Date   

Re: Water coming in at portside from a previous wrong repair

Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...>
 

Hello Victor,

I agree with Bill to get a professional opinion!  But, I do have some comments and would like to know if they make sense.  

1.  Do not let anyone patch this from the inside.  This will continue to allow water to get into the fiberglass.  This repair would just be an infected bandaid causing more problems in the future.  You need to find the place where the water enters.

2.  Once you find the place where the water is entering - grind it down, pour lots of alcohol down the crack, then put some Creek Crack cure down it.

3.  Then a few layers of fiberglass, then some Gelcoat.

4.  I would not seal from the interior.  This might trap some moisture in your fiberglass causing more problems in the future.

Just something to think about.

Best,

Ken Powers
Aquarius


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Matt Salatino
 

If you REALLY want confusing, Japan’s power is 100 v. 
50 Hz in the east, and 60 Hz in the west. They use the same outlets as the US. 
That must make appliance manufacturers, crazy!

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 2, 2021, at 11:30 PM, Brent Cameron <brentcameron61@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]
[Reason: Typo]

Actually Matt is right, the US (and Canadian) standard is 120Volts AC +/- 5% (which is 114 to 126 Volts) at 60 Hertz.

Way back in the early days, Edison (who won the power battle with AC power over Tesla’s DC), had set the standard at 110 VAC to ensure that houses at the end of lines could at least get 100 VAC and many appliances were labeled that way but the standard was changed to 115V in about the 1930’s and then in 1984, the NEC mandated 120V +/- 5%.    It has been creeping up to make power transmission more efficient with the existing gauges of wire used.  

Normal residential power is delivered  as single phase from each leg of the transformer at 120 VAC to neutral with the other leg to neutral being 180 degrees out of phase (so the two hot wires together will give 240 VAC - still at 60 Hertz).   Industrial systems (and some marinas) use 3 phase power because it is more efficient and that system has three hot legs, each of which is at 120 VAC to neutral but 208 VAC to another leg as the power is out of phase by only 120˚.  Think of the power as coming in on a Sine wave oscillating at 60 Hertz.  When you combine those three phases together you get 360 degrees (or 120 degrees on each of three legs).     The net of it is that your boat can see anything from 208 to 240 VAC if you join two hot legs together or 120 VAC if you just use one hot leg to neutral.  All 60 Hertz and +/-5%.  

Most devices labelled 110VAC will have no difficulty at all at 120VAC.  NEMA rated motors will go +/- 10% of their nameplate voltages.   Old incandescent bulbs might burn a bit hotter (as might the element on your stove or hair dryer) but the motors will take to it just fine as will your electronics.

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Brent Cameron
 
Edited

Actually Matt is right, the US (and Canadian) standard is 120Volts AC +/- 5% (which is 114 to 126 Volts) at 60 Hertz.

Way back in the early days, Edison (who won the power battle with AC power over Tesla’s DC), had set the standard at 110 VAC to ensure that houses at the end of lines could at least get 100 VAC and many appliances were labeled that way but the standard was changed to 115V in about the 1930’s and then in 1984, the NEC mandated 120V +/- 5%.    It has been creeping up to make power transmission more efficient with the existing gauges of wire used.  

Normal residential power is delivered  as single phase from each leg of the transformer at 120 VAC to neutral with the other leg to neutral being 180 degrees out of phase (so the two hot wires together will give 240 VAC - still at 60 Hertz).   Industrial systems (and some marinas) use 3 phase power because it is more efficient and that system has three hot legs, each of which is at 120 VAC to neutral but 208 VAC to another leg as the power is out of phase by only 120˚.  Think of the power as coming in on a Sine wave oscillating at 60 Hertz.  When you combine those three phases together you get 360 degrees (or 120 degrees on each of three legs).     The net of it is that your boat can see anything from 208 to 240 VAC if you join two hot legs together or 120 VAC if you just use one hot leg to neutral.  All 60 Hertz and +/-5%.  

Most devices labelled 110VAC will have no difficulty at all at 120VAC.  NEMA rated motors will go +/- 10% of their nameplate voltages.   Old incandescent bulbs might burn a bit hotter (as might the element on your stove or hair dryer) but the motors will take to it just fine as will your electronics.

