Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hurth Transmission Coolers

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Thanks for the great information !!!

Does any one know if this is the same issue on the ZF Transmission?

Also does any one know a supplier to get a spare hose for the transmission:
http://nikimat.com/volvo_tmd22p_missing_hoses.html
the purple one is for the transmission.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Ric




--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 8/26/16, greatketch@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hurth Transmission Coolers
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, August 26, 2016, 9:09 PM


 









One of the things that Joel told me to
keep on my maintenance schedule was inspection of the Hurth
Transmission cooler for corrosion.  Many thanks to him for
mentioning it, it is something I would have missed.  Sure
enough, mine needed to be replaced.
It's very much a crappy
design:  A cast aluminum box made part of the engine
galvanic electrical circuit.  Not surprising that it has
issues. I have read rumors that there is a stainless steel
version also available, but that would have its own
problems.  Stainless has a much lower thermal conductivity
than aluminum, so it wouldn't cool as
efficiently. 
I installed a new aluminum
cooler, and modified it to accept a zinc anode.  You can
see photos and some more details on our blog here:  An
engine project.


An
engine project. One
of the great things that came to us when we purchased this
boat was the experience of the yacht broker who arranged the
sale.  Joel has a vast store&nbs...




View on fetchinketch.net


Preview by Yahoo

Bill
KinneyHarmonie, SM
#160Block Island,
RI"Men and ships rot in
port."http://fetchinketch.net 









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Re: espar ducting

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

Eric,

We cut off the original Amel ducting inside the cockpit locker and replaced it with Eberspächer-brand silencer  (where it fit) and with heater-rated marine ducting (where Espar silencers are too long to fit or where the Amel curves are too much for the Espar silencers).

Obviously where the ducting actually goes into the locker bulkheads aft and fwd, we simply joined in with the factory flimsy-looking ducting.

We cruised the boat continuously during the 2015/2016 winter season and ran the heater hundreds of hours, all copacetic.  

I guess the Amel factory ducting is actually better quality than it looks, but I am still glad the areas closest to the heater have improved ducting.

Cheerio,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
At anchor, Olbia


1978 Maramu in Marmaris Turkey

karkauai
 

Hi  all,

I have a friend who is interested in a 1978 Maramu for sail in Marmaris Turkey.

Amel Maramu for sale Turkey, Amel boats for sale, Amel used boat sales, Amel Sailing Yachts For Sale Classic 1978 Amel Maramu Ketch 46 - Apollo Duck


Does any one know this boat?  It's owner is Bob Wall, I don't know the boats name or hill number.

Thanks,

Kent

SM243

Kristy



espar ducting

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Espar d5lc knob broke..replacement?

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

Alexandre,

Write: 

info@...

I bought the wireless remote control for my Espar D5 from them, and they sell parts.   Any time I wrote them before and after purchase, they wrote considered, personalised responses.  Their website is heatso.com, but I get the feeling not everything is on their website.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K n. 350
At anchor, Olbia (Sardinia)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Latches for lockers and drawers

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Oman won't start!

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Which Autopilot drive Rotary or Linear?

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Latches for lockers and drawers

eric freedman
 


Hurth Transmission Coolers

greatketch@...
 

One of the things that Joel told me to keep on my maintenance schedule was inspection of the Hurth Transmission cooler for corrosion.  Many thanks to him for mentioning it, it is something I would have missed.  Sure enough, mine needed to be replaced.


It's very much a crappy design:  A cast aluminum box made part of the engine galvanic electrical circuit.  Not surprising that it has issues. I have read rumors that there is a stainless steel version also available, but that would have its own problems.  Stainless has a much lower thermal conductivity than aluminum, so it wouldn't cool as efficiently. 


I installed a new aluminum cooler, and modified it to accept a zinc anode.  You can see photos and some more details on our blog here:  An engine project.


Bill Kinney

Harmonie, SM #160

Block Island, RI

"Men and ships rot in port."

http://fetchinketch.net

 


Oman won't start!

Mawgan grace
 

Hi all. I haven't run my 3yr old Onan generator for about 1-2months. It turns over but won't even think about starting. I've changed the fuel filter, both relays and water pump. The fuel pump is ticking away and my main fuel tank has just over half fuel level left. I've primed it for 30sec to a minute but no joy. Any ideas??

Thanks

Mawgan
SM Jovic #310
Gold Coast Hong Kong

SM Jovic #310
Hong Kong Gold Coast


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Given the amount of condensation over the winter yep pump it. 
Second depending on location keep a dehumidifier going and draining into the bilge is a good way to reduce the MOLD factor. And yes you have to put full strength anti freeze in the bilge too. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Aug 26, 2016, at 18:42, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Any reason we couldn't power the bilge pump from the battery side of the main switches?  That's how my charger is wired.

