Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

karkauai
 

I also had trouble getting my aqua signal masthead light to work. I switch to an Orca Green Marine masthead light and have had no further troubles

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

On Sep 14, 2016, at 8:18 AM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

My two cents: The AquaSignal unit is not sealed. It is junk. After two AquaSignal unit failures, I installed the more expensive SignalMate unit. It is a much higher quality construction than AquaSignal. SignalMate is a truly sealed unit and much easier to install. A quick Google search will show you I am not alone with my opinion and troubles with AquaSignal.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising:  Tampa Bay for hurricane season

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 9:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

 

Pat,

 

Hella, SignalMate and AquaSignal all make sealed LED fixtures that have an operating voltage range of 9 to 33 Volts.

 

One of the real advantages of using an LED designed fixture instead of an LED bulb in a traditional fixture is that the LED fixture can be made really, truly, waterproof. I have had trouble with contact corrosion using LED bulbs in regular navigation light fixtures.

 

Bill

 

 

On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v, it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.

Thanks,

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

Pat,

 

First, do not worry about your instruments.  Modern sailing instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system is seriously out of whack.  

 

As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models, fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters. Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for nothing else.

 

There is one place where the converter is a great solution:  running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12 Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during transmissions without a charging source running.  That big converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of other boats.

 

If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt converters.  

 

Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.  Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and work fine. 

 

To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast.  For me at least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized, waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture. It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not require separate, external, voltage regulators. 

 

Bill Kinney

SM #160, Harmonie

Newport, RI, USA

“Ships and men rot in port."

 

 

 

 

On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without  being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture. Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.

Thanks,

Pat SM123

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+ equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.

 

Kent

SM243

Kristy 


On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big battery bank.

IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues with lamps and other 24VDC devices.

The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC circuit before starting to do it.

Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water ingress into the lamp holder.....

Cheers

Alan

Elyse SM437

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

Mark Erdos
 

My two cents: The AquaSignal unit is not sealed. It is junk. After two AquaSignal unit failures, I installed the more expensive SignalMate unit. It is a much higher quality construction than AquaSignal. SignalMate is a truly sealed unit and much easier to install. A quick Google search will show you I am not alone with my opinion and troubles with AquaSignal.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising:  Tampa Bay for hurricane season

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 9:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

 

Pat,

 

Hella, SignalMate and AquaSignal all make sealed LED fixtures that have an operating voltage range of 9 to 33 Volts.

 

One of the real advantages of using an LED designed fixture instead of an LED bulb in a traditional fixture is that the LED fixture can be made really, truly, waterproof. I have had trouble with contact corrosion using LED bulbs in regular navigation light fixtures.

 

Bill

 

 

On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v, it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.

Thanks,

Pat

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

Pat,

 

First, do not worry about your instruments.  Modern sailing instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system is seriously out of whack.  

 

As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models, fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters. Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for nothing else.

 

There is one place where the converter is a great solution:  running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12 Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during transmissions without a charging source running.  That big converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of other boats.

 

If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt converters.  

 

Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.  Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and work fine. 

 

To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast.  For me at least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized, waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture. It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not require separate, external, voltage regulators. 

 

Bill Kinney

SM #160, Harmonie

Newport, RI, USA

“Ships and men rot in port."

 

 

 

 

On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without  being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture. Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.

Thanks,

Pat SM123

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 

I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+ equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.

 

Kent

SM243

Kristy 


On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big battery bank.

IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues with lamps and other 24VDC devices.

The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC circuit before starting to do it.

Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water ingress into the lamp holder.....

Cheers

Alan

Elyse SM437

 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Hanspeter and Steve and thanks for the information.

Sincerely, Alexandre




--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 9/13/16, 'hanspeter.baettig@bluemail.ch' hanspeter.baettig@bluemail.ch [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 6:56 PM


 









Hi AlexandreNew Lofrans Tigres cost
1389.95 €plus shipment from
Germanywww.svb.dethe one of the best
shipchandlers around the world; my personal experience since
24 years; and yes they speak englisch. German
Quality!and
to Bill from ex BeBei have no business
relation to svbgreetings
HanspeterTamango 2; SM16
Von meinem iPhone gesendet
Am 13.09.2016 um 23:55 schrieb Stephen Davis flyboyscd@gmail.com
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>:
















 






Hi Alexandre,
We found new motors for the Tigres
Windlass at Le Ship in Martinique for 550 euros this year.
The cost is closer to the $1200 if purchased in the
USA. 
Steve
DavisAloha SM72Grenada
On Sep 13, 2016, at 09:56, Alexandre Uster von
Baar uster@rocketmail.com
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:
















 






For the new owners like myself who are intimidated
by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated
the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”



If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.