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Peter de Groot
 

Thank you Bill, Matt and Tom,
Just to clarify, when I refer to plugging into shore power, for this discussion I mean 230VAC 50A shore power in NorthAmerica.  (Yes 60 Hz).  The previous owners converted the Amel cable to feed 2 hot legs and a ground (no neutral).  Again, the previous owners claim (and I believe)were able to run the AC from this power source.

The wire removed was the A to B connection on the diagram

Peter
SM 207


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

 

Peter,

You definitely have a ground fault in some device on your boat. A ground fault will trip a pedestal breaker in a marina much faster than a ground fault will trip the main breaker on your 220-volt panel because the sensitivity for ground faults in a marina is very high, especially in the US where marinas do not want to be sued for injury.

I suggest you get an electrician to isolate which device is causing a ground fault.
The most common is the water heater which develops pinholes in the heating element, and the second most common is the Climma AC/Heat units. There are many different causes of ground faults in the Climma units with the most expensive being a ground fault inside the compressor.

Write me at brouse@... or call at the number below. I am in the US Central time zone. WhatsAp or Signal work for me. 
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 4:44 PM Peter de Groot <pandmdegroot@...> wrote:


Greetings,
I’m hoping someone has run into this before, and can shed some light.  I have the feeling the answer is staring me right in the face and I just can’t see it.

For 3 years of owning la Querida SM#207 I’ve always run the heaters and Air Conditioning from generator power.  The marina where I was berthed only offered a 30A 120VAC circuit.  Now that we’re in Mexico, we’ve had occasion to run the water heater and Air Conditioning from shore power.  It has not gone well.  Upon plugging into shore power the breaker on the side of the 220VAC load center in the galley immediately tripped.  Mind you this is North American 220(230) VAC with two hot legs and no neutral.  Together with an electrician we found the offending circuit and disconnected the blue (normally neutral) wire and all circuits worked except the Climma air conditioning.  Restoring that connection A to B in the diagram above, the Air conditioning works being powered from the generator.  However the main breaker trips immediately when connected to shore power.  Power feed “1” comes off the main power distribution, no circuit separate circuit breaker.  Power feed “2” comes off the “Climma” individual breaker on the Amel Panel.

Measuring voltage from “B” to a brown junction point reads 125VAC.  From “B” to a blue wire junction point (normally neutral) also reads about 125 VAC.  “B” to ground is open.

The electrician did his work three ports ago (and we were sailing the next day) when our priority was to get the hot water heater to work without bothering the neighbors with generator noise and exhaust.  Now our priority is getting the air conditioning working from shore power.  We’re much further south and the cabin is a sauna most evenings.  The previous owner was on board for a week in Zihuatenejo and reiterated he was able to run all circuits (including the air conditioning) from shore power.  He also did his cruising in Mexico with 2 hot leg 230VAC power.

Any tips or similar past experience/solutions would be welcome.

Peter de Groot
la Querida, SM#207
now in Barra de Navidad
(just back from Ixtapa where the mosquitoes forced us to close the hatches making the problem worse)


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Matt Salatino
 

One thing to keep in mind, US power is 120 volts, 60 hz, not 110.
Easy mistake to make.
Even our A50 with the US power option is labeled 110 volts.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 2, 2021, at 6:48 PM, Thomas Peacock <peacock8491@...> wrote:

Being in the US, we have also had to occasionally run on a shore pedestal that puts out 30 amps at 110 volts. The transformer in the engine room then converts that to 220 volts, which, I have always assumed, yields only about 15 amps. Once that feeds into the 220 panel, I have, again, always assumed that the panel cannot tell what the original voltage was, it just sees 220 in a European wiring configuration. Obviously, the Hertz will be 60, whereas with the generator it is 50. 
I’m not sure what wire your electrician disconnected, but I would be VERY reluctant to mess with the original Amel wiring. 
That said, you cannot run both the AC units and the water heater on US (or Mexican) 30 amp 110 volts. There just isn’t enough juice. Check the watts on all your devices. 30 amps at 110 volts should only be able to give you about 3,300 watts.
By the breaker, do you mean the 32 amp breaker on the 220 volt box?
As always, I am not an electrician. Past results do not predict future returns. I’m sure others may add more expertise.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay 

On Feb 2, 2021, at 5:44 PM, Peter de Groot <pandmdegroot@...> wrote:


<B87D5313-A35F-4F7C-9F56-612E08B1201E.jpeg>


Greetings,
I’m hoping someone has run into this before, and can shed some light.  I have the feeling the answer is staring me right in the face and I just can’t see it.

