Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gap behind the sofa

amelforme
 

CAREFUL! And in addition to the useful information Bill provides, those spaces must remain open, or other provisions made, as these open spaces are ‘vents’ to allow the latent heat of the devices in this area, namely air conditioning and refrigeration compressors, to rise up and out. I got this information from none less than Jacques Carteau who was the technical manager and later the chairman at Chantiers Amel. On the handful of boats built with squared off dinette seatbacks to port, look carefully and you will see other ‘vents’ for heat dissipation.

 

Have Fun With Your Amel, Joel

 

 

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2017 4:05 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gap behind the sofa

 

 

In my opinion, leave it alone...the last thing that you might need on an Amel Super Maramu is more storage, and if you have not tallied the storage, here it is:

 

STORAGE DETAILS:

40

Doors Hinged w/locking latches

average 12x18” and 18’ deep and lined with 100% Dralon® plush

26

Cubby Storage Compartments

average 19 x 10” and 15” deep and lined with 100% Dralon® plush

20

Drawers

2 are extra deep and 30” long and 3 more are 30” long and lined with 100% Dralon® plush

10 lineal feet

Closet - hanging

1 fwd, 1 aft, 1 nav station, and 1 passage berth

60 cubic feet

Closet - storage

1 fwd, 1 aft, 1 nav station, and 1 passage berth

75 lineal feet

Shelf - storage

averages 4 “ deep lined with vinyl or Dralon®

75 cubic feet

Under berth - storage

2 fwd and 1 aft lined with 100% Dralon® plush

60 cubic feet

Under floor - storage

1 fwd and 6 saloon

75 cubic feet

Lazarette - storage

cockpit

225 cubic feet

Lazarette - storage

aft

100 cubic feet

Sail locker - storage

2 forward at the bow

40 cubic feet

Beam – storage below deck to below waterline

1 locker usually used for emergency equip. & life raft.

Best,

 

Bill

X-BeBe

 

 

On Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 12:21 PM, rcavie <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Hello

In the rounded corners behind the sofa of ASM 2k, there is a gap on each side towards port, one towards the bow and another towards the stern, which reaches the floor but is unreachable to clean or pick something dropped. Anyone have any ideas how to take advantage of that space or close it?

 

Rafael

AMEL SM2K 246

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gap behind the sofa

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

In my opinion, leave it alone...the last thing that you might need on an Amel Super Maramu is more storage, and if you have not tallied the storage, here it is:

STORAGE DETAILS:
    40
    Doors Hinged w/locking latches
    average 12x18” and 18’ deep and lined with 100% Dralon® plush
    26
    Cubby Storage Compartments
    average 19 x 10” and 15” deep and lined with 100% Dralon® plush
    20
    Drawers
    2 are extra deep and 30” long and 3 more are 30” long and lined with 100% Dralon® plush
    10 lineal feet
    Closet - hanging
    1 fwd, 1 aft, 1 nav station, and 1 passage berth
    60 cubic feet
    Closet - storage
    1 fwd, 1 aft, 1 nav station, and 1 passage berth
    75 lineal feet
    Shelf - storage
    averages 4 “ deep lined with vinyl or Dralon®
    75 cubic feet
    Under berth - storage
    2 fwd and 1 aft lined with 100% Dralon® plush
    60 cubic feet
    Under floor - storage
    1 fwd and 6 saloon
    75 cubic feet
    Lazarette - storage
    cockpit
    225 cubic feet
    Lazarette - storage
    aft
    100 cubic feet
    Sail locker - storage
    2 forward at the bow
    40 cubic feet
    Beam – storage below deck to below waterline
    1 locker usually used for emergency equip. & life raft.
    Best,

    Bill
    X-BeBe


    On Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 12:21 PM, rcavie <no_reply@...> wrote:
     

    Hello

    In the rounded corners behind the sofa of ASM 2k, there is a gap on each side towards port, one towards the bow and another towards the stern, which reaches the floor but is unreachable to clean or pick something dropped. Anyone have any ideas how to take advantage of that space or close it?


    Rafael

    AMEL SM2K 246




    Re: AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI

    webercardio <webercardio@...>
     

    Did you check the 3 control-lights at the motor for fuses ? The red emergency stops switch is in Upper position ? I have a download of a lot of service data for the VW Marine TDI (German language) Where is the boat?  I had once  contact to service company www.cityboats.de in Hamburg. 

