Date   

Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

RIck Stanley
 

What we did on our SM2K - after we got access to all the hatches - was to first shock the tanks with bleach, then hit them all with a pressure sprayer. Worked like a champ, considering our boat was left up on the hard for 5+ years, and the tanks were black inside.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: bow thruster service. Problem

Santorin LO
 

Hi Group,

Just observed that water is coming through the main cylinder / shaft hole in the forward cabin picture 3 and pic headed "Removed the old seal (please note that I did not had the 2 retainer screws") in Alexanders document) when in wavy seas the hole is below the waterline.

Am currently on a relative long trip in Greece would and would prefer to do the full service when on the hard when done with my trip, will need to fix only this for  now and trying to find out the following:

a. Good to know - what would be the mercy practice for water coming through there on a long passage with no means to get spares and heavy leakage - of course shifting weight back, but anyway to seal it temporarily as it is?

b. Amel tool - what is the use of it? - push down the shat? lead it back to its position? can be done without? seen your direction for it Bill, but unless it is literally IN the the black housing which I didn't open - couldn't see it).

c. the neofoam seals - 2 outside, 1 inside -  meaning? I can see 2 between the shaft to the hole from the cabin, the 3rd on e is below the hole (from its ' sea side)?

d. the relevant problem seal mentioned above - is it only by delivery from Amel or could be found / made by spec - then what is the spec? same question for the neofoam seals.

Thank you all in advance 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: bow thruster service. Problem

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good afternoon, 


Not sure the message was to me, but since my name is Alexandre, I thought I would answer!!!  


After 1 - 1.5 year, my bow thruster started to leak (water coming in while sailing) (I later realized it often started after I motor too quickly bow thruster down - but that is another story).  


First, I checked every day I used the boat and every 24 hour of sailing (when there was no known leak).  


Second, I added a “High water Alarm”, very practice when there is a leak, you are alerted when you have 15-20 liters of water


Third, I added a bilge pump to remove the water and put it in the head (bathroom - not toilet), which itself would go to the bilge and be emptied from there.   


You have all the pictures on:  

http://supermaramu2000.com/bilge_pump_high_water_alarm_bow_thruster.html


Sincerely, Alexandre (Currently in Geneva, Switzerland). 




On Saturday, November 7, 2020, 11:05:31 AM CST, Santorin LO via groups.io <santorinlo18@...> wrote:


Hi Alexander (or anyone else),
While on relatively long trip in Greece is that when the bow thruster hole (of the cylinder in the forward cabin - the 3rd picture of your page) is underwater (when pitching) - water is coming through. As limited with lifting her right now or perform full service to the bow thruster (no time to get spares etc...). Need to find a quick (but proper) fix to this seal while in the water.

My question are as follows:

a. Good to know - what would be the emergency practice to this problem middle of long passage? (except of shifting weight to stern) anyway to seal it from the top without removing anything?
b. The specific seal is only from Amel or could be found or made anywhere?
c. What is the Amel special tool for - only to lead the shaft/cylinder back to its hole? can the bow thruster be removed and back without?
d. Would it be relatively easy to replace the seal without the tool?

Getting to know our baby better and better...

Cheers


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: bow thruster service. Problem

Santorin LO
 

Hi Alexander (or anyone else),
While on relatively long trip in Greece is that when the bow thruster hole (of the cylinder in the forward cabin - the 3rd picture of your page) is underwater (when pitching) - water is coming through. As limited with lifting her right now or perform full service to the bow thruster (no time to get spares etc...). Need to find a quick (but proper) fix to this seal while in the water.

My question are as follows:

a. Good to know - what would be the emergency practice to this problem middle of long passage? (except of shifting weight to stern) anyway to seal it from the top without removing anything?
b. The specific seal is only from Amel or could be found or made anywhere?
c. What is the Amel special tool for - only to lead the shaft/cylinder back to its hole? can the bow thruster be removed and back without?
d. Would it be relatively easy to replace the seal without the tool?

Getting to know our baby better and better...

Cheers


Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

Gary Wells
 

I am going to stick my neck out a bit and say that first, it's not that bad, second a serious and time consuming effort may get only moderate results and finally, if you have a year of patience you'll see improvements by staying with a 'program' of treatments.

I've had good luck with using moderately strong concentrations of bleach (about 6 ounces in a tank fill-up) every third or fourth time I add water.

