Date   

Re: Hatch door repair

Dan
 

Hi Slavko.  
 I used veneer on mine. Mahogany 
Good luck
Daniel 
Mango 33 Sarqui



On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:46 PM, Alan Grayson <bazgrayson@...> wrote:


Hi Slavko, we painted ours with awlgrip after sanding and fairing. It all has to be done in place but you can lift the door all the way to the dodger roof by removing a piece of plywood which stops the door raising all the way. It was a bit messy with the sanding dust but lots of plastic and tape keeps most of it outside.
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
<Image.jpeg>


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Slavko D. <slavko@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 12:30:50 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Hatch door repair
 
I have very bad hutch door on my SM. Does not look nice at all. See photo attached. I am not sure how to get it better. Just sand it, put some epoxy and then several layers of UV protected varnish. Is this the way to go? I am going to boat tomorrow and will check if door an be taken out, or all the work has to be done on the boat.
Thank you.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Chris Doucette
 


Re: Hatch door repair

Alan Grayson
 

Hi Slavko, we painted ours with awlgrip after sanding and fairing. It all has to be done in place but you can lift the door all the way to the dodger roof by removing a piece of plywood which stops the door raising all the way. It was a bit messy with the sanding dust but lots of plastic and tape keeps most of it outside.
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Image.jpeg


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Slavko D. <slavko@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 12:30:50 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Hatch door repair
 
I have very bad hutch door on my SM. Does not look nice at all. See photo attached. I am not sure how to get it better. Just sand it, put some epoxy and then several layers of UV protected varnish. Is this the way to go? I am going to boat tomorrow and will check if door an be taken out, or all the work has to be done on the boat.
Thank you.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279


Re: Hatch door repair

 

FYI,

The companionway door cannot be removed. I found Chris Waelen in Jolly Harbour Boatyard, Jolly Harbour, Antigua. Chris works wonders with anything wood. I looked him up because he replaced the veneer on the companionway door of an Amel 54 with teak veneer. He does this job with the door in place.
Here is a photo:

The turnkey price is $300 US.
Contact Information
Anything Wood Boat Builder
+1 268-726-1690

I include all of this information because even if you are not in Antigua, I believe if you find a capable wood-working guy, you can probably match the quality and price.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Nov 3, 2020 at 1:14 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
I never perform this task but I have heard the following from others who have. 

You cannot remove the door unless you remove the dodger and most people refuse to do that. You can lift the door as far up as it can, affix it there so you can work on the surface and perhaps just sand and then recover with hi quality gloss epoxy paint would be my choice. Apparently, only the very bottom of the door remains covered by the sliders and this is not visible in normal use. 

Good luck in your project. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, New Zealand


On 4/11/2020, at 6:30 AM, Slavko D. <slavko@...> wrote:

I have very bad hutch door on my SM. Does not look nice at all. See photo attached. I am not sure how to get it better. Just sand it, put some epoxy and then several layers of UV protected varnish. Is this the way to go? I am going to boat tomorrow and will check if door an be taken out, or all the work has to be done on the boat.
Thank you.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279
<TRRF7530.pdf>


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Mark Garver
 

Thanks John Pierre, does anyone have the part number of the switch they used? I know Alan was going to try to locate it for me.

Thanks again everyone!

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester, VA


On Nov 3, 2020, at 2:28 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello Alan,

I extended the wires into the forward face of the cockpit locker and installed my manual selector above the Oban controls. 

Tidier and less faffing to get shore power connected. :-)

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 4/11/2020, at 5:21 AM, Alan Grayson <bazgrayson@...> wrote:


Hi Mark that is the auto switch over for shore power and Generator. It is a common fault after this long. I removed mine and put in a manual switch Which means I have to go into the engine room and manually switch over from generator to shore power on the rare occasions I go into a marina. I’ll hunt down the part number of the manual switch and post when I find it?
<Image.jpeg>
And here is the new installation 
<Image.jpeg>

Regards
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Brunswick, GA


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:37:00 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat
 
Two nights ago our shore power breaker tripped, so I shut all power circuits down on the boat and tried to reset it and got a spark and smoke at the shore power pedestal. Tried another pedestal so began to investigate on the boat. Found a problem, but since I don’t have a complete wiring diagram I’m kind of guessing as I go along. Does anyone know what this is or function of this? It appears to be where shore power comes in and out. There are a lot of burnt wires behind it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester Point, VA

<IMG_6212.PNG>
<IMG_6211.PNG>


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Alan,

I extended the wires into the forward face of the cockpit locker and installed my manual selector above the Oban controls. 

