Date   

Dinghy Inflator - Amel 54

James Wendell <ms42phantom54@...>
 

Does anyone out there know about the electric dinghy inflator for the Amel 54? I have a circuit breaker labeled as such above the battery area and I think a plug in the lazarette. I do not have the inflator and do not know what it is or how it would work.

Also, I had to rebuild my Opacmare passarelle. It no longer works correctly and I cannot figure it out. It allows me to extend and/or raise the gangway when it is stowed in its pocket. I would not expect that, as it could jam. Also, it does not raise or lower fully. I suspect I have problems with the limit sensors, but I do not know enough about how it is supposed to function. The manual is written in English, but the translation is really confusing.

Any advice would be much appreciated. I know these are somewhat unusual questions.

Thanks,
Jamie
 
s/v Phantom Amel 54 #044


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

I like the idea!
Adding duck seal on my list of things to find!
Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 10/17/16, 'sailormon' kimberlite@optonline.net [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 9:26 PM


 









I have had great
success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in
this manner:I use a clay like
substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.I build up a small dam
around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster
for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time
if not I continue the process eventually they come
out.It is also important to
try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB
blaster.When I re install them
I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is
especially good on the outhaul shaft.Works like a
charm.Fair
WindsEricKimberlite Amel Super
Maramu #376    From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48
AM
To:
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners]
Windlass bolt to deck    Mike,Danny's thru-bolt
solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out,
will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt
you've got left above deck you may want to try removing
it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may
shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some
acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two
nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could
weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and
use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may
also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're
likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to
using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood luck with
it,Craig
Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 

---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com,
<simms@...> wrote
:Hi mike.
I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut
top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and
blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a
cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the
standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a
boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM,
"'Mike Ondra' mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote: [Attachment(s) from
Mike Ondra included below]As others may have experienced
with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts
were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into
the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in
steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain
coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the
hawse pipe. In attempting removal the bolt
head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as
pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am
afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining
bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My
question is what have others done in this situation? I can envision finding a coupling
that could be used but would require an enlargement of the
bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The
stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with
new holes for all bolts. Thoughts? Mike OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD 










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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

Veit M <veitm@...>
 

Hello Trevor:

Just reading about your location. We had a Super Maramu for glorious 5 years and have just moved to Dubai, maybe we can grab a coffee sometime. Contact me at Veit - at - iCloud dot com if you're interested.

Cheers,
Veit
Previous : Atman 


On Oct 17, 2016, at 9:20 PM, tfortner1975@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Alexandre,

Thank you.  I'm currently in Abu Dhabi. The boat is in Langkawi and soon back to Phuket for some small work.  Then I'll either resign from work and go to the boat or bring the boat to Abu Dhabi and work for another year. 

Cheers 

And your documentation of the work you do on your boat is priceless and much appreciated. Thank you. 

On Oct 17, 2016, at 6:11 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Congratulations Trevor, where are you located?

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 10/17/16, Ric Gottschalk ric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin
To: "'amelyachtowners@...'" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 9:05 AM


 













Trevor,
I have a 1990
Santorin SN24. I don’t know what I have is that great of a
manual, but it is something.  Contact me off the Amel
owners site and I will try to
help. Also please post the boats name, number, and location
on emails. I think that you find the Santorins systems
intuitive and like all Amels amazingly well thought out.

 
Ric
(ric@...)
Bali Hai
SN24
Annapolis

 


From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]


Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 9:09 AM

To: amelyachtowners@...

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990
Santorin


 
 



Hello All,



I have finally taken possession of a 1990 Santorin, formerly
named AKWAABA.  The previous family bought her new in
1990.  Conducting a true turnover of the boat was not
possible, due to various events.  Which as you could
imagine is not ideal; I could have
learned an enormous amount of valuable information in the
process.  They have left behind plenty of folders and files
to rummage through.  I have not come across the factory /
original manual that would state what equipment is
installed, location, etc.  I
do understand that some items vary boat to boat.  However,
If any one has a Santorin manual they don't mind sharing
I would greatly appreciate it.  I do intend on tracing
every thing out, sorting out the major items, then slowly
updating or modifying as required. 
And mapping out plumbing, wiring, etc. (using some of
Bebe's meticulous charts as a guideline - thank you).




I have searched the group site for all things SANTORIN and
downloaded such.



Take Care,

Trevor
 

















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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

eric freedman
 

I have had great success over the years removing stuck and broken bolts in this manner:

I use a clay like substance called here in the USA Duct Seal.

I build up a small dam around the offending bolts and fill the dam with PB blaster for a week. The bolts almost always are loose by that time if not I continue the process eventually they come out.

It is also important to try to turn the bolt in both directions to spread the PB blaster.

When I re install them I use a paste called never seize high temperature. It is especially good on the outhaul shaft.

Works like a charm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 8:48 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Mike,

Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads

Good luck with it,

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <simms@...> wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Mike Ondra
 

The part about a “good and pure life” is a problem. I will soak the hell out of it and put a pipe wrench on the stud to see if that breaks the bolt free. If it shears off I’ll drill it out.

Thanks for the insights.

Mike

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 6:29 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Mike,

 

If you took this problem to a machinist they would try drilling out the bolt with a left hand drill (cuts turning counter clockwise).  If you lead a good and pure life it just might grab and unscrew the bolt halfway down. Not something your corner hardware store has, but easy to find online.

 

Some of this has already been said, but it can’t hurt to repeat…

 

Do soak the bolt with penetrating oil.  This is a case where it is very likely to help by softening the rust.  Overnight is not too long to let it soak.  Multiple applications over several days is best.

 

Before starting to drill, grind the face of the bolt off flush and smooth and be sure to use a center punch to give you a starting dimple for the drill.  Do not skip this step! It’s impossible to get a good start drilling in the center of a stainless bolt, especially with a hand drill, if you do not dimple it first.

 

Do not try and drill it out all in one go, start with a small bit to make a pilot hole. Go slow. Slow drill speed and gentle pressure.  Use new, or freshly sharpened bits. Cobalt bits are worth the extra cost.

 

When drilling stainless steel, use cutting oil.  It will help keep your bit sharp and cutting smoothly and help reduce the chance of breaking the bit.

