Date   

Re: SSB Not Receiving - IC M801

rossirossix4
 

Hi Chris,  Wondering if you had any luck on improving your reception?  I thought I would wait to see if you had any more responses before volunteering some ideas.  In theory a tuned antenna improves reception but in practice little or none if you have a long whip or backstay.  However, I believe you can press F (function) and then Tune to bypass your tuner to eliminate this possibility--your display will show "THRU".  Also, since other stations are receiving you well and assuming "TUNE" shows up on your display you would expect that your tuner is working and not blocking reception. Its always a good idea to check the GTO wire and connectors between your tuner and antenna as well.

Also, to bypass your existing antenna system is pretty easy to do (FOR RECEIVING ONLY) you can take a convenient length of insulated wire, say 20+ feet and stick the conductor in the hole in the middle of your coax receptacle of your 801 and lay it out through the cockpit and rear coachroof.  You should be able to hear known scheduled broadcasts like Chris Parker or 14300 Net or WWV (continually broadcasts at2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 MHz) depending on your location or propagation due to time of day.  If someone has a portable shortwave receiver, tune a station and try to receive it with your 801.  It is also possible that components inside your 801 have gone bad.  If the longwire test does not work AND you have correct voltage going to the radio AND your settings are correct (find someone with an 801 or 802 near you and have them try), then you may want to call ICOM if you haven't already.  I use a Yaesu 857-D and when it went deaf I discovered that a couple of ceramic filters had gone bad (they were sweating moisture) and had to be replaced.  I replaced all 3 of these $1 parts and the radio was back to normal.  Hopefully you have already found the solution, if not, maybe this will be helpful to searchers in the future.
Bob, KAIMI SM429   KDØKIX


Re: Any SM owners use a Beta engine??

Matt & Michelle Day, SM#208 SV Talia
 

Thank you all for the enjoyable conversation and debate.  Given how new to the Amel Michelle and I are, it is rare I have much to share that could be of benefit to the group.

Several comments have been made about the Beta being a "tractor" engine, and naturally subject to more vibration.  Unless the engine is an outboard, there is no such thing as a "true marine" engine.  The Yanmar 4J frame was developed for John Deere many moons ago under contract (as were most Yanmar engines).  If you bought a small frame tractor from JD, you got a Yanmar engine painted black or green.  That contract ended a few years ago, allowing Yanmar to start their allied equipment line of products.  Kubota has had the V1505 and V3300 (Beta 85) in production for years supporting their small frame tractor line that is seen all over Asia Pac and NA.  Perkins has a very similar story, except they liked to file for bankruptcy periodically until they were purchased by CAT. 

My point...the marine market is too small to support the development of a marine engine.  They are 'all' derivatives optimized to varying degrees (and varying degrees of success) to support a marine contract.

Next, the issue of the BETA 85 install and vibration.  I am in FULL AGREEMENT with Bill on this one.  As someone whom spent many years designing equipment, using OEM engines and certifying them, the engine installer in the thread is terrible.  The more interesting question is did BETA recommend this installer?  If so, that could represent a product support problem.  If not, you can't hang this one on BETA. 

In order for BETA to be sold engines and receive a Kubota warranty, they have to certify the installation design.  This includes building and testing all options presented to potential customers.  Note: They do not have to build the install on the boat...they can use a test stand.  The vibration spectrum of this engine is accounted for in the testing process.  The engine will be instrumented with accelerometers, run through the RPM/Load profile of the engine, and a specialty engine mount company will spec an engine mount.  BETA and Kubota do this work together....it is NOT dependent on the instillation.  If you are using the specified engine mounts for the installation and you have significant vibration issues, you have an alignment and/or coupling issue.

Just a fun side note....the certification process also covers emissions compliance.  Kubota, NOT BETA, has to certify to the US and EU authorities that the engine install meets the regulations.  They can't do that with a jacked up, half done piece of redneck engineering.  The BETA designs that I have seen look thorough and well thought out.  There is always room for improvement.  The challenge for BETA in this situation is we are a vocal bunch, the installer looks to have done a poor job and the name on the engine still says BETA.

Just my two cents.

 



Re: battery balancers /A54/ Victron AGM

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hello Ulrich;

 

Sorry about this question about a completely unrelated issue. But since I did not have your direct e-mail, thought I’d reach out to you  on the forum.

