alternator produce too high of an amperage flow at float stage, during an extended period of engine usage, producing too much of a charge, causing the excess creation of the gas from the charging process?

2. Is the battery compartment improperly vented in the 54? (I thought there was a discussion of this in the past on the forum. Apologies. I don't follow the forum regularly, and may have missed this discussion

I opened the compartment regularly after the episode after the event to be safe.


If there was some kind of a protocol I wasn't following, please, by all means, let me know.

If there is something I was remiss in, or should have done differently, again, please let me know.


There was ZERO evidence of any type of a burning from the explosion.

The only evidence in the sea berth was a slight marking on the wall where the cover pushed hard into the wall on the aft end.


Any educated thoughts on the episode would be appreciated.

I will be tied up for a few months in my latest port of call as I get to the bottom of this event, along with a few other repairs, a few of which I'll seek the forum's advise.

Thanks Amelians.


Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14










Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Explosive episode

James Studdart
 

As an aside, when our batteries blew they remained hot for many many hours (sitting on the dock). It was at least overnight until they returned close to ambient. I'd be very surprised if yours managed to cool while you cleaned up. However, it the rest of the evidence certainly points to a boiled battery.

Cheers,
James
SeaBean, SM344
Shelter Bay, Panama

On Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 05:25 gary@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I had two batteries 'boil off' while in the BVIs in 2015. The batteries were at least three years old and we were on shore power with float charge in progress.

While there was no explosion, the event was marked by the distinct smell of sulphur/gunpowder and by the very real heat coming through the wood of the battery compartment.
After shutting the masters off and tripping all the breakers I could think of we left the boat for four hours.
When we returned, the batteries were still boiling so I stuck a fan into the berth area to vent it and gingerly removed them and set them on the cement dock. There was quite a flood of acid/water mix in the compartment. The batteries continued to boil off while sitting on the dock for maybe 6 more hours.

I'm on a monthly schedule to top the batteries with distilled water, and they seldom take very much but exposed plates can often lead to internal shorts and a boil off. If there's a lot of gas in the battery compartment, even if properly vented, a tiny internal hot spot can ignite it and you'd hear the big 'pop'.  Thankfully, the compartment's design is good enough to contain it.

A few years prior one of the batteries in our RV 5th Wheel exploded just as we were leaving the coach. Sounded like a gunshot and then we smelled the sulphur. Pretty scary till we figured it out.  Since we were outside we didn't feel and concussion, but in the closed space below decks I imagine there was a good amount of overpressure when the battery popped.

Just glad to hear that no one was hurt!

Gary W.
s/v Adagio, SM #209
Patmos, Greece


Re: Explosive episode

Gary Wells
 

I had two batteries 'boil off' while in the BVIs in 2015. The batteries were at least three years old and we were on shore power with float charge in progress.

While there was no explosion, the event was marked by the distinct smell of sulphur/gunpowder and by the very real heat coming through the wood of the battery compartment.
After shutting the masters off and tripping all the breakers I could think of we left the boat for four hours.
When we returned, the batteries were still boiling so I stuck a fan into the berth area to vent it and gingerly removed them and set them on the cement dock. There was quite a flood of acid/water mix in the compartment. The batteries continued to boil off while sitting on the dock for maybe 6 more hours.

I'm on a monthly schedule to top the batteries with distilled water, and they seldom take very much but exposed plates can often lead to internal shorts and a boil off. If there's a lot of gas in the battery compartment, even if properly vented, a tiny internal hot spot can ignite it and you'd hear the big 'pop'.  Thankfully, the compartment's design is good enough to contain it.

A few years prior one of the batteries in our RV 5th Wheel exploded just as we were leaving the coach. Sounded like a gunshot and then we smelled the sulphur. Pretty scary till we figured it out.  Since we were outside we didn't feel and concussion, but in the closed space below decks I imagine there was a good amount of overpressure when the battery popped.

Just glad to hear that no one was hurt!

Gary W.
s/v Adagio, SM #209
Patmos, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Sloop rig santorin, Stainless steel bolts on the mast foot?

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Dave,

due to the age of your Santorin, your mainsail is probably not original, but I'm sure the sailmaker who made it, made a mainsail like the original, with the same dimensions.
The mainsail on a Santorin sloop is indeed bigger than on a ketch and I hope you are not sailing your sloop with a ketch mainsail !
The genoa on a Santorin sloop is indeed bigger than on a ketch.
The compression on the mast is made from the mainsail AND the genoa.
The compression on a Santorin sloop mast is indeed higher than on a ketch.

No, the boom is not the only difference...