 

Or, you can try a “Speed Out” bolt remover.  I have had good luck with those, but never had any luck with the more commonly found “Eazy-Out”.

 

Good Luck with this!  Anytime a bolt breaks off it is a real hassle.

 

 

Bill Kinney

SM #160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD

“Ships and men rot in port."

 

 

 

 

On Oct 17, 2016, at 10:06, 'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

So I can agree that the cleanest final solution is likely to drill out the bolt and then drill through the fiberglass so that a bolt can be completely through with washer/nut on the end in the bow locker. Cobalt bit is a bit help in that. Keeping the bit inside the bolt being drilled sounds tricky and if it wanders out I may be in trouble with a partially done job. Maybe do a smaller “pilot” hole, maybe 1/8” through the center than move up to larger bits.

 

Since I still have about 1” of the sheared off bolt above the deck, I will soak it with penetrating oil for a while and then apply a pipe wrench to see if I can turn it out. Worst case it breaks at the deck line and on to the drill method. I think even if I miraculously get the bolt out, I would still drill through to allow a nut on the bottom of this bolt. Any ideas as to why this 1 of 4 bolts was done differently by Amel?

 

Mike

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2016 2:34 PM
To: Amel Owners <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

  

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

  

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe. 

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts. 

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Mike Ondra
 

WOW! That is quite the extraction set!

Just what people with old boats need.

Mike

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 7:06 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Hello Mike,

As you might have seen on my Windlass overhaul illustration, I have tools for broken bolt, screw, etc. This is a good idea to have on board…
I actually just purchase more…
If you had access to a Irwin Hanson Bolt Extractor (Set 54009) that cost $65 that would be good for this project and the future…
http://www.irwin.com/tools/browse/screw-bolt-extractors/bolt-extractors
I also recently purchase the Irwin Hanson 11135 crew extractor… but they seem to have a new 48 pieces
http://www.irwin.com/tools/screw-bolt-extractors/48pc-master-extraction-set

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 10/17/16, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 1:17 PM


 









Hi
again,whatever
you do have a nut on top. Then it cant happen again. I
drilled up from the bottom, there was too much bolt to go
through from the top. This bolt is the critical one. Being
through a plate attached to the hawse pipe it gives the
strength to the attachment. Otherwise it is only the deck
holding the winch and there would be considerable flexing
under load leading to deck failure.CheersDanny



From:
"sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@...>

To:
amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, 18
October 2016 1:48 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel
Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck



 









Mike,Danny's thru-bolt solution
sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the
key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got
left above deck you may want to try removing it before you
go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a
good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack
the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw
it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of
the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts
hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the
threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into
drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread
inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood
luck with it,Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 


---In amelyachtowners@...,
<simms@...> wrote :

Hi
mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have
a nut top and bottom

I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the
process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless
much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as
always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 ocean pearl

Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17,
2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
[Attachment(s)
from Mike Ondra included
below]As others may have
experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of
the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is
threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a
glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is
rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all
along the hawse pipe. In attempting
removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1”
above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with
email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the
remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the
deck line. My question is what have others done in this
situation? I can envision finding a
coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement
of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it.
The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly
with new holes for all
bolts. Thoughts? Mike
OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD
 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Well I had to use these on 2 projects so far and looks like it will happened again in the future...

Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 10/17/16, 'Mike Ondra' mdondra@verizon.net [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 6:53 PM


 









WOW! That is quite the extraction
set!Just what people with old boats
need.Mike  From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 7:06
PM
To:
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners]
Windlass bolt to deck    Hello Mike,

As you might have seen on my
Windlass overhaul illustration, I have tools for broken
bolt, screw, etc. This is a good idea to have on board…

I actually just purchase more…
If you had access to a Irwin Hanson Bolt
Extractor (Set 54009) that cost $65 that would be good for
this project and the future…
http://www.irwin.com/tools/browse/screw-bolt-extractors/bolt-extractors
I also recently purchase the Irwin Hanson 11135
crew extractor… but they seem to have a new 48 pieces
http://www.irwin.com/tools/screw-bolt-extractors/48pc-master-extraction-set

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico
de San Juan, Puerto Rico

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 10/17/16, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@xtra.co.nz
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel
Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To:
"amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 1:17 PM


 









Hi
again,whatever
you do have a nut on top. Then it cant happen
again. I
drilled up from the bottom, there
was too much bolt to go
through from the
top. This bolt is the critical one. Being
through a plate attached to the hawse pipe it
gives the
strength to the attachment.
Otherwise it is only the deck
holding the
winch and there would be considerable flexing
under load leading to deck
failure.CheersDanny



From:
"sangaris@aol.com
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>

To:
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Tuesday, 18
October
2016 1:48 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel
Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck



 









Mike,Danny's thru-bolt
solution
sounds good and the drilling, as he
points out, will be the
key to success. With
the good amount of bolt you've got
left
above deck you may want to try removing it before you
go to drilling it out, even though it may shear
off. After a
good soaking with penetrants
(use some acid too, to attack
the salts) you
may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw
it out. If or when that fails you could weld a
short bolt of
the same diameter to the
broken end and use the new bolts
hex head to
turn. The welding heat may also help break the
threads free. If still no joy,you're likely
into
drilling it out,. Here's a great
link to using tread
inserts after drilling
out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood
luck with it,Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 


---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com,
<simms@...> wrote
:

Hi
mike.
I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have
a nut top and bottom

I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several
drills in the
process. If you can get a
cobalt drill they cut stainless
much better
than the standard. I didn't have one, as
always I was fixing a boat in an exotic
location.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 ocean pearl

Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17,
2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra'
mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:

 
[Attachment(s)
from Mike Ondra
included
below]As others may have
experienced with removing the windlass from the
deck, 3 of
the 4 bolts were easily removed.
The aft starboard bolt is
threaded into the
deck (no visible nut and probably into a
glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow
locker there is
rust stain coming through
the fiberglass deck and also all
along the
hawse pipe. In attempting
removal the bolt
head sheared off leaving a stud about 1”
above the deck as pictured above (assuming
picture goes with
email. I am afraid that
continuing to attempt to remove the
remaining bole will simply result in shearing
off at the
deck line. My question is what
have others done in this
situation? I can
envision finding a
coupling that could be
used but would require an enlargement
of the
bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it.
The stud could be cut off and the windlass
moved slightly
with new holes for all
bolts. Thoughts? Mike
OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD
 















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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 30 Amp 125 volt shore power to 50 Amp 125/250 Volt plug?