So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago
I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the
outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4
complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead
to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.



With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken
bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).



1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.


1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt

1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the
brushes… gave up.

1/2 day to clean all the parts

1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)

1/2 day to put back together



I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2
half days (10 hours).



Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor
really upset me:

In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase),
one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.

A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the
Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the
electric motor.

Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the
rust.

Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.


This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to
spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend
$1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24
Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)



Anyway, back to the illustration:



Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made
error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 



For example:

I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128

Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have
put grease.

Since I did, is this going to conflict?



Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic
layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” /
Sensor

But the sensor works fine.



Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I
took better pictures on Part 30



Here is the link: 

http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html



They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico





































#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653 --
#yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp #yiv8922539653hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp #yiv8922539653ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp .yiv8922539653ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp .yiv8922539653ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mkp .yiv8922539653ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor
#yiv8922539653ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor
#yiv8922539653ygrp-lc #yiv8922539653hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor
#yiv8922539653ygrp-lc .yiv8922539653ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653activity span
.yiv8922539653underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 dd.yiv8922539653last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 dd.yiv8922539653last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 dd.yiv8922539653last p
span.yiv8922539653yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653file-title a, #yiv8922539653
div.yiv8922539653file-title a:active, #yiv8922539653
div.yiv8922539653file-title a:hover, #yiv8922539653
div.yiv8922539653file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653photo-title a,
#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653photo-title a:active,
#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653photo-title a:hover,
#yiv8922539653 div.yiv8922539653photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 div#yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv8922539653ygrp-msg p a span.yiv8922539653yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv8922539653 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;min-height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv8922539653 .yiv8922539653replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv8922539653 input, #yiv8922539653 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv8922539653
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-mlmsg #yiv8922539653logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-msg
p#yiv8922539653attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-reco
#yiv8922539653reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor #yiv8922539653ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor #yiv8922539653ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-sponsor #yiv8922539653ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv8922539653 #yiv8922539653ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv8922539653


New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.


File : /FURUNO Electronics/RD-30 Operators Manual [OME-44130] Rev-H 2004-03-03.pdf
Uploaded by : dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>
Description : Operator's Manual for FURUNO MULTI (Remote) DISPLAY RD-30


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/files/FURUNO%20Electronics/RD-30%20Operators%20Manual%20%5BOME-44130%5D%20Rev-H%202004-03-03.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&;y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>


New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.


File : /FURUNO Electronics/RD-30 Installation Manual [IME-44130] Ed.01 2003-02-03.pdf
Uploaded by : dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>
Description : Installation Manual for FURUNO MULTI (Remote) DISPLAY RD-30


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/files/FURUNO%20Electronics/RD-30%20Installation%20Manual%20%5BIME-44130%5D%20Ed.01%20%202003-02-03.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&;y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>


New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.


File : /FURUNO Electronics/FURUNO Discontinued Products 2016-08-29.pdf
Uploaded by : dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>
Description : Maintenance service availability status for FURUNO products discontinued since 2011 (EFF: 2016-08-29).


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/files/FURUNO%20Electronics/FURUNO%20Discontinued%20Products%202016-08-29.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&;y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


dbv_au <dbv_au@yahoo.com>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

Pat,

Hella, SignalMate and AquaSignal all make sealed LED fixtures that have an operating voltage range of 9 to 33 Volts.

One of the real advantages of using an LED designed fixture instead of an LED bulb in a traditional fixture is that the LED fixture can be made really, truly, waterproof. I have had trouble with contact corrosion using LED bulbs in regular navigation light fixtures.

Bill


On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v, it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
Pat,

First, do not worry about your instruments.  Modern sailing instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system is seriously out of whack.  

As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models, fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters. Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for nothing else.

There is one place where the converter is a great solution:  running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12 Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during transmissions without a charging source running.  That big converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of other boats.

If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt converters.  

Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.  Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and work fine. 

To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast.  For me at least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized, waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture. It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not require separate, external, voltage regulators. 