I really don't think a functioning sump pump is necessary when on the hard, but when in the water, it would be nice to have a functioning sump pump, but turn everything else off.
Kent "Patch"
SM 243
Kristy 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

karkauai
 

Any reason we couldn't power the bilge pump from the battery side of the main switches?  That's how my charger is wired.

I really don't think a functioning sump pump is necessary when on the hard, but when in the water, it would be nice to have a functioning sump pump, but turn everything else off.
Kent "Patch"
SM 243
Kristy 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

Patrick McAneny
 

Joel, I have always noticed that about you , can't drag an opinion out of you . Anyway , Thanks again for looking through your stash for a new prop . Maud is back , emailed me and will be sending one out on Monday . Have a good weekend.
Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2016 3:51 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

 
DOH! Pat, you are correct. When I said to shut off ALL the circuit breakers if you leave the red handled positive and negative master switches just next to the batteries in the ON position, I should have mentioned ALL EXCEPT THE BILGE PUMP BREAKER IN THE ENGINE ROOM. On every unmodified ( don’t get me started…) SM 53 I have seen, the bilge pump power supply is indeed cut off when you turn off both red handled master switches. And while I expect a happy go lucky Irishman like yourself to generally be cracking wise, regarding suggestions, you know I never have much of an opinion about anything. I’ll alert Joe privately, thanks for the catch.
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2016 2:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?
 
 
Joel, I am in the habit of turning off the main breakers when I leave the boat for any time, just feel better about it. That's with one exception , that electric to my bilge pump is also shut off. Is that just my boat or all SMs ? I am accustomed to bilge pumps being directly wired to the batteries . On one hand , I like not having electric running through the boat , but don't like , not having the bilge pump electrified . Thoughts, suggestions , I know you have them .
Wisecrack intended,
Pat SM#123

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2016 1:19 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?
 
Hello Joe. All good advice regarding drainage while on the hard. Pat is very correct about a positive bow up angle. Place a level on the cockpit sole and make sure the bubble is floating forward. Otherwise any water that gets inside won’t be able to flow aft to the bilge sump in the engine room. While even more important for longer term storage than the 2 months you’ll be absent, an incredible amount of water can make its way inside the boat during tropical waves, depressions, storms and hurricanes through the anchor hawse and the masts. It is a good idea to get an expanding foam product at any hardware store  like GREAT STUFF greatstuff ‘dot‘ dow ‘dot’ com and fill the hawse hole that the anchor chain goes down to prevent water coming in. It works even better if you separate the chain from the anchor and drop the chain into the chain locker ( and put the anchor out of sight in a foredeck locker for safe keeping ), but you can use the foam around the anchor chain and it will stop almost all the water. Very easy to remove the foam and if you are lazy, a trip or two through the windlass makes it go away. Quite a bit of water can come in through the main mast in a driving rainstorm. Make sure that the small waterway passage (under the main mast inside the boat just overhead and outboard of the forward head ) that goes from the water trap that catches any water coming in from the mast ( all the mast wires for lights and electronics run through this water trap ) that feeds this water to the drain hole that is close to the shower head ( that allows the water to escape into the shower drain pan and make its way aft to the bilge sump ) is open and clear. I don’t know how the seeds the birds ‘expel’ while sitting in the rig end up inside the mast and then into this water trap, but they do and plug up the drain with not good results when the water trap overflows. Here in Florida, we check them monthly on the boats I have for sale or under my care. Yours was clean and clear when you left! If you leave the battery switches on, be sure to turn of ALL the dc/12-24 volt breakers. ALL including the ones in the hanging locker next to/aft of the navigation desk, and all the ones for the winches, windlass, furlers and all the ones in the engine room too. The stories I could tell you after 35 years of Amel adventures would seem too far-fetched to be believed but if the breaker ain’t on, nothing bad can happen to flatten the batteries. Or worse. I’ll tell you over an adult beverage next time we meet. Be sure to test the bilge pump switch for easy reliable operation. It’s a good time to carefully take the assembly for the bilge pump floater switch apart and clean it meticulously of all dirt, grease, hair and other nasty stuff. If not cleaned, this ‘goop’ can harden when it dries if it isn’t getting wet every day, and trap the switch float in the off or on position. Seen it happen twice. Not good either way. Be sure that the boat stands/cradle don’t cover up the cockpit drains ( unlikely but…) or the bilge pump exit .
Now you won’t wake up in the middle of the night and wonder ‘what if’.
Have fun with your Amel!
Joel
Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
954 462 5869 office
954 812 2485 cell
 

With 4.5 stars in iTunes, the Yahoo Mail app is the highest rated email app on the market. What are you waiting for? Now you can access all your inboxes (Gmail, Outlook, AOL and more) in one place. Never delete an email again with 1000GB of free cloud storage.

·        New Members 3
 
.


Interior varnish.