    Wolfgang Weber SY Elise Amel 54 #162 Marina Zea Athens 


    Re: Caribbean surveyors

    rcavie <no_reply@...>
     

    I recently did the surveyor with Olivier: serious, punctual and with great experience. It is my recommendation
    Rafael SM2K246


    Gap behind the sofa

    rcavie <no_reply@...>
     

    Hello

    In the rounded corners behind the sofa of ASM 2k, there is a gap on each side towards port, one towards the bow and another towards the stern, which reaches the floor but is unreachable to clean or pick something dropped. Anyone have any ideas how to take advantage of that space or close it?


    Rafael

    AMEL SM2K 246



    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engines used in the Amel 54

    Stephen Hancock
     

    No one can give as much information that is concise and to the point like you. Wish our Media could.

    On Apr 5, 2017, at 9:56 AM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

     

    When the Amel 54 was introduced, Amel made a break from the Yanmar engines that gave such good service in the Millennium series Super Maramu’s. I pushed for years to get my friends at Amel to consider installing Yanmars, based on  very favorable experiences with them by my clients and personally, but mainly because Volvo service, from Volvo North America, was and I understand still is so sub-par in North America compared to elsewhere. Volvo in Europe and in many  other places enjoy much better after sales service than what we have here in North America.

     

    Amel would have liked to consider continuing with Yanmars but new E.U. emission regulations required the use of FADEC/full authority digital engine control systems which, essentially, means the engines combustion process is controlled by a computer and several electronic sensors and actuators. This makes certain that the engine produces power efficiently and the exhaust is as free of pollutants as possible. Yanmar did not offer a FADEC diesel of the proper power output at that time so Amel went to Volvo diesels.

     

    Amel used Volvos exclusively for the majority of the production run of the Amel 54. One client wanted a Steyr diesel and as Amel was interested in that firms diesels for future models, they installed one in a 54. Steyr is an Austrian company, world famous for precision engineered and crafted diesels and for well-engineered and jewel like construction quality small arms military weapons and hand guns. Steyr diesels have a seldom seen mono-block construction where the engine’s head and block are a one-piece casting with much of the machining of the head being accomplished from the inside of the engine. This eliminates the head gasket which can be a trouble prone component in pressure induction ( turbo or supercharged ) engines. I really like these engines and if you go to the Steyr booth at a major boatshow and give one some eyeball, you will too. The excellence in design and construction is extremely obvious.

     

    Towards the end of the Amel 54 production run, Volvo decided not to offer the D3 110 diesel in an isolated negative/full floating ground as they had been doing previously. Amel was obliged to find a replacement quickly as this type of electrical system is absolutely essential for Amel boats. About 20 , plus or minus a few, Amel 54’s were then equipped with Volkswagen  marine FADEC diesels.

     

    Hope this is helpful.

     

    All The Best, Joel

     

    Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

    THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

    954 462 5869 office

    954 812 2485 cell

     




    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

    Sv Garulfo
     

    Hi Christian,

    Do you have a contact for cryogenic blasting in west french med?

    Thomas

    Amel 54 #122
    Cap d'Agde, France



    On Mon, 16 Jan 2017 at 17:01, christian alby calbyy@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

     we did clean the hull of our 1982 Maramu april 2016 using cryogenic blasting; quite common now in the industry in Europe.
    - boat had been in water since april 2014, unused since april 2015, growing weeds by the bushel & great farm for oysters & mussels -

    Cryogenic blasting uses CO2 gas to produce carbonic dry ice pellets blasted on the hull at low air pressure; no dirt or pollution and less agressive on gel coat resins.
    cleaned all layers of antifouling paint which had been splattered on during ? ages (no record of maintenance when we boughht the boat 2016) ?
    went down to gel coat layers & left them clean to survey the hull and dry out before laying on new protection (époxy coating) underwater.
    reasonable price (Euros 2K Euros for a speedy process - took 4 hours (setting up, work & dismantling apparatus) to team of 2 to clean the bottom hull of the Maramu.

    If available in your corner of the Oceans, I would recommend that you check industrial cleaning companies for the service - search companies or small operators working for metal, housing (front coatings), wood, stone cleaning using low pressure compressors.

