Date   

Re: Curtain Sizes for SM2000

Richard May
 

Hi Brian,

I know your post on curtains is 7+ years old but I am looking for some advice on fabric selection. Sailrite recommends using an acrylic fabric like Sunbrella. Did you use that type? Did you use a UV liner as well? I am worried about the weight of the curtains creating too much bunching behind the fans and sconces, especially in the aft cabin but want the curtains to be long lasting. How are your curtains holding up? Any advice you have would be much appreciated :)

Richard and I just took delivery of Super Maramu hull #477. It looks like the original curtains from 2005 throughout the interior. It looks/feels to me that the original curtains are a cotton/poly blend with a canvas type, possibly UV liner. The liners of the curtains are rotting so I am looking at redoing all the curtains. 

Best regards,

Kathy May
SV Avogato


Re: Maramu Curtains For $100 + Shipping

 


Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 11:42 AM Richard May via groups.io <airwisrich2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Jer,

I know your post is pretty old but I am wondering why you decided to go with Sunbrella fabric on the old blue curtains and if you went with Sunbrella fabric on the new beige curtains? Did you line the curtains with a UV fabric? How are they holding up? Richard and I just took delivery of Super Maramu hull #477. It looks like the original curtains from 2005 throughout the interior. The liners of the curtains are rotting so I am looking at redoing all the curtains. Any advice you have would be much appreciated :)

Best regards,

Kathy May
SV Avogato


Re: Maramu Curtains For $100 + Shipping

Richard May
 

Hi Jer,

I know your post is pretty old but I am wondering why you decided to go with Sunbrella fabric on the old blue curtains and if you went with Sunbrella fabric on the new beige curtains? Did you line the curtains with a UV fabric? How are they holding up? Richard and I just took delivery of Super Maramu hull #477. It looks like the original curtains from 2005 throughout the interior. The liners of the curtains are rotting so I am looking at redoing all the curtains. Any advice you have would be much appreciated :)

Best regards,

Kathy May
SV Avogato


Re: ULTRA anchor 45KG or 35KG

Karen Smith
 

We would suggest that no sailor EVER woke up at 02:00 as a squall rolled through the anchorage and worried that their anchor was too big...

Our boat came to us with a 40kg Rocna as the primary anchor, we increased that to a 47 kg Mantus and would never go back. If I could have figured out a way to fit a 55kg anchor I probably would have used that!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC, USA



Re: Volvo D3 110 Sea Water Pump - Cover seal

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

A friend owns a large trawler and he had identical problems with his water pump. He circumvented the problem by removing the drive belt and the internals of the unit and replaced it with an electric pump wired into the battery charge alternator. 

Surely, some of the smart owners here could design a system which will work on 54’s equipped with Volvo D30... 

A lateral thought ...

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007,  NZ. 




On 10 Feb 2021, at 21:31, ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:


My little trick

We all agree it is daft that the 12v alternator is located directly below the raw water pump. It is a question of when not if it starts to leek as the lip seal eventually wears a groove in the shaft, but we are where we are.
The good news is that it will start to drip very slowly. So I stuff a clean rag below the pump and regularly inspect it for salt crystals. If the rag is dark in colour the salt shows up, otherwise one can taste it for salt. When the dripping starts the rag will absorb the water and dry from the heat of the engine before any damage is done. This is the moment to service or change the pump. If you ignore the drips then sure enough it will end up getting worse and damaging the alternator.  By the way, getting that alternator off is bloody business literally.

Nick locked down in the UK whilst
 
Amelia AML 54-019 is in Leros Gr.
On 9 Feb 2021, at 18:41, Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

Can a drip shield be fabricated to keep seawater off the alternator?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt Salatino A50#27, Speed of Life

On Feb 9, 2021, at 1:29 PM, Ralph Heilig <ralph.heilig@...> wrote:

Stefan,

I had a leaking D3 seawater pump. Unfortunately I discovered it too late. The seawater was already dropping on the Alternater and demaged the alternator (it's stupid from Volvo to position the alternator directly under the seawater pump!).