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Bill (Rouse),

My Transformer is Original (option) from Amel, just never been used. I can only hope the wiring was done accordingly to:
blue wire goes to the neutral connection, brown wire goes to the hot and green/yellow goes to ground.

I am honestly not sure an “electrician” could be useful, in the only 4 years that I own my boat, I have noted that 2/3 of the people I hired did not do a proper job, nor knew anything… and I keep seeing that for other boat owners…

Marinco has confirm as well the link I mentioned will not work.
When I mentioned the 2 x 30 Amp 125 Volt going to a 50 Amp 125/250 Volt, they say it would work “IF” the marina has a Split Phase, but I doubt the marina knew about that…

Unfortunately that small marina in Tortola (Harbourview), so far only has 30 amp… this will be a first for me as well.
I have been asking them for 1 week, the answer is: we are working on it… kind of reminds me of the Bahamas…

Bill (Kinney),
I know about my second shore power going to the Transformer, but since it has never been used since installed 16 years ago, I don’t know if it is working… and in my case, when I arrive somewhere i do have to work right away for my clients (need electricity, etc.). so no time for down time which Island people don’t understand…
So now, I am just looking for back up alternatives…

Craig,
I have ask the marina is it was 50 Amp 125 Volt or 50 Amp 125/250 Volt, they were not able to answer…

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 10/17/16, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@svbebe.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 30 Amp 125 volt shore power to 50 Amp 125/250 Volt plug?
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 10:28 AM


 









Alex, No, that will not help.

Without knowing what
transformer you have and how it was wired...and if that
wiring has changed, none of us can give you much
input.
I suggest that before
you arrive at a marina that only has 110VAC available, that
you consult with an electrician and have him inspect what
you have.
BTW, I
was never in a marina that had only 110VAC 60htz
available...they all had 110VAC and 220VAC 60
htz.
You have my
wiring graphic for wiring to 220VAC 60htz without an onboard
transformer. If not it is in this album: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/search/photos?query=shore%20power#zax/albums_1949812811
BillBeBe
387
On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at
10:10 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@rocketmail.com
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:















 











Good morning,



The next marina I am going to is likely to only have 30 Amp
125 Volt.

Since I have never used my big transformer on the boat, I am
not sure it works, so trying to cover options.



I need 220 volt.

I am very ignorant when it comes to electricity…



Would the following product be ok?

http://www.go2marine.com/
product/389365F/pigtail-shore- power-adapter-30a-125v-male-
to-50a-125-250v-female.html

Or is there a problem with the phases or something else…




I am not concerned with the Amp, but the voltage…



Thanks in advance!

Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

































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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Mike,

As you might have seen on my Windlass overhaul illustration, I have tools for broken bolt, screw, etc. This is a good idea to have on board…
I actually just purchase more…
If you had access to a Irwin Hanson Bolt Extractor (Set 54009) that cost $65 that would be good for this project and the future…
http://www.irwin.com/tools/browse/screw-bolt-extractors/bolt-extractors
I also recently purchase the Irwin Hanson 11135 crew extractor… but they seem to have a new 48 pieces
http://www.irwin.com/tools/screw-bolt-extractors/48pc-master-extraction-set

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico




--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 10/17/16, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@xtra.co.nz [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 1:17 PM


 









Hi
again,whatever
you do have a nut on top. Then it cant happen again. I
drilled up from the bottom, there was too much bolt to go
through from the top. This bolt is the critical one. Being
through a plate attached to the hawse pipe it gives the
strength to the attachment. Otherwise it is only the deck
holding the winch and there would be considerable flexing
under load leading to deck failure.CheersDanny



From:
"sangaris@aol.com [amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>

To:
amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, 18
October 2016 1:48 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel
Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck



 









Mike,Danny's thru-bolt solution
sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the
key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got
left above deck you may want to try removing it before you
go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a
good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack
the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw
it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of
the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts
hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the
threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into
drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread
inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threadsGood
luck with it,Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 


---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com,
<simms@...> wrote :

Hi
mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have
a nut top and bottom

I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the
process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless
much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as
always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 ocean pearl

Sent from my Vodafone SmartOn Oct 17,
2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@...
[amelyachtowners]"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 
[Attachment(s)
from Mike Ondra included
below]As others may have
experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of
the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is
threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a
glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is
rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all
along the hawse pipe. In attempting
removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1”
above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with
email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the
remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the
deck line. My question is what have others done in this
situation? I can envision finding a
coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement
of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it.
The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly
with new holes for all
bolts. Thoughts? Mike
OndraAletes SM#240Rock Hall,
MD


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

Mike,

If you took this problem to a machinist they would try drilling out the bolt with a left hand drill (cuts turning counter clockwise).  If you lead a good and pure life it just might grab and unscrew the bolt halfway down. Not something your corner hardware store has, but easy to find online.

Some of this has already been said, but it can’t hurt to repeat…

Do soak the bolt with penetrating oil.  This is a case where it is very likely to help by softening the rust.  Overnight is not too long to let it soak.  Multiple applications over several days is best.

Before starting to drill, grind the face of the bolt off flush and smooth and be sure to use a center punch to give you a starting dimple for the drill.  Do not skip this step! It’s impossible to get a good start drilling in the center of a stainless bolt, especially with a hand drill, if you do not dimple it first.

Do not try and drill it out all in one go, start with a small bit to make a pilot hole. Go slow. Slow drill speed and gentle pressure.  Use new, or freshly sharpened bits. Cobalt bits are worth the extra cost.

When drilling stainless steel, use cutting oil.  It will help keep your bit sharp and cutting smoothly and help reduce the chance of breaking the bit.

Or, you can try a “Speed Out” bolt remover.  I have had good luck with those, but never had any luck with the more commonly found “Eazy-Out”.

Good Luck with this!  Anytime a bolt breaks off it is a real hassle.


Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Oct 17, 2016, at 10:06, 'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


So I can agree that the cleanest final solution is likely to drill out the bolt and then drill through the fiberglass so that a bolt can be completely through with washer/nut on the end in the bow locker. Cobalt bit is a bit help in that. Keeping the bit inside the bolt being drilled sounds tricky and if it wanders out I may be in trouble with a partially done job. Maybe do a smaller “pilot” hole, maybe 1/8” through the center than move up to larger bits.

 

Since I still have about 1” of the sheared off bolt above the deck, I will soak it with penetrating oil for a while and then apply a pipe wrench to see if I can turn it out. Worst case it breaks at the deck line and on to the drill method. I think even if I miraculously get the bolt out, I would still drill through to allow a nut on the bottom of this bolt. Any ideas as to why this 1 of 4 bolts was done differently by Amel?

 

Mike

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2016 2:34 PM
To: Amel Owners <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

  

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

  

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe. 

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts. 

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Mike Ondra
 

So that explains why the hawse pipe is also showing rust. Thanks. This bolt must have been leaking seawater for quite some time.

Mike

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 2:18 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Hi again,

whatever you do have a nut on top. Then it cant happen again. I drilled up from the bottom, there was too much bolt to go through from the top. This bolt is the critical one. Being through a plate attached to the hawse pipe it gives the strength to the attachment. Otherwise it is only the deck holding the winch and there would be considerable flexing under load leading to deck failure.

Cheers

Danny

 


From: "sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, 18 October 2016 1:48 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 

 

Mike,

Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads

Good luck with it,

Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <simms@...> wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]

As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.

 

In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?

 

I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.

 

Thoughts?

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 30 Amp 125 volt shore power to 50 Amp 125/250 Volt plug?

Craig Briggs
 

Alex,
Then again, we were just in a New York marina that ONLY had 110v 60hz 50Amp. It was single phase 110v, not 110v/225v. They do exist.  That required yet a different plug which is the 50A SINGLE "J" 110v.  NOT the much more common double "J" 125v/250v 50A of the adapter you were looking at.  The local chandler carried both plugs.
Go figger!  but none of this is rocket science and you sound like you've got it sorted.
Cheers,
Craig,  SN#68, Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Alex, No, that will not help.

Without knowing what transformer you have and how it was wired...and if that wiring has changed, none of us can give you much input.

I suggest that before you arrive at a marina that only has 110VAC available, that you consult with an electrician and have him inspect what you have.

BTW, I was never in a marina that had only 110VAC 60htz available...they all had 110VAC and 220VAC 60 htz.

You have my wiring graphic for wiring to 220VAC 60htz without an onboard transformer. If not it is in this album: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/search/photos?query=shore%20power#zax/albums_1949812811

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 10:10 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Good morning,

The next marina I am going to is likely to only have 30 Amp 125 Volt.
Since I have never used my big transformer on the boat, I am not sure it works, so trying to cover options.

I need 220 volt.
I am very ignorant when it comes to electricity…

Would the following product be ok?
http://www.go2marine.com/ product/389365F/pigtail-shore- power-adapter-30a-125v-male- to-50a-125-250v-female.html
Or is there a problem with the phases or something else…

I am not concerned with the Amp, but the voltage…

Thanks in advance!
Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 30 Amp 125 volt shore power to 50 Amp 125/250 Volt plug?

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

I am sorry if I confused people. You are of course correct, if a boat was changed, then who knows what it might look like. High voltage wiring is really, really risky to if you do not understand the what’s and whys of what you are doing and the details of all the connections. I should supply more caveats about that.  

I tried to be clear that my comments applied ONLY to a boat with the optional Amel installed transformer wired as Amel originally intended.  The standard configuration Amel built without the transformer (most of them, I believe!) is different and requires different shore power connections.

On boats with an Amel installed transformer as Amel installed it, there is a dedicated 120 volt shore power feed to the transformer which then feeds the 220 volt system on the boat so delivering 120V single phase power to the boat is perfectly acceptable. That is what the transformer is there for!  So 125V single phase power is how I routinely connect to US marinas because it is how my boat was designed by Amel. 

Like you, I have never seen a marina that did not have 50A 125/250 volt service, but I have seen many marinas that did not have 50A-125/250 at every slip. (Like the slip I am in right now…)  So I greatly appreciate the flexibility Amel built into my boat.  

With the transformer, Amel gave me the option of using a 30A-125V or 50A-125V, or 50A-125-250V with one cord, (and suitable inexpensive adapters), OR 220V directly with a separate cord.  For my travels around the US it has been great, because when the marina asks “What kind of power connection do you need?” I can say “Whatever you have!”

Right now I am plugged into a 30 AMP 125 Volt plug and the boat systems are powered with 220 Volt 60 Hz power.  Of course no transformer changes the frequency of the power, so that stays the same as the supply in all cases.

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Oct 17, 2016, at 12:43, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Bill Kinney,

If anyone has need to use the Pigtail Shore Power Adapter, 30A 110-125V Male to 50A 125/250V Female, you will deliver 110VAC 60htz to the boat. That is the reason that I said Alex has no need for the plug in the link he sent. 

You said:
"The functional result on the boat is the same as plugging into a 50A-125/250V plug connected with three wires." but what you did not say is that it will only deliver 110-125VAC 60htz to the boat.

Frankly, I do not know what transformer Alex has, what the input requirements are, how it is wired, what its maximum amperage is, and if maybe something has changed since it was installed.

There is a device that will connect to two US type 30A 110-125VAC supplies and deliver 220-250VAC 60htz to the boat. It has 2 each 30A 110-125V Male connectors to connect to the shore power and 1 each  50A 220-250VAC 60htz Female connector to connect to the boat's US style plug. I have one and it will work when each of the 30A 125VAC connections are made to a different 110-125VAC circuit. I used this $800 device once and did not really need it because the marina had both the 30A 110-125VAC 60htz and the 50A 220-250VAC 60htz connections on shore. And, because to use the adapter, the two 30A 125V lines must be connected to a single power source providing from 208V to 250V between them for proper operation...in other words, the marina has to have 220-250VAC anyway, but possibly not 30 Amp connections.

My adapter is similar to this one in function: 
http://www.go2marine.com/product/206914F/50-amp-shorepower-smart-reverse-y-adaptor-2-male-plugs.html

I also believe that without a complete inspection of Alex's boat, none of can help him accurately.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 10:59 AM, Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Alexandre,


My boat also has the transformer. and having just redone the power cord, I know in detail how MY boat was wired for the 125 volt inlet cord.  This assumes that your existing cord with the 50 Amp connector is wired to bring 125 volts to the transformer.  This is the way my boat is wired. 