    Worth the cost when you gain another 10 to 15 years of trouble free hull & the extra speed from a clean & smooth hull.

    fair winds & clean hulls

    christian alby, Maramu Désirade VIII, Canet/roussillon





    De : "Steve Lawson lawson911@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
    À : amelyachtowners@...
    Envoyé le : Lundi 16 janvier 2017 16h34
    Objet : Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)


     
    I did my bottom a few years ago, and my current boat is a Dufour 39 ( working my way up to an Amel ). It's a dirty, rotten, time consuming job, that you may do once, but will never repeat. Sandblasting is old school, the latest and greatest is soda blasting, which does a great job, is environmentally friendly, and is easier on the hull than sandblasting.
    Cheers

    On Jan 16, 2017, at 9:31 AM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

     
    I have been thinking I would like to get rid of all the layers of bottom paint. I was wondering about chemical stripers , if they work and how well. Seems like you may run the risk of scratching the gel coat scraping , is that a concern and how wide of a scraper would you use. I got a quote of almost $3000. to sandblast, more than I expected , being a one day job , but if it saves ten days of scraping ... Just wondering what others have done. Also wondering how one deals with the bottom of the keel only a couple of inches off the ground and resting on blocking.
    Pat SM#123


    -----Original Message-----
    From: James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
    To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
    Sent: Sun, Jan 15, 2017 8:16 pm
    Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

     
    I have always avoided the chemical strippers myself due to concerns of short and long term damage to the gel coat.  The stuff goes into any cracks in the gel coat and can get into the laminate and or into any voids under the gel coat which is not a good thing.   The suggestion that was made to use a good sharp scrapper is IMO a good way to go,  just take your time.  As was also suggested, go with the carbide blades.  The Bahco 660 or 665 scrapper works well for me,  you can find these on Amazon.  You can also sand it off with a dustless system or use this as a follow up to the scrapping.  Definitely avoid using a heat gun as it is just too easy to craze the gel coat. 

    Best of luck,

    James Alton
    SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
    Sardinia,  Italy

    On Jan 15, 2017, at 1:11 PM, santorinlo18@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


    Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom - is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad, however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any experiences or view





    Engines used in the Amel 54

    amelforme
     

    When the Amel 54 was introduced, Amel made a break from the Yanmar engines that gave such good service in the Millennium series Super Maramu’s. I pushed for years to get my friends at Amel to consider installing Yanmars, based on  very favorable experiences with them by my clients and personally, but mainly because Volvo service, from Volvo North America, was and I understand still is so sub-par in North America compared to elsewhere. Volvo in Europe and in many  other places enjoy much better after sales service than what we have here in North America.

     

    Amel would have liked to consider continuing with Yanmars but new E.U. emission regulations required the use of FADEC/full authority digital engine control systems which, essentially, means the engines combustion process is controlled by a computer and several electronic sensors and actuators. This makes certain that the engine produces power efficiently and the exhaust is as free of pollutants as possible. Yanmar did not offer a FADEC diesel of the proper power output at that time so Amel went to Volvo diesels.

     

    Amel used Volvos exclusively for the majority of the production run of the Amel 54. One client wanted a Steyr diesel and as Amel was interested in that firms diesels for future models, they installed one in a 54. Steyr is an Austrian company, world famous for precision engineered and crafted diesels and for well-engineered and jewel like construction quality small arms military weapons and hand guns. Steyr diesels have a seldom seen mono-block construction where the engine’s head and block are a one-piece casting with much of the machining of the head being accomplished from the inside of the engine. This eliminates the head gasket which can be a trouble prone component in pressure induction ( turbo or supercharged ) engines. I really like these engines and if you go to the Steyr booth at a major boatshow and give one some eyeball, you will too. The excellence in design and construction is extremely obvious.

     

    Towards the end of the Amel 54 production run, Volvo decided not to offer the D3 110 diesel in an isolated negative/full floating ground as they had been doing previously. Amel was obliged to find a replacement quickly as this type of electrical system is absolutely essential for Amel boats. About 20 , plus or minus a few, Amel 54’s were then equipped with Volkswagen  marine FADEC diesels.

     

    Hope this is helpful.

