Date   

Re: ZOOM Meeting - Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #ZOOM #IMPORTANT

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Thanks to Bill and Tilo for taking the time to make these happen.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of CW Bill Rouse via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2020 7:05 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [Special] [AmelYachtOwners] ZOOM Meeting - Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #IMPORTANT #ZOOM

 

Re: Confirmation of Amel 50 ZOOM Meeting: Saturday, May 16th at 20:00 UTC.

This Saturday at 2000 hours GMT, we will have a presentation of a new Amel 50. Group members Matt & Cindy Salatino will present their brand new Amel 50 #27 "Speed of Life" from the Amel pontoon in La Rochelle. Matt and Cindy will give us a virtual tour during this presentation and answer your questions at the end of the presentation. Tilo Peters will administer the ZOOM meeting and I suspect that things will run smoothly and be enjoyed by all attending. Tilo may record this on YouTube and also may do a YouTube simulcast, but your best experience will be with ZOOM. Tilo will update you on what he will do with YouTube.

 

   Direct link to Join the 16 May at 20:00 UTC - ZOOM Meeting https://epfl.zoom.us/j/98523568530

   Meeting ID: 985 2356 8530

   Join by SIP 98523568530@...

 

If you missed our first ZOOM meeting, you can view it on YouTube: https://youtu.be/7Mm1bbL-PaA. The first meeting was a test to understand the process. We did not have an expert guest speaker but we plan to have an expert guest speaker for most future meetings. I am currently working to line up experts for:
   Standing Rigging
   Sails 
   Refrigeration
   And more

Times for participation around the world.

 

 

 

 

Country

GMT +/-

Scheduled Time

Scheduled Date

(GMT)

0

2000

5/16/2020

UK Summer Time

100

2100

5/16/2020

NZ

1200

800

5/17/2020

AU Queensland

1000

600

5/17/2020

Tahiti

-1000

1000

5/16/2020

USA West DST

-700

1300

5/16/2020

USA East DST

-400

1600

5/16/2020

USA Central DST

-500

1500

5/16/2020

Martinique

-400

1600

5/16/2020

Germany

200

2200

5/16/2020

Central EU Summer Time

200

2200

5/16/2020

Note: The above was checked with: https://greenwichmeantime.com/time-gadgets/time-zone-converter/

Best,

Bill

 

 

--

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School

 

Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 

 

 

View My Training Calendar


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Ryan Meador
 

On my last boat, I had exactly the scenario you suggest happen: a hose let go while I was away from the boat, the entire water supply was pumped into the bilge, and the pump's diaphragm failed.

I recently had to replace the pressure switch on our SM's AMFA water pump, which is a standard Square D switch.  Rather than exact replacement, I used the FSG2J24M4BP, which has a low-pressure cut off.  If a hose lets go, the pressure drops to such an extent that the pump will turn off and not turn on again until you manually flip the switch.  This should prevent the worst of this type of problem, but it won't protect against slow leaks.

Thanks,

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Mon, May 11, 2020 at 8:04 AM Arlo <svplanb@...> wrote:
On my last vessel  51 footer I used wall mounted timer from.McMaster carr that you could turn the dial from 15 to 120 minutes and then it would open the contacts electrically thereby turning off the water pump electric. It was placed by the galley sink. It worked flawlessly with daily use for 10 years. The reason we installed it was to ensure when we left the vessel that the water was turned off. On my Mango my SOP is simply turn off the water when I leave the boat. We have a bilge alarm when the water gets high for when we are onboard. 


Re: Parasailor on A54

Joerg Esdorn
 

Scott, my procedure is similar to yours.  Getting the main unfurled is helpful and easing the sheet is vital, although there is a point where easing it too much results in the sail coming down twisted.   I lead the snuffer line to an opening block attached to the Leeward forward mooring cleat with a soft shackle and pulling through that block, I’ve not needed a winch to pull down the snuffer.   If you don’t have the block, you cannot really pull effectively and a light person risks being hoisted up by the line!   I’m having the snuffer line lengthened now so I can get it on one of the cockpit winches when necessary.   As it was, I could put it on the anchor capstan but it was not long enough to reach the mast winches.  I want to be able to pull the snuffer down from the cockpit, which could be a big safety factor.  