The cause was a worn shaft in the sea water pump. I had to replace both: seawaterpump and alternator! My mechanic suggestet not to do the shaft repair, but to install an new one. 

So be carefull: If it's the shaft, it will ultimately ruin the alternater if not changed. The alternator was much more expensive than the pump...

Greeting from Vienna,
Ralph
A54, #144


Re: ULTRA anchor 45KG or 35KG

VICTOR MOLERO
 

It took no more than an hour. You just need the tool. See pic.
image.png


Re: Propeller recommendation

Karen Smith
 

Having driven Super Maramus with both MaxProps and AutoProps, I find little noticeable difference under most conditions from the helm.  I know that theoretically the Autoprop is more efficient while motor sailing, but within the (admittedly very coarse) ruler of the dipstick measuring liters/day of fuel used I have not been able to measure a difference. I have also never seen the significant increase in boat speed at the same RPM that Burton claims in their advertising over a feathering prop, which has me question the whole assumption of greatly improved efficiency.

The one place where there is a difference while under power is in reverse.  On a Super Maramu, the AutoProp has more prop walk than the MaxProp. Neither one has prop walk that is difficult to manage with the bow thruster, but the stern slides distinctly more to port with the AutoProp. It's not at all clear to me why there should be a difference, and it is not a  difference which would make me chose one over the other, but it is there.

While sailing in light winds, at low boat speeds, the MaxProp is going to have a lower drag--but most Amel owners don't sail extensively in those conditions so that is likely an academic argument. Both will be dramatically better in this regard than a fixed prop.

The AutoProp has a reputation for being more sensitive to low levels of fouling, so might need more routine cleaning, but on the other hand you don't have to fully disassemble it to service the propshaft seal like you do the MaxProp.  So net-net the amount of service work is likely similar, just of a different flavor.

In short, if they were priced the same, and there were no installation issues, I'd likely consider them a wash.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC, USA


Re: ULTRA anchor 45KG or 35KG

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Very nice !

Thank you for this valuable information.
Could you also tell me if this modification is difficult to do and if it requires particular skills.
It took you how many hours of work to make it.
Thank you again for this precious information

JL MERTZ

CottonBay

SM316


Le 10/02/2021 à 17:00, VICTOR MOLERO a écrit :

Hello. I bought and installed the Ultra 45 kg. See pictures, and let me know if you need any more information.
Victor 
SM314 Alendoy


Re: ULTRA anchor 45KG or 35KG

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Hello. I bought and installed the Ultra 45 kg. See pictures, and let me know if you need any more information.
Victor 
SM314 Alendoy


Re: ULTRA anchor 45KG or 35KG

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Hello Jarek,
I'm changing my anchor on CottonBay and I was thinking of putting on a 45 kg Ultramarine.
It seems that it does not fit. Could you tell me how you managed to get it through/over  the rollers (photos?)
Merci beaucoup
JL MERTZ
CottonBay
SM316


Re: Tips appreciated: Major frustration trying to pull cable through Mizzen.

 

Kent,

They are cylindrical foam located every 1.3m and about Ø10.5mm, Length 40mm.
image.png

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Feb 9, 2021 at 7:15 PM karkauai via groups.io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I had the same problem.  I wanted to install a new antenna for my AIS at the top of the mizzen to get it away from the VHF antenna.  We couldn't pull the new cable from either end as it got stuck at the spreaders. I couldn't do top a new messenger from the top or get a long tape to go past the spreaders. There were two messenger lines, and we tried both from both ends.  It was frustrating that the messengers came out on the starboard side below the level of the opening between the stbd and port sides, then had to go up a few cm before coming back down a bit to exit at the lower (stbd) mizzen access panel.  No way to get a good pull from below or help feed from below.