     

    All The Best, Joel

     

    Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

    THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

    954 462 5869 office

    954 812 2485 cell

     


    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI

    Mark Erdos
     

    Christian,

     

    Check for:

     

    1.     Water flow into the engine from the strainer to the water pump

    2.     Check transmission cooler (if equipped)

    3.     Check raw water pump (impeller, wear, rotation)

    4.     Check heat exchanger for blockage (most likely to be the cause if engine overheats with load but not in idle)

    5.     Check after cooler for blockage (turbo engines only)

    6.     Check coolant thermostat

    7.     Check belt tension for coolant water pump

    8.     Check engine temperature sensor

     

    Hope this helps

     

     

    With best regards,

     

    Mark

     

    Skipper

    Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

    Currenlty cruising – Turks and Caicos Islands

    www.creampuff.us

     

     

     

    On Apr 5, 2017, at 3:00 AM, c.zwach@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

     

     

    there must be some more Amel54 Owners with a VW Marine TDI Machine. I can start the Engine but after 5 seconds it stops and the sign for the preheating is blinking.

    the fuel injection Pump was checked, the VW service computer told us there is no ?? error.

    Thanks for Helping

    christian

    APSARA Amel 54 Nr70

     

     

    Porter McRoberts

    S/V IBIS 54 Hull 152

     

     

     

     


    Re: Locking the wheel on a SM...

    greatketch@...
     


    Ian,

    No photo needed, I got the picture!  That sounds exactly what I am looking for while sailing. Simple, and elegant.

    Funny you should mention the Hydrovane... I had just added one of those to our boat's "Wish LIst".  You are happy with it?  It's installation is something I'd like to see a photo of when you are aboard again!

    Bill Kinney
    SM#160 Harmonie
    Ponce P.R.


    ---In amelyachtowners@..., <parkianj@...> wrote :

    When I bought my boat I found two small (ie dinghy size) pulleys in a cockpit storage bag by the wheel. I realised that these attached to two pad eyes, one on the footwell on the starboard side of the wheel and one low down on the side of the of the port locker.
    The pulley systems each had a snap hook on one end to attach to the pad eyes, and a stainless hook on the other which fitted on to the spokes of the steering wheel. It is a simple single purchase with a simple jamming pulley at one end. Clipping them on and off is simple, but I can adjust them and jam them off once I have the course/sail trim correct. It locks the wheel solidly - for me it's for the Hydrovane to steer efficiently. The diameter of the pulley cord is around 4mm just to give you a notion of size. I had tried bungy chord, but there is too much potential play.

    Sorry, I am not on the boat at present or I would post a picture. PS no damage to leather spoke covers.

    Ian
    Ocean Hobo. SN 96




    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI

    Porter McRoberts
     

    from my understanding only 3 were made.


    On Apr 5, 2017, at 3:00 AM, c.zwach@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


    there must be some more Amel54 Owners with a VW Marine TDI Machine. I can start the Engine but after 5 seconds it stops and the sign for the preheating is blinking.

    the fuel injection Pump was checked, the VW service computer told us there is no ?? error.

    Thanks for Helping

    christian

    APSARA Amel 54 Nr70



    Porter McRoberts
    S/V IBIS 54 Hull 152





    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI

    Alexandre Uster von Baar
     

    Good morning,
    Do you see water going out of the exhaust?
    Have you check the raw water impeller?

    Sincerely, Alexandre
    SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
    Island Water World Marina, Sint Maarten, NA


    --------------------------------------------

    On Wed, 4/5/17, c.zwach@zwach.at [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

    Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI
    To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
    Date: Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 2:00 AM


     









    there must be some more Amel54 Owners with a
    VW Marine TDI Machine. I can start the Engine but after 5
    seconds it stops and the sign for the preheating is
    blinking.the fuel injection Pump was checked, the VW
    service computer told us there is no ?? error.Thanks
    for HelpingchristianAPSARA Amel 54 Nr70









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    Re: Locking the wheel on a SM...

    Ian Park
     

    When I bought my boat I found two small (ie dinghy size) pulleys in a cockpit storage bag by the wheel. I realised that these attached to two pad eyes, one on the footwell on the starboard side of the wheel and one low down on the side of the of the port locker.
    The pulley systems each had a snap hook on one end to attach to the pad eyes, and a stainless hook on the other which fitted on to the spokes of the steering wheel. It is a simple single purchase with a simple jamming pulley at one end. Clipping them on and off is simple, but I can adjust them and jam them off once I have the course/sail trim correct. It locks the wheel solidly - for me it's for the Hydrovane to steer efficiently. The diameter of the pulley cord is around 4mm just to give you a notion of size. I had tried bungy chord, but there is too much potential play.

    Sorry, I am not on the boat at present or I would post a picture. PS no damage to leather spoke covers.