For 3 years of owning la Querida SM#207 I’ve always run the heaters and Air Conditioning from generator power.  The marina where I was berthed only offered a 30A 120VAC circuit.  Now that we’re in Mexico, we’ve had occasion to run the water heater and Air Conditioning from shore power.  It has not gone well.  Upon plugging into shore power the breaker on the side of the 220VAC load center in the galley immediately tripped.  Mind you this is North American 220(230) VAC with two hot legs and no neutral.  Together with an electrician we found the offending circuit and disconnected the blue (normally neutral) wire and all circuits worked except the Climma air conditioning.  Restoring that connection A to B in the diagram above, the Air conditioning works being powered from the generator.  However the main breaker trips immediately when connected to shore power.  Power feed “1” comes off the main power distribution, no circuit separate circuit breaker.  Power feed “2” comes off the “Climma” individual breaker on the Amel Panel.

Measuring voltage from “B” to a brown junction point reads 125VAC.  From “B” to a blue wire junction point (normally neutral) also reads about 125 VAC.  “B” to ground is open.

The electrician did his work three ports ago (and we were sailing the next day) when our priority was to get the hot water heater to work without bothering the neighbors with generator noise and exhaust.  Now our priority is getting the air conditioning working from shore power.  We’re much further south and the cabin is a sauna most evenings.  The previous owner was on board for a week in Zihuatenejo and reiterated he was able to run all circuits (including the air conditioning) from shore power.  He also did his cruising in Mexico with 2 hot leg 230VAC power.

Any tips or similar past experience/solutions would be welcome.

Peter de Groot
la Querida, SM#207
now in Barra de Navidad
(just back from Ixtapa where the mosquitoes forced us to close the hatches making the problem worse)

--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Thomas Peacock
 

Being in the US, we have also had to occasionally run on a shore pedestal that puts out 30 amps at 110 volts. The transformer in the engine room then converts that to 220 volts, which, I have always assumed, yields only about 15 amps. Once that feeds into the 220 panel, I have, again, always assumed that the panel cannot tell what the original voltage was, it just sees 220 in a European wiring configuration. Obviously, the Hertz will be 60, whereas with the generator it is 50. 
I’m not sure what wire your electrician disconnected, but I would be VERY reluctant to mess with the original Amel wiring. 
That said, you cannot run both the AC units and the water heater on US (or Mexican) 30 amp 110 volts. There just isn’t enough juice. Check the watts on all your devices. 30 amps at 110 volts should only be able to give you about 3,300 watts.
By the breaker, do you mean the 32 amp breaker on the 220 volt box?
As always, I am not an electrician. Past results do not predict future returns. I’m sure others may add more expertise.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay 

On Feb 2, 2021, at 5:44 PM, Peter de Groot <pandmdegroot@...> wrote:


<B87D5313-A35F-4F7C-9F56-612E08B1201E.jpeg>


Greetings,
I’m hoping someone has run into this before, and can shed some light.  I have the feeling the answer is staring me right in the face and I just can’t see it.

For 3 years of owning la Querida SM#207 I’ve always run the heaters and Air Conditioning from generator power.  The marina where I was berthed only offered a 30A 120VAC circuit.  Now that we’re in Mexico, we’ve had occasion to run the water heater and Air Conditioning from shore power.  It has not gone well.  Upon plugging into shore power the breaker on the side of the 220VAC load center in the galley immediately tripped.  Mind you this is North American 220(230) VAC with two hot legs and no neutral.  Together with an electrician we found the offending circuit and disconnected the blue (normally neutral) wire and all circuits worked except the Climma air conditioning.  Restoring that connection A to B in the diagram above, the Air conditioning works being powered from the generator.  However the main breaker trips immediately when connected to shore power.  Power feed “1” comes off the main power distribution, no circuit separate circuit breaker.  Power feed “2” comes off the “Climma” individual breaker on the Amel Panel.

Measuring voltage from “B” to a brown junction point reads 125VAC.  From “B” to a blue wire junction point (normally neutral) also reads about 125 VAC.  “B” to ground is open.

The electrician did his work three ports ago (and we were sailing the next day) when our priority was to get the hot water heater to work without bothering the neighbors with generator noise and exhaust.  Now our priority is getting the air conditioning working from shore power.  We’re much further south and the cabin is a sauna most evenings.  The previous owner was on board for a week in Zihuatenejo and reiterated he was able to run all circuits (including the air conditioning) from shore power.  He also did his cruising in Mexico with 2 hot leg 230VAC power.