 

We are considering adding a hardtop to our 54 and would like to discuss your experience with the hard top on Soleil Bleu. Would you mind sending me an e-mail directly to mshirloo at transpacific.us

 

I apologize to the rest of the forum for this unrelated post.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of ULRICH DANGELMEYER via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2020 4:34 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] battery balancers /A54/ Victron AGM

 

Hello Ameliens,

I hope you are all healthy and in good spirits, wherever you are. Inspired by some comments here about better battery condition and performance, I decided to install Victron battery balancers. We have a 54 #088, and replaced all 12 service batteries in Victron AGM 110Ah deep cycle this summer. Here I have the following questions specifically to other 54 friends who have done this optimization themselves:

- where did you install these blue boxes? Directly in the battery compartment or next to the bulkhead where all the cables and the main switches are mounted?Victron recommends mounting vertically, out of the battery vapor. since I can't get directly into the boat at the moment, I have no idea where and how to mount.

- 2nd question: what is the best way to wire? Victron recommends for 12 batteries 2 balancers connected in parallel. so 1 balancer between 6 batteries. If you have better pragmatic experience, I am very grateful. Since we do not know when we come back to Greece, I would with your recommendation then provide the electrician of the marina with the parts and installation instructions, so that he can install the balancers in the meantime optimally.

I have already asked twice at Pochon, Mr. Geniteau, who make the electrical installations at all Amel. But until today unfortunately no answer or feedback get. pity.

Therefore, I hope for your tremendous practical experience and exchange in this great forum and thank you very much in advance.

 

For 2021, wherever you are, I wish you only the best: health, happiness and fair winds.

Stay healthy!

 

Best regards
Ulrich
"Soleil Bleu" / A54#088

 

 

 


Re: Carrying Tender on Davits while crossing

Jaswinder Chhibber <rohtaki@...>
 

Ingenious modification indeed . I wonder if an added support at bottom might help too .
JasC ( Rohtaki )


Re: Simpson Davits Amel 64 and Amel 60

Jaswinder Chhibber <rohtaki@...>
 

Thx Bill
This definitely helps 
I will look more into Simpson Davits 
My cruising will be mostly coastal in Great Lakes preferably with an experienced Captain. 
Thanks again . 

JasC

On Dec 27, 2020, at 09:28, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Jaswinder,

If I am not mistaken, an Amel 64 has Simpson Davits and the Amel 60 has a copy of Simpson Davits.

I do not have a simple direct answer to your question, but here are several things to consider:
  1. The rated lifting capacities from the davit manufacturer (Simpson lifting capacities range from 150kg to 300kg per pair of davits).
  2. The rated weight from Amel because the attachment of the davits is an important consideration (unknown...check with Amel)
  3. How you will use the 60 or 64 with the dinghy on the davits.
Numer 3 above is probably the biggest issue with the Minijet tender. If you sail short distances in relatively calm conditions, you probably will not experience any problems. However, you cannot reduce the weight by removing the engine or fuel, so the weight is the weight. I believe if you are going to explore different parts of the world you may have an issue crossing oceans and in heavy seas, regardless of the rated weight of the davits or the installation of the davits. As the stern of the boat moves "smartly" in every direction in heavy seas the inertia of the tender will create a significant load (in every direction) that could weaken the davits, the installation, and/or damage the dingy as it moves. Completely stopping all movement of the dinghy in heavy seas will probably be an impossibility. There are plenty of owners who have successfully stored dinghies with outboards on Simpson Davits during ocean crossings. The problem with heavy seas will probably only happen with 5% or fewer passages and some owners never experience heavy seas and gale conditions. Maybe this is an acceptable risk for you. Maybe not.

Good luck, I hope this helps you.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 7:35 AM Jaswinder Chhibber via groups.io <rohtaki=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Can Amel 60 or 64 carry a William Minijet tender 
2.79m/9ft 2in
BEAM1.54m/5ft 1in
Dry Weight210kg/465lb
Overall Height0.83m/2ft 8in (0.71m in Low Profile Setting)
Engine60hp BRP Rotax Ace 900 Engine
Fuel Capacity28 litres

JasC

On Dec 27, 2020, at 06:52, Dirk Hazenoot Maramu Huli 171 via groups.io <dekoer=me.com@groups.io> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Good day Amel friends,
 
Does anyone have pictures of a Beta 60 placed in an Amel Maramu? I followed the story of Mark & Nicky Barter regarding their placement of a Beta 85 in a super Maramu. It hurts me to read what went wrong with their placement. I admire their perseverance. As far as I can, I want to rule out anything that could go wrong with the placement of our Beta 60. We intend to order the engine directly from Beta UK and have it configured there. On the advice of Bill Kinney, we intend to install a 175 Amp alternator at the factory. Can this be placed in the standard position or should it be placed on the other side as with Mark & Nicky? We plan to install 2 fuel filters so that we can switch easily in case of calamities if one filter is dirty. Does anyone have experience with this? I would also like to know what you think is the best configuration with regard to oil filter and water pump. In short, who owns an Amel Maramu containing a Beta 60 and would like to share his knowledge with me? I look forward to your response.
 
