Date   

Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Dan Carlson
 

If you are in the land of Amazon we ordered and used this little tool.



Best Regards, Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe SM #387

On Sun, Nov 8, 2020, 3:28 PM Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Good day all,

I’m having difficulty removing the old packing material.  I was successful getting the top ring out albeit with much difficulty, but I can’t seem to make much headway with the second ring and I imagine the last one will be even more difficult.

I am using a straight pick to loosen the adherence of the material around the perimeter of the rudder post, but the hook picks I am using to try to remove the material are bending and breaking.

I am trying to be careful so as not to damage the threads for the lock not and wondering if anyone has any tricks or suggestions.

Thanking respondents in advance for their time and wisdom.


All the best,


Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

James Alton
 

Paul,

  I am assuming that you are pulling packing from a bronze stuffing box?  If so, I normally use about a long #8 deck screw that will easily thread into the packing.  Only run it maybe 1/2-2/3  of the way into the packing and keep the screw centered as best you can.  Then using vice grips clamped to the head of the screw, pull with force parallel to the walls of the packing grove.  It helps a lot if you pull from a position that is close to the butt end of a packing ring so if the packing seems reluctant, just try and different location.  

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Nov 8, 2020, at 2:28 PM, Paul Stascavage via groups.io <pstas2003@...> wrote:

Good day all,

I’m having difficulty removing the old packing material.  I was successful getting the top ring out albeit with much difficulty, but I can’t seem to make much headway with the second ring and I imagine the last one will be even more difficult.

I am using a straight pick to loosen the adherence of the material around the perimeter of the rudder post, but the hook picks I am using to try to remove the material are bending and breaking.

I am trying to be careful so as not to damage the threads for the lock not and wondering if anyone has any tricks or suggestions.

Thanking respondents in advance for their time and wisdom.


All the best,


Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA



Re: Rudder Stuffing Box Packing Material

Paul Stascavage
 

Good day all,

I’m having difficulty removing the old packing material.  I was successful getting the top ring out albeit with much difficulty, but I can’t seem to make much headway with the second ring and I imagine the last one will be even more difficult.

I am using a straight pick to loosen the adherence of the material around the perimeter of the rudder post, but the hook picks I am using to try to remove the material are bending and breaking.

I am trying to be careful so as not to damage the threads for the lock not and wondering if anyone has any tricks or suggestions.

Thanking respondents in advance for their time and wisdom.


All the best,


Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
On The Hard - Severn Yachting Center - Hayes, VA


A pot of Gold at the end of the Rainbow

Barry Connor
 

Dear All,
When I was child growing up I was told that I could find a Pot of Gold at the end of a Rainbow.
Voila, I found it.
An “AMEL”.
Next to us in our anchorage.

Very Best

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penrlope II”
Amel 54. #17
Sainte-Anne anchorage Martinique


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Karen Smith
 

On the subject of Leroy Somer furling motors, we learned a bit about them this year--way more than we wanted to.

For the first time since we owned Harmonie, the outhaul motor exhibited classic signs of needing new brushes:  irregular operation.  When I removed the brush holders, oddly, the brushes looked fine. Upon further disassembly the rest of the story was obvious.  25 years of accumulated carbon dust had obstructed the rotation of the armature to the point that the friction shattered the internal magnets. This motor was dead.

Amel shipped us a new motor which fit and works just fine. Key point here:  Whenever changing brushes do not just pull them out of the holder and drop new ones in, but clean out all the dust. Do not let it accumulate inside the motor!  Do not assume that previous owners or mechanics did this correctly.

Lesson learned, we completely disassembled the furling motor (which is identical), and cleaned the inside with vacuum and contact cleaner, dressed and polished the commutator, and tested resistances.  All checked out well, so they should be good for the next 25 years...

Notes on the new motor:  the new Leroy-Somer motor carried the same part number, and was in all key external dimensions identical to the 25 year old original. It mounted and worked just fine. The internals are quite different, however. Key for maintenance is the fact that the brushes are different.  Instead of two externally accessible brushes, the new design requires disassembly of the motor and replacement of the entire internal brush holder assembly because the four (not two!) brushes are welded in place to the holder.  This emphasizes the importance of sending pictures of parts to Amel when ordering.  If you simply order brushes for Leroy-Somer motor Part Number XXX_XXX you might not get what you need.

Other important lessons that would have saved us this cost:
* Electric motors are (almost) forever if regularly cared for.  The furling motors hadn't gotten to the top of our list for a professional rebuild.
* Take stuff apart.  You learn a lot, and this problem could have been avoided if this motor had been on my "take it apart and put it back together for no reason" list. 