Any tips or similar past experience/solutions would be welcome.

Peter de Groot
la Querida, SM#207
now in Barra de Navidad
(just back from Ixtapa where the mosquitoes forced us to close the hatches making the problem worse)

--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Climma Air Conditioning from shore power

Peter de Groot
 



Greetings,
I’m hoping someone has run into this before, and can shed some light.  I have the feeling the answer is staring me right in the face and I just can’t see it.

For 3 years of owning la Querida SM#207 I’ve always run the heaters and Air Conditioning from generator power.  The marina where I was berthed only offered a 30A 120VAC circuit.  Now that we’re in Mexico, we’ve had occasion to run the water heater and Air Conditioning from shore power.  It has not gone well.  Upon plugging into shore power the breaker on the side of the 220VAC load center in the galley immediately tripped.  Mind you this is North American 220(230) VAC with two hot legs and no neutral.  Together with an electrician we found the offending circuit and disconnected the blue (normally neutral) wire and all circuits worked except the Climma air conditioning.  Restoring that connection A to B in the diagram above, the Air conditioning works being powered from the generator.  However the main breaker trips immediately when connected to shore power.  Power feed “1” comes off the main power distribution, no circuit separate circuit breaker.  Power feed “2” comes off the “Climma” individual breaker on the Amel Panel.

Measuring voltage from “B” to a brown junction point reads 125VAC.  From “B” to a blue wire junction point (normally neutral) also reads about 125 VAC.  “B” to ground is open.

The electrician did his work three ports ago (and we were sailing the next day) when our priority was to get the hot water heater to work without bothering the neighbors with generator noise and exhaust.  Now our priority is getting the air conditioning working from shore power.  We’re much further south and the cabin is a sauna most evenings.  The previous owner was on board for a week in Zihuatenejo and reiterated he was able to run all circuits (including the air conditioning) from shore power.  He also did his cruising in Mexico with 2 hot leg 230VAC power.

Any tips or similar past experience/solutions would be welcome.

Peter de Groot
la Querida, SM#207
now in Barra de Navidad
(just back from Ixtapa where the mosquitoes forced us to close the hatches making the problem worse)


Re: How much Solar?

Wolfgang Weber <webercardio@...>
 

Hello to the group,
We have 600Ah/24V wetcell batteries and no solar which is good for sailing the Med-sea.
The problem with this configuration is you start the onan and charger with 100-80 A and charging will decrease to 30-40 A after 1/2-1 .
So first step for me is to switch to 600Ah Lithium batteries before adding any solarcells.
Stay healthy!
Wolfgang Weber SY Elise Amel 54#162






Re: Solid cockpit roof on Super Maramu

michael winand
 

Thanks for sharing.  Could you please advise on the approximate hours to construct your own?
Thanks, Michael, Nebo sm251 


On Wed, 3 Feb 2021 at 2:53 am, Ann-Sofie
<ann-sofie@...> wrote:
As per request we have made a short film about our cockpit roof on our SuperMaramu S/Y Lady Annila.
Please follow this URL https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i9dzki9zbz2s4mv/AAA1Nv70ovxLvpMuDCQHAUG1a?dl=0

Regards
Annsofie & Jonas
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998
Present in Algarve, Portugal


Re: How much Solar?

Justin Maguire
 

Congratulations on Makemo!

 

I had no idea that the generator run time was that much – wow! Solar and Lithium would transform your world for sure!

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chantal & Alain sv Makemo
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2021 12:50 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] How much Solar?

 

Hello Billy,
we acquired 4 months ago Makemo, Amel 55 nº1 and we are experiencing all the fixtures.
today with one fridge and one freezer, we are consuming about 200Ah/day at the mooring and much more while sailing with everything on. We only have 2x 185w solar panels on our davitts producing in the West Indies between 1.2 and 1.5kwh in January (8am till 5pm more or less).
Therefore we are using the genset everyday min 2.5 h up to 4h.
We are looking for increasing our solar capacity replacing ours panels with 2x 370 or 440w new panels located at the  same place.
it should deliver 2x mini representing 2-3 of our consumption at the mooring.
our batteries are AGM 660Ah (24v).
we would also like to put flexi panels in the hard top but we have not yet identified a good way to put the cables.
Happy to exchange your project when defined.
regards

 


Re: How much Solar?