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Newport, RI, USA
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without  being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture. Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.
Thanks,
Pat SM123

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+ equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.

Kent
SM243
Kristy 

On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big battery bank.
IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues with lamps and other 24VDC devices.
The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC circuit before starting to do it.
Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water ingress into the lamp holder.....
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

hanspeter baettig
 

Hi Alexandre
New Lofrans Tigres cost 1389.95 €
plus shipment from Germany
the one of the best shipchandlers around the world; my personal experience since 24 years; and yes they speak englisch. German Quality!
and to Bill from ex BeBe
i have no business relation to svb
greetings
Hanspeter
Tamango 2; SM16
Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 13.09.2016 um 23:55 schrieb Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hi Alexandre,

We found new motors for the Tigres Windlass at Le Ship in Martinique for 550 euros this year. The cost is closer to the $1200 if purchased in the USA. 

Steve Davis
Aloha SM72
Grenada

On Sep 13, 2016, at 09:56, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For the new owners like myself who are intimidated by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”

If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.
So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4 complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.

With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).

1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.
1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt
1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the brushes… gave up.
1/2 day to clean all the parts
1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)
1/2 day to put back together

I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2 half days (10 hours).

Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor really upset me:
In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase), one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.
A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the electric motor.
Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the rust.
Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.
This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend $1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24 Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)

Anyway, back to the illustration:

Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 

For example:
I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” / Sensor
But the sensor works fine.

Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I took better pictures on Part 30

Here is the link: 
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html

They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Stephen Davis
 

Alex,

Le Ship is a dealer for Lofrans, and are very nice people to deal with. I purchased a new gypsy for 220 euros vs the $460 that Imtra in the USA wanted. My motor is 1200 watts, but I Think the newer models come with a 1500 watt motor. 

Steve
Aloha SM72

On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:06, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good afternoon Danny and Steve,

Danny, I tried for 4 hours adding penetrating oil, used a hammer to try to break things loose, nothing…
Unless I didn’t do it correctly… Should be turning (counter clock wise) the 4 large phillips bolt?

Steve, this is a great news for the price of the Windlass motor! Is your also 24 Volt 1200 Watt?
I should be in Martinique next year. Definitely a saving from the $1200…

If anyone can comment on the:
Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 9/13/16, simms simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul
To: "Amel Owners" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 3:52 PM


 









Hi Alexandre, it is s pity you
were unable to open your rusty motor. A few years back we
are leaving savusavu in Fiji and when trying to anchor for
the night the windlass would not function. I was grateful it
failed on the down, not the up!!

Returned to savusavu and stripped the very rusty motor.
Found one of the brush holders had rusted away. Was able to
find an old part that fitted from a savusavu business. I
rifled through his junk box to find it. When we got back to
new Zealand I got a new motor. I think the motor is the most
vulnerable part of the windlass so perhaps you should
revisit it . you don't have to disassemble the whole
motor to get at the brushes

Regards

Danny

Sm 299 OceanPearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart
On Sep 14, 2016 7:56 AM,
"Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@...> wrote:















 









For the new owners like myself who are intimidated
by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated
the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”



If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.


So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago
I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the
outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4
complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead
to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.



With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken
bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).



1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.


1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt

1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the
brushes… gave up.

1/2 day to clean all the parts

1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)

1/2 day to put back together



I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2
half days (10 hours).



Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor
really upset me:

In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase),
one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.

A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the
Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the
electric motor.

Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the
rust.

Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.


This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to
spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend
$1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24
Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)



Anyway, back to the illustration:



Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made
error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 



For example:

I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128

Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have
put grease.

Since I did, is this going to conflict?



Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic
layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” /
Sensor

But the sensor works fine.



Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I
took better pictures on Part 30



Here is the link: 

http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html



They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good afternoon Danny and Steve,

Danny, I tried for 4 hours adding penetrating oil, used a hammer to try to break things loose, nothing…
Unless I didn’t do it correctly… Should be turning (counter clock wise) the 4 large phillips bolt?

Steve, this is a great news for the price of the Windlass motor! Is your also 24 Volt 1200 Watt?
I should be in Martinique next year. Definitely a saving from the $1200…


If anyone can comment on the:
Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Sincerely, Alexandre




--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 9/13/16, simms simms@xtra.co.nz [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul
To: "Amel Owners" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2016, 3:52 PM


 









Hi Alexandre, it is s pity you
were unable to open your rusty motor. A few years back we
are leaving savusavu in Fiji and when trying to anchor for
the night the windlass would not function. I was grateful it
failed on the down, not the up!!