Having said that, living aboard we go through 1,000 liters pretty quickly when dockside.

After each "shock" the water smells strongly of chlorine for a day or two.  That's when it's time to wash the sheets :)

The next fill-up is plain water, and may still smell of chlorine very slightly depending on how far down we depleted the tank.  
Only on the third fill will I then flush the watermaker.  After that I'll add 1/4 tsp of the StarBright water purifier. 
Then the next one is plain water, then the next one (or one more if I lose count) is back to bleach.  It works out to about monthly to bi-monthly. 

The bleach treatments will kill a charcoal water filter quickly so I just use paper/fiber ones.  

I also believe that if we were to highly chlorinated water sit in the lines it would be detrimental to pumps and valves and especially the copper fittings (nipples) on the holding tanks, so we always make sure we use the "bleached tank" of water fairly quickly.

Give it two years and see :) 

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio
Maryland, USA


Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

David Kurtz
 

Thanks, everyone.  I’m going to follow along the lines of what James and James both did.  Scrub it down, hit it with another dose of chlorine bleach in the spring, close it up and not think about it for a year.  If anyone asks, I’ll just refer to it as my guppy fish tank...😊.  And Bill, you’re absolutely right.  We frequently installed level sensors, high water alarms, etc. in municipal water system tanks up here in southeastern Michigan and they are pretty crusty in there.  Consntruction crews will still, very occasionally, dig up wooden water pipes still in use.
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: Silicone BT seals

Barry Connor
 

Hi, this was on our 2006 Amel 54 when we bought in 2015. 
We thought it was a standard attached by Amel at build. Was very helpful when we first sailed but we do more checks now.

Very Best 

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penelope II”
Amel 54. #17
Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique 

On Nov 6, 2020, at 20:33, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429


Re: Silicone BT seals

William O'Toole
 

Excellent suggestion. Use flow to create the list. (You commercial big iron guys are the best!)

William Sent from my iPhone 

On Nov 6, 2020, at 5:00 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:

Hello William,

I flew heavies and they all use a flow form of checklist.  I have never needed a written one but you could develop your own, specific to your vessel, broken down by areas of concern.  

Include BT pin removal before leaving the dock.  Start the engine 10 minutes before leaving the dock if it is likely you’ll need to give it the beans… perhaps run the genset if you expect to use the BT or windlass.

Fair winds,


Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ



On 7 Nov 2020, at 13:32, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429



Re: Silicone BT seals

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello William,

I flew heavies and they all use a flow form of checklist.  I have never needed a written one but you could develop your own, specific to your vessel, broken down by areas of concern.  

Include BT pin removal before leaving the dock.  Start the engine 10 minutes before leaving the dock if it is likely you’ll need to give it the beans… perhaps run the genset if you expect to use the BT or windlass.

Fair winds,


Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ



On 7 Nov 2020, at 13:32, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429



Re: Silicone BT seals

William O'Toole
 

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429


Re: Silicone BT seals

rossirossix4
 

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429


Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

Karen Smith
 

Your trivia for the day....

The fish added to cisterns is usually Gambusia affinis the "mosquito fish" a close relative of the "guppy," and very similar looking.  

I don't know about on Bonaire, but on some of the other Caribbean Islands if you have a cistern you are required to keep a living population of Gambusia, or treat regularly with a chemical larvicide to keep mosquito larvae in check. People chose one or the other depending on their own personal bias against fish poop, or chemicals!


Re: Silicone BT seals

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Mark,

I'm referring to these external neoprene seals (two glued together). They should be slightly compressed when the locking pin is in, creating a watertight seal. Photo is from Nikimat ( https://nikimat.com/bow_thruster_overhaul.html ). An improved shaft seal, like the flexible silicone one, would only help in the effort to keep water out - so no problems there. Just saying the neoprene seals and proper tensioning/positioning of the locking pin hole is critical.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua, NZ


On Fri, Nov 6, 2020, 4:03 PM Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I don’t see how the main seal is pressured by the thruster assembly? Nothing touches it when the bow thruster is in the up position.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Germain Jean-Pierre
Sent: Thursday, November 5, 2020 4:41 PM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals

 

FWIW... my seals are good for years. 

 

My trick is to release the pin whenever we are in a harbour/ anchorage. The pin is in only during offshore passages. Saves the crush on the seals

 

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ



On 6/11/2020, at 2:33 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



To all,

 

We had constant issues with our bow thruster and a small amount of water coming in. I followed the directions for the service to the letter and for a few months it would be dry. Then, slowly the drips began and over time would slowly get worse. I found myself having to change the seals every 6-months to a year.