Kind regards and a happy new year,
 
Dirk Hazenoot,
 


--
JasC ( Rohtaki )


Re: Simpson Davits Amel 64 and Amel 60

 

Jaswinder,

If I am not mistaken, an Amel 64 has Simpson Davits and the Amel 60 has a copy of Simpson Davits.

I do not have a simple direct answer to your question, but here are several things to consider:
  1. The rated lifting capacities from the davit manufacturer (Simpson lifting capacities range from 150kg to 300kg per pair of davits).
  2. The rated weight from Amel because the attachment of the davits is an important consideration (unknown...check with Amel)
  3. How you will use the 60 or 64 with the dinghy on the davits.
Numer 3 above is probably the biggest issue with the Minijet tender. If you sail short distances in relatively calm conditions, you probably will not experience any problems. However, you cannot reduce the weight by removing the engine or fuel, so the weight is the weight. I believe if you are going to explore different parts of the world you may have an issue crossing oceans and in heavy seas, regardless of the rated weight of the davits or the installation of the davits. As the stern of the boat moves "smartly" in every direction in heavy seas the inertia of the tender will create a significant load (in every direction) that could weaken the davits, the installation, and/or damage the dingy as it moves. Completely stopping all movement of the dinghy in heavy seas will probably be an impossibility. There are plenty of owners who have successfully stored dinghies with outboards on Simpson Davits during ocean crossings. The problem with heavy seas will probably only happen with 5% or fewer passages and some owners never experience heavy seas and gale conditions. Maybe this is an acceptable risk for you. Maybe not.

Good luck, I hope this helps you.
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 7:35 AM Jaswinder Chhibber via groups.io <rohtaki=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Can Amel 60 or 64 carry a William Minijet tender 
2.79m/9ft 2in
BEAM1.54m/5ft 1in
Dry Weight210kg/465lb
Overall Height0.83m/2ft 8in (0.71m in Low Profile Setting)
Engine60hp BRP Rotax Ace 900 Engine
Fuel Capacity28 litres

JasC

On Dec 27, 2020, at 06:52, Dirk Hazenoot Maramu Huli 171 via groups.io <dekoer=me.com@groups.io> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Good day Amel friends,
 
Does anyone have pictures of a Beta 60 placed in an Amel Maramu? I followed the story of Mark & Nicky Barter regarding their placement of a Beta 85 in a super Maramu. It hurts me to read what went wrong with their placement. I admire their perseverance. As far as I can, I want to rule out anything that could go wrong with the placement of our Beta 60. We intend to order the engine directly from Beta UK and have it configured there. On the advice of Bill Kinney, we intend to install a 175 Amp alternator at the factory. Can this be placed in the standard position or should it be placed on the other side as with Mark & Nicky? We plan to install 2 fuel filters so that we can switch easily in case of calamities if one filter is dirty. Does anyone have experience with this? I would also like to know what you think is the best configuration with regard to oil filter and water pump. In short, who owns an Amel Maramu containing a Beta 60 and would like to share his knowledge with me? I look forward to your response.
 
Kind regards and a happy new year,
 
Dirk Hazenoot,
 


Simpson Davits Amel 64 and Amel 60

Jaswinder Chhibber <rohtaki@...>
 

Can Amel 60 or 64 carry a William Minijet tender 
2.79m/9ft 2in
BEAM1.54m/5ft 1in
Dry Weight210kg/465lb
Overall Height0.83m/2ft 8in (0.71m in Low Profile Setting)
Engine60hp BRP Rotax Ace 900 Engine
Fuel Capacity28 litres

JasC

On Dec 27, 2020, at 06:52, Dirk Hazenoot Maramu Huli 171 via groups.io <dekoer@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Good day Amel friends,
 