On your other point, I fully agree.  It’s very important to make sure the people doing the work have done the specific work before and have an excellent reputation.  And you or a third person whom you trust must check the work carefully.  I’m having Lithium batteries installed on my boat by the local Mastervolt dealer.  At the end, a Mastervolt technician will travel to the boat and certify the installation.   I’m hoping that is being careful enough!  Cheers. Joerg 


ZOOM Meeting - Presentation of the Amel 50 from La Rochelle #ZOOM #IMPORTANT

 

Re: Confirmation of Amel 50 ZOOM Meeting: Saturday, May 16th at 20:00 UTC.

This Saturday at 2000 hours GMT, we will have a presentation of a new Amel 50. Group members Matt & Cindy Salatino will present their brand new Amel 50 #27 "Speed of Life" from the Amel pontoon in La Rochelle. Matt and Cindy will give us a virtual tour during this presentation and answer your questions at the end of the presentation. Tilo Peters will administer the ZOOM meeting and I suspect that things will run smoothly and be enjoyed by all attending. Tilo may record this on YouTube and also may do a YouTube simulcast, but your best experience will be with ZOOM. Tilo will update you on what he will do with YouTube.

 

   Direct link to Join the 16 May at 20:00 UTC - ZOOM Meeting https://epfl.zoom.us/j/98523568530
   Meeting ID: 985 2356 8530
   Join by SIP 98523568530@...

If you missed our first ZOOM meeting, you can view it on YouTube: https://youtu.be/7Mm1bbL-PaA. The first meeting was a test to understand the process. We did not have an expert guest speaker but we plan to have an expert guest speaker for most future meetings. I am currently working to line up experts for:
   Standing Rigging
   Sails 
   Refrigeration
   And more

Times for participation around the world.

       
Country GMT +/- Scheduled Time Scheduled Date
(GMT) 0 2000 5/16/2020
UK Summer Time 100 2100 5/16/2020
NZ 1200 800 5/17/2020
AU Queensland 1000 600 5/17/2020
Tahiti -1000 1000 5/16/2020
USA West DST -700 1300 5/16/2020
USA East DST -400 1600 5/16/2020
USA Central DST -500 1500 5/16/2020
Martinique -400 1600 5/16/2020
Germany 200 2200 5/16/2020
Central EU Summer Time 200 2200 5/16/2020
Note: The above was checked with: https://greenwichmeantime.com/time-gadgets/time-zone-converter/

Best,

Bill

 

 

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
 
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
 
View My Training Calendar


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Matt Salatino
 

I believe it’s the valves in the diaphragm. It’s usually a gang of 3 or 4 valves that are replaced as a set on a common “diaphragm”. Easily replaced, and spare part at most chandleries or from Amazon/EBay. Replacing that part fixes the problem.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On May 11, 2020, at 3:38 PM, Patrick McAneny via groups.io <sailw32@...> wrote:

William , I have that problem , my pump cycles on for a maybe two seconds every five minutes or so. I have looked everywhere for a leak and finally concluded it had to be a leak in the pump, allowing water to go back to the tank. Can the check valves be accessed to clean ? 
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: william reynolds <sail23692@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 11, 2020 9:19 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

 we suggest you always kill the power  to the fresh water pump when leaving the boat.We check all clamps on the fresh water system every 6 months. I keep the water pressure at about 40 psi to reduce pressure on all water components. A final note, all Shurflo and Jabsco pumps have tiny check valves on the inlet and outlet. They do not tell you about this. Any tiny particles can lodge in these valves and bleed off the system pressure. The symptom of this problem is an infrequent cycling of the pump with no apparent leaks. I have always installed a prefilter on my fresh water system and have rarely had a pump problem. See attached pic CloudStreet
Bill Reynolds SM2K 331