It is possible that the 50 A-125/250 volt cord was wired to bring 250 volts directly into the Amel electrical system.  If THAT is true, then the following is NOT true….


That is the correct adapter to make the connection.

USA marinas offer a very confusing number of electrical options. Compounded by the fact that we talk about 110 volts, 115 volts, 120 volts and 125 volts all for the same thing!

The 50 Amp 125/250 volt plug in the USA is a 4 wire plug.  It has a ground, connected to a metal rim, a neutral, and two hots connected to the three pins.  The two hot wires are 180 degrees out of phase, so between the two of them is 250 volts, and from each of those to the neutral wire is 125 volts.

On my boat, there was a 50 A 125/250 V plug on the end of the cord.  ONE of the hot wire pins was connected, along with the neutral and ground to bring 125 volt service on three wires in the boat to the transformer. The other hot wire was not connected.

30 A/125 V service is a 3 wire service.  One hot, one neutral, and one ground.  The adapter will connect the hot wire from the supply to BOTH hot wires in the 50 AMP plug.  Connected like this, each hot wire is 125volts to the neutral, and 0 volts to each other. The functional result on the boat is the same as plugging into a 50A-125/250V plug connected with three wires.

I hope that helps!

Bill Kinney
SM #160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD
“Ships and men rot in port."





On Oct 17, 2016, at 10:10, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


Good morning, 

The next marina I am going to is likely to only have 30 Amp 125 Volt. 
Since I have never used my big transformer on the boat, I am not sure it works, so trying to cover options.  

I need 220 volt.  
I am very ignorant when it comes to electricity…  

Would the following product be ok?
http://www.go2marine.com/product/389365F/pigtail-shore-power-adapter-30a-125v-male-to-50a-125-250v-female.html
Or is there a problem with the phases or something else… 

I am not concerned with the Amp, but the voltage…

Thanks in advance!  
Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi again,
whatever you do have a nut on top. Then it cant happen again. I drilled up from the bottom, there was too much bolt to go through from the top. This bolt is the critical one. Being through a plate attached to the hawse pipe it gives the strength to the attachment. Otherwise it is only the deck holding the winch and there would be considerable flexing under load leading to deck failure.
Cheers
Danny



From: "sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, 18 October 2016 1:48 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 
Mike,
Danny's thru-bolt solution sounds good and the drilling, as he points out, will be the key to success. With the good amount of bolt you've got left above deck you may want to try removing it before you go to drilling it out, even though it may shear off. After a good soaking with penetrants (use some acid too, to attack the salts) you may be able to lock two nuts on top to screw it out. If or when that fails you could weld a short bolt of the same diameter to the broken end and use the new bolts hex head to turn. The welding heat may also help break the threads free. If still no joy,you're likely into drilling it out,. Here's a great link to using tread inserts after drilling out the bolt. https://racemagazine.com.au/cars/thread-repair-how-to-fix-broken-bolts-and-stripped-threads
Good luck with it,
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris. 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hi mike. I drilled mine out and put a bolt through. I now have a nut top and bottom
I  lost a lot of sweat and blunted several drills in the process. If you can get a cobalt drill they cut stainless much better than the standard. I didn't have one, as always I was fixing a boat in an exotic location.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart
On Oct 17, 2016 4:33 AM, "'Mike Ondra' mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Mike Ondra included below]
As others may have experienced with removing the windlass from the deck, 3 of the 4 bolts were easily removed. The aft starboard bolt is threaded into the deck (no visible nut and probably into a glassed in steel plate). In fact in the bow locker there is rust stain coming through the fiberglass deck and also all along the hawse pipe.
 
In attempting removal the bolt head sheared off leaving a stud about 1” above the deck as pictured above (assuming picture goes with email. I am afraid that continuing to attempt to remove the remaining bole will simply result in shearing off at the deck line. My question is what have others done in this situation?
 
I can envision finding a coupling that could be used but would require an enlargement of the bolt hole in the windlass base thereby weakening it. The stud could be cut off and the windlass moved slightly with new holes for all bolts.
 
Thoughts?
 
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240
Rock Hall, MD
 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bilge / Sump pump

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Pat.
Try taking the suction pipe off the pump. Is it full? If not, fill it and see if it stays full. Of course if its not full the foot valve is leaking. The fill and watch will just confirm this.
I have the original pump. If the foot valve is working ie no leak allowing the water in the suction to go down at all, the pump is always full. I struggled trying to fix things at the pump. Now at last I have a foot valve that works and the pump does too. One thing I did was shorten the suction to get it higher above the sediment that gets into the sump and my problems have been much less since. Foot valves don't like bits of stuff stuck it them when they try to close.
However I wish it would self prime like the manual one does. It doesn't even have a foot valve and yet primes perfectly every time and it cheerfully pumps all the muck from the bottom.
Cheers
Danny



From: "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, 18 October 2016 12:34 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bilge / Sump pump

 
Danny, As far as  can determine the foot valve is not leaking, however over a long time it may . I have tried to seal and clamp the hoses as tight as possible. It has always been unreliable .
Thanks,
Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: simms simms@... [amelyachtowners]
To: Amel Owners
Sent: Sun, Oct 16, 2016 2:14 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bilge / Sump pump

 
Hi pat. I battled the bilge pump forever. The key is the foot valve. If you can stop that leaking so the pipe stays full you should have no more trouble. Also ensure there are no leeks in the suction pipe.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 ocean pearl
Sent from my Vodafone Smart
On Oct 17, 2016 2:44 AM, "sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
I have a Jabsco sump pump and have found it unreliable . The motor works fine , I have replaced everything and it still fails to pump water from the bilge every time. I have replaced the joker and flap valves and I have a check valve , but I think over time the pump slowly loses its prime and becomes air bound , when not used for  some time. I have thought about buying a new one and hope it works better . I have looked everywhere and cannot find it . I assume all SMs have the same pump , can someone tell me where I can purchase a new one. Has anyone replaced it with something more reliable ?
Thanks,
Pat SM #123



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] sea wather from bow-thruster

James Alton
 

Bill,

   I agree, the bow thruster is a really great design.  IMO, it is vastly superior to the tunnel type thrusters due to the larger diameter, slower turning (more efficient,  more thrust).  I also like the fact that when it is retracted everything is protected.  I am hoping that the bottom paint will be pretty effective in controlling marine growth.  With a high speed in tunnel thruster I have found it hard to keep paint on the blades.  Henri Amel had a lot of vision I think.

