Date   
black wire in the genset exhaust fan

eric freedman
 

We are just getting ready to head south from NY to the Caribe (BURRR) and that is one thing that is holding us up.

Fair Winds,

Eric

SM 376 Kimberlite

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of eric freedman
Sent: Sunday, November 10, 2019 11:33
To: Amel Owners
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] The Black wire on the genset exhaust fan

Thanks Tom,

I kind of figured that out the red wire, I just don't know what the black wire connect to. Possibly someone with a hull number closer to mine knows how the black wire connects.

Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

Hey Eric- just changed my blower so this is still fresh. The line ahead of the transfer box is energized by the genset running (on SM 422). The hot line goes fuse, capacitor, then fan. I'm not sure about your black wire.....if that's a 4th wire coming from your fan, we don't have one so can't help there.

As an aside, due to charger overheating, we installed Hella 24 volt fan in ceiling light block over genset, pointed at charger. Switch is by watermaker panel. It resolved my charger overheating issue where new blower had made no difference.

Tom and Kirstin 
SM2K 422
L'ORIENT

The Black wire on the genset exhaust fan

eric freedman
 

Thanks Tom,

I kind of figured that out the red wire, I just don't know what the black wire connect to. Possibly someone with a hull number closer to mine knows how the black wire connects.

Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite




Hey Eric- just changed my blower so this is still fresh. The line ahead of the transfer box is energized by the genset running (on SM 422). The hot line goes fuse, capacitor, then fan. I'm not sure about your black wire.....if that's a 4th wire coming from your fan, we don't have one so can't help there.

As an aside, due to charger overheating, we installed Hella 24 volt fan in ceiling light block over genset, pointed at charger. Switch is by watermaker panel. It resolved my charger overheating issue where new blower had made no difference.

Tom and Kirstin 
SM2K 422
L'ORIENT

Re: Help with 220 Volt Genset exhaust fan Super Maramu

Thomas Kleman
 

Hey Eric- just changed my blower so this is still fresh. The line ahead of the transfer box is energized by the genset running (on SM 422). The hot line goes fuse, capacitor, then fan. I'm not sure about your black wire.....if that's a 4th wire coming from your fan, we don't have one so can't help there.

As an aside, due to charger overheating, we installed Hella 24 volt fan in ceiling light block over genset, pointed at charger. Switch is by watermaker panel. It resolved my charger overheating issue where new blower had made no difference.

Tom and Kirstin 
SM2K 422
L'ORIENT

Re: Bowthruster Gear Oil

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Nick,

 

I filled mine from the top, with the drain open, then used a dinghy pump to pressurise the reservoir until clean oil came out the drain. I did need a few periodical top-ups but never had any problem with the bowthruster.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io
Sent: 10 November 2019 10:43
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Bowthruster Gear Oil

 

Hi Matt,

 

That does make sense but this is not the first time I have changed the oil. I did it when I bought the boat in June 2017 in Grenada WI. As I remember, I just drained it and filled the reservoir. It was hot and the oil would have been thinner. It was quite cool this time and the oil more viscous…any other thoughts out there?

 

Nick 

Amelia AML 54-019

On 10 Nov 2019, at 14:03, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

 

I may be speaking from ignorance, but many lower units require removing the vent plug, and filling via a squeeze bottle from the drain plug, until oil seeps out the vent, installing the vent plug, an then quickly installing the drain plug.

This way, you fill from the bottom, and air is pushed out the top.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt


I On Nov 10, 2019, at 8:15 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I recently hauled out and decided to drain the gear oil from the Bowthruster, the oil was good and not cloudy but after two years needed changing.

 

Then after replacing the oil drain screw filled up the oil reservoir with 90 weight gear oil. The problem is that the gear oil will not flow. There is obviously some kind of air lock. I managed to get about 250ml in by Blowing into the reservoir, i.e. pressurising it. 

 

I have now left the boat for the winter and maybe the oil will work its way down by gravity. 

 

I looked for a bleed screw to let the air out but found nothing. 

 

Does anyone know if there is a air vent bleed screw? Or is there some trick?

 

Nick

 

Amelia 

AML 54-019 ashore at the Bazimakoplou boat yard Kilada Greece

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Bowthruster Gear Oil

Ian Park
 

Don’t know if it will help. Have you tried rotating prop by hand to get the shaft and gears turning? It may move the oil a bit. 
Ian
Ocean Hobo


On 10 Nov 2019, at 14:42, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

Hi Matt,

That does make sense but this is not the first time I have changed the oil. I did it when I bought the boat in June 2017 in Grenada WI. As I remember, I just drained it and filled the reservoir. It was hot and the oil would have been thinner. It was quite cool this time and the oil more viscous…any other thoughts out there?