Tidier and less faffing to get shore power connected. :-)

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 4/11/2020, at 5:21 AM, Alan Grayson <bazgrayson@...> wrote:


Hi Mark that is the auto switch over for shore power and Generator. It is a common fault after this long. I removed mine and put in a manual switch Which means I have to go into the engine room and manually switch over from generator to shore power on the rare occasions I go into a marina. I’ll hunt down the part number of the manual switch and post when I find it?
<Image.jpeg>
And here is the new installation 
<Image.jpeg>

Regards
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Brunswick, GA


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:37:00 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat
 
Two nights ago our shore power breaker tripped, so I shut all power circuits down on the boat and tried to reset it and got a spark and smoke at the shore power pedestal. Tried another pedestal so began to investigate on the boat. Found a problem, but since I don’t have a complete wiring diagram I’m kind of guessing as I go along. Does anyone know what this is or function of this? It appears to be where shore power comes in and out. There are a lot of burnt wires behind it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester Point, VA

<IMG_6212.PNG>
<IMG_6211.PNG>


Re: Hatch door repair

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

I never perform this task but I have heard the following from others who have. 

You cannot remove the door unless you remove the dodger and most people refuse to do that. You can lift the door as far up as it can, affix it there so you can work on the surface and perhaps just sand and then recover with hi quality gloss epoxy paint would be my choice. Apparently, only the very bottom of the door remains covered by the sliders and this is not visible in normal use. 

Good luck in your project. 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, New Zealand


On 4/11/2020, at 6:30 AM, Slavko D. <slavko@...> wrote:

I have very bad hutch door on my SM. Does not look nice at all. See photo attached. I am not sure how to get it better. Just sand it, put some epoxy and then several layers of UV protected varnish. Is this the way to go? I am going to boat tomorrow and will check if door an be taken out, or all the work has to be done on the boat.
Thank you.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279
<TRRF7530.pdf>


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Mark Garver
 

Thanks guys I know how I’m proceeding!

Fair Winds,

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester Point, VA


On Nov 3, 2020, at 12:25 PM, Chris Doucette <amaroksailing@...> wrote:



Mark,
 
I replaced the solenoid based shore-power Gen switch and landed on the exact BlueSeas switch Alan used- I don't like automagical switching, especially with the 50 /60 hz issue.  I also have an isolation transformer that will be going in very soon for the shore power.

In my case, I did not install the switch in the engine room, rather I ran the necessary AC  wiring to this box (now a junction box) to a location in the Gally next to the AC Panel and just above the Genset Start t so I can work everything AC from there.

Chris
SM 385 Amorak


Hatch door repair

Slavko Despotovic
 

I have very bad hutch door on my SM. Does not look nice at all. See photo attached. I am not sure how to get it better. Just sand it, put some epoxy and then several layers of UV protected varnish. Is this the way to go? I am going to boat tomorrow and will check if door an be taken out, or all the work has to be done on the boat.
Thank you.
--
Slavko
SM 2000
#279


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Chris Doucette
 


Mark,
 
I replaced the solenoid based shore-power Gen switch and landed on the exact BlueSeas switch Alan used- I don't like automagical switching, especially with the 50 /60 hz issue.  I also have an isolation transformer that will be going in very soon for the shore power.

In my case, I did not install the switch in the engine room, rather I ran the necessary AC  wiring to this box (now a junction box) to a location in the Gally next to the AC Panel and just above the Genset Start t so I can work everything AC from there.

Chris
SM 385 Amorak


Re: Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Alan Grayson
 

Hi Mark that is the auto switch over for shore power and Generator. It is a common fault after this long. I removed mine and put in a manual switch Which means I have to go into the engine room and manually switch over from generator to shore power on the rare occasions I go into a marina. I’ll hunt down the part number of the manual switch and post when I find it?Image.jpeg
And here is the new installation 
Image.jpeg
Regards
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Brunswick, GA


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Mark Garver via groups.io <mgarver@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:37:00 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat
 
Two nights ago our shore power breaker tripped, so I shut all power circuits down on the boat and tried to reset it and got a spark and smoke at the shore power pedestal. Tried another pedestal so began to investigate on the boat. Found a problem, but since I don’t have a complete wiring diagram I’m kind of guessing as I go along. Does anyone know what this is or function of this? It appears to be where shore power comes in and out. There are a lot of burnt wires behind it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester Point, VA


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Paul Stascavage
 

I haven’t gotten that far yet Bill.

Currently working on cleaning everything up.

I will report back when I do.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


Shore Power Breaker Trip - Problem apparently on the boat

Mark Garver
 

Two nights ago our shore power breaker tripped, so I shut all power circuits down on the boat and tried to reset it and got a spark and smoke at the shore power pedestal. Tried another pedestal so began to investigate on the boat. Found a problem, but since I don’t have a complete wiring diagram I’m kind of guessing as I go along. Does anyone know what this is or function of this? It appears to be where shore power comes in and out. There are a lot of burnt wires behind it.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark
S/V It’s Good
SM #105
Gloucester Point, VA


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

 

Paul,

I assume that you tested the fit?
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Nov 3, 2020 at 7:50 AM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill R,

The diameter of the Rudder Shaft Post measured exactly 50 mm using a digital caliper which means the circumference should be 157.08 mm

The wealth of information on this forum never ceases to amaze me.