    Ian
    Ocean Hobo. SN 96


    AMEL 54 -electronicle Problems with VW Marine TDI

    c.zwach@...
     

    there must be some more Amel54 Owners with a VW Marine TDI Machine. I can start the Engine but after 5 seconds it stops and the sign for the preheating is blinking.

    the fuel injection Pump was checked, the VW service computer told us there is no ?? error.

    Thanks for Helping

    christian

    APSARA Amel 54 Nr70


    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Caribbean surveyors

    Porter McRoberts
     

    Dave Huffman from Tampa is pretty fantastic. I’d have no reservations about his recommendation. 




    On Apr 4, 2017, at 3:13 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

    I actually flew: Martial BARRIEL
    expert.maritime.barriel@...
    from another island to do my survey.
    Recommend him.
    Therefore the best in my opinion is Olivier.

    Sincerely, Alexandre
    SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
    Island Water World Marina, Sint Maarten, NA

    --------------------------------------------
    On Tue, 4/4/17, Alan Grayson bazgrayson@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

    Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Caribbean surveyors
    To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
    Date: Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 11:48 AM


     












    Hi All, I'm flying down to the BVI next week to look at
    a super Maramu and hopefully the next step will be a pre
    purchase survey. I remember some posts about surveyors when
    I first hooked up to the site about 6 months ago but I
    can't seem to find them again.
    Does anyone know of good Amel qualified surveyors in the
    Caribbean or one who will go to the Caribbean. I'm not
    sure where the survey will be done but the owner seems keen
    to deliver it.

    Regards

    Alan Grayson

    Hopefully a future Amel owner












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    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Problematic Mainsail Furling in mid 80s Maramu/Sharki models

    James Alton
     

    Dave,

       I was hoping that you could elaborate on the support issue for the Nirvana masts that you mentioned?  Are there any Nirvana specific problems to watch out for that you are aware of or did your comment on pertain to acquiring replacement parts?  I am planning to add the ability to refill all of the gearboxes with grease and want to go through the system.  I am wondering what service might be needed at the top of the system and whether the bearing is open or closed?  I am also curious about the coating that you mentioned to reduce the furling loads.  That sounds like a great idea so long as it does not tend to hold dirt etc.

       Good post.

    Best,

    James Alton
    SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

    On Apr 4, 2017, at 3:50 PM, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


    John,
    I'm a sailmaker who has owned a Maramu (non-furling masts) and have built sails for several different Amels including the Maramu, Santorin, and Super Maramu. 

    The Amel furling is quite rugged and reliable but the older ones like on the 80's vintage Maramu may require a bit more effort to support as it was made by a company called Nirvana that has been out of business a long time. 

    You mention "behind the mast furling", which is not something you'd see on an Amel unless it was retrofitted. Behind the mast furling as opposed to having the furling mandrel contained in a foil section is a lousy idea. The problem with behind mast furling is you have nothing to limit sag and they perform poorly compared to a conventional furling mast.&n bsp;

    For me personally, I prefer the older conventional rig as I find the small main and mizzen on a Maramu very easy to manage. I use retractable lazy jacks and don't mind going to the mast to hoist, reef, and douse the sails. And there's certainly less to go wrong. 

    One thing we do when we build new furling mains and mizzens is use a coating on the sail to reduce friction and you can tell listening to the motor that it's not working as hard as it used to with the previous sail.

    ---In amelyachtowners@...,

    Dear Amel Collective,


    Firstly I have been lurking ion the background soaking up as much information as I can from the group as it is my intention to buy a Sharki or Maramu within the next couple of months.


    Some of the boats I am looking at have the older mainsail furling set behind the mast whereas others have the in mast furling as seen often on more modern boats. In my quest for knowledge I seem to recall a comment by another group member that the earlier mainsail furling was troublesome compared with the in-mast version, and I guess Amel changed it for good reason. I now can't track down this comment and hence this post!


    Whilst I would probably prefer the Sharki, would it be better to get an in-mast furled Maramu instead of an older furling system Sharki or are both systems actually perfectly sound?


    I very much look forward to your expertise and comments.


    John




    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Locking the wheel on a SM...

    greatketch@...
     

    Thanks Bill,


    Certainly great solution that I’ll be using at anchor, for locking down, not so much for sailing where fine tuning of the rudder position is needed.