Bill Kinney
SM#160
Harmonie
Annapolis, MD


Re: BT seals

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Thank you so much, Bill.
Victor 

El dom., 8 nov. 2020 17:23, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> escribió:
Victor,

From my book: 0.3 liters of 80/90 gear oil.
image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Nov 8, 2020 at 2:07 AM VICTOR MOLERO <victor.moleroxx@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I plan to change the oil and seals of the bow thruster in my SM. Can anyone tell me how much oil I need? Ant the type of oil?
Thanks in advance.
Victor
Alendoy SM #314


Re: BT seals

 

Victor,

From my book: 0.3 liters of 80/90 gear oil.
image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Nov 8, 2020 at 2:07 AM VICTOR MOLERO <victor.moleroxx@...> wrote:
Hello all.
I plan to change the oil and seals of the bow thruster in my SM. Can anyone tell me how much oil I need? Ant the type of oil?
Thanks in advance.
Victor
Alendoy SM #314


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Aras Grinius
 

On my Sharki, I have a problem with my swivel (top of the mast).  Turns out the swivel was locked up.  It caused the tnages to crack and shear.  More importantly it also made the motor work really hard to furl the sail..
I took it to a machine shop and I am going to have it duplicated ( it's 32 years old) since it was original equipment. Nonetheless, I would check to see if your jib furler might be part of the issue.,

Aras
Shark #163 1988

On Sun, Nov 8, 2020 at 4:56 AM michael winand via groups.io <mfw642000=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks  Danny.
I will drop the main to check the top swivel. 
When the furler stopped it was being unfurled. 
I used the winch handle to put the sail away and it was very easy to rotate the foil. 
The break looks like it's clean, ie not a partial break that has let go. But hard to tell. 
I  normally keep the outhaul  slack when furling in and out. Tight in a few spots to keep the sail neat when furling in.  Not sure if this could be my fault?.
The ratio of the gearbox,  makes me feel that the shaft that has sheared is unusual?  I was a little surprised by what I found, I was expecting to find that the leroy somer gearbox pinion gears were worn out in a section that stopped the worm from engaging. 
Regards Michael Nebo sm251 


On Sun, 8 Nov 2020 at 6:33 pm, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
<simms@...> wrote:

Friction causes over loading. So what are the posible friction points. Well there are the bearings in the gear box if they are not lubricated, a good starting point. But a much over looked one and more likely is the swivel at the topmof the sail. This gets encrusted with salt and can in the worst  case not rotate at all. It is more likely to be less extreme than that but can cause your problem. It will also cause the bolt hole a the bottom of the foil extrusion to elongate and even fracture. Solution. Lower the main sail to access the swivel. Thoroughly flush it with pressure fresh water, allow itv to dry, then liberally apply spay can silicon. This should be part of regular maintenance.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 08 November 2020 at 21:15 "michael winand via groups.io" <mfw642000=yahoo.com.au@groups.io> wrote:


Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. Many thanks to the group Michael  Nebo  sm251 




 



--
Aras Grinius


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

michael winand
 

Thanks  Danny.
I will drop the main to check the top swivel. 
When the furler stopped it was being unfurled. 
I used the winch handle to put the sail away and it was very easy to rotate the foil. 
The break looks like it's clean, ie not a partial break that has let go. But hard to tell. 
I  normally keep the outhaul  slack when furling in and out. Tight in a few spots to keep the sail neat when furling in.  Not sure if this could be my fault?.
The ratio of the gearbox,  makes me feel that the shaft that has sheared is unusual?  I was a little surprised by what I found, I was expecting to find that the leroy somer gearbox pinion gears were worn out in a section that stopped the worm from engaging. 
Regards Michael Nebo sm251 


On Sun, 8 Nov 2020 at 6:33 pm, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
<simms@...> wrote:

Friction causes over loading. So what are the posible friction points. Well there are the bearings in the gear box if they are not lubricated, a good starting point. But a much over looked one and more likely is the swivel at the topmof the sail. This gets encrusted with salt and can in the worst  case not rotate at all. It is more likely to be less extreme than that but can cause your problem. It will also cause the bolt hole a the bottom of the foil extrusion to elongate and even fracture. Solution. Lower the main sail to access the swivel. Thoroughly flush it with pressure fresh water, allow itv to dry, then liberally apply spay can silicon. This should be part of regular maintenance.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 08 November 2020 at 21:15 "michael winand via groups.io" <mfw642000@...> wrote:


Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. Many thanks to the group Michael  Nebo  sm251 




 


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Arnold Mente
 

It is in a good position in the upper area of the storage space (behind the backrest next to the electric winch motor and switch box) and the expansion tank is placed there with a hand hole with a lock and can be filled from the outside (cockpit).