Nick 
Amelia AML 54-019
On 10 Nov 2019, at 14:03, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

I may be speaking from ignorance, but many lower units require removing the vent plug, and filling via a squeeze bottle from the drain plug, until oil seeps out the vent, installing the vent plug, an then quickly installing the drain plug.
This way, you fill from the bottom, and air is pushed out the top.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

I On Nov 10, 2019, at 8:15 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I recently hauled out and decided to drain the gear oil from the Bowthruster, the oil was good and not cloudy but after two years needed changing.

Then after replacing the oil drain screw filled up the oil reservoir with 90 weight gear oil. The problem is that the gear oil will not flow. There is obviously some kind of air lock. I managed to get about 250ml in by Blowing into the reservoir, i.e. pressurising it. 

I have now left the boat for the winter and maybe the oil will work its way down by gravity. 

I looked for a bleed screw to let the air out but found nothing. 

Does anyone know if there is a air vent bleed screw? Or is there some trick?

Nick

Amelia 
AML 54-019 ashore at the Bazimakoplou boat yard Kilada Greece

Re: Bowthruster Gear Oil

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Matt,

That does make sense but this is not the first time I have changed the oil. I did it when I bought the boat in June 2017 in Grenada WI. As I remember, I just drained it and filled the reservoir. It was hot and the oil would have been thinner. It was quite cool this time and the oil more viscous…any other thoughts out there?

Nick 
Amelia AML 54-019

On 10 Nov 2019, at 14:03, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:

I may be speaking from ignorance, but many lower units require removing the vent plug, and filling via a squeeze bottle from the drain plug, until oil seeps out the vent, installing the vent plug, an then quickly installing the drain plug.
This way, you fill from the bottom, and air is pushed out the top.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

I On Nov 10, 2019, at 8:15 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I recently hauled out and decided to drain the gear oil from the Bowthruster, the oil was good and not cloudy but after two years needed changing.

Then after replacing the oil drain screw filled up the oil reservoir with 90 weight gear oil. The problem is that the gear oil will not flow. There is obviously some kind of air lock. I managed to get about 250ml in by Blowing into the reservoir, i.e. pressurising it. 

I have now left the boat for the winter and maybe the oil will work its way down by gravity. 

I looked for a bleed screw to let the air out but found nothing. 

Does anyone know if there is a air vent bleed screw? Or is there some trick?

Nick

Amelia 
AML 54-019 ashore at the Bazimakoplou boat yard Kilada Greece

Re: Antal 120x18 Composite Fibre jib block

karkauai
 

Oops, I just noticed that my iPhone changed a word.
Correction:
I RINSED my job blocks ( the large ones that lead to the winch) in warm water.

Kent
Kristy
SM 243

You receive all messages sent to this group.

View/Reply Online (#49104) | Reply To Group | Reply To Sender | Mute This Topic | New Topic

Your Subscription | Contact Group Owner | Unsubscribe [karkauai@...]

_._,_._,_

Re: Bowthruster Gear Oil

Matt Salatino
 

I may be speaking from ignorance, but many lower units require removing the vent plug, and filling via a squeeze bottle from the drain plug, until oil seeps out the vent, installing the vent plug, an then quickly installing the drain plug.
This way, you fill from the bottom, and air is pushed out the top.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 10, 2019, at 8:15 AM, ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington@...> wrote:

I recently hauled out and decided to drain the gear oil from the Bowthruster, the oil was good and not cloudy but after two years needed changing.

Then after replacing the oil drain screw filled up the oil reservoir with 90 weight gear oil. The problem is that the gear oil will not flow. There is obviously some kind of air lock. I managed to get about 250ml in by Blowing into the reservoir, i.e. pressurising it. 

I have now left the boat for the winter and maybe the oil will work its way down by gravity. 

I looked for a bleed screw to let the air out but found nothing. 

Does anyone know if there is a air vent bleed screw? Or is there some trick?

Nick

Amelia 
AML 54-019 ashore at the Bazimakoplou boat yard Kilada Greece

Bowthruster Gear Oil

ngtnewington Newington
 

I recently hauled out and decided to drain the gear oil from the Bowthruster, the oil was good and not cloudy but after two years needed changing.

Then after replacing the oil drain screw filled up the oil reservoir with 90 weight gear oil. The problem is that the gear oil will not flow. There is obviously some kind of air lock. I managed to get about 250ml in by Blowing into the reservoir, i.e. pressurising it. 

I have now left the boat for the winter and maybe the oil will work its way down by gravity. 

I looked for a bleed screw to let the air out but found nothing. 

Does anyone know if there is a air vent bleed screw? Or is there some trick?

Nick

Amelia 
AML 54-019 ashore at the Bazimakoplou boat yard Kilada Greece

Re: Amel 54 battery group

Joerg Esdorn
 

It may be that they do not recommend AGM anymore.  All 55s have Mastervolt gel batteries.  Mine are fine after 4 seasons (never below 60%).  I met another Amel 55 from 2011 still with the original batteries.  