Returned to savusavu and stripped the very rusty motor.
Found one of the brush holders had rusted away. Was able to
find an old part that fitted from a savusavu business. I
rifled through his junk box to find it. When we got back to
new Zealand I got a new motor. I think the motor is the most
vulnerable part of the windlass so perhaps you should
revisit it . you don't have to disassemble the whole
motor to get at the brushes

Regards

Danny

Sm 299 OceanPearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart
On Sep 14, 2016 7:56 AM,
"Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@rocketmail.com
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:















 









For the new owners like myself who are intimidated
by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated
the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”



If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.


So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago
I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the
outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4
complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead
to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.



With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken
bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).



1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.


1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt

1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the
brushes… gave up.

1/2 day to clean all the parts

1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)

1/2 day to put back together



I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2
half days (10 hours).



Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor
really upset me:

In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase),
one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.

A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the
Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the
electric motor.

Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the
rust.

Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.


This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to
spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend
$1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24
Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)



Anyway, back to the illustration:



Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made
error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 



For example:

I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128

Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have
put grease.

Since I did, is this going to conflict?



Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic
layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” /
Sensor

But the sensor works fine.



Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I
took better pictures on Part 30



Here is the link: 

http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html



They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Alexandre,

We found new motors for the Tigres Windlass at Le Ship in Martinique for 550 euros this year. The cost is closer to the $1200 if purchased in the USA. 

Steve Davis
Aloha SM72
Grenada

On Sep 13, 2016, at 09:56, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For the new owners like myself who are intimidated by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”

If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.
So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4 complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.

With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).

1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.
1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt
1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the brushes… gave up.
1/2 day to clean all the parts
1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)
1/2 day to put back together

I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2 half days (10 hours).

Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor really upset me:
In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase), one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.
A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the electric motor.
Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the rust.
Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.
This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend $1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24 Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)

Anyway, back to the illustration:

Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 

For example:
I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” / Sensor
But the sensor works fine.

Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I took better pictures on Part 30

Here is the link: 
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html

They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Alexandre, it is s pity you were unable to open your rusty motor. A few years back we are leaving savusavu in Fiji and when trying to anchor for the night the windlass would not function. I was grateful it failed on the down, not the up!!
Returned to savusavu and stripped the very rusty motor. Found one of the brush holders had rusted away. Was able to find an old part that fitted from a savusavu business. I rifled through his junk box to find it. When we got back to new Zealand I got a new motor. I think the motor is the most vulnerable part of the windlass so perhaps you should revisit it . you don't have to disassemble the whole motor to get at the brushes
Regards
Danny
Sm 299 OceanPearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Sep 14, 2016 7:56 AM, "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

For the new owners like myself who are intimidated by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”

If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.
So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4 complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.

With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).

1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.
1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt
1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the brushes… gave up.
1/2 day to clean all the parts
1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)
1/2 day to put back together

I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2 half days (10 hours).

Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor really upset me:
In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase), one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.
A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the electric motor.
Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the rust.
Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.
This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend $1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24 Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)

Anyway, back to the illustration:

Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 

For example:
I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” / Sensor
But the sensor works fine.

Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I took better pictures on Part 30

Here is the link: 
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html

They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

eric freedman
 


[Amel Yacht Owners] Illustration of the Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

For the new owners like myself who are intimidated by maintenance they have not performed yet, I illustrated the “Lofrans Tigres Windlass Overhaul”

If I understood correctly, Amel said it was not necessary.
So why did I do it? For the simple reason, that 3 years ago I read an article (by Harry Hungate saying to change the outside seals every 4 years) and purchased at that time 4 complete set of bearings, oil seal, o ring, etc. so instead to keep the parts unused I decided to use them.


With the complications I encountered: seized bolt, broken bolt, etc. it took me 6 half days (30 hours).

1/2 day to unbolt the windlass, 1 bolt alone took 4 hours.
1/2 day to put apart, had to use an extractor on 1 bolt
1/2 day to unsuccessfully open the electric motor to see the brushes… gave up.
1/2 day to clean all the parts
1/2 day to reassemble (didn’t work as expected)
1/2 day to put back together

I feel that regularly maintained, this could be done in 2 half days (10 hours).