Chantal & Alain sv Makemo
 

Hello Billy,
we acquired 4 months ago Makemo, Amel 55 nº1 and we are experiencing all the fixtures.
today with one fridge and one freezer, we are consuming about 200Ah/day at the mooring and much more while sailing with everything on. We only have 2x 185w solar panels on our davitts producing in the West Indies between 1.2 and 1.5kwh in January (8am till 5pm more or less).
Therefore we are using the genset everyday min 2.5 h up to 4h.
We are looking for increasing our solar capacity replacing ours panels with 2x 370 or 440w new panels located at the  same place.
it should deliver 2x mini representing 2-3 of our consumption at the mooring.
our batteries are AGM 660Ah (24v).
we would also like to put flexi panels in the hard top but we have not yet identified a good way to put the cables.
Happy to exchange your project when defined.
regards


Solid cockpit roof on Super Maramu

Ann-Sofie, S/Y Lady Annila
 

As per request we have made a short film about our cockpit roof on our SuperMaramu S/Y Lady Annila.
Please follow this URL https://www.dropbox.com/sh/i9dzki9zbz2s4mv/AAA1Nv70ovxLvpMuDCQHAUG1a?dl=0

Regards
Annsofie & Jonas
S/Y Lady Annila, SM 232, 1998
Present in Algarve, Portugal


Re: Water coming in at portside from a previous wrong repair

 

Victor,

I believe that you should get a professional opinion/survey.

I suggest that you ask the most qualified person I know.
Olivier BEAUTE / ATLANTIC YACHT SURVEY
32 avenue des Corsaires
17000 LA ROCHELLE
Tel: +33 546 522 147   Mob: +33 674 028 243
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 7:09 AM VICTOR MOLERO <victor.moleroxx@...> wrote:
Hello all.
 A few yeras back, while in the marina a strong storm caused a collision of my SM with the boat moored to our portside. It was repaired but since then we have noticed water in the kitchen, right under the stove. I think that I have finally found from the inside what the source of water may be (only when it rains), and seems to be on the fibreglass. Does anyone have any recomendation to fix this? Should I just put a patch of fibre glass on top of the affected area inside the boat, or should I do something also at the outside (by the rubrail)? I am attaching some pictures. Any recomendation will be more than welcome.
Victor
SM314 Alendoy 


Water coming in at portside from a previous wrong repair

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Hello all.
 A few yeras back, while in the marina a strong storm caused a collision of my SM with the boat moored to our portside. It was repaired but since then we have noticed water in the kitchen, right under the stove. I think that I have finally found from the inside what the source of water may be (only when it rains), and seems to be on the fibreglass. Does anyone have any recomendation to fix this? Should I just put a patch of fibre glass on top of the affected area inside the boat, or should I do something also at the outside (by the rubrail)? I am attaching some pictures. Any recomendation will be more than welcome.
Victor
SM314 Alendoy 


Re: Cracked Forestay Chainplate

Ellen Cahill
 

Thank you very much for the detailed explanation. The fracture was not in fact on a weld but rather on a bend. Even if it was bent under proper heat tratments I suspect that it still caused stress concentrators to occur in this area. The fracture surface looks very similar indeed to yours Bill, mostly dull and grainy with signs of slow crack propagation. 

So careful inspection and regular washing seems to be the best preventative solution before replacing parts. 


Re: How much Solar?

Justin Maguire
 

Has anyone experienced the 50 with the lithium? 

My new 50..  which because of covid I won’t set foot on until April 1 when she arrives in the US... has 800ah of 24v mastervolt lithium (which I could almost not believe). 

I’ve got the new gn-espace induction stove...

She currently has 600watts of solar on the davits, and 575 on the hard top... I could go up to 1000 on the davits by wanted to see if this setup would work before making the davits into a full blown flight deck 🤣

Anyway.. I’m dying to see what the real world usage will be and how often I’ll have to run the gen set... ideally this setup should provide for a very independent and luxurious setup but real world vs. theory are always different...

Anyone out there have the lithium on the 50 (or the 60 for that matter as it’s the same)?

Scott - your numbers make me sooper optimistic...

Aching to see my new baby in person...