I had added an wifi extender and a cellphone extender a couple years ago, and both antennae were mounted on the mizzen spreaders. Neither one seemed to improve wifi signal or cell phone signal significantly, so I removed both antennae, and pulled out their cables. I couldn't tell where the line with the foam pieces was, so assumed it had broken and fallen down into the mast.  I didn't remove the radar cable which exited the mast at the spreaders.  We pulled a new strong messenger down using one of the old ones from the starboard side and it got stuck at about the spreaders again.  We pulled from the bottom with a lot of force and finally got a wad of knotted line out from below. There were no foam pieces to be found.  After that the new antenna cable passed easily from above.
A new messenger was placed using a 1/2 inch nut as a weight, without interference.

When it warms up again, I'll pull another line through with foam pieces attached.  Does anyone know:
what kind of foam was used, or 
how big the pieces are, or
How they are attached to the line?

Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Tips appreciated: Major frustration trying to pull cable through Mizzen.

Matt Salatino
 

Interesting info on WiFi 

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 10, 2021, at 1:07 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Kent,

As mentioned on my earlier response, the foam bits are cut pieces of the seal for the Goiot port lights. At least the ones on the 54. I seem to recall they were 3cm long each, attached with a simple overhand knot every 1.5m on the line, if I remember right.

BTW - at the risk of thread drift, I'll touch on the wifi antenna. We first had it on our arch and while in Hawaii, we noticed the wifi signal would change dramatically depending on how we rotated with respect to the land based access point that was around 0.6nm away. Made no sense to me that speed/latency increased dramatically as we rotated...until I learned how radio waves transmit and the concept of the Fresnel Zone as it relates to RF signals. Summary is that: RF signals on my omnidirectional antenna extend out in a cone, with the narrowness depending on antenna gain and if 60% of the cone is blocked, signal drops dramatically. Turns out in our case, the solar panels were blocking a significant proportion of that cone if we rotated the wrong way, hence the significant drop in speed and dramatic increase in jitter.

I first moved it to the spreader. The mast had the same effect, albeit reduced. Now it's on the main masthead with a long Cat7 cable down to a router in the boat. We have been connected to access points a mile away and have fast enough speeds and low enough latency/jitter to both stream video and have zoom calls. Downside is that with our 8db antenna, if you're right next to the access point, the mast mounted antenna may not see the AP. But if we're next to it, I just connect to the AP directly with my laptop.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Volvo D3 110 Sea Water Pump - Cover seal

Courtney Gorman
 

Just an FYI but my replacement pump lasted only three years before it started leaking and before I noticed I had fried my alternator so I now have a new replacement pump and a new alternator. Moral of the story is to keep a close eye on those pumps.
Cheers 
Courtney 
Trippin 
54 #101
St Thomas


On Feb 10, 2021, at 2:15 AM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

Yup, I replaced my Volvo pump with a JMP. They claim the parts are interchangeable so I may get around to trying to rebuild the leaking Volvo one if I get bored. Given that the repair kit isn't much cheaper than the pump, I will probably just replace the whole pump if it ever leaks again. You are right about the pump on the D3 having two different iterations - the mounting holes changed. If anyone wants the iteration that fits on a D3-110C, I can try to dig up the order.

As an aside, the mounting metal "washer" on ours had to be cut off in order to align the JMP with the serpentine belt. Easy with a Dremel.

For our 11kw Onan, it's almost certainly a Sherwood water pump. It was weeping a tiny bit and I replaced it before leaving Hawaii last fall, just in case. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Volvo D3 110 Sea Water Pump - Cover seal

ngtnewington Newington
 

My little trick

We all agree it is daft that the 12v alternator is located directly below the raw water pump. It is a question of when not if it starts to leek as the lip seal eventually wears a groove in the shaft, but we are where we are.
The good news is that it will start to drip very slowly. So I stuff a clean rag below the pump and regularly inspect it for salt crystals. If the rag is dark in colour the salt shows up, otherwise one can taste it for salt. When the dripping starts the rag will absorb the water and dry from the heat of the engine before any damage is done. This is the moment to service or change the pump. If you ignore the drips then sure enough it will end up getting worse and damaging the alternator.  By the way, getting that alternator off is bloody business literally.