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Patrick McAneny
 

William , I have that problem , my pump cycles on for a maybe two seconds every five minutes or so. I have looked everywhere for a leak and finally concluded it had to be a leak in the pump, allowing water to go back to the tank. Can the check valves be accessed to clean ? 
Thanks,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: william reynolds <sail23692@...>
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 11, 2020 9:19 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

 we suggest you always kill the power  to the fresh water pump when leaving the boat.We check all clamps on the fresh water system every 6 months. I keep the water pressure at about 40 psi to reduce pressure on all water components. A final note, all Shurflo and Jabsco pumps have tiny check valves on the inlet and outlet. They do not tell you about this. Any tiny particles can lodge in these valves and bleed off the system pressure. The symptom of this problem is an infrequent cycling of the pump with no apparent leaks. I have always installed a prefilter on my fresh water system and have rarely had a pump problem. See attached pic CloudStreet
Bill Reynolds SM2K 331


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

william reynolds
 

 we suggest you always kill the power  to the fresh water pump when leaving the boat.We check all clamps on the fresh water system every 6 months. I keep the water pressure at about 40 psi to reduce pressure on all water components. A final note, all Shurflo and Jabsco pumps have tiny check valves on the inlet and outlet. They do not tell you about this. Any tiny particles can lodge in these valves and bleed off the system pressure. The symptom of this problem is an infrequent cycling of the pump with no apparent leaks. I have always installed a prefilter on my fresh water system and have rarely had a pump problem. See attached pic CloudStreet
Bill Reynolds SM2K 331


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Arlo
 

On my last vessel  51 footer I used wall mounted timer from.McMaster carr that you could turn the dial from 15 to 120 minutes and then it would open the contacts electrically thereby turning off the water pump electric. It was placed by the galley sink. It worked flawlessly with daily use for 10 years. The reason we installed it was to ensure when we left the vessel that the water was turned off. On my Mango my SOP is simply turn off the water when I leave the boat. We have a bilge alarm when the water gets high for when we are onboard. 


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Gerhard Mueller
 

It is far easier to use faucets or water taps equipped with micro switches. The micro switches operate a relay to start/stop the pump. So the pump only runs when a faucet is opened. You can get such faucets with micro switches e.g. from Whale.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Matt Salatino
 

I’ve seen some boats use an ordinary light timer, available in any hardware store. They crank it on when they use the water system, and it times out, shutting off the pump. There is also a device made specifically for this purpose for boats.
This device would need a relay to operate a higher amperage pump:

On May 11, 2020, at 7:51 AM, Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117 <steve@...> wrote:

FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--
Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention
Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 
Western Mediterranean
+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp
 


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi again Steve;

 

I forgot to mention that we will be installing the Yacht Sentinel boat monitoring system that has many functions that it monitors such as Geofencing (Anchor drag), low battery, high water, motion sensor, shore power, temperature (battery compartment, engine room, etc.) and more. It is also setup for remote monitoring and notifications, while you are away from the boat, in case anything goes wrong so you can be informed and respond to any condition.

 

For example, many water intrusion alarms can be installed in areas where the water will first start accumulating, if there is a breach of fresh water lines or a breach to sea water. There are many issues that may lead to unwanted outcomes. In our opinion, monitoring and being alerted to these is the way to go so we do not interfere with the normal operation of boat systems.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 11:20 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

 

Hi Steve,

in the first month of our ownership of Ocean Pearl a pin hole developed in the hot water cylinder. We were ashore and when we got back the fresh water pump was merrily running pouring water into the bilge. Fortunately we were back on board very soon after the leak developed. You are quite right about the risk this presents, particularly if the bilge pump fails and 900 litres of water finishes up in the engine room. I would choose overboard any day. So we always turn the fresh water breaker off when we leave the boat. We also installed a very intrusive beeping alarm that functions when the bilge pump is operating. Could be considered irritating but we like knowing when the bilge pump is going. Keeps us informed. If there are shower hungry guests aboard who continually have long showers the bilge alarm notifies us to do a sneaky turn off of the water pump. grin.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 11 May 2020 at 17:51 Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117 <steve@...> wrote:


FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--

Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention

Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 

Western Mediterranean

+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp

 


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mohammed,

totally agree. I marvel and cringe at the complex electronic and electrical systems some people are adding. Not something for a boat intended for extended off shore sailing in remote third world locations.