Thank you all for your knowledgeable and detailed responses.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Paul Stascavage
 

Bill R,

The diameter of the Rudder Shaft Post measured exactly 50 mm using a digital caliper which means the circumference should be 157.08 mm

The wealth of information on this forum never ceases to amaze me.

Thank you all for your knowledgeable and detailed responses.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: New 175 am alternator

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Karen,

 Good to read. We have also found over the years that our main engine alternator is a very efficient means of charging. It would be really useful if you could add your boat name and number so people can see what year your SM was built--in this case we would then know the size of engine you have and the number of batteries.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Karen Smith via groups.io <karenharmonie@...>
Sent: 31 October 2020 14:57
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] New 175 am alternator
 
This isn't advice, just our experience.  

Our boat was one of what seems to have been few SMs that were delivered with the "standard" 50 Amp alternator.  For the way we use our boat, that has been completely sufficient.  It supplies all the power we need when motoring, with enough left over to run the watermaker, or top off the batteries.  It's rare that we leave an anchorage with less than 80% charge in our batteries, so we are not normally asking the main engine alternator to deliver very much in the way of charge.  If we actually need to bulk charge the batteries while underway, we use the generator.


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Laurens Vos
 

Had the same problem with my bilge switch. A water sensor is a good safety device. 


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Scott,

 

This is really good info. Should I ever find myself in a similar situation I’ll be sure to follow your advice.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott SV Tengah
Sent: 02 November 2020 19:48
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Mark Erdos
 

Scott,

 

Glad to hear you found your issues.

 

Putting a water sensor on the tube is a GREAT idea!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Scott SV Tengah
Sent: Monday, November 2, 2020 8:48 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Just completed a 2900nm tough passage - two little switches almost ruined my month: Bilge Float Switch and Volvo D3-110C auxiliary stop

Scott SV Tengah
 

Hi all,

We just completed a 2900nm passage from Hawaii to French Polynesia with pretty rough upwind/up current conditions for the first 10 days or so. Just a bit longer than the Atlantic crossing but much more difficult, with days on end at 38-40 degrees apparent, bashing into current and waves. The second half was a bit better, but two little failed switches almost ruined our trip.

1) The on-off switch for our bilge pump float tube failed. I presume it's the original - 13 years old. Internally, it corroded and while it has been working perfectly during our ownership until now, the resistance finally got high enough that it didn't activate the bilge pump when the water level rose in the gray water bilge. The quick connect tabs are not well sealed and I believe this is how moisture gets into the switch.

The secondary bilge water level alarm on my A54 is located to port of the gray water bilge. Because this was a hard upwind port tack, the gray water (and saltwater from the anchor well and bow deck locker) pooled to starboard and NEARLY SUBMERGED THE ALTERNATORS. I would guess another few hours or another shower or two and it would have been an expensive problem.

I would suggest everyone check their bilge switches for resistance in the "on" position. Ours was approaching 500 ohms. It's a bit of a custom job, so you may want to plan on having a backup made or purchase one from Amel.

I also intend to install a water sensor on the float tube itself, in case we ever find ourselves on another multi-day port tack upwind adventure with a dead switch or bilge pump.

2) We have been having intermittent electrical issues with our Volvo D3-110C where it would turn off randomly, generally with the helm display going blank. Further, the Volvo displayed voltage was always 0.1-0.3v less than what we measured at the engine-side battery cables and less than what was displayed on our Onan remote panel.  I believe I have found the problem and I believe it's a design fault resulting from Volvo's adaptation of a car engine for marine use.

On the starboard side of the engine lid/cover is an "auxiliary stop button" that is normally closed and allows power to flow to the ECU. When you press this button, it opens the circuit and depowers the ECU, turning off the motor.

The problem is that this switch is not sealed and is in the path of the engine room intake fan. That means salty air is blown onto it and since it's not sealed, it will corrode internally over time. See attached photo. We had a motor that would die randomly and had major difficulty starting up as we were heading south from the doldrums into southerly winds.  Not a great place to have an intermittent motor.

After finding the problem, I simply butt connected the two wires leading into the aux stop switch and if we can't find a SEALED replacement switch, we will likely leave it as such. The aux stop switch is redundant there because you can always remove the ECU blade fuse right next to this faulty switch.

I'd suggest owners of the D3-110 check resistance on their aux stop switch. Also examine the quick connect spade connectors - both of mine were corroded from the constant flow of salty air.

Hope this helps someone.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

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