Does anyone have pictures of a Beta 60 placed in an Amel Maramu? I followed the story of Mark & Nicky Barter regarding their placement of a Beta 85 in a super Maramu. It hurts me to read what went wrong with their placement. I admire their perseverance. As far as I can, I want to rule out anything that could go wrong with the placement of our Beta 60. We intend to order the engine directly from Beta UK and have it configured there. On the advice of Bill Kinney, we intend to install a 175 Amp alternator at the factory. Can this be placed in the standard position or should it be placed on the other side as with Mark & Nicky? We plan to install 2 fuel filters so that we can switch easily in case of calamities if one filter is dirty. Does anyone have experience with this? I would also like to know what you think is the best configuration with regard to oil filter and water pump. In short, who owns an Amel Maramu containing a Beta 60 and would like to share his knowledge with me? I look forward to your response.
 
Kind regards and a happy new year,
 
Dirk Hazenoot,
 


Placement of Beta 60 in an Amel Maramu #replacement

Dirk Hazenoot Maramu Huli 171
 
Edited

Good day Amel friends,
 
Does anyone have pictures of a Beta 60 placed in an Amel Maramu? I followed the story of Mark & Nicky Barter regarding their placement of a Beta 85 in a super Maramu. It hurts me to read what went wrong with their placement. I admire their perseverance. As far as I can, I want to rule out anything that could go wrong with the placement of our Beta 60. We intend to order the engine directly from Beta UK and have it configured there. On the advice of Bill Kinney, we intend to install a 175 Amp alternator at the factory. Can this be placed in the standard position or should it be placed on the other side as with Mark & Nicky? We plan to install 2 fuel filters so that we can switch easily in case of calamities if one filter is dirty. Does anyone have experience with this? I would also like to know what you think is the best configuration with regard to oil filter and water pump. In short, who owns an Amel Maramu containing a Beta 60 and would like to share his knowledge with me? I look forward to your response.
 
Kind regards and a happy new year,
 
Dirk Hazenoot,
 


battery balancers /A54/ Victron AGM

Ulrich Michael Dangelmeyer
 

Hello Ameliens,
I hope you are all healthy and in good spirits, wherever you are. Inspired by some comments here about better battery condition and performance, I decided to install Victron battery balancers. We have a 54 #088, and replaced all 12 service batteries in Victron AGM 110Ah deep cycle this summer. Here I have the following questions specifically to other 54 friends who have done this optimization themselves:
- where did you install these blue boxes? Directly in the battery compartment or next to the bulkhead where all the cables and the main switches are mounted?Victron recommends mounting vertically, out of the battery vapor. since I can't get directly into the boat at the moment, I have no idea where and how to mount.
- 2nd question: what is the best way to wire? Victron recommends for 12 batteries 2 balancers connected in parallel. so 1 balancer between 6 batteries. If you have better pragmatic experience, I am very grateful. Since we do not know when we come back to Greece, I would with your recommendation then provide the electrician of the marina with the parts and installation instructions, so that he can install the balancers in the meantime optimally.
I have already asked twice at Pochon, Mr. Geniteau, who make the electrical installations at all Amel. But until today unfortunately no answer or feedback get. pity.
Therefore, I hope for your tremendous practical experience and exchange in this great forum and thank you very much in advance.
 
For 2021, wherever you are, I wish you only the best: health, happiness and fair winds.
Stay healthy!
 
Best regards
Ulrich
"Soleil Bleu" / A54#088
 
 
 


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Thanks, Danny,

..and of course, no hard feelings between friends as we certainly agree regarding "ugly" bit at least, as well as how dangerous this could become in extreme conditions. 

For me, with a mission to circumnavigate within the small 3-year window which we had available, and also to have the maximum enjoyment of leisure time too possible, after 6 years of making absolutely zero modifications to the way Captain Henry set this brilliant boat up, it later became all about function, rather than good looks at the time actually set off to circumnavigate in early 2017. 

Furthermore, to add to the controversy you may also have noticed that we had two single orange paddle skis lashed to the rails as well, and of course, these could equally prove to be a huge issue with any side-on wave hits, and we did indeed take a few small dead wave hits to those, but again these were lifted a little above the deck height, and we fortunately never experienced any boat hardware strain or problems with this. Also, our dinghy had the optional extra of two huge draining bung holes fitted for very quick draining, plus a cover lashed onto it too most of the time when at sea in order to avoid it ever actually filling up with any wave hit.

