Date   

Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I dont think I have ever commented negatively before but sorry Colin. I saw your set ip in Vuda Point Fiji. In my opinion ugly as sin, obstructive and creating a huge blind spot looking forward. How you could put up with it for as long as you did confounds me. If you had struck a major storm with big deck sweeping seas I hate to think of the result.However, just proves tastes differ.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 December 2020 at 17:26 Colin - ex SV Island Pearl <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote:

Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend < smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas

 

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Davi Rozgonyi
 

We run the same dink as delos on Wake. I too can't understand the physics of that setup... Though they are clearly far more experienced than us, it seems a disaster waiting to happen. We keep our 3.3m solid alu dink in the same spot, but lashed down tight upside down on its own foam side covers (flipped up). Much better viz, low profile and rock solid. I have a permanent lift rope tied between the bow and stern on the starboard side, with an alpine butterfly loop at the exact balance point to lift her side-first over the rail, up and lowered, tipped gently down and lashed. Between us, we can hoist the 20hp motor on the back rail and lift or lower the dink in 7 minutes flat. It's big but otherwise no sweat, light for such bulk, and such an amazing dinghy that we wouldn't trade it for anything. I highly recommend oceancraft if you do any diving or frequent long rides from anchorages, etc. You'll be driving around happily on those days when while everyone else is hunkered down terrified... 


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Finally, on the all-important visibility issue, I should add that before purchasing the large dinghy and building strong davits, we did have our 3.2m hyperlon dinghy inverted lying flat on the bow for many years and the visibility with that arrangement seemed to us to be far worse than later with the large dinghy on the bow davit. This was because, with the large one on bow davits, we actually looked though, (ie. underneath) the dinghy and this was not possible previously with hyperlon 3.2m dinghy lying flat on the deck where I was forced to try to look around this, often leaving the wheel to do so on my own. 

We lived on a canal system that required tight close-quarter maneuvering,  often with me sailing solo, and so this previous inverted normal dinghy on bow arrangement became quite dangerous for me. Of course in an ocean crossing situation, with no close quarter maneuvering, and with someone else on board to alert you to boats in front, this may not be so critical at all.

Fair winds
Colin
Scarborough, QLD Australia


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:28 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
typo correction - OceanCraft make a new standard 2.9m aluminium dingy, not 2.0m length


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:26 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

typo correction - OceanCraft make a new standard 2.9m aluminium dingy, not 2.0m length


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:26 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Karen Smith
 

Hey Ian,

We have just recently seen Delos’ dinghy arrangement. I have no idea how they see anything in front of the boat.  It’s a huge dinghy, and the cradle they have sits very high on the deck.  I can’t comment on the attachment or other engineering details.  It might work for them, but it’s not my cup of tea...

Before I’d go that route, I’d do a good mockup and check to be sure sight lines meet your standards.

Enjoy the warm island weather, we are freezing our butts off here!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello gang,

We have a 9.5 Alu RIB which we store inverted on the foredeck during long passages. The 15 HP Yamaha 2 Str is on a carrier fixed to the stbd rail near the transom. We use a spare halyard to hoist. 

On short passages, we lift the combined pair into our davits which also incorporate our solar panels. 

The balance is a bit better when the dinghy is inverted on the fore deck. 

Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera,SM007, NZ


On 27/12/2020, at 6:42 AM, Philippe Chatton <chattonp960@...> wrote:


Hi Ian,
That's what we plan to do.
We did a few tests with a 2.80 meter Avon dinghy + engine.
We could easily lift the dinghy and its engine (25hp) with the genoa winch without problems.
So we decided  to go ahead  with this concept and just ordered a classic 3.40 highfield dinghy.
The tender will go on relativally small nylon covered cradles
Philippe
S/V Chameleon 
SM 445
Antibes FR

 

Le sam. 26 déc. 2020 à 18:02, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> a écrit :

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Philippe Chatton
 

Hi Ian,
That's what we plan to do.
We did a few tests with a 2.80 meter Avon dinghy + engine.
We could easily lift the dinghy and its engine (25hp) with the genoa winch without problems.
So we decided  to go ahead  with this concept and just ordered a classic 3.40 highfield dinghy.
The tender will go on relativally small nylon covered cradles
Philippe
S/V Chameleon 
SM 445
Antibes FR