 

I changed Jose’s seals in Galapagos before crossing tp French Polynesia. So far, the area is bone dry! 6 months now.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of david bruce
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 7:33 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals

 

Hello All, 
I am ordering 10 pr (min order size) of the silicone BT seals pioneered by Jose Venegas a while back. Although I have not used them myself they are apparently quite effective and I am anxious to install them on Liesse (if I ever manage to see her again).   I will have an extra 4 pr at USD 81.00/pr. plus shipping for anyone that would like a pair or two.  If you have specific questions about them I would refer you to the archives.  Private message me if you are interested.  Thanks. 
Best regards, 
David Bruce
Liesse
SN006


Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

James Cromie
 

Great source of Iron!

On Nov 6, 2020, at 09:34, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

It is difficult to get you head around this but to set your expectations maybe you should try to see the inside of your local municipal water tank. Here is a real photo:
<image.png>

As for strange solutions, when we were at Bonaire in the Caribbean, we visited a house that was being built for some American cruising friends who had successfully immigrated to Bonaire.  Residents of Bonaire collect rainwater for their primary freshwater source. Freshwater can also be delivered by truck to the residents. Judy and I were amazed that the locals place a certain type of fish in the tanks to keep the "growth" to a minimum. I wish I could remember the name of the fish. 

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 10:36 AM James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
David,

   We cleaned the tanks in our Maramu and they were much worse than your, in fact we even had live snails living in there!  There was also significant amount of sediment in the aft low end of the tank.  I just used the bleach version of Soft scrub and a medium deck type brush with an extension handle to clean our tank followed by lots of flushing and pumping.  I was concerned that the abrasive powder in the Soft Scrub might be abrasive so I used a portable diaphragm pump to remove the water and debris instead of the ships water system. Obviously rinse the tank from forward to aft to flush things downhill.    Maybe be a little careful with the putty knife in case you encounter some loose gel coat, some came loose on my boat just from the scrubbing.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 6, 2020, at 10:07 AM, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?<214D1856-A9F4-4713-BDFD-CA75CE8E2004.jpeg>
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan






Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

 

It is difficult to get you head around this but to set your expectations maybe you should try to see the inside of your local municipal water tank. Here is a real photo:
image.png

As for strange solutions, when we were at Bonaire in the Caribbean, we visited a house that was being built for some American cruising friends who had successfully immigrated to Bonaire.  Residents of Bonaire collect rainwater for their primary freshwater source. Freshwater can also be delivered by truck to the residents. Judy and I were amazed that the locals place a certain type of fish in the tanks to keep the "growth" to a minimum. I wish I could remember the name of the fish. 

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Fri, Nov 6, 2020 at 10:36 AM James Alton via groups.io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
David,

   We cleaned the tanks in our Maramu and they were much worse than your, in fact we even had live snails living in there!  There was also significant amount of sediment in the aft low end of the tank.  I just used the bleach version of Soft scrub and a medium deck type brush with an extension handle to clean our tank followed by lots of flushing and pumping.  I was concerned that the abrasive powder in the Soft Scrub might be abrasive so I used a portable diaphragm pump to remove the water and debris instead of the ships water system. Obviously rinse the tank from forward to aft to flush things downhill.    Maybe be a little careful with the putty knife in case you encounter some loose gel coat, some came loose on my boat just from the scrubbing.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 6, 2020, at 10:07 AM, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?<214D1856-A9F4-4713-BDFD-CA75CE8E2004.jpeg>
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan



Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

James Alton
 

David,

   We cleaned the tanks in our Maramu and they were much worse than your, in fact we even had live snails living in there!  There was also significant amount of sediment in the aft low end of the tank.  I just used the bleach version of Soft scrub and a medium deck type brush with an extension handle to clean our tank followed by lots of flushing and pumping.  I was concerned that the abrasive powder in the Soft Scrub might be abrasive so I used a portable diaphragm pump to remove the water and debris instead of the ships water system. Obviously rinse the tank from forward to aft to flush things downhill.    Maybe be a little careful with the putty knife in case you encounter some loose gel coat, some came loose on my boat just from the scrubbing.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 6, 2020, at 10:07 AM, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?<214D1856-A9F4-4713-BDFD-CA75CE8E2004.jpeg>
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan



Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

James Cromie
 

Hi Dave.  I’m familiar with this view!  Last year, I opened up all of the ports, and found mold balls on the walls of the water tank.  I flushed our tanks with bleach solution as described elsewhere, but this will not remove the adherent growth.  You will need to mechanically clean the surfaces, which is a bit tedious.   I did this by using a soft putty knife attached to the end of a broomstick or similar.   I let everything sit in a bleach solution for 2 days, which likely helped to loosen a great deal of the residual material.  Once removing all of the adherent material with the scraper, I repeated the process with a scrub brush attached on an extension.   