Nick locked down in the UK whilst
 
Amelia AML 54-019 is in Leros Gr.

On 9 Feb 2021, at 18:41, Matt Salatino via groups.io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

Can a drip shield be fabricated to keep seawater off the alternator?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt Salatino A50#27, Speed of Life

On Feb 9, 2021, at 1:29 PM, Ralph Heilig <ralph.heilig@...> wrote:

Stefan,

I had a leaking D3 seawater pump. Unfortunately I discovered it too late. The seawater was already dropping on the Alternater and demaged the alternator (it's stupid from Volvo to position the alternator directly under the seawater pump!).

The cause was a worn shaft in the sea water pump. I had to replace both: seawaterpump and alternator! My mechanic suggestet not to do the shaft repair, but to install an new one. 

So be carefull: If it's the shaft, it will ultimately ruin the alternater if not changed. The alternator was much more expensive than the pump...

Greeting from Vienna,
Ralph
A54, #144


Re: Amel 54 masthead tricolour light

Scott SV Tengah
 

Is this a problem with the regular incandescent bulbs that have been used in these fixtures for time eternal? I was just being double belts-and-suspenders by bending the tabs and adding silicone grease, but I haven't heard of many other Amel with intermittent bulb issues on the masthead? I considered replacing the fixture with a full LED one but (1) it's over 20x the cost of a bulb (2) I was trying to minimize the work involved at the masthead. :)

For our combo Aqua Signal bow nav light, I have to say it was a poor choice by Amel. It's not even IP67 rated - I think it's only rated for dust, not water ingress. A completely different design than the masthead fixture. On hard upwind legs, water kept getting in and damaging the bulb. We greased the little foam seal, even tried sealing it with Sikaflex 295UV, everything. I ended up going for a sealed unit from Marinebeam that fits the custom stainless mount that Amel welded on for the OEM Aqua Signal. It was 20% of the cost of an equivalent Aqua Signal and after a 2900nm upwind sail (not my favorite passage of all time), the bow light is still functioning perfectly.

The masthead LED bulb has lasted 15,000 nm with no issues. That includes the 2900nm upwind sail and a near direct hit by TS Dorian.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Volvo D3 110 Sea Water Pump - Cover seal

Scott SV Tengah
 

Yup, I replaced my Volvo pump with a JMP. They claim the parts are interchangeable so I may get around to trying to rebuild the leaking Volvo one if I get bored. Given that the repair kit isn't much cheaper than the pump, I will probably just replace the whole pump if it ever leaks again. You are right about the pump on the D3 having two different iterations - the mounting holes changed. If anyone wants the iteration that fits on a D3-110C, I can try to dig up the order.

As an aside, the mounting metal "washer" on ours had to be cut off in order to align the JMP with the serpentine belt. Easy with a Dremel.

For our 11kw Onan, it's almost certainly a Sherwood water pump. It was weeping a tiny bit and I replaced it before leaving Hawaii last fall, just in case. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Tips appreciated: Major frustration trying to pull cable through Mizzen.

Scott SV Tengah
 

Kent,

As mentioned on my earlier response, the foam bits are cut pieces of the seal for the Goiot port lights. At least the ones on the 54. I seem to recall they were 3cm long each, attached with a simple overhand knot every 1.5m on the line, if I remember right.