Sv Fregata - amel50 #43



Cheers,
-Justin 



On Feb 1, 2021, at 16:44, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:


Hello Billy, I just increased my solar to 2 @ 335w panels on a stern arch (670w total). In January in Antigua I'm averaging just under 3kw per day but it is increasing slightly as the days get longer. Location around the island impacts cloud cover! (Currently ranging from 2.5kW to 3.6KW)

We typically consume about 140AH (3.7KW) at anchor. So I have a daily deficit that ranges from 5AH to 40AH. 

I have 400 AH of LiFePo4, so I can now go extended time without running the genset. Basically I run the genset when I want to run the watermaker and then add 30-60amps of charging to load the generator up to about 19-21 amps and add some charge to the batteries.

This is so much better than when I was running the generator daily to keep the batteries charged.

The downside of my new situation is that I used to also keep the water heater hot with the daily generator runs. Now I need to rewire my 230v side so that I can periodically run the water heater from the inverter.

Hope that helps with and additional data point. 

Best regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 11:49 AM Billy Newport <billy@...> wrote:
I dont know if this has been addressed before but besides an answer of as much as possible, what are peoples experiences? 
My 55 currently has 750W (2 × 375w LG) on the davitts. I am debating bumping this to 3 panels.

I dont have lithium and dont intend to do that ub
Neil my new GELs die, hopefully in 4 or 5 years.

I suspect 750W will be enough in a sunny location at anchor to avoid running the generator most days. Our boat drops from 100% to 70% overnight or about 200aH. So, at anchor, I figure just under 400aH a day or about 5kw. I dont know if that's high or now. Our boat is pretty stock as fitted.
If I'm moving then I will need to run the genset no matter what because of radar, auto pilot etc, I suspect. 
I'd appreciate other people's experience with Amels.

Billy
Amel 55#56


Re: How much Solar?

Dan Carlson
 

Hello Billy, I just increased my solar to 2 @ 335w panels on a stern arch (670w total). In January in Antigua I'm averaging just under 3kw per day but it is increasing slightly as the days get longer. Location around the island impacts cloud cover! (Currently ranging from 2.5kW to 3.6KW)

We typically consume about 140AH (3.7KW) at anchor. So I have a daily deficit that ranges from 5AH to 40AH. 

I have 400 AH of LiFePo4, so I can now go extended time without running the genset. Basically I run the genset when I want to run the watermaker and then add 30-60amps of charging to load the generator up to about 19-21 amps and add some charge to the batteries.

This is so much better than when I was running the generator daily to keep the batteries charged.

The downside of my new situation is that I used to also keep the water heater hot with the daily generator runs. Now I need to rewire my 230v side so that I can periodically run the water heater from the inverter.

Hope that helps with and additional data point. 

Best regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM #387



On Mon, Feb 1, 2021, 11:49 AM Billy Newport <billy@...> wrote:
I dont know if this has been addressed before but besides an answer of as much as possible, what are peoples experiences? 
My 55 currently has 750W (2 × 375w LG) on the davitts. I am debating bumping this to 3 panels.

I dont have lithium and dont intend to do that ub
Neil my new GELs die, hopefully in 4 or 5 years.

I suspect 750W will be enough in a sunny location at anchor to avoid running the generator most days. Our boat drops from 100% to 70% overnight or about 200aH. So, at anchor, I figure just under 400aH a day or about 5kw. I dont know if that's high or now. Our boat is pretty stock as fitted.
If I'm moving then I will need to run the genset no matter what because of radar, auto pilot etc, I suspect. 
I'd appreciate other people's experience with Amels.

Billy
Amel 55#56


Re: Cracked Forestay Chainplate

Matt Salatino
 

It’s likely that the “Y” had to be welded.
It’s very difficult to maintain the metallurgy of stainless, the proper mix of chromium, nickel, etc, through the welding process. Putting that welded chainplate on the bow, constantly washed by salt water, is asking for trouble. No wonder they changed the design. Good move.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt Salatino A50 #27

On Feb 1, 2021, at 5:21 PM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

For what it's worth, it looks like Amel changed the forestay chainplate design for the Super Maramu.  Our forestay chainplate is one solid piece of stainless steel:

<IMG_20201213_170323993.jpg>

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Cracked Forestay Chainplate

Mark McGovern
 

For what it's worth, it looks like Amel changed the forestay chainplate design for the Super Maramu.  Our forestay chainplate is one solid piece of stainless steel:



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Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

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