Not to be able to inspect the brushes on the electric motor really upset me:
In 2012, when I had the vessel surveyed (prior to purchase), one of the Switch on the Windlass was not working.
A “professional” was hired to change it, changed the Switch but didn’t bother telling me there was rust on the electric motor.
Possibly at the time I could have taken measure to stop the rust.
Another reminder that we should always supervise the work.
This error, means that when the brushes run out, instead to spend the $78 for new ones, I likely will have to spend $1220 (plus shipping) for a new Electric motor 1200 Watt 24 Volt (Lofran part#418b or Imtra part LWP8252)

Anyway, back to the illustration:

Please do not hesitate to comment, especially if I made error, as this can only be beneficial for our group. 

For example:
I am not sure is: Part 15 - Pictures 123 to 128
Since this partially in the Oil, I am not sure i should have put grease.
Since I did, is this going to conflict?

Part 28 - Picture 257 I don’t know why there is a metallic layer on the electric wire of the Chain Counter “Eye” / Sensor
But the sensor works fine.

Since I had to redo the “basic” greasing of the shaft, I took better pictures on Part 30


Here is the link: 
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html

They are 302 pictures… so I decided in 32 Sections.


Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

Patrick McAneny
 

Richard , That's a thought. Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard03801 richard03801@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 1:41 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
Pat look at buying new blobs that are LED It's cheaper and they're easier to find. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v, it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
Pat,

First, do not worry about your instruments.  Modern sailing instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system is seriously out of whack.  

As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models, fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters. Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for nothing else.

There is one place where the converter is a great solution:  running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12 Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during transmissions without a charging source running.  That big converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of other boats.

If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt converters.  

Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.  Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and work fine. 

To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast.  For me at least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized, waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture. It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not require separate, external, voltage regulators. 

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Newport, RI, USA
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without  being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture. Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.
Thanks,
Pat SM123

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+ equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.

Kent
SM243
Kristy 

On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big battery bank.
IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues with lamps and other 24VDC devices.
The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC circuit before starting to do it.
Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water ingress into the lamp holder.....
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric , Do you mean the company converted the light fixture before shipping it to you ?
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 1:32 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
Pat,
They converted mine to 24 volts.
Fair Winds,
Eric


----- Original Message -----
From: "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2016 1:03 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last
To: amelyachtowners@...

>
>
> Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v,
> it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would
> recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned
> a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.
> Thanks,
> Pat
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
> To: amelyachtowners 
> Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
> Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Pat,
>
>
> First, do not worry about your instruments. Modern sailing
> instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from
> 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V
> side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system
> is seriously out of whack.
>
>
> As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models,
> fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters.
> Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt
> instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available
> back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than
> then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I
> still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for
> nothing else.
>
>
>
> There is one place where the converter is a great solution:
> running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12
> Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage
> up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during
> transmissions without a charging source running. That big
> converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of
> other boats.
>
>
>
> If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage
> equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off
> while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt
> converters.
>
>
> Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.
> Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and
> work fine.
>
>
> To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing
> with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast. For me at
> least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the
> cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized,
> waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power
> draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture.
> It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not
> require separate, external, voltage regulators.
>
>
>
>
> Bill Kinney
> SM #160, Harmonie
> Newport, RI, USA
> “Ships and men rot in port."
> http://fetchinketch.net
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@...
> [amelyachtowners] wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without
> being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter
> next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture.
> Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did
> not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as
> converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change
> things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow
> them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me
> why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to
> discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical
> question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase
> voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly
> , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going
> to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if
> necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.
> Thanks,
> Pat SM123
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]
> To: amelyachtowners
> Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
> Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last
>
>
>
>
>
> I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+
> equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.
>
>
>
> Kent
> SM243
> Kristy
>
> On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners]
> wrote:
>
>
>
> No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big
> battery bank.
> IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues
> with lamps and other 24VDC devices.
> The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you
> used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the
> masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to
> around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely
> do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you
> suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising
> batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC
> circuit before starting to do it.
> Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water
> ingress into the lamp holder.....
> Cheers
> Alan
> Elyse SM437
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Pat look at buying new blobs that are LED It's cheaper and they're easier to find. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Sep 13, 2016, at 13:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, I am glad to hear that the instruments are fine up to 30v, it should never get there. Do you have a tri-color you would recommend that runs on 24v. ? I looked at the one Eric mentioned a few days ago , but it listed it as operating between 11.6 v to 16v.
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2016 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
Pat,

First, do not worry about your instruments.  Modern sailing instruments are designed to run on normal system voltages from 10 to 30 volts and will have no problem with running off the 24V side of the Amel electrical system--unless your charging system is seriously out of whack.  