 

Le sam. 26 déc. 2020 à 18:02, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> a écrit :

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Foredeck dinghy cradle

Ian Townsend
 

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Re: stop my enrollment

Mark Erdos
 

Hi,

 

I turned off your email notifications. You can still access the group but will no longer receive emails.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Boudewijn Vanhuysse
Sent: Friday, December 25, 2020 6:27 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io Group Moderators
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] stop my enrollment

 

Hi,

can you please stop my enrollment on your amel yacht owners forum....I cannot buy an amel right now and 90% of the mails are totally irrelevant for a non-owner.

Thanks

Angel & Boudewijn Vanhuysse - Durie

GSM: +33672497006

GSM: +32483468032

 

 


stop my enrollment

Boudewijn Vanhuysse <boudewijn.vanhuysse@...>
 

Hi,
can you please stop my enrollment on your amel yacht owners forum....I cannot buy an amel right now and 90% of the mails are totally irrelevant for a non-owner.
Thanks
Angel & Boudewijn Vanhuysse - Durie
GSM: +33672497006
GSM: +32483468032
 
 


Model specific sub site

david bruce
 

Hi Ian and all,  

 Capital idea! 

 I have also thought that a model specific sub section of the site might serve to promote more discourse among owners of similar boats and be more efficient.   For instance I would really appreciate hearing more about what John Hayes has to say about his SN, but I share his expressed reluctance to engage in detailed discussions on the forum that would only benefit a minority of members.

 I know that most Amel owners are very gracious and generous in sharing their experiences and knowledge, so for me it’s more a matter of my not wanting to ‘clog things up’ or bore the majority by say, asking for some minor clarification of Craigs response to my query regarding installing nav lights. I could PM but then Ian might miss a bit, etc.  

Thoughts Bill?

Dave
LiesseSN006





On Dec 25, 2020, at 2:41 AM, Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

Would it be a good idea for all SN owners to start any post or photo title with 'Santorin' followed by an easily searchable sub title - steering/engine/mast etc.
I find I am trawling through lots of posts that are not always applicable to the Santorin?
Just a thought..

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Port side Front Navigation Light unreliable

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Ian,
Interesting. We're 1992 built Hull 68 - I've assumed it was an Amel installation as the holes in the bottom of the stanchion bases and the holes where the wire exits the tubing are identical to that in the aft stanchion where they ran the wire for the GPS. And all the bedding compound looked original. There is no hole through the deck other than directly under the stanchion bases.

Merry Christmas,--
SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL


Re: ONAN replacement or not?

Alain Durante
 

Bonjour Ken,

 

Just watched your latest video and found you installed 3 lithium batteries, I believe 3 x 300 AH / 24V?

 

i believe these batteries were custom made to fit into the batteries's compartment?


Alain
Meige
A54#21


Re: Any SM owners use a Beta engine??

Mark Barter
 

I have been researching the issues on the forum and the Beta is over 50% heavier than the Perkins. The new gearbox is also a lot chunkier. As a result it shouldn't come as any surprise that the engine vibrates as it does. The old mounts as well as being old clearly wouldn't have been designed for the weight of the Beta.

With regard to new mounts, is it just a case of dividing the engine/gearbox and frame weight by 6 and using that figure to spec the mounts? 
--
Mark & Nicky Barter
S/V Nunky
SM 110


Re: Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical

Ian Park
 

Would it be a good idea for all SN owners to start any post or photo title with 'Santorin' followed by an easily searchable sub title - steering/engine/mast etc.
I find I am trawling through lots of posts that are not always applicable to the Santorin?
Just a thought..

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical

JOHN HAYES
 

Hi Volker

So my santorin Nga Waka is a year younger launched in 1991 but it had sailed to nz from the med.....and it sat unused in Panama for a couple of years and on arrival in nz

I did a couple of cruises around NZ and some shorter transits in gales cause I wanted to see what bits of the boat might fail when stressed

First to fail were the gear boxes on the main mast. Both replaced with bonfiglioli gear boxes identical to those originally fitted. They were about Nz$300 each

The Genoa furler gear box also failed a couple of months later. It has a circular gear driven by a worm drive. I found a highly skilled gear maker (who had never seen a fibreglass gear box). He made new parts and assured me they would last another 30 years. Cost was about nz$2500 

The 12 volt motors that drive the furlers have been fully overhauled by specialists each costing about $1000. 

