Date   
Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Mike,

We have a stainless arch with 3 solar panels on it and none of it is grounded. You may know also that the masts and rigging on an SM are not grounded either.
The only ground (Bonding) connections on our boat are metal items that are in continuous contact with salt water i.e. the main engine, generator, head pumps, salt water manifold. The reason for this is corrosion prevention, nothing to do with electrical protection. I don't think it's necessary to "ground" the solar controller; it's not in contact with salt water and therefore bonding is unnecessary.
Remember this "ground" is only for corrosion protection, it's not like the ground you have in hour home electrical supply...which really is ground (stake in the earth).
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
G21 Opua NZ

Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Everyone,

I've done some searching but haven't found a definitive answer. I'm curious for those of you with solar panels mounted on an aft arch (mine is aluminum)... do you have any grounding in place? My panels and arch have been in place for roughly two years and I haven't noticed any problems. No other equipment on the arch at this point. Does grounding just protect in the event of a panel failure/short/leak?

The MPPT controller is grounded to the generator. Is this OK?

Can anyone recommend some tests I could perform with the voltmeter to make sure everything is OK?

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

Re: Saint Maarten

Courtney Gorman
 

Thanks so much for the information 
Alexandre I will be there near the end of March 
Cheers 
Courtney 


On Jan 26, 2020, at 3:27 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:



I was just there a 6 weeks ago.  

I would NOT recommend the French side.  

On the Dutch side, I recommend first: Island Water World, they have the best price, I stayed there 3 months in 2017 and there was several other SM2K.  Just when you go to the dock, stay in the middle of the channel.  

The other options are Simpson Bay Marina, but it is quite more expensive and unjustified in my opinion if just storing the boat.


I should back Mid-Fev, may be we meet.  


Sincerely, Alexandre



On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 07:50:15 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:



Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour


Re: Saint Maarten

Matt Salatino
 

Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 3:40 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...> wrote:

6 weeks ago, Anse Marcel was still not repaired (from the Hurricane damages)



On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:33:09 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


There are several good marinas. Both on the Dutch side, in Simpson Bay, and on the French side, on the north. Anse Marcel Marina, on the French side, is very protected.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 2:50 PM, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1@...> wrote:


Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour



Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Sorry Leo, somehow I missed your earlier response about the seal dimensions (SD 20x26x4 radial). Thanks!

Bill - can you or anyone else out there confirm that the basic procedure and seal size is the same for the HBW250? I suppose I could get my hands dirty and find out... I'm just a bit shy when it comes to messing around with the transmission.

Thanks!
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

Re: Suggestions for Annapolis Sailboat Show 2020

Brian Riggs
 

Pat and Jay,

Thank you so much for the input! We'll look closely at the offerings, and we hope to see you, and others in the group, at and around the show.

Cheers!
Brian

Re: Saint Maarten

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

6 weeks ago, Anse Marcel was still not repaired (from the Hurricane damages)



On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:33:09 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


There are several good marinas. Both on the Dutch side, in Simpson Bay, and on the French side, on the north. Anse Marcel Marina, on the French side, is very protected.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 2:50 PM, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1@...> wrote:


Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour



Re: Saint Maarten

Matt Salatino
 

There are several good marinas. Both on the Dutch side, in Simpson Bay, and on the French side, on the north. Anse Marcel Marina, on the French side, is very protected.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Jan 26, 2020, at 2:50 PM, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1@...> wrote:


Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour



Re: Saint Maarten

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

I was just there a 6 weeks ago.  

I would NOT recommend the French side.  

On the Dutch side, I recommend first: Island Water World, they have the best price, I stayed there 3 months in 2017 and there was several other SM2K.  Just when you go to the dock, stay in the middle of the channel.  

The other options are Simpson Bay Marina, but it is quite more expensive and unjustified in my opinion if just storing the boat.


I should back Mid-Fev, may be we meet.  


Sincerely, Alexandre



On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 07:50:15 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:



Hi All I  would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour


Saint Maarten

Courtney Gorman
 

Hi All I would love a recommendation on where to leave my boat for a month in Saint Martin (Dockage)
Cheers
Courtney
svTrippin
54 #101
Secret Harbour

Re: Suggestions for Annapolis Sailboat Show 2020

Patrick McAneny
 

Brian, My wife and I have sailed down to Annapolis and attended the show for the last thirty plus years. Since we have always been on a boat, I can not address accommodations . There is little to tell you about the show ,except that the first day of the show is a Thursday ,which is VIP day and the ticket prices are about double on that day ,we have never attended on a Thursday. For us ,not being in the market for a boat or even equipment now days ,two days are plenty. Monday if you stay to the end of the day ,you can watch them break down the show ,with all the boats leaving at the same time ,kinda cool. You can buy the tickets online and save a little time getting in. 
One huge disappointment this year , they double the price on the Nutty Buddies (ice cream cones) from $3.00 to $6.00 .So after all these years of eating at least one a day ,its over ,I will not allow my taste buds be extorted like that. We may boycott the show next year ,it was great while it lasted, everything delicious must come to an end.
Hope this helps,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Riggs <7briggs@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jan 26, 2020 9:42 am
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Suggestions for Annapolis Sailboat Show 2020

Hi all,

My wife and I are interested in attending the sailboat show in Annapolis this year. Since we've never been, and since many of you have, some on several occasions, I'm requesting any input you may have. We're open to any thoughts from which tickets to purchase or avoid to accommodations and dining. We are currently boatless, so staying on our own vessel, while likely ideal, isn't an option.