Arnold

Am 07.11.2020 um 21:28 schrieb Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...>:

Thank you!
What's the reason for having the heater in the cockpit locker and not in the engine room?
Paul



--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Friction causes over loading. So what are the posible friction points. Well there are the bearings in the gear box if they are not lubricated, a good starting point. But a much over looked one and more likely is the swivel at the topmof the sail. This gets encrusted with salt and can in the worst  case not rotate at all. It is more likely to be less extreme than that but can cause your problem. It will also cause the bolt hole a the bottom of the foil extrusion to elongate and even fracture. Solution. Lower the main sail to access the swivel. Thoroughly flush it with pressure fresh water, allow itv to dry, then liberally apply spay can silicon. This should be part of regular maintenance.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 08 November 2020 at 21:15 "michael winand via groups.io" <mfw642000@...> wrote:

Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. Many thanks to the group Michael  Nebo  sm251 




 


Furler motor to gearbox sm2000

michael winand
 

Hi.I have encountered this problem with my main furler motor. 
I have sheared the shaft on the leroy somer motor where it enters the gearbox. 
Any suggestions on how I would be causing this problem?
The gearbox is still working well. As I have it apart I will give it a full service. 
I would like to ask if anyone has been through this issue and what action is needed to fix this. 
I'm not sure if this is a design that allows the shaft to be replaced as a sacrificial item to prevent overloading?I have taken a photo of the issue. 
Apon removal it was still the original installation. The electrical brushes still have most of their length intact. 
Many thanks to the group 
Michael  Nebo  sm251 





Re: BT seals

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Hello all.
I plan to change the oil and seals of the bow thruster in my SM. Can anyone tell me how much oil I need? Ant the type of oil?
Thanks in advance.
Victor
Alendoy SM #314


BT seals

david bruce
 

Hello All, 

 I had posted availability of 4 pr of the silicone seals that I had available from my order of 10 (min order size).  Since they have been spoken for and I have had some additional interest, I am posting the information I received from Jose regarding ordering them.  Perhaps someone else wants to place an order.  Ray seems very accommodating and will accept credit card.  

Best, 

Dave
Liesse
SN006


Begin forwarded message:

From: Jose Venegas <josegvenegas@...>
Subject: Re: BT seals
Date: October 24, 2020 at 5:28:46 PM PDT
To: david bruce <davidcbruce57@...>

Hi Dave, I am glad to hear that Steve is happy with the seals.  I still have the same ones and probably will last a few more years before I have to change them given that I am no longer moored at a marina, and thus causing minimal wear on them.  

As you could imagine, the order of the seals was easy but sending them and getting paid for them was a pain in the neck.  I still have my two new sets in addition to the older ones that are still working fine, so I am not envisioning purchasing more within the next 10 years.  

One thing I do is to avoid placing the pin on them while I am in a marina to prevent additional forces that could deform them over time.  I do put the pin as soon as I am out of the marina and take it out only before arriving.

Here is the information of my order and you can mention my name if that can help.  Also remind them to keep the dimensions as close as possible to the design;  in the last batch they were off a little bit on one of the dimensions, which did not affect the performance of the seals but it would be better if they follow the exact design.

Good luck,

Jose

10 pcs. Silicone wiper 59.5 x 80 x 4/12 =$ 31.65ea.
20 pcs.                          ditto                          =$ 29.75ea.
 
10 pcs. Silicone u-cup 59.5 x 80 x 12 = $ 32.50ea.
20 pcs.                          ditto                     =  $ 30 75ea.
Will need 14-17 business days to ship.      
 
Ray Romanick
200_logo_contact_2 email small
SSP Manufacturing Inc.
83 Spring Lane
Hackettstown, NJ 07840
Phone: 908-852-3125
Fax: 908-852-3425
1-888-238-SEAL
Web Page:www.sspseals.com





On Oct 24, 2020, at 6:09 PM, david bruce <davidcbruce57@...> wrote:

Hi Jose,   

I have been speaking with Steve Davis of Aloha and he is very pleased with the performance of the silicone seals that you had made.  I would like to use on my Santorin and Steve would like some extras for Aloha.  Are they at all available any more?  I know this was a lot of work for you and would understand if you didn’t want to be the broker for them any more but if this should be the case we (Steve and I) are wondering if it would be possible to get the specs and fabrication source information, and perhaps we could have another batch made.  

Thank you, hope all is well aboard Ipanema.

Best regards,

Dave Bruce
Liesse
Amel Santorin





Re: Installing a diesel heater

 

On Sat, Nov 7, 2020 at 2:28 PM Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote:
Thank you!
What's the reason for having the heater in the cockpit locker and not in the engine room?
Paul


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you!
What's the reason for having the heater in the cockpit locker and not in the engine room?
Paul


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Arnold Mente
 

These are plate heat exchangers with a fan. Unfortunately, I don't have any pictures of the installation, only the cockpit and the backside of it! Left to the Autopilot!!