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi all
I have always thought the quality of the varnished timberwork on the SM to be a remarkable feature. I have never seen better on any boat and few maintain that quality for the years that an Amel does
To maintain that I have regularly gone over ever square inch of varnish with a good furniture polish. Just completed another polish and it looks so good, the timber glows. Takes a while but makes a change from engine room work.
Danny
Sm 299
Ocean Pearl


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

amelforme
 

DOH! Pat, you are correct. When I said to shut off ALL the circuit breakers if you leave the red handled positive and negative master switches just next to the batteries in the ON position, I should have mentioned ALL EXCEPT THE BILGE PUMP BREAKER IN THE ENGINE ROOM. On every unmodified ( don’t get me started…) SM 53 I have seen, the bilge pump power supply is indeed cut off when you turn off both red handled master switches. And while I expect a happy go lucky Irishman like yourself to generally be cracking wise, regarding suggestions, you know I never have much of an opinion about anything. I’ll alert Joe privately, thanks for the catch.

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2016 2:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

 

 

Joel, I am in the habit of turning off the main breakers when I leave the boat for any time, just feel better about it. That's with one exception , that electric to my bilge pump is also shut off. Is that just my boat or all SMs ? I am accustomed to bilge pumps being directly wired to the batteries . On one hand , I like not having electric running through the boat , but don't like , not having the bilge pump electrified . Thoughts, suggestions , I know you have them .

Wisecrack intended,

Pat SM#123

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2016 1:19 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

 

Hello Joe. All good advice regarding drainage while on the hard. Pat is very correct about a positive bow up angle. Place a level on the cockpit sole and make sure the bubble is floating forward. Otherwise any water that gets inside won’t be able to flow aft to the bilge sump in the engine room. While even more important for longer term storage than the 2 months you’ll be absent, an incredible amount of water can make its way inside the boat during tropical waves, depressions, storms and hurricanes through the anchor hawse and the masts. It is a good idea to get an expanding foam product at any hardware store  like GREAT STUFF greatstuff ‘dot‘ dow ‘dot’ com and fill the hawse hole that the anchor chain goes down to prevent water coming in. It works even better if you separate the chain from the anchor and drop the chain into the chain locker ( and put the anchor out of sight in a foredeck locker for safe keeping ), but you can use the foam around the anchor chain and it will stop almost all the water. Very easy to remove the foam and if you are lazy, a trip or two through the windlass makes it go away. Quite a bit of water can come in through the main mast in a driving rainstorm. Make sure that the small waterway passage (under the main mast inside the boat just overhead and outboard of the forward head ) that goes from the water trap that catches any water coming in from the mast ( all the mast wires for lights and electronics run through this water trap ) that feeds this water to the drain hole that is close to the shower head ( that allows the water to escape into the shower drain pan and make its way aft to the bilge sump ) is open and clear. I don’t know how the seeds the birds ‘expel’ while sitting in the rig end up inside the mast and then into this water trap, but they do and plug up the drain with not good results when the water trap overflows. Here in Florida, we check them monthly on the boats I have for sale or under my care. Yours was clean and clear when you left! If you leave the battery switches on, be sure to turn of ALL the dc/12-24 volt breakers. ALL including the ones in the hanging locker next to/aft of the navigation desk, and all the ones for the winches, windlass, furlers and all the ones in the engine room too. The stories I could tell you after 35 years of Amel adventures would seem too far-fetched to be believed but if the breaker ain’t on, nothing bad can happen to flatten the batteries. Or worse. I’ll tell you over an adult beverage next time we meet. Be sure to test the bilge pump switch for easy reliable operation. It’s a good time to carefully take the assembly for the bilge pump floater switch apart and clean it meticulously of all dirt, grease, hair and other nasty stuff. If not cleaned, this ‘goop’ can harden when it dries if it isn’t getting wet every day, and trap the switch float in the off or on position. Seen it happen twice. Not good either way. Be sure that the boat stands/cradle don’t cover up the cockpit drains ( unlikely but…) or the bilge pump exit .

Now you won’t wake up in the middle of the night and wonder ‘what if’.

Have fun with your Amel!

Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 


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·        New Members 3

 

.



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Which Autopilot drive Rotary or Linear?

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill, that's the irony of storm sails. In building conditions we can be quite comfortable sailing with the big Genoa part furled, but those same conditions are beyond what we want to face on the fore deck handing that huge sail. A hard call. When having a new 150% headsail made I told the sail maker not to weight the cloth for the moderate winds the full sail would be used in, but for the strong winds it would be used in partly furled. Their first try was way too light and I sent it back and they provided the right weight at their cost.
Cheers
Danny
Sm 299
Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On Aug 27, 2016 1:54 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul,

We had a new ATN "Gale Sail" on board, but the conditions prohibited bending this sail on to the Genoa Furler. I sold the Gale Sail afterwards...it had never been used. We mostly used about 2.3 meters of the Genoa and about half of the Mizzen for most of the high winds. When winds subsided to about 35kts, we added about 50% the main and more of the Genoa. We preferred to keep the boat speed under 7kts.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 8:44 AM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thank you Bill!