Since this work was done I’ve sailed through the pacific and down to the sub Antarctic islands. The Amel systems are brilliant to use and in my experience,  properly maintained, very reliable 

We did experience difficulty furling the main sail inside the mast when it would jam. That problem disappeared with a new sail

The other difficulty we had was the Perkins main engine. It was reliable but the cooling fresh water system was driven by a spline on top of the engine that slotted in to the back of the water pump. I did not know about a special realigning tool which is critical to reassembly ...... that cost me a couple of water pumps until I figured the problem. Later to ensure reliability I replaced the Perkins with a Volvo d250 Which is identical to the Perkins but has improved systems and less bits like water circulating systems hanging off it

I could go on but if you have any issues email me direct rather than clogging up everyone’s in boxes

Seasons greetings 

Johnhayes862@...

Wellington NZ








On 25/12/2020, at 9:34 PM, Ian Park <parkianj@...> wrote:

Volker, 
A bit more. Championship gearboxes are available and relatively not expensive. Their motors are a straightforward rebuild by a good motor electrics specialist.
There are a number of parts on the Santorin that are the same as the bigger and heavier Super Maramu. The C drive is one and I'm pretty sure the curled gearbox is another. Therefore they are well over engineered for the smaller Santorin and should last and last.

There's nothing like your first sudden tropical squall to make you appreciate the Santorin's curling system!

Merry Christmas

Ian 
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Genua Furler on Santorin...stay electrical or go mechanical

Ian Park
 

Volker, 
A bit more. Championship gearboxes are available and relatively not expensive. Their motors are a straightforward rebuild by a good motor electrics specialist.
There are a number of parts on the Santorin that are the same as the bigger and heavier Super Maramu. The C drive is one and I'm pretty sure the curled gearbox is another. Therefore they are well over engineered for the smaller Santorin and should last and last.

There's nothing like your first sudden tropical squall to make you appreciate the Santorin's curling system!

Merry Christmas

Ian 
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Port side Front Navigation Light unreliable

Ian Park
 

Criag, Dave,
My Santorin (96) did not have deck lights or a steaming light fitted when it was built. So I have a single port/starboard unit clamped on the front of the pulpit. The  wires are cable tied to the pulpit and to through the deck. I would like to change to two separate lights as the single one right on the front interferes a little with the use of the ballooner with the potential of causing a rip!
I retrofitted a deck/steaming light. Talking to Amel they said that when built (1994) only masthead lights were required. I'd be interested if there was a date when this changed, and did it apply to the SM or did their extra size warrant deck lights at an earlier date?I

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96  Happy Christmas


Re: Port side Front Navigation Light unreliable

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Dave on Liesse,
Frankly, your mast head lights seem an excellent (original AMEL) choice all by themselves, but if you want deck level lights too the wires of our AMEL installed lights (SN68) were run up inside each side's bow pulpit tubes (not around the bow, as on the SM's) with a branch wire from the port side over to the starboard side on the underside of the deck lockers.

There is a hole in the gunnel under the aft-most bow pulpit stanchion on each side that goes through the carbon steel backing plate that is embedded in the grp gunnel.  That's the plate that can corrode, expand and distort/crack the grp if any moisture gets in down the wire.

The wire then exits through a hole in the bow pulpit tube just below the lower cross member and goes to the bow light fixture that is mounted on a thin stainless steel plate welded to the pulpit tubes (port and starboard, of course). Slather the holes with silicone to keep any water from running down the wire. I can send a picture if you wish - just ask.

Perhaps the advantage of the SM version discussed in this thread is there is only one hole through the port side bow pulpit base, with the crossover wire to the port side being fished through the tubing (with some difficulty). The SN installation with the wires crossing over inside the bow lockers is easier but does have two holes in the (port and starboard) stanchion bases.

Merry Christmas, Craig - SN68 Sangaris, Tropic Isle Harbor, FL

2661 - 2680 of 58444