   I gave the gearbox of my bow thruster a really good flushing with white spirits.  There was a slight amount of milky oil and rust in the very bottom.  I replaced the prop shaft lip seal and refilled with fresh oil but so far I have not replaced the bearings.  The thruster sounds good when run in both directions both before and after the servicing  but I noticed that it felt a little rough when I turned the shaft before the oil was replaced.  With the boat out of the water, the prop takes more than 3 seconds to spin down.   I could not feel any play at all in the prop shaft, laterally or in and out.  I would like to replace the bearings as you suggested but am hoping that I can get another 3 months out of what are probably the originals.  Can you advise based on this information whether you feel I should change them now, or go one more season?

   The foam seals have all been replaced and they have a lot more compression than the old ones.

   Good point about releasing the tension on the halyards.  I actually removed all of the sails for storage so the tension is just enough to control slapping.

   I note that my boat has a powerful adjuster on the main permanent backstay.  Is this to make it easy to add tension to reduce forestay sag or to make detensioning that stay easy when the boat is not sailing?

Best,

James

On Oct 17, 2016, at 1:57 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Both good questions.

Here is my opinion. Henri Amel created a really good retractable bow thruster when there were none on the market. It went through several changes and updates in its 25+/- year history. I suspect the O ring was replaced by the lip seal for some good reason. I do not know the reason.

I believe and Amel specifies that the bow thruster should be serviced every 2 years, replacing the gear oil, the foam donuts, lip seal, nylon hub for the propeller, and the propeller shaft seal. Your Amel is certainly due for the two year service and also possibly the replacement of the internal bearings. 

I have never stored BeBe on the hard for any length of time, but if I did, it probably makes sense  to release the pin on the Bow Thruster. BTW, Amel recommends releasing tension on all sail halyards when not sailing.

Bill
BeBe 387
Trinidad

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 12:24 PM, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>wrote:
 

Bill,


   Great analysis.  

   On the bow thruster for my 1987 Maramu, I have two large O-ring grooves moulded into the hole in the hull for the composite tube to slid and seal on instead of the lip seal used on the Super Maramu.   Do you know if this system worked well or should I look at upgrading to the newer system with the lip seal?

   One other question.  I noticed that the old foam donuts had compressed quite a bit,  measuring about 2/3 of their original thickness where they had been under pressure.  My boat is currently in dry storage and I was wondering if it might be best to leave the pin out and to not fully compress my new seals until the boat is put back into service?  

Best,

James Alton

SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Oct 17, 2016, at 10:59 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


This is my guess:

When the "B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort," the foam donuts are probably being distorted and water is passing through where the foam is distorted.

When the "BT climbs less, the pin comes in with more effort," the foam aligns as it should and the unit is sealed.

I believe your problem with water entry is that the "raised limit" is not correct when the "B.T. climbs higher."

There could be different causes based on the year of manufacture of your Amel bow thruster. If I had your problem on Super Maramu #387, the most likely defective parts would be the upper limit switch or the relay it is connect to inside of the control box...and it could be either the switch or the relay, or both. 

I am convinced this is what is happening when  the "B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort:"
  1. The bow thruster goes up and reaches the "raised limit" where it should stop
  2. The "raised limit" switch engages when it should...BUT..
  3. The actuator motor which raises and lowers continues raising the bow thruster until it reaches a physical limitation
  4. The actuator motor strains against the physical limitation and amperage increases in the circuit as the bow thruster can no longer move and heat travels through the circuit.
  5. When the amperage and heat increases enough through the relay, the relay finally makes correct contact or opens, stopping the actuator motor.
  6. But the bow thruster has distorted the lower foam seals and water will enter.
If this is not corrected soon, either some things will burn up including the actuator motor, relay and switch, or a fuse inside the control box will burn...but earlier model bow thrusters did not have this fuse and some bow thrusters have too large of a fuse.

Hopefully with my explanation, you, or a technician can find your problem.

In the meantime and until it is repaired, I advise you to manually turn off the bow thruster when you are raising it before it reaches the physical limit. One person at the bow thruster and one at the bow thruster power switch will work...then use the pin. You may have to pull on one of the cables to align the pin correctly.

Bill
BeBe 387

Questa è la mia ipotesi:

Quando l'elica di prua (B.T.) "sale più in alto e il perno entra senza sforzo", le ciambelle schiuma sono probabilmente essere distorti e l'acqua sta attraversando in cui la schiuma è distorta.

Quando "B.T. sale meno, il perno entra con uno sforzo maggiore," la schiuma allinea come dovrebbe e l'unità è sigillata.

Credo che il tuo problema con l'ingresso di acqua è che il "limite sollevato" non è corretto quando il "B.T. sale più in alto."

Ci potrebbero essere diverse cause sulla base dell'anno di costruzione della vostra Amel BT. Se ho avuto il problema su Super Maramu # 387, le parti più probabili difettoso sarebbe l'interruttore di limite superiore o il relè si collegano verso l'interno della scatola di controllo ... e potrebbe essere sia l'interruttore o relè, o entrambi.

Sono convinto che questo è ciò che sta accadendo quando il "B.T. sale più in alto e il perno entra senza sforzo:"
1.) Il B.T. sale e raggiunge il "limite sollevato" dove dovrebbe fermarsi
2.) L'interruttore di "limite sollevato" impegna quando dovrebbe ... MA ..
3.) Il motore attuatore che alza e abbassa continua alzando il B.T. fino a raggiungere una limitazione fisica
4.) Il motore attuatore ceppi contro la limitazione e l'amperaggio fisiche aumenti il ​​circuito con B.T. non può più muoversi e calore viaggia attraverso il circuito.
5.) Quando l'amperaggio e calore aumenta abbastanza attraverso il relè, il relè, infine, rende corretto contatto o si apre, arrestare il motore attuatore.
6.) Ma la B.T. ha distorto i sigilli schiuma bassi e l'acqua entrerà.
Se questo non è corretto presto, sia alcune cose brucerà tra cui il motore attuatore, relè e uno switch o un fusibile all'interno della scatola di controllo brucerà ... ma modello precedente B.T. non ha avuto questo fusibile e alcuni propulsori di prua hanno troppo grande di un fusibile.