Arnold



Am 07.11.2020 um 20:44 schrieb Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...>:

Thank you!
What kind of heat exchanger do you have in the cabins? Just convector elements or heat exchanger that blows air into the cabin?
Do you have any photos on the installation?
Paul SY Kerpa


--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you!
What kind of heat exchanger do you have in the cabins? Just convector elements or heat exchanger that blows air into the cabin?
Do you have any photos on the installation?
Paul SY Kerpa


Re: Installing a diesel heater

Arnold Mente
 

Hi Paul,

I have an Eberpächer Hydronic heater on my SM with an outlet in all cabins, saloon and cockpit. The heating is also connected to the water heater, which requires an Isotemp with 2 heating circuits, a motor and diesel heating. This guarantees hot water preparation even without a motor under sail. We particularly recommend the outlet in the cockpit, which with a closed cockpit ensures a very pleasant temperature in the steering position. Also staying in the cockpit, eating ... is very pleasant. The heater was housed in my cockpit storage space and can be individually regulated in all areas via thermometers. I am very satisfied with this heater, since I already had both air and water heaters on my other boats, I would recommend the hydronic (water heater).

Best

Arnold
SV Zephyr
SM203

Am 07.11.2020 um 19:35 schrieb Paul Osterberg <osterberg.paul.l@...>:

Hello!
Plan a trip to Nordkapp next season and need to install a diesel heater in our SM (we do not have the forced ventilation). I have searched on the forum but did not find the information I was looking for.
Location of a diesel heater could be in the engine room or in the large cockpit locker. You who have a diesel heater where is it located?
One could choose either air or a water distributed heater, advantage with the water distributed heater, easier to install the water pipe, but the heat elements takes large place. the hot air heater duct takes a lot of space as diameter is 90 mm or about 3½ inch. 
So would very much appreciate you experience and recommendations when it comes to install a diesel heater 
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259, Lagos, Portugal 


--
Arnold
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Silicone BT seals

William O'Toole
 

Thanks to all for your responses. This site is an amazing resource. 

William Sent from my iPhone 

On Nov 7, 2020, at 3:47 AM, Barry Connor via groups.io <connor_barry@...> wrote:

Hi, this was on our 2006 Amel 54 when we bought in 2015. 
We thought it was a standard attached by Amel at build. Was very helpful when we first sailed but we do more checks now.
<image1.jpeg>
<image0.jpeg>


Very Best 

Barry and Penny
“SV Lady Penelope II”
Amel 54. #17
Sainte Anne anchorage Martinique 

On Nov 6, 2020, at 20:33, William O'Toole <william@...> wrote:

Was a private pilot and very familiar with check lists. But…in my sailing I never crossed the concept of checklist from flying pre-flight over to leaving the dock. Humbling realization. Anybody have a checklist for going bow to stern and back again that they could share?
-- 
William O'Toole 
President
EcoNomics, Inc.
832 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1
Del Mar, California   92014
(858) 793-9200 Main Office
(858) 886-6657 San Juan Capistrano Office
(805) 331-9591 Cellular

On Nov 6, 2020, at 4:15 PM, rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Absolutely agree on releasing the pin at the dock or anchorage and decompressing the seals.  On our boat, pulling the pin and flipping the down switch for as short a time as possible usually lowers it just enough to take the pressure off the seals. This leaves the pressure on the cable and the lowering motor mechanism but there is little force if the anchorage/dock is quiet.  I do the same on the hard except i don't like to leave it on the lifting cable/motor mechanism for such a long period of time.  In that case I use a split pin and rest it on that rather than the locking pin.  Because the split pin (AKA cotter key) is a smaller diameter you can rest it on the thinner spllit pin and the seals are not compressed as much.  This may not seem to be a significant distance but it really reduces the compression.  I think it is that tight, tight compression that gives a good seal--but, again--leaving it that way for a long time causes a problem.  Doing this seems to dramatically reduce the leak problem.

Regarding check lists, let me add that they way we prepare for departure is to start inside and go from bow to stern, then outside from bow to stern checking as we go.  So our first item is the bow thruster, windlass/genoa breaker, inside windlass switch, front hatch, cabinet latches, head hatch, toilet emptied, front bilge check......etc...etc.....ending with a look at the rudder quadrant and rear hatch.  We then do the exterior--bow to stern--starting with running lights, anchor, windlass....etc....ending with davits and stern light.  We do the engine room last.  For us, it is the easiest way to do a thorough check.

Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429

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