I should have mentioned we did on quite a few occasions get waves sweeping right across/over the boat (including the bow area) sideways during our circumnavigation, the worst of these was an occasion when Lauren was sleeping on the port side cockpit seat and was washed completely across the cockpit from the port side bunk (wedged in behind the captain seat) and to the top of the opposite side combing (over almost out onto the stbd deck rail!) in the black of a moonless night right to the end of her long harness tether during one storm. However, on all these occasions, the dinghy placement never proved to be a problem for us, as it was never more than a foot of solid water over the bow areas (never a dead hit to the raised dinghy height with a solid wave as you may be referring to), ie. just white water and it was always able to quickly wash unhindered right across the bow decks from one side to the other under our dinghy which was heavily lashed down. 

Yes, I agree that if we were caught in extreme conditions, ie worse than we faced mid-Indian Ocean, then things could be worse, especially if we were unable to turn and run slightly downwind as we did between Chagos and Rodrigues when we got over 55 knots and 6m rolling swells which seemed like mountains each time one rose to the top of them and looked down on the whiteout conditions, and where we learnt how safe these Amel SM's actually are in very big conditions. My main concern though with this large aluminium craft on deck, in front to the mast, was what could occur if it was washed hard backwards and smashed into the base of the mast which could then be compressed and come tumbling down forwards???, and/or what may actually happen during a roll???? We did virtually knocked down sideways at least once (sails not quite into water though), but the dinghy was completely fine on that occasion (did not shift at all and righting movement of SM still very fast) due to being so well lashed down.

Please note, I am absolutely not advising anyone on this forum to place a heavy dinghy upfront as we did, especially if you do not have a lot of ocean crossing experience yet. That would not be helpful here and is also perhaps what Danny is quite rightly possibly alluding to here as this could be downright dangerous! Far better to leave your boat as she was designed, but of course, for those with experience, and who will actually be taking on large crews and who are mostly intending to avoid extreme conditions anyway, this OceanCraft dinghy on the bow, as well as our paddle skiis, for us did actually prove to be a wonderful addition to our circumnavigation with frequent use and gave us so much pleasure, (especially the paddle skiis which were used almost daily when anchored) that we would say it is worth considering at least. 

Fair winds
Colin
Currently Boatless in Brisbane

On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 7:15 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

I dont think I have ever commented negatively before but sorry Colin. I saw your set ip in Vuda Point Fiji. In my opinion ugly as sin, obstructive and creating a huge blind spot looking forward. How you could put up with it for as long as you did confounds me. If you had struck a major storm with big deck sweeping seas I hate to think of the result.However, just proves tastes differ.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 December 2020 at 17:26 Colin - ex SV Island Pearl <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote:

Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend < smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas

 

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Randall Walker
 

Hello Ian,

As you know all Amels seem to be loaded heavily in the stern, so anything you can find a place for toward the bow is a benefit, and when on a long passage it is nicer to have the sugar scoop free for fun during those moments in the doldrums. As for blocking your forward sight, I spend most of my sailing looking up, out, or down to the electronics or a good book. So I don't see the blocked forward view being an issue.
I have a 54 and just wish I had the ability to put the tender on the foredeck. The rigging on the 54 with the 3 forestays and takes away from the benefit you enjoy with space. You reference the Delos videos, I like the upright positioning for hoisting on and off, I would leave the motor on. Just be sure to pull the drain plug while on deck. My tender has a joker valve as part of the drain plug very convenient.

Enjoy the day and stay safe.

Randall,
A54#56

Virus-free. www.avg.com


On Sat, Dec 26, 2020 at 6:02 PM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I dont think I have ever commented negatively before but sorry Colin. I saw your set ip in Vuda Point Fiji. In my opinion ugly as sin, obstructive and creating a huge blind spot looking forward. How you could put up with it for as long as you did confounds me. If you had struck a major storm with big deck sweeping seas I hate to think of the result.However, just proves tastes differ.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 December 2020 at 17:26 Colin - ex SV Island Pearl <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote:

Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend < smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas

 

 



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Davi Rozgonyi
 

We run the same dink as delos on Wake. I too can't understand the physics of that setup... Though they are clearly far more experienced than us, it seems a disaster waiting to happen. We keep our 3.3m solid alu dink in the same spot, but lashed down tight upside down on its own foam side covers (flipped up). Much better viz, low profile and rock solid. I have a permanent lift rope tied between the bow and stern on the starboard side, with an alpine butterfly loop at the exact balance point to lift her side-first over the rail, up and lowered, tipped gently down and lashed. Between us, we can hoist the 20hp motor on the back rail and lift or lower the dink in 7 minutes flat. It's big but otherwise no sweat, light for such bulk, and such an amazing dinghy that we wouldn't trade it for anything. I highly recommend oceancraft if you do any diving or frequent long rides from anchorages, etc. You'll be driving around happily on those days when while everyone else is hunkered down terrified... 