Speriamo che con la mia spiegazione, voi, o un tecnico in grado di trovare il vostro problema.

Nel frattempo e fino a quando non viene riparato, vi consiglio di spegnere manualmente il B.T. quando si stanno alzando prima che raggiunga il limite fisico. Una persona alla B.T. e uno al B.T. interruttore di alimentazione funziona ... quindi utilizzare il pin. Potrebbe essere necessario tirare uno dei cavi per allineare correttamente il perno.

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 9:00 AM, rossienio@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

The bow of my boat is very high on the water level and the water enters in the boat only with waves.
I've done the maintenance and replaced 3 foam rings the springtime this year : two foam rings below and one above. Slightly cutting rings below on a side (starboard). The foams are the new ones 29x42x8.
The problem is :
sometimes the B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort, but , in case of waves, the water filters in the boat.
other times the BT climbs less, the pin comes in with more effort and the water does not enter.

How about  putting a third foam ring under??
To relace the rings in natural foam with those in neoprene coul be a solution?
Thanks to all. Regards.
 EnioRossi
#SN122 Earendil
Italy









Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

tfortner1975
 

Thanks Ric,

I'm currently working in Abu Dhabi but the boat is not. 

IRIS SN 27 (her papers are in for the renaming)
Langkawi

On Oct 17, 2016, at 6:05 PM, Ric Gottschalk ric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Trevor,

I have a 1990 Santorin SN24. I don’t know what I have is that great of a manual, but it is something.  Contact me off the Amel owners site and I will try to help. Also please post the boats name, number, and location on emails. I think that you find the Santorins systems intuitive and like all Amels amazingly well thought out.

 

Ric (ric@...)

Bali Hai SN24

Annapolis

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 9:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

 

 

Hello All,

I have finally taken possession of a 1990 Santorin, formerly named AKWAABA.  The previous family bought her new in 1990.  Conducting a true turnover of the boat was not possible, due to various events.  Which as you could imagine is not ideal; I could have learned an enormous amount of valuable information in the process.  They have left behind plenty of folders and files to rummage through.  I have not come across the factory / original manual that would state what equipment is installed, location, etc.  I do understand that some items vary boat to boat.  However, If any one has a Santorin manual they don't mind sharing I would greatly appreciate it.  I do intend on tracing every thing out, sorting out the major items, then slowly updating or modifying as required.  And mapping out plumbing, wiring, etc. (using some of Bebe's meticulous charts as a guideline - thank you).

I have searched the group site for all things SANTORIN and downloaded such.

Take Care,
Trevor

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

tfortner1975
 

Hello Alexandre,

Thank you.  I'm currently in Abu Dhabi. The boat is in Langkawi and soon back to Phuket for some small work.  Then I'll either resign from work and go to the boat or bring the boat to Abu Dhabi and work for another year. 

Cheers 

And your documentation of the work you do on your boat is priceless and much appreciated. Thank you. 

On Oct 17, 2016, at 6:11 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Congratulations Trevor, where are you located?

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 10/17/16, Ric Gottschalk ric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin
To: "'amelyachtowners@...'" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Monday, October 17, 2016, 9:05 AM


 













Trevor,
I have a 1990
Santorin SN24. I don’t know what I have is that great of a
manual, but it is something.  Contact me off the Amel
owners site and I will try to
help. Also please post the boats name, number, and location
on emails. I think that you find the Santorins systems
intuitive and like all Amels amazingly well thought out.

 
Ric
(ric@...)
Bali Hai
SN24
Annapolis

 


From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]


Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 9:09 AM

To: amelyachtowners@...

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990
Santorin


 
 



Hello All,



I have finally taken possession of a 1990 Santorin, formerly
named AKWAABA.  The previous family bought her new in
1990.  Conducting a true turnover of the boat was not
possible, due to various events.  Which as you could
imagine is not ideal; I could have
learned an enormous amount of valuable information in the
process.  They have left behind plenty of folders and files
to rummage through.  I have not come across the factory /
original manual that would state what equipment is
installed, location, etc.  I
do understand that some items vary boat to boat.  However,
If any one has a Santorin manual they don't mind sharing
I would greatly appreciate it.  I do intend on tracing
every thing out, sorting out the major items, then slowly
updating or modifying as required. 
And mapping out plumbing, wiring, etc. (using some of
Bebe's meticulous charts as a guideline - thank you).




I have searched the group site for all things SANTORIN and
downloaded such.



Take Care,

Trevor
 

















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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] sea wather from bow-thruster

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Both good questions.

Here is my opinion. Henri Amel created a really good retractable bow thruster when there were none on the market. It went through several changes and updates in its 25+/- year history. I suspect the O ring was replaced by the lip seal for some good reason. I do not know the reason.

I believe and Amel specifies that the bow thruster should be serviced every 2 years, replacing the gear oil, the foam donuts, lip seal, nylon hub for the propeller, and the propeller shaft seal. Your Amel is certainly due for the two year service and also possibly the replacement of the internal bearings.

I have never stored BeBe on the hard for any length of time, but if I did, it probably makes sense  to release the pin on the Bow Thruster. BTW, Amel recommends releasing tension on all sail halyards when not sailing.

Bill
BeBe 387
Trinidad

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 12:24 PM, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


   Great analysis.  

   On the bow thruster for my 1987 Maramu, I have two large O-ring grooves moulded into the hole in the hull for the composite tube to slid and seal on instead of the lip seal used on the Super Maramu.   Do you know if this system worked well or should I look at upgrading to the newer system with the lip seal?

   One other question.  I noticed that the old foam donuts had compressed quite a bit,  measuring about 2/3 of their original thickness where they had been under pressure.  My boat is currently in dry storage and I was wondering if it might be best to leave the pin out and to not fully compress my new seals until the boat is put back into service?  

Best,

James Alton

SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Oct 17, 2016, at 10:59 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


This is my guess:

When the "B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort," the foam donuts are probably being distorted and water is passing through where the foam is distorted.