I don't know how many Santorins are equipped with this reinforcement at mast foot.
I have never heard of another Santorin mast front bottom collapsing during my 19 years at AMEL and since 1990.
The recall was made in order to avoid new cases 
This part of the mast with stainless steel bolts should not corrode more than the other areas of the mast where stainless steel is close to painted aluminum (goose-neck, winches and spreaders fittings). So, just check corrosion around these bolts but also on the whole mast, and if you or your surveyor thinks it is too much, then it may be time for a new mast paint...

If you purchased your Santorin with the advice of a surveyor, what did he say about these bolts and the general corrosion of the mast paint?

Olivier.




On Thursday, June 15, 2017 7:48 AM, "david bruce davidcbruce57@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Hello, 
 We are on a shakedown of our new and beautiful SN006 Liesse, in South Of France, which although going very well and stunningly beautiful I have taken to calling the Motorterranean! 
 I do have the 4 ss bolts securing a large somewhat substantial hemispherical reinforcement bar on the leading edge of the mast.  Surrounding paint at bolt and inspection plate on stb side which is aluminum do show a bit of dissimilar metal paint lifting but it seems superficial and is on my list to address.  
I am curious about your statement about the compression loads on the Santorin sloop Olivier, as it is my understanding that it is the same mast as the ketch but with a longer boom.  On our boat the main sail is well short of the full length of the boom which I assumed is due to an inability of the mast to accommodate any more rolled sail. (clearly no more room when furler).  So it does appear the main is underpowered, is this typical of the sloops?  Also IF the boom is the only thing different on the sloop rig how does this serve increase the compression loads of the mast that you mentioned.  Finally are there any ongoing structural concerns regarding this mast reinforcement which those of us with these earlier boats should be aware?   Sorry to be so long winded.  

Thanks and best regards,  Dave Bruce   s/v Liesse. SN006, 


On Jun 12, 2017, at 10:40 AM, Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Hello,

yes there are several Santorins (probably only sloops) that have a main mast with a backing aluminum bar (inside the mast) at the front bottom, and bolted with 4 stainless steel bolts (with SS and nylon washers).
It happened once that one of the first Santorins (sloop but not the one our unknown writer talks about)  came back from its maiden cruising navigation with the front bottom part of the main mast collapsed. The aluminum had suffered too much compression and showed slight wrinkles.
The vessel was not showing grounding signs, and no evidence of a bad mast setting (installing the mastfoot not flat on deck, but too much on the front edge) was found.
The cause was probably the vessel beating in strong winds and choppy seas, AND a too thin skin at the bottom of the extrusion. Why only at the bottom?
For those who are not familiar with aluminum extrusion process, and to make it short:
In the aluminum factory, the aluminum alloy, warmed up (but not melting, otherwise this is cast aluminum), is pushed through a matrix with the shape of the mast's profile.
This "tube" is then rolling on roller bars and "strechted" to make it "straight" and not twisted or curved.
During the stretching process, it is possible that the thickness of the aluminum shows too thin areas, or too much curve, or too much twist. The extrusion is thus rejected and recycled.
The faulty mast was probably made of an extrusion that "escaped" the checking process.
So, AMEL decided to install a piece of aluminum of about 50 cm length, 2cm thickness, with the shape of the curved front face of the mast, inside the mast, stepped on the mast's sole, and bolted with 4 S/S bolts.
I cannot tell how many Santorins were treated by AMEL like this. However, this may concern the Santorins sloop with masts of the same batch. AMEL had extrusions made by 20 or 30 units, so this may affect only the Santorins  sloops delivered with masts of the same batch.
This means maybe only 7 or 8 Santorins sloops of 1990/1991.
Why only sloops? Because the compression is higher with a sloop as there is more sail area on the mast than on a kectch main mast.

I'm sure AMEL did the right thing when they (Captain Amel and Jacques Carteau) decided to make this reinforcement system.
Just like when AMEL decided to make a recall on all the AMEL 54 main masts...

Now, for those who own a Santorin sloop and read this post, I'm sure you will have a close look at your mast foot !!

Like Craig, I can't wait to know who set this question... I may give him a lot more answers about the whole vessel (this is called a survey).
And this is definitely the right behavior on this forum.

Olivier.


On Sunday, June 11, 2017 3:25 PM, "Ric Gottschalk ric@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
No bolts on my sloop mast foot. SN 24 1990

Ric Gottschalk
Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc
Office 410-923-5800
Fax 410-923-5802

On Jun 11, 2017, at 9:02 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
I agree with Eric. Contact Olivier Beaute gmail.com>

I also agree with Craig...I do not believe those bolts are original.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970






On Sat, Jun 10, 2017 at 5:59 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
HI,
If you are considering this boat, why don’t you contact  Olivier to look at the boat?
He does not live too far away.
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com [mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Saturday, June 10, 2017 6:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Sloop rig santorin, Stainless steel bolts on the mast foot?
 