    On my old boat I sailed half way across the Pacific with the wheel brake on, steering by tweaking the mizzen sheet once a watch or so.  One of the ways I came to love ketches.  The SM balances so well, I know she can do at least as well.


    Bill Kinney

    SM#160 Harmonie

    Ponce, PR


    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Reeling damage on AMEL54

    Alex Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...>
     

    Pictures tell more than 1000 words. If you look at them, what would be your recommendation to get the other half of a screw out?
    Is there a nut on the other side? How to get there?
    thanks, Alex
    Amel54, no15, "NOSTRESS"Inline image

    Inline image






    On Tuesday, April 4, 2017, 8:04 AM, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

     

    Alex,
    I don't understand what you are trying to describe here. Perhaps you can revisit your email, and write it in a better and more descriptively understandable way.

    Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


    On Mon, Apr 03, 2017 at 02:10 PM, Alex Ramseyer alexramseyer@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

     

    in the rear of the boat, both reeling on my AMEL54 lost a couple of screws, or even worse - broke - and half of it still is in the hole. As a result I get water into the upper compartments of the owner cabin. To repair it, we need to know how it looks on the other side. Is there a mounting plate installed or something else /if so what exactly? How do we get to the counter nut? There seems no obvious way to get to that place. Do we have to cut into the fiberglass to get to a point that allows to work on it?
    A very similar problem occurs at the starboard side with the metal plate the holds the down sail pole. Same question: How is it mounted? How do we get to it to work on it from the other side?
    I’m in St. Martin and there are some god resources here to work on boats. However, as I plan to sail down to Martinique anyway, it would be good to know a company that knows AMEL hulls and can help with these kind of issues.
    Thanks a lot, Alex
    AMEL54 no 15, SY NO STRESS


    Re: Problematic Mainsail Furling in mid 80s Maramu/Sharki models

    Dave_Benjamin
     

    John,
    I'm a sailmaker who has owned a Maramu (non-furling masts) and have built sails for several different Amels including the Maramu, Santorin, and Super Maramu. 

    The Amel furling is quite rugged and reliable but the older ones like on the 80's vintage Maramu may require a bit more effort to support as it was made by a company called Nirvana that has been out of business a long time. 

    You mention "behind the mast furling", which is not something you'd see on an Amel unless it was retrofitted. Behind the mast furling as opposed to having the furling mandrel contained in a foil section is a lousy idea. The problem with behind mast furling is you have nothing to limit sag and they perform poorly compared to a conventional furling mast. 

    For me personally, I prefer the older conventional rig as I find the small main and mizzen on a Maramu very easy to manage. I use retractable lazy jacks and don't mind going to the mast to hoist, reef, and douse the sails. And there's certainly less to go wrong. 

    One thing we do when we build new furling mains and mizzens is use a coating on the sail to reduce friction and you can tell listening to the motor that it's not working as hard as it used to with the previous sail.

    ---In amelyachtowners@..., <jdbedforduk@...> wrote :

    Dear Amel Collective,


    Firstly I have been lurking ion the background soaking up as much information as I can from the group as it is my intention to buy a Sharki or Maramu within the next couple of months.


    Some of the boats I am looking at have the older mainsail furling set behind the mast whereas others have the in mast furling as seen often on more modern boats. In my quest for knowledge I seem to recall a comment by another group member that the earlier mainsail furling was troublesome compared with the in-mast version, and I guess Amel changed it for good reason. I now can't track down this comment and hence this post!


    Whilst I would probably prefer the Sharki, would it be better to get an in-mast furled Maramu instead of an older furling system Sharki or are both systems actually perfectly sound?


    I very much look forward to your expertise and comments.


    John


    Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Locking the wheel on a SM...

    Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
     

    Bill,

    Try what is shown in the attached photo which uses a bungee cord with hooks on each end...whip the leather.

    Best,

    Bill
    X-BeBe

    On Tue, Apr 4, 2017 at 2:19 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
     

    Is there a way to lock the wheel in place on an SM?  Tightly.  I don't like the rudder waving back and forth at anchor, and sometimes the boat sails better upwind with the helm lashed than it does with the autopilot.


    I have been lashing it to a padeye, but that always leaves a few degrees of play (too much to sail with) and the lashing chafes the leather wheel cover.  (I know, I know, first world problems!)


    Just curious if anybody has a better solution.


    Bill Kinney

    SM#160 Harmonie

    Ponce, PR