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 11 May 2020 at 18:07 Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:

Hello Steve;

 

You make valid points. However, we feel that at some point, we must have standard operating procedures, that address issues like the one you mention. There are many systems on board that could create undesirable and sometime dangerous conditions, if we do not think them through and have operating procedures that address these conditions. In regards to the issue you correctly point out, we never leave the water pressure breaker on, while away from the boat, at night or while under way. This simple SOP addresses this concern for us.

 

It is my opinion that by trying to prevent all potential issues that may arise , without the need for standard operating procedures that prevent them, we will create a far more complex system, than our boats currently are, with sometimes unintended outcomes.

 

One of the main reasons we were drawn to the Amel concept, was the fact that thousands of the same design concepts had done what we intended to do and had been tested in real life conditions. We did not feel that Amel design were necessarily the best, but that they had been well tested and proven throughout decades of real life conditions.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 10:52 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

 

FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--

Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention

Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 

Western Mediterranean

+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp

 

 



 


 


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Steve,

in the first month of our ownership of Ocean Pearl a pin hole developed in the hot water cylinder. We were ashore and when we got back the fresh water pump was merrily running pouring water into the bilge. Fortunately we were back on board very soon after the leak developed. You are quite right about the risk this presents, particularly if the bilge pump fails and 900 litres of water finishes up in the engine room. I would choose overboard any day. So we always turn the fresh water breaker off when we leave the boat. We also installed a very intrusive beeping alarm that functions when the bilge pump is operating. Could be considered irritating but we like knowing when the bilge pump is going. Keeps us informed. If there are shower hungry guests aboard who continually have long showers the bilge alarm notifies us to do a sneaky turn off of the water pump. grin.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 11 May 2020 at 17:51 Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117 <steve@...> wrote:

FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--
Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention
Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 
Western Mediterranean
+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp
 


Re: FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hello Steve;

 

You make valid points. However, we feel that at some point, we must have standard operating procedures, that address issues like the one you mention. There are many systems on board that could create undesirable and sometime dangerous conditions, if we do not think them through and have operating procedures that address these conditions. In regards to the issue you correctly point out, we never leave the water pressure breaker on, while away from the boat, at night or while under way. This simple SOP addresses this concern for us.

 

It is my opinion that by trying to prevent all potential issues that may arise , without the need for standard operating procedures that prevent them, we will create a far more complex system, than our boats currently are, with sometimes unintended outcomes.

 

One of the main reasons we were drawn to the Amel concept, was the fact that thousands of the same design concepts had done what we intended to do and had been tested in real life conditions. We did not feel that Amel design were necessarily the best, but that they had been well tested and proven throughout decades of real life conditions.

 

Happy Sailing;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

AMEL 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 10:52 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

 

FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--

Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention

Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 

Western Mediterranean

+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp

 


FRESH WATER SAFETY CUTOFF

Steven Bode - SV Intention 1994-SM#117
 

FRESH WATER SAFETY SHUTOFF SYSTEM REQUEST FOR COMMENTS

Amelians, I believe that there is a serious issue with the fresh water pump system on the Super Maramu and I would like your input. 

The problem: In the event of a failure of the pressurized freshwater system — a break anywhere in the water plumbing, the entire freshwater supply could be drained overboard resulting in (a) loss of critical freshwater, (b) overuse of the freshwater pump (killing it) and (c) over use of the main bilge pump (killing it, too). Don’t ask me how I know.