As I upgrade my instruments from the 70’s era “vintage” models, fewer and fewer things are connected to the 12V converters. Remember, those converters were installed because 24 volt instruments of a quality that Amel wanted were not available back in the mid 70’s when 24 volts boats were much rarer than then are today. They are never quite going to go away, because I still need a 12V source for my NMEA2000 network backbone, if for nothing else.

There is one place where the converter is a great solution:  running an SSB off it’s own dedicated converter. Boats with 12 Volt only systems can have a lot of trouble keeping the voltage up high enough (13.4V) to properly drive an SSB during transmissions without a charging source running.  That big converter makes our SSB installations work better than a lot of other boats.

If you have batteries that require occasional high voltage equalization, it is just good practice to turn everything off while that process is going on, including your 24 to 12 volt converters.  

Not all Amel’s have the navigation lights run off the converter.  Mine does not. They have always run directly off 24 volts, and work fine. 

To be honest, I am mystified why anybody would still be fussing with incandescent lamps on the top of the mast.  For me at least, the hassle of changing a masthead light is well worth the cost and effort of a well made, internally voltage stabilized, waterproof, LED fixture. Even if I wasn’t concerned about power draw at all, (and I am!) the mast head would be an LED fixture. It is mature technology these days, and well made ones do not require separate, external, voltage regulators. 

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Newport, RI, USA
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:47, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I have had all new instruments installed on my boat . Without  being consulted the electrician removed the 24 to 12v converter next to the head and installed 24v bulbs in mast head fixture. Thinking it was something the previous owner installed , I did not object , not knowing it stabilized the current as well as converted it. From the beginning , Joel advised me not to change things electrically, I value his opinions and tried to follow them. When I brought this up to the electrician , he asked me why all boats don't have a stabilizer if necessary. I want to discuss this further with him , but how do I answer the logical question . Other boats have generators and engines that increase voltage , how is that they don't require a stabilizer ? Secondly , they powered all my new instruments with 24v . Are they going to be prone to failure ? I want to have any changes done , if necessary before getting my boat back within the next week or so.
Thanks,
Pat SM123

-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 7, 2016 8:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

 
I believe that the charging voltage is, 28.8 absorption and 32+ equalization, transmitted to the Masthead lights.

Kent
SM243
Kristy 

On Sep 7, 2016, at 4:14 PM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
No I don't think so....you can't get voltage surges with a big battery bank.
IF it could possibly happen you'd be having all sorts of issues with lamps and other 24VDC devices.
The ONLY way you MIGHT have an issue with this would be if you used the EQUALISE cycle on your battery charger while the masthead light was on. The EQUALISE cycle raises the voltage to around 32VDC for a while, but that is something you would rarely do, possibly only if you had flooded batteries that you suspected of being sulphated, and if you know about equalising batteries, you would also know to turn off anything on the DC circuit before starting to do it.
Its much more likely that you have bad connections, salt water ingress into the lamp holder.....
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt Water Manifold

Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

Is it possible that some of these manifolds have disintegrated because they were not connected to the bonding system.

Andrew
Ronpische 
SM472
Canet-en-Roussillon 


On 13 Sep 2016, at 15:59, Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

While you are following Capt R’s great advice about replacing your hose clamps, get some of these: 

http://clamp-aid.com 
They are very cheap, and I know they save me from lots of scratches and scrapes while working on, or around, hose clamps.  That’s pretty much every project on a boat!  

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Newport, RI, USA
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Sep 13, 2016, at 08:05, Richard03801 richard03801@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hey folks when you are doing all the inspections on the salt water system buy a few boxes of hose clamps and do a replacement project. I've seen more then one boat with leakage due to clamp failure. 
Not pleasant task but you'll sleep better at night. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Sep 12, 2016, at 23:59, kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

DONE

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" 
Date: Monday, September 12, 2016 6:04 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Joker Valve
To: amelyachtowners@...