That trigger an other question,
What canvas did you use at that condition?
We made very good speed at 30 knots of wind with half the Genua pooled out, but I guess it difficult to have it further furled I got the impression that the top will "fall" out and flog a lot if further furled:
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

Patrick McAneny
 

Joel, I am in the habit of turning off the main breakers when I leave the boat for any time, just feel better about it. That's with one exception , that electric to my bilge pump is also shut off. Is that just my boat or all SMs ? I am accustomed to bilge pumps being directly wired to the batteries . On one hand , I like not having electric running through the boat , but don't like , not having the bilge pump electrified . Thoughts, suggestions , I know you have them .
Wisecrack intended,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2016 1:19 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

 
Hello Joe. All good advice regarding drainage while on the hard. Pat is very correct about a positive bow up angle. Place a level on the cockpit sole and make sure the bubble is floating forward. Otherwise any water that gets inside won’t be able to flow aft to the bilge sump in the engine room. While even more important for longer term storage than the 2 months you’ll be absent, an incredible amount of water can make its way inside the boat during tropical waves, depressions, storms and hurricanes through the anchor hawse and the masts. It is a good idea to get an expanding foam product at any hardware store  like GREAT STUFF greatstuff ‘dot‘ dow ‘dot’ com and fill the hawse hole that the anchor chain goes down to prevent water coming in. It works even better if you separate the chain from the anchor and drop the chain into the chain locker ( and put the anchor out of sight in a foredeck locker for safe keeping ), but you can use the foam around the anchor chain and it will stop almost all the water. Very easy to remove the foam and if you are lazy, a trip or two through the windlass makes it go away. Quite a bit of water can come in through the main mast in a driving rainstorm. Make sure that the small waterway passage (under the main mast inside the boat just overhead and outboard of the forward head ) that goes from the water trap that catches any water coming in from the mast ( all the mast wires for lights and electronics run through this water trap ) that feeds this water to the drain hole that is close to the shower head ( that allows the water to escape into the shower drain pan and make its way aft to the bilge sump ) is open and clear. I don’t know how the seeds the birds ‘expel’ while sitting in the rig end up inside the mast and then into this water trap, but they do and plug up the drain with not good results when the water trap overflows. Here in Florida, we check them monthly on the boats I have for sale or under my care. Yours was clean and clear when you left! If you leave the battery switches on, be sure to turn of ALL the dc/12-24 volt breakers. ALL including the ones in the hanging locker next to/aft of the navigation desk, and all the ones for the winches, windlass, furlers and all the ones in the engine room too. The stories I could tell you after 35 years of Amel adventures would seem too far-fetched to be believed but if the breaker ain’t on, nothing bad can happen to flatten the batteries. Or worse. I’ll tell you over an adult beverage next time we meet. Be sure to test the bilge pump switch for easy reliable operation. It’s a good time to carefully take the assembly for the bilge pump floater switch apart and clean it meticulously of all dirt, grease, hair and other nasty stuff. If not cleaned, this ‘goop’ can harden when it dries if it isn’t getting wet every day, and trap the switch float in the off or on position. Seen it happen twice. Not good either way. Be sure that the boat stands/cradle don’t cover up the cockpit drains ( unlikely but…) or the bilge pump exit .
Now you won’t wake up in the middle of the night and wonder ‘what if’.
Have fun with your Amel!
Joel
Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
954 462 5869 office
954 812 2485 cell
 

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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dry dock bilge usage?

Joe Nance
 

Thank you everyone for the great advice!

I've now got a little more work to do before we leave Provo!

On Fri, Aug 26, 2016 at 10:05 AM, cloudstreet100@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi All,


Tracie & I are returning to the States for 1 - 2 months and have had the boat hauled at the Caicos shipyard in Providenciales.  She is secured in their 'Hurricane Section' which has large cement blocks buried about 8' down for their anchors.


My question is; Should the power to the automatic bilge be left on?  There is no power available to the boat while it's hauled. To conserve the batteries, I'm trying to decide if I should disconnect all of the power at the batteries via the two large red handles or should they be left on so that the bilge can operate?  What happens it the boat gets a large amount of rain during a storm or hurricane when it is secured on dry land?


I know that while in the water if the cockpit is hit with a lot of water it is supposed to evacuate it rapidly,, but I don't know exactly how this is accomplished.


Thank you,


Joe & Tracie

SV CloudStreet, hull 331

Providenciales, TCI



Re: Latches for lockers and drawers

Walter
 

Sorry for the typo,
it´s
www.onmar.se