 
Perhaps you could introduce yourself - are you shopping for an Amel? What's your name? home port, etc.
There are no bolts on the forward face of the original Santorin mast.
Craig, SN#68 Sangaris
Hi every body and thank you in advance for sharin your knowledge!
 
I have visited a 1991 sloop rigged Santorin in La Rochelle couple days ago.
The boat is fine. But i have been very surprised by discovering on the forward face of the mast foot three big stainless steel bolts.
Is it a standard feature?
What is its purpose?
The paint on the mast was tearing around these bolts, is this a sign of ss/aluminium bad neighbourhood?
 
 






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

Alan Leslie
 

I would hazard a guess that your alternator doesn't have a Smart Regulator but rather a standard automotive type which keeps the batteries at 28.8V forever, and they boiled after running the motor for a long time....
Would be nice to know EXACTLY what your alternator / regulator configuration is...
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Explosive episode

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Instalation SSB

Alan Leslie
 

Hello Eric,

It's the ground in the SSB transceiver and the antenna tuner that is the problem, and I would think that -ve tied to ground is pretty common practice in most radios.
The AT130/140 tuners, for example, use the ground shield in the coax cables, which are connected to the antenna ground, as the negative return for the tuner power supply which comes from the transceiver.
If the 24-12 converter is not isolated, the -ve rail in the transceiver / tuner combination finds it's way to ships ground through the seawater from the tuner ground plate to the anodes on the rudder.. and it will light up the little red test light in the companionway when you push the switch fwd.... you don;t need to ask me how I know that !

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Instalation SSB

eric freedman
 

Alan,

You are absolutely right in the case of the ICOM, I forget to check the example.

 

I did purchase isolated ground units.

I think only on the Icom does it make a difference, the other converters are without a ground.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 15, 2017 2:37 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Instalation SSB

 

 

You need to be careful with these 24 to 12 volt converters.

Ideally to suit the Amel system you need an isolated converter i.e. one where the input negative is isolated from the output negative.

If you use a non-isolated converter where the input negative is connected to the output negative, then you will have a direct path from the house battery negative to the ships ground when you connect to the Icom SSB, as inside the ICOM SSB the -ve 12v rail is connected to ground. This is anathema to the Amel grounding system of isolating the battery negative from ground.

So, to avoid this you either need an isolated 24-12 converter or, do what I did, with a non-isolated converter, and put in a relay to completely disconnect the converter from the SSB when its not in use.

The Victron 24-12 unit mentioned is not an isolated unit.

Cheers

Alan

Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Instalation SSB

Alan Leslie
 

You need to be careful with these 24 to 12 volt converters.
Ideally to suit the Amel system you need an isolated converter i.e. one where the input negative is isolated from the output negative.
If you use a non-isolated converter where the input negative is connected to the output negative, then you will have a direct path from the house battery negative to the ships ground when you connect to the Icom SSB, as inside the ICOM SSB the -ve 12v rail is connected to ground. This is anathema to the Amel grounding system of isolating the battery negative from ground.
So, to avoid this you either need an isolated 24-12 converter or, do what I did, with a non-isolated converter, and put in a relay to completely disconnect the converter from the SSB when its not in use.
The Victron 24-12 unit mentioned is not an isolated unit.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Options in Santorin

Ian Park <oceanhobo@...>
 

Eric
let me know what you do about the Sterling Alternator to Battery charger. I was looking at that as an alternative to changing to a larger alternator. It reads as if you could connect both the engine and shaft alternators to it (still working independently as originally designed) but would complete a better 4 stage charging regime and be adjustable for different battery types. Has anyone else out there installed one of these??
....and get plenty beers ready on the battery exchange - I've done it twice now and lost about 7lbs body weight in sweat each time. Next time I do it I'm going to sail somewhere cold first!!
I've currently got 2 x 75w solar panels on the aft side rails. They pivot easily at anchor and stack vertically inside the rails when sailing, but they are not enough to keep the fridge going during the day. I need around another 100 w of solar. I did buy a portable generator which I plug directly into the shore power socket. This works well for charging and giving some mains voltage in the boat provided you keep the total outgoing amps within the range of what's being produced. It means Linda is a happy girl because she can use her hair dryer etc when we're anchored - well worth it for a contented crew!!
Good luck with your installation.
Ian
'Ocean Hobo' SN96



On Wednesday, 14 June 2017, 23:34, "ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Ian

We ended up going with the following


new batteries are purchased. 680 Amp hours at 12 volt. Also purchased an automated battery watering system with the batteries. Picking them up on Friday and installing on friday then beer. each batter was 250 MINUS the core (varies on type of battery) I originally wanted the L16 wich would give 840 Amp hours but figured the savings in money could buy another solar panel.