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Finally, on the all-important visibility issue, I should add that before purchasing the large dinghy and building strong davits, we did have our 3.2m hyperlon dinghy inverted lying flat on the bow for many years and the visibility with that arrangement seemed to us to be far worse than later with the large dinghy on the bow davit. This was because, with the large one on bow davits, we actually looked though, (ie. underneath) the dinghy and this was not possible previously with hyperlon 3.2m dinghy lying flat on the deck where I was forced to try to look around this, often leaving the wheel to do so on my own. 

We lived on a canal system that required tight close-quarter maneuvering,  often with me sailing solo, and so this previous inverted normal dinghy on bow arrangement became quite dangerous for me. Of course in an ocean crossing situation, with no close quarter maneuvering, and with someone else on board to alert you to boats in front, this may not be so critical at all.

Fair winds
Colin
Scarborough, QLD Australia


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:28 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
typo correction - OceanCraft make a new standard 2.9m aluminium dingy, not 2.0m length


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:26 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

typo correction - OceanCraft make a new standard 2.9m aluminium dingy, not 2.0m length


On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 2:26 PM Colin - ex SV Island Pearl via groups.io <colin.d.streeter=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Since OceanCraft (Delos "Maggie") factory just a short distance from our home here in Australia, we copied Delos and purchased an OceanCraft 3300 aluminium dinghy, but had it specially custom made to just 3.0m (instead of 3.3m) with floor and front locker built-in. This cut back size was helpful and allowed us to easily get around the deck and also better use the Genoa, however, OceanCraft now make a standard 2.0m one which would be even better we feel.  We then made a custom timber cradle for our SM, similar cradle to Delos and circumnavigated with it with no real adverse effects, including in 6m swells / 55+knots mid-Indian Ocean wild seas.

As for the positives and negatives, and will we get another one on the bow of our next Amel in a few years time?

Positives
  1. This large dinghy was absolute gold when we had at times as allowed us to get everyone to shore in one go.
  2. Whenever we had long distances, inter-island etc., to cross we used it as it cut through any chop smoothly and was very fast and comfortable. 
  3. We used it for most refuelling as we mainly visited many remote places and almost always refuelled via Gerry cans. Compared to our smaller Hyperlon Dinghy which took max 5-6 x 23L fuel cans, we typically loaded up 12 x 23 Litre jerry cans full of fuel (plus two of us too!) on the large dinghy which saved us so much time.
  4. In calm waters such as throughout the Maldives for 4 months, we towed it easily (over 800mn!) as we crisscrossed this cruising haven. That was such a luxury!
  5. When going forwards on the bow in rough seas one felt much safer having the dinghy to hold onto.
  6. The large dinghy on the bow became a wonderful storage area for all our fenders and other bulky light goods freeing up lots of space in the rear locker.
Negatives
  1. It looks really ugly on the bow!!
  2. When tacking we always tacked by furling the genoa in at least 60% to avoid it catching on the dinghy, and also had a sheet line (like an inner staysail stay) running from the first spreader down to the anchor winch so that the genoa sheets would pull around this rather than catching on the dinghy. Whilst we got used to this and could tack without starting the motor, it still remained was a small price to pay but fortunately, on a circumnavigation, one is rarely tacking anyhow.
  3. The extra weight up front was fine (note we s/s welded a nice strong long shaft new outboard bracket on the rear rail opposite the Amel supplied one - and always placed our larger outboard there - never on the bow) and we never got any drips through our bow thruster until purchasing a new 110m chain in the Caribbean. Just in case though, before leaving Thailand, we had also devised a sneaky plan in case of any emergency bow thruster leaks by purchasing a new $10 bicycle tire tube from a Phuket bike shop (for a large rim, a fat tire bike) and we split it around the perimeter and cut it to form one nice long wide pliable new rubber strip in case of any emergencies. At the start of all major ocean crossings after this, we wrapped this tightly around the bow thruster area (where water may come up into the boat) in large rough seas and never got a drop of water in, even with all the weight up front. Also, boat balance in big seas also seemed unaffected.
  4. We tied both the timber davit itself and the dinghy very firmly with multiple straps and these both added to the "ugliness" and could become a trip hazard for any new crew who were not accustomed to running around on the bow on dark black nights. That said we never had anyone trip on these, so were fortunate.
  5. Visibility forwards was not great but fine as we cut huge "see-through" holes in the timber of davit itself without impacting its strength. That said, however, at night, with no moon, it took a lot of time to get used to working out if you were looking at the dinghy or beyond this!!
So, in summary, will we do this again in a few year's time after COVID when we purchase our next Amel? The answer would certainly be "yes" if we had any intentions of having more than just one extra crew member for any long periods of time. However, since most of our circumnavigation was just Lauren and me on our own, and we far preferred it that way, we doubt that we would do this again. We think an approx 3.1 or so meter hyperlon dinghy with a 15 is the way to go, but particularly ensure you get one that fits nicely on the rear deck with enough space to move around it, plus such that the mizzen sheet does not get caught up on it.