> Can someone figure out how to change the heading on these posts 
> about the salt water manifold? That should be something easy to find.
> 
> Kristy was completed in 1999, but has the "SM2K" on the rail. 
> She must have been one of the first to be called a SM2K
> 
> Kent
> SM 243
> Kristy
> 
> On Sep 12, 2016, at 2:48 PM, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... 
> [amelyachtowners] wrote:
> 
> Hi Eric Millennium/2000 series boats brought all sea water in as 
> on yours, through the one intake/mini sea chest. 'Classic' 
> models such as Kent' s also have separate salt water supply for 
> each head and the anchor wash feeds from the forward head feed. 
> You are on the money regarding the manifold. All SM 53's are now 
> in the window of possible failure. Really a bad thing to happen. 
> You all should check the manifold by removing all branch 
> hose/feeds. This is very important as I have been seeing many 
> failures and near failures on boats I have for sale or recently 
> sold. Better safe than sorry.
> 
> Joel F. Potter
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
> 954-812-2485
> 
> > On Sep 12, 2016, at 2:40 PM, kimberlite@... 
> [amelyachtowners] wrote:
> > 
> > 
> > Kent,
> > my anchor wash, High pressure wash, and the toilets get their 
> water from the Manifold.
> > You might want to checkout the manifold. Mine was made of 
> copper and rotted away years ago.
> > Fair Winds,
> > Eric
> > SM376 Kimberlite
> > 
> > 
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" 
> > Date: Monday, September 12, 2016 1:24 pm
> > Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Joker Valve
> > To: amelyachtowners@...
> > 
> > > No, Eric. On Kristy each head has its own through-hull 
> intake 
> > > in the "hall" outside each head. The anchor wash gets its 
> > > intake from the one that feeds the forward head.
> > > In the engine room, the manifold feeds the engines, the A/C 
> > > cooling pump, and the watetmaker.
> > > Kent
> > > SM 243
> > > 
> > > Kent Robertson
> > > karkauai@...
> > > 828-234-6819828-234-6819 voice/text
> > > 
> > > On Sep 12, 2016, at 12:57 PM, kimberlite@... 
> > > [amelyachtowners] u wrote:
> > > 
> > > Kent,
> > > Do you have a Jabsco electric toilet with the water coming 
> from 
> > > the manifold via a pump from the engine room? That is how my 
> SM 
> > > 376 is arranged.
> > > Fair Winds,
> > > Eric
> > > 
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" 
> > > Date: Monday, September 12, 2016 9:56 am
> > > Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Joker Valve
> > > To: amelyachtowners@...
> > > 
> > > > Hmmm. That's on the intake side, the joker valves being on 
> the 
> > > > output si! de. I have a strainer between the stopcock and 
> the 
> > > > pump. I'll have to look to see if it has a one way valve 
> as well.
> > > > Thanks.
> > > > I have made a practice of filling the head with fresh 
> water 
> > > > every few months or when ever I leave the boat for a week 
> or 
> > > > more, and putting some vegetable oil in before flushing it 
> > > down. 
> > > > I read somewhere that it helps keep the joker valves 
> supple. I 
> > > > also ask the crew to flush for a good 10 seconds after 
> using 
> > > the 
> > > > head to get all debris and urine out of the discharge 
> pipe. I 
> > > > have to change joker valves about twice a year with this 
> regimen.> > > Kent
> > > > SM243
> > > > Kristy
> > > > 
> > > > Kent Robertson
> > > > karkauai@...
> > > > 828-234-6819828-234-6819 voice/text
> > > > 
> > > > On Sep 12, 2016, at 9:35 AM, Ian Park parkianj@... 
> > > > [amelyachtowners] wrote:
> > > > 
> > > > On the hose from the sea cock. It is usual to have a loop 
> in 
> > > the 
> > > > flexible pipe taking it above the heeled water line. There 
> is 
> > > > usually plastic 'u' bend clamped on to the up and down 
> pipes 
> > > to 
> > > > form the u shape. This bend should have a small screw cap 
> > > (like 
> > > > a car tyres valve). Inside is a tiny rubber non return 
> valve. 
> > > It 
> > > > al! lows air into the pipework to prevent the motion of 
> the boat 
> > > > pumping sea water back up the pipe until it siphons back 
> into 
> > > > the toilet.
> > > > 
> > > > Ian
> > > > 
> > > >
> > >
> > Call
> > Call from mobile
> > Send SMS
> > Add to Skype
> > You'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype
> 
> 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Masthead lights do not last

eric freedman