BTW - at the risk of thread drift, I'll touch on the wifi antenna. We first had it on our arch and while in Hawaii, we noticed the wifi signal would change dramatically depending on how we rotated with respect to the land based access point that was around 0.6nm away. Made no sense to me that speed/latency increased dramatically as we rotated...until I learned how radio waves transmit and the concept of the Fresnel Zone as it relates to RF signals. Summary is that: RF signals on my omnidirectional antenna extend out in a cone, with the narrowness depending on antenna gain and if 60% of the cone is blocked, signal drops dramatically. Turns out in our case, the solar panels were blocking a significant proportion of that cone if we rotated the wrong way, hence the significant drop in speed and dramatic increase in jitter.

I first moved it to the spreader. The mast had the same effect, albeit reduced. Now it's on the main masthead with a long Cat7 cable down to a router in the boat. We have been connected to access points a mile away and have fast enough speeds and low enough latency/jitter to both stream video and have zoom calls. Downside is that with our 8db antenna, if you're right next to the access point, the mast mounted antenna may not see the AP. But if we're next to it, I just connect to the AP directly with my laptop.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Rigging Bonding and newer 316 stainless steel

Scott SV Tengah
 

Here's Olivier's post confirming the connection of rigging to bonding in 2009:

https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/message/21220

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Tips appreciated: Major frustration trying to pull cable through Mizzen.

karkauai
 

I had the same problem.  I wanted to install a new antenna for my AIS at the top of the mizzen to get it away from the VHF antenna.  We couldn't pull the new cable from either end as it got stuck at the spreaders. I couldn't do top a new messenger from the top or get a long tape to go past the spreaders. There were two messenger lines, and we tried both from both ends.  It was frustrating that the messengers came out on the starboard side below the level of the opening between the stbd and port sides, then had to go up a few cm before coming back down a bit to exit at the lower (stbd) mizzen access panel.  No way to get a good pull from below or help feed from below.

I had added an wifi extender and a cellphone extender a couple years ago, and both antennae were mounted on the mizzen spreaders. Neither one seemed to improve wifi signal or cell phone signal significantly, so I removed both antennae, and pulled out their cables. I couldn't tell where the line with the foam pieces was, so assumed it had broken and fallen down into the mast.  I didn't remove the radar cable which exited the mast at the spreaders.  We pulled a new strong messenger down using one of the old ones from the starboard side and it got stuck at about the spreaders again.  We pulled from the bottom with a lot of force and finally got a wad of knotted line out from below. There were no foam pieces to be found.  After that the new antenna cable passed easily from above.
A new messenger was placed using a 1/2 inch nut as a weight, without interference.

When it warms up again, I'll pull another line through with foam pieces attached.  Does anyone know:
what kind of foam was used, or 
how big the pieces are, or
How they are attached to the line?

Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

--
Kent & Iris
KRISTY
SM243


Re: Volvo D3 110 Sea Water Pump - Cover seal

Karen Smith
 

The shaft "sealing washer" (as Volvo calls it) is actually a lip seal.  Just like the oil seals used on the Amel propshaft, or an engine crankshaft, or any number of other places. In most applications they last at least as long as a carbon face mechanical seals.  It is listed as an "obsolete" part because Volvo does not stock it any longer in their part supply chain.  It is a standard industrial part, although a bit hard to find because of the stainless steel garter spring.

The raw water pumps, and raw water pump parts, for the D3 were (and still are) made by JMP and are readily available at a fraction of the price than from Volvo.  If you know the Volvo part number for your pump, you can cross reference them and get a new pump or any of the parts if you want to rebuild them yourself.  My understanding is that there were at least different two versions of the pump used on the D3 engines.  A complete new pump is less than US$400.

Same with the TMD22: Those raw water pumps are made by Jabsco.  Look closely at the cover plate, and the Jabsco number is stamped there.  Dealing with a Jabsco distributer will save you a boat load of money compared to Volvo.

At least some of the Onan models used Oberdorfer pumps, again these are usually clearly stamped with the original maker and model number on the cover plate.

I'd give very long odds that the Yanmar raw water pumps are also third party supplied, but I do not know which supplier Yanmar used.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC, USA

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