Cheers
Colin, Scarborough, QLD
(currently boatless until at least 2022)

PS If any of you happen to be here in QLD, Australia, and want our timber davit for the OceanCraft get back in touch. The new owners did not want the extra dinghy or davit and my wife wants it gone soon from our garage. The dinghy sold previously so just a free davit available now with correct camber for the SM bow- Email me at colin.cruisingpoint@...





On Sun, Dec 27, 2020 at 3:02 AM Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> wrote:

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas



--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Karen Smith
 

Hey Ian,

We have just recently seen Delos’ dinghy arrangement. I have no idea how they see anything in front of the boat.  It’s a huge dinghy, and the cradle they have sits very high on the deck.  I can’t comment on the attachment or other engineering details.  It might work for them, but it’s not my cup of tea...

Before I’d go that route, I’d do a good mockup and check to be sure sight lines meet your standards.

Enjoy the warm island weather, we are freezing our butts off here!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Charleston, SC


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello gang,

We have a 9.5 Alu RIB which we store inverted on the foredeck during long passages. The 15 HP Yamaha 2 Str is on a carrier fixed to the stbd rail near the transom. We use a spare halyard to hoist. 

On short passages, we lift the combined pair into our davits which also incorporate our solar panels. 

The balance is a bit better when the dinghy is inverted on the fore deck. 

Jean-Pierre Germain,Eleuthera,SM007, NZ


On 27/12/2020, at 6:42 AM, Philippe Chatton <chattonp960@...> wrote:


Hi Ian,
That's what we plan to do.
We did a few tests with a 2.80 meter Avon dinghy + engine.
We could easily lift the dinghy and its engine (25hp) with the genoa winch without problems.
So we decided  to go ahead  with this concept and just ordered a classic 3.40 highfield dinghy.
The tender will go on relativally small nylon covered cradles
Philippe
S/V Chameleon 
SM 445
Antibes FR

 

Le sam. 26 déc. 2020 à 18:02, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> a écrit :

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Re: Foredeck dinghy cradle

Philippe Chatton
 

Hi Ian,
That's what we plan to do.
We did a few tests with a 2.80 meter Avon dinghy + engine.
We could easily lift the dinghy and its engine (25hp) with the genoa winch without problems.
So we decided  to go ahead  with this concept and just ordered a classic 3.40 highfield dinghy.
The tender will go on relativally small nylon covered cradles
Philippe
S/V Chameleon 
SM 445
Antibes FR

 

Le sam. 26 déc. 2020 à 18:02, Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...> a écrit :

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas


Foredeck dinghy cradle

Ian Townsend
 

Merry Christmas/Joyeaux Noel/Buon Natale to all AMEL Owners. We are considering a new strategy for our dinghy and have a few questions for anyone that might be able to help.

1. Foredeck storage cradle. Who has done this? Do you have pictures? How does it fasten to the deck? Is it foldable/removable? Do you store it upside down? If not, do you keep the outboard on or off?
2. Maximum length and beam. I note that SV Delos has an 11 ft. Oceancraft on a cradle. Anyone with different experience?
3. Balance. How is boat balance affected with foredeck storage and the motor still on the dinghy?
4. Any other things I should consider?


Thanks and to everyone, please stay safe, healthy and happy. 


ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II
Bahamas

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