Cheers!
Brian Riggs
Hampton Roads Area, Virginia

Suggestions for Annapolis Sailboat Show 2020

Brian Riggs
 

Hi all,

My wife and I are interested in attending the sailboat show in Annapolis this year. Since we've never been, and since many of you have, some on several occasions, I'm requesting any input you may have. We're open to any thoughts from which tickets to purchase or avoid to accommodations and dining. We are currently boatless, so staying on our own vessel, while likely ideal, isn't an option.

Cheers!
Brian Riggs
Hampton Roads Area, Virginia

Re: Crossing Pirate Waters

David Cummane
 

My small efforts to reduce spam type messages, unsigned,  were clearly futile.

During one period of my life I wore diapers.  I wasn’t o member of this forum then either.

David
Ker Marie
SM#101


On 26 Jan 2020, at 00:14, Orion Martin <poonz1@...> wrote:

Respectfully, I totally disagree with this comment. You were once a non-Amel owner...

I’m glad Bill has the good sense to find a solution i.e a subgroup for commercial postings. Thank you Bill for your work in keeping the Amel owners group going and keeping it inclusive for all interested participants.

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

James Alton
 

Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--

Re: Crossing Pirate Waters

Orion Martin
 

Respectfully, I totally disagree with this comment. You were once a non-Amel owner...

I’m glad Bill has the good sense to find a solution i.e a subgroup for commercial postings. Thank you Bill for your work in keeping the Amel owners group going and keeping it inclusive for all interested participants.

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Ruslan Osmonov
 

Thank you Bill. Agree about thought through, one of the big reasons why I’m looking at Amels. 

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 5:41 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Ruslan Osmonov,

Some of the most frustrating issues experienced by some Amel owners are the failure of systems or modifications made by previous owners. 

Valves fail in saltwater environments. Electrical sensors and switches fail.

I think that you should seriously reconsider the solution suggested by Charles Doane, who BTW, is not an Amel owner. Also, keep in mind that it is very possible that a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th owner of an Amel has no idea whether the mechanicals, including the exhaust system, are Amel OEM.

I recommend that you should be very cautious in designing a change to an Amel designed system, device, or procedure. Amel is not totally infallible, but in my experience, Amel has usually thought things out correctly and reached the best conclusion.

--

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 3:56 PM Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:
Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

 

Ruslan Osmonov,

Some of the most frustrating issues experienced by some Amel owners are the failure of systems or modifications made by previous owners. 

Valves fail in saltwater environments. Electrical sensors and switches fail.

I think that you should seriously reconsider the solution suggested by Charles Doane, who BTW, is not an Amel owner. Also, keep in mind that it is very possible that a 2nd, 3rd, or 4th owner of an Amel has no idea whether the mechanicals, including the exhaust system, are Amel OEM.

I recommend that you should be very cautious in designing a change to an Amel designed system, device, or procedure. Amel is not totally infallible, but in my experience, Amel has usually thought things out correctly and reached the best conclusion.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar

On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 3:56 PM Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:
Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Ruslan Osmonov
 

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

--

Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ


On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 

Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hello,

I'm having the same issue with my HBW250. I'm guessing the repair will be similar. Just wondering if anyone has changed this seal before and has any tips/suggestions? Also, can anyone confirm the seal dimensions? I found online it might be SD 20x26x4 radial. Would be nice to have the correct replacement on hand and do the job in one go.

Cheers,
Mike

On Wed, Jan 15, 2020, 5:13 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Bill
Many thanks for your speedy reply. I believe it's the seal that has gone as that is where it is leaking from. I will have a go at changing it. 

Many thanks for your help. 

Rob

FORESIGHT SM #152

On Tue, 14 Jan 2020, 16:25 CW Bill Rouse, <brouse@...> wrote:
Rob,

I have not personally experienced this issue. Your ZF 25 holds 0.75 liters of fluid. Is it possibly overfilled? You do not screw in the dipstick to check the level.

If not, it probably is a worn sealing ring. If so, maybe this will help you:

image.png
5.2 Removing and disassembling the
actuating lever cover plate

5.2.1 Always set actuating lever to neutral
position.
5.2.2 Remove hex nuts (22) from cover
plate (9), using 13 mm spanner (wrench),
and take off spring washers (4).
5.2.3 Remove cover plate assembly (12),
lever (6) and actuating cam (11).
5.2.4 Remove screw (7) from lever (6).
Pull off lever (6). Remove actuating cam
(11) and needle bearing (70) only in
models ZF 12 M - 15 M - 25 M - 30 M.
Remove actuating cam sealing ring (8).

==========================

6.3 Assembling the shifting fork in
gearbox section side shifting cover

6.3.1 Insert shifting fork (15) into gearbox
section (1) side the actuating lever
in such a way that the long arm of the
fork points downwards.
6.3.2 Insert shifting rod (16) through
bores in gearbox and shifting fork.
6.3.3 Fit screw plug (17) to gearbox,
making certain that the clearance between
shifting rod (16) and screw plug
(17) is min. 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
Seal screw plug with Loctite 242 (ZF 3
M - 5 M only O-Ring).
6.3.4 Check shifting fork for easy
movability.
6.4 Pre-assembling the actuating
lever cover plate

Use punch tool to press sealing ring (8)
into cover plate (9). Spread antifriction
bearing grease between sealing lips.

6.4.1 Insert actuating cam assembly (11)
into cover plate (9).
6.4.2 Fit actuating lever (6).
IMPORTANT:
Clearance between actuating lever and
cover plate 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
6.4.3 Clamp actuating lever by means
of retaining screw (7), using a 13 mm
spanner (wrench). Screw in with torque
of 20 Nm.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
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On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 8:28 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152