When the "BT climbs less, the pin comes in with more effort," the foam aligns as it should and the unit is sealed.

I believe your problem with water entry is that the "raised limit" is not correct when the "B.T. climbs higher."

There could be different causes based on the year of manufacture of your Amel bow thruster. If I had your problem on Super Maramu #387, the most likely defective parts would be the upper limit switch or the relay it is connect to inside of the control box...and it could be either the switch or the relay, or both. 

I am convinced this is what is happening when  the "B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort:"
  1. The bow thruster goes up and reaches the "raised limit" where it should stop
  2. The "raised limit" switch engages when it should...BUT..
  3. The actuator motor which raises and lowers continues raising the bow thruster until it reaches a physical limitation
  4. The actuator motor strains against the physical limitation and amperage increases in the circuit as the bow thruster can no longer move and heat travels through the circuit.
  5. When the amperage and heat increases enough through the relay, the relay finally makes correct contact or opens, stopping the actuator motor.
  6. But the bow thruster has distorted the lower foam seals and water will enter.
If this is not corrected soon, either some things will burn up including the actuator motor, relay and switch, or a fuse inside the control box will burn...but earlier model bow thrusters did not have this fuse and some bow thrusters have too large of a fuse.

Hopefully with my explanation, you, or a technician can find your problem.

In the meantime and until it is repaired, I advise you to manually turn off the bow thruster when you are raising it before it reaches the physical limit. One person at the bow thruster and one at the bow thruster power switch will work...then use the pin. You may have to pull on one of the cables to align the pin correctly.

Bill
BeBe 387

Questa è la mia ipotesi:

Quando l'elica di prua (B.T.) "sale più in alto e il perno entra senza sforzo", le ciambelle schiuma sono probabilmente essere distorti e l'acqua sta attraversando in cui la schiuma è distorta.

Quando "B.T. sale meno, il perno entra con uno sforzo maggiore," la schiuma allinea come dovrebbe e l'unità è sigillata.

Credo che il tuo problema con l'ingresso di acqua è che il "limite sollevato" non è corretto quando il "B.T. sale più in alto."

Ci potrebbero essere diverse cause sulla base dell'anno di costruzione della vostra Amel BT. Se ho avuto il problema su Super Maramu # 387, le parti più probabili difettoso sarebbe l'interruttore di limite superiore o il relè si collegano verso l'interno della scatola di controllo ... e potrebbe essere sia l'interruttore o relè, o entrambi.

Sono convinto che questo è ciò che sta accadendo quando il "B.T. sale più in alto e il perno entra senza sforzo:"
1.) Il B.T. sale e raggiunge il "limite sollevato" dove dovrebbe fermarsi
2.) L'interruttore di "limite sollevato" impegna quando dovrebbe ... MA ..
3.) Il motore attuatore che alza e abbassa continua alzando il B.T. fino a raggiungere una limitazione fisica
4.) Il motore attuatore ceppi contro la limitazione e l'amperaggio fisiche aumenti il ​​circuito con B.T. non può più muoversi e calore viaggia attraverso il circuito.
5.) Quando l'amperaggio e calore aumenta abbastanza attraverso il relè, il relè, infine, rende corretto contatto o si apre, arrestare il motore attuatore.
6.) Ma la B.T. ha distorto i sigilli schiuma bassi e l'acqua entrerà.
Se questo non è corretto presto, sia alcune cose brucerà tra cui il motore attuatore, relè e uno switch o un fusibile all'interno della scatola di controllo brucerà ... ma modello precedente B.T. non ha avuto questo fusibile e alcuni propulsori di prua hanno troppo grande di un fusibile.

Speriamo che con la mia spiegazione, voi, o un tecnico in grado di trovare il vostro problema.

Nel frattempo e fino a quando non viene riparato, vi consiglio di spegnere manualmente il B.T. quando si stanno alzando prima che raggiunga il limite fisico. Una persona alla B.T. e uno al B.T. interruttore di alimentazione funziona ... quindi utilizzare il pin. Potrebbe essere necessario tirare uno dei cavi per allineare correttamente il perno.

On Mon, Oct 17, 2016 at 9:00 AM, rossienio@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

The bow of my boat is very high on the water level and the water enters in the boat only with waves.
I've done the maintenance and replaced 3 foam rings the springtime this year : two foam rings below and one above. Slightly cutting rings below on a side (starboard). The foams are the new ones 29x42x8.
The problem is :
sometimes the B.T. climbs higher and the pin enters without effort, but , in case of waves, the water filters in the boat.
other times the BT climbs less, the pin comes in with more effort and the water does not enter.

How about  putting a third foam ring under??
To relace the rings in natural foam with those in neoprene coul be a solution?
Thanks to all. Regards.
 EnioRossi
#SN122 Earendil
Italy






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

JOHN HAYES
 

We asked for and received from Amel a wiring diagram by email for our 1991 Santorin based in Wellington. Helps if you understand French 

John


On 18/10/2016, at 3:05 AM, Ric Gottschalk ric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Trevor,

I have a 1990 Santorin SN24. I don’t know what I have is that great of a manual, but it is something.  Contact me off the Amel owners site and I will try to help. Also please post the boats name, number, and location on emails. I think that you find the Santorins systems intuitive and like all Amels amazingly well thought out.

 

Ric (ric@...)

Bali Hai SN24

Annapolis

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2016 9:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] New Owner - 1990 Santorin

 

 

Hello All,

I have finally taken possession of a 1990 Santorin, formerly named AKWAABA.  The previous family bought her new in 1990.  Conducting a true turnover of the boat was not possible, due to various events.  Which as you could imagine is not ideal; I could have learned an enormous amount of valuable information in the process.  They have left behind plenty of folders and files to rummage through.  I have not come across the factory / original manual that would state what equipment is installed, location, etc.  I do understand that some items vary boat to boat.  However, If any one has a Santorin manual they don't mind sharing I would greatly appreciate it.  I do intend on tracing every thing out, sorting out the major items, then slowly updating or modifying as required.  And mapping out plumbing, wiring, etc. (using some of Bebe's meticulous charts as a guideline - thank you).

I have searched the group site for all things SANTORIN and downloaded such.

Take Care,
Trevor