I then sprayed water and used a portable pump with a long hose extension to suction out all of the particulate material.   This was repeated numerous times until all debris was evacuated.  Finally, I fully filled the tank again with a dilute bleach solution, let sit overnight, and then drained completely.   One lide of the tank was kept accessible so that I could easily use the portable pump to drain the water quickly.  (I used a high capacity Parmax puppy pump (50 gal / min) that I keep on board as an auxillary bilge pump if I needed to evacuate water from the cabin for any reason.  

For simplicity, I simply wire it onto my gray water bilge pump switch and used that as a temporary means of supplying the 24V power for the pump. 

Perhaps someone else out there has a better idea than what I felt I needed to do to clean the tanks  completely… 

James Cromie
SV Soteria
SM2K 347
Anacortes,WA


On Nov 6, 2020, at 07:07, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?<214D1856-A9F4-4713-BDFD-CA75CE8E2004.jpeg>
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan



Re: Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

Thomas Peacock
 

We have a similar appearing tank. I also shocked it with chlorine, with little cosmetic improvement. 
My sense is that it is classic mildew. Even if you kill the fungus, the dark stains will persist unless vigorously scrubbed.
I drink it nevertheless. As my mother told me, everyone has to eat a pound of dirt in their life. 

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay

with its tiny keyboard

On Nov 6, 2020, at 10:07 AM, David Kurtz via groups.io <Davidwkurtz@...> wrote:

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?
<214D1856-A9F4-4713-BDFD-CA75CE8E2004.jpeg>

--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Cleaning fresh water tank on my SM2K

David Kurtz
 

Good morning all!  I tried cleaning my fresh water tank using Bill’s alternate method (fill with bleach solution, let sit for 48 hours, drain, flush, etc.) and did not get the desired results.  The attached photo shows what I am dealing with.  Seems to be a couple varieties of mold that was not killed off by the bleach solution.  Now that I am opening up all three access ports I want to clean it with something that works, but doesn’t poison my whole family 😳.  What have some of you used for cleaning?
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: Silicone BT seals

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hi Mike,

I’m very methodical in my checks before sailing away ... retired airline pilot.. and it involves all systems internally, in the engine room and on deck. Covers all bases. 

Takes 10 minutes

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera,SM007, NZ


On 6/11/2020, at 3:55 PM, Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:


JP, I think this is good advice. Especially because it's the foam seals that really keep the water out, not the vertical shaft seal. Do you have a foolproof method to remember to put the pin in place while at sea/underway? That's the only risk I my opinion.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua, NZ

On Fri, Nov 6, 2020, 3:40 PM Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain45@...> wrote:
FWIW... my seals are good for years. 

My trick is to release the pin whenever we are in a harbour/ anchorage. The pin is in only during offshore passages. Saves the crush on the seals

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, NZ


On 6/11/2020, at 2:33 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:



To all,

 

We had constant issues with our bow thruster and a small amount of water coming in. I followed the directions for the service to the letter and for a few months it would be dry. Then, slowly the drips began and over time would slowly get worse. I found myself having to change the seals every 6-months to a year.

 

I changed Jose’s seals in Galapagos before crossing tp French Polynesia. So far, the area is bone dry! 6 months now.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of david bruce
Sent: Tuesday, November 3, 2020 7:33 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Silicone BT seals

 

Hello All, 
I am ordering 10 pr (min order size) of the silicone BT seals pioneered by Jose Venegas a while back. Although I have not used them myself they are apparently quite effective and I am anxious to install them on Liesse (if I ever manage to see her again).   I will have an extra 4 pr at USD 81.00/pr. plus shipping for anyone that would like a pair or two.  If you have specific questions about them I would refer you to the archives.  Private message me if you are interested.  Thanks. 
Best regards, 
David Bruce
Liesse
SN006

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