Situational description: The freshwater pump may be left on. This is often the case when people are onboard, for example overnight or sometimes when they are ashore (off the boat).

The pump will pressurize the water system and remain off as long as the system remains pressurized. The pump will activate automatically any time there is a drop in water pressure.

If there is a break in the pressurized water system — a fault, then the pump will activate and run continuously until it is switched off, draining the entire fresh water supply into the bilge where it will be pumped overboard by the main bilge pump. This is a costly occurrence or possibly a safety issue if fresh water can not be resupplied, for example if the boat is off shore and there is no water maker.

A Proposal: A safety mechanism is needed to prevent this. A simple solution would be a timer that is activated every time the pump is activated. When the timer expires the pump is automatically deactivated until the system is manually reset. By determining the average time the pump is running each time it is activated, the timer could be set to shut off the system whenever above average run time is encountered. For example, if the pump typically runs for an average of 60 seconds, then the timer could be set for five minutes. If the pump runs for five minutes, then the timer turns off the power to the water pump, functioning like a breaker. The pump must be reset manually like a breaker.

Resetting the breaker: Ideally, this timer circuit would reset automatically once water pressure is restored, but that is much more complicated as it would require the deactivated pump to be turned on again or some other system employed.

 

This is a request for comments from those of you out there who have either considered this issue or who would like to develop a solution. I propose that a timer circuit be introduced between the breaker and the pump to serve as a safety device. It would be unobtrusive as long as the water was not to remain open for more than the timer duration. I am not a circuit designer, but I have been researching homebuilt circuits that might work.

--
Steve Bode, Sailing Vessel Intention
Amel Super Maramu #117 (1994) 
Western Mediterranean
+1 415-710-6659 voice/text/whatsapp
 


Re: The ultimate cockpit table?

Paul McDonald <paul@...>
 

Hi all,

Sorry to revive an old thread, but seeing Ibis still waiting for Porter's return to NZ prompted me.

After being very impressed with the helm seat on Ibis last year, we had a new base fabricated that allows us much better access to the engine room. It was a quick and relatively cheap project. Photos attached.

Regards,
Paul McDonald
sv Mari A54-124

On 9 Mar 2020 03:03, "Porter McRoberts via Groups.Io" <portermcroberts@...> wrote:
Randal.  On our A54-152 the table stores in a tucked forward position so the engine hatch opens unencumbered.  
I thought it was this way for everyone until we were parked next to another A54 in Opua.  What a nightmare to get into the engine room!  I think an easy modification to pull forward could be done.  Ill post a photo of our scenario when we get back to the boat shortly.
Amel does listen!
Porter A54-152




On Mar 8, 2020, at 9:50 AM, Randall <sailingalbedo@...> wrote:

Just to keep the hype for a good thing. Here some pics of basically the same bracketing. I don't Know who started this good thing, but this was on my 54. I will say the previous owners did upgrades a world traveller could appreciate. The one thing I plan for in the future is the stainless reinvent of the helm seat bracket, I believe is on Attika That is just brilliant. I will copy a pic from the owners group pics.

Great table ideas.

If I were to ever be a boat builder.
My first question to an owner of a boat that I had built, would be. What did you not like?. Why? Well, if I change what you don't like I will make them better.
My point is. How long have they been building that table in the way. I had to get in the engine bay on passage. Hold it in the air, while I reach for and lift the floor. You all have had to.

Randall
A54 #56

On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 1:39 PM Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io <sailw32=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Ann-Sofia, Diane and I were on your boat in 2015 in Prickly Bay ,Grenada, and that is when we first saw the bracket and bought one when we got home. So you get credit for our's . Say Hi! to Jonas .
Hope all is well,
Pat & Diane,
SV Shenanigans,



-----Original Message-----
From: Annsofie & Jonas Svanberg <ann-sofie@...>
To: main <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Mar 8, 2020 3:37 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] The ultimate cockpit table?