Joerg Esdorn 
A55 Kincsem #53
Vigo, Spain

Re: Amel 54 battery group

Porter McRoberts
 

John Completely agree. 
I am tempted by the lithium ion technology but our 2 year old AGMs rate at 98% on the load tests after 2 years of living on the biat   Again never below 80%. We have 1000watts solar and are highly attentive to running the generator when needed. Which equals about 40 minutes a day. AGM works great. 

Porter
A54-152
IBIS 

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 
Www.fouribis.com

On Nov 10, 2019, at 4:36 PM, John Clark <john.biohead@...> wrote:


I think I am going to second what Joel just said.  Annie has a good quality set of AGM lead-acid batteries.  They were installed in 2012 and are still working fine.  The previous owners, who purchased the batteries were minimalists who did not significantly deplete the batteries during their two circumnavigations.  In the last three years cruising nonstop for two years we almost never depleted the batteries below 80%....we were able to do this with 700w solar and timing the genset run. An were not totally frugal with power.  

Anyway AGM is a proven technology and is not terrible more expensive than a wet lead acid battery.  With some care they will last.  As Joel said, newer chargers and alternators do take better care of the batteries than before.  It appears that Lifeline and Lithium batteries are "better" performance wise...but at least for me it is an open question as to whether or not they are economically better.  I guess I will be facing that question soon as my batteries are seven years old.  

Regards,  John
SV Annie  SM 37
Brunswick GA

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 11:40 AM amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:

I have an invoice from when I replaced the batteries on my Amel 54 and I am sure I replaced them with what Amel recommended at the time. The size was Group 31. There are big but sometimes small  hard to notice differences in closely numbered battery group sizes. These tiny differences become very obvious when you try to install the wrong size of 13 different new batteries in a space designed to hold Group 31’s . For what it’s worth, my batteries were maintenance free lead-calcium sealed types and  lasted almost exactly 4 years and were not  quite dead but dying. As my 54 was my demonstration boat for the North American market and was only sailed around 8,000 miles a year . It was on a dock with shore power and the 30 amp charger on 24/7 to keep the fridge/freezers happy, I got more battery life than boats that were on the hook more often than not. Steady supply to demand fosters longer battery life. I was unfortunate to only be able to be on the anchor less than a month each year. Full time jobs do this…

In having sold hundreds of brokerage Amel boats over the past 39 years, I can offer you these observations. Up until about five years ago, boats that were actively cruised at least 9 months each year and dependent on using the diesel propulsion engine or the generator for charging seemed to average about 3 years on a set of lead acid batteries. With the advent of better alternators with smart/adaptive/controllable regulation,  much more efficient solar panels and control mechanisms that are also efficient, the same lead acid batteries now days seem to be lasting about four years and sometimes five and six. Steady electrical flow in/out and not depleting the batteries into the danger zone would seem to be the logical explanation.

I am just now starting to resell boats with Firefly and Lithium Ion batteries  and, so far, nothing but love for them from selling owners. I think this is because they are rather expensive and get better care than what we thought of as disposable lead acids, as well as being technologically superior. I have also noted a phenomenon over the  four decades of selling Amel and other better quality boats that the more an emerging technology costs, the more the person who wrote the check attempts to rationalize and justify any less than stellar experiences.

Of course, there are so many variables with charging systems that this epistle should be viewed as opinion based on a wide swath of experience and certainly not absolute fact.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel    

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

Gary,

 

Thanks, yes it was the group part I was interested in. It just makes it a bit easier when researching potential replacements.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Wells
Sent: 09 November 2019 10:50
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

When I had a failure of two batteries and ended up replacing the bank Injse grp29 AC Delco lead acids. They served quite well.  
I am pretty sure that the grp27/29/30/31 are (nearly) identical in size and then differences lie ni capacity and post arrangement.
Most recently I installed a Trojan 30xhs set and am quite pleased.  
It was a snug fit but they are nice batteries. 
So, I said all that and you'll be looking at agm's but I wanted to try to answer the 'group number' part. 
Measurements are readily available from almost any manufacturer's website. A secure for matters :) .

Gary W.
SM209, Adagio
Charleston, SC


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Help with 220 Volt Genset exhaust fan Super Maramu

eric freedman
 

Hi,

My genset fan fell of the overhead in the engine room disconnecting some wires.
the fan has 4 wires blue, brown, green/yellow, and black.
The green/yellow and the blue are still connected but the brown and the black are not.

The cable  coming from the transfer switch area has 3 wires green/yellow (still connected) blue (still connected)
However the capacitor is connected to a red wire from that cable through a fuse and it is disconnected as is the black wire..

How is the red wire with the fuse and capacitor connected to the fan and how is the black wire connected to the wiring of  the fan? The electrical drawing of the genset fan from Amel just shows a fan.

Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite






Re: FW: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

John Clark
 

I think I am going to second what Joel just said.  Annie has a good quality set of AGM lead-acid batteries.  They were installed in 2012 and are still working fine.  The previous owners, who purchased the batteries were minimalists who did not significantly deplete the batteries during their two circumnavigations.  In