I wonder if not S/Y Lady Annila is that friend of a friend. 😊

We have had that solution since 2007, and I think our pictures is here on the forum some where.

Glad that our idea has been adopted by so many.

Regard
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM232, 1998


Skickat från min iPhone

> 8 mars 2020 kl. 01:45 skrev Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...>:
>
> Hi all,
>
> Last year, we installed a cockpit table based on a Lagun structure and a skimboard. Yes, after looking for months for the perfect table top, a light bulb switched on in the fun sports department of a hardware store in Panama.
>
> The Lagun arm idea came from a friend on an SM, who got the idea from a friend of his on another SM. It has since been used on a Mango, and Maramu friend is drooling over it. I think it would fit most Amel model i can think of.
>
> Table tops are a personal choice but the skimboard, although looking “modern” (some may say weird) won it for being lightweight, weatherproof, very rigid, skid proof, very cheap (~$20!) and, as it turns out, very cleanable.
>
>
> On a 54, it’s possible to find the right table dimensions to:
>
> - Use it as a coffee table for everybody’s sundowners,
> - use it as a dinner table for two, on either side of the mizzen, or other layout to stay out of the sun,
> - use it as a computer desk, again in various parts of the cockpit,
> - stay/swing out of the way of people moving in the cockpit while sailing or entertaining,
> - open any cockpit locker and the engine room hatch(*) without removing the table,
> - deploy and use the banquet cockpit table without removing the useful cockpit table,
> - operate the winches on the mizzen.
>
> We put it up more than a year ago in Panama and basically never removed it since.
>
>
>
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> (*) by cutting a wedge off the foot, the hatch can even open without raising the table.
>
>
> Hope it will give you ideas and a many enjoyable alfresco meals.
>
>
> Thomas
> GARULFO
> A54-122
> Hiva Oa, French Polynesia
>
>
>
> <image1.jpeg>
> <image2.jpeg>
> <image3.jpeg>
> <image4.jpeg>
> <image5.jpeg>
> <image6.jpeg>
> <image7.jpeg>
> <image8.jpeg>





<table 2.JPG><table 1.JPG><table 3.JPG><chair 1.JPG><chair 2.JPG>



Re: Parasailor on A54

Craig Briggs
 

"a professional is someone who gets paid for his work - it doesn't mean they are competent."


Re: Parasailor on A54

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thanks for all the answers, Joerg. Very helpful.

Last question - what's your procedure for taking down the Parasailor. Specifically, what AWA do you use, do you use the main to blanket the Parasailor and where do you run the snuffer line? After experiencing a lot of trouble getting it down in 35 knots true, I've settled on pulling out the main (not easy in 35 knots!) leading the snuffer line to the aft part of the leeward pulpit rail and then back to the windward side main mast winch. When I release the leeward sheet, the Parasailor flies forward and by doing this with the snuffer line, the snuffer more closely matches angle of the luffing Parasailor. All is easy when it's 15 knots true or less, but when a squall hits, things get much harder!

As an aside, I just checked the MPPT a few days ago and noticed that the positive wire leading to the battery was heating up a lot. Turns out, it was yet another thing done during our nightmare experience with some marine electricians (nearly everything they touched, I had to re-do). The wire connection was loose and when I checked the MPPT, noticed that when charger output got above say 25amps, output hit a wall and dropped suddenly - probably because of the loose wire! Moreover, the plastic around the terminal was sooty and had melted a bit, probably from all the arcing and overheating.

After tightening the connection, the solar panels output more yesterday than they've ever output in the last 2 years I've had it - 265AH. Another reminder to always check during/after you pay someone to do something!

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Flushing the water maker with fresh water

Joerg Esdorn
 

Yes, but many thanks.  Good thing to check.  Cheers. Joerg 


Re: Ral Nr. for the red boat stripe on A54

Nicolas Klene
 

Thank you Bill 
--
Nicolas Klene
DarNico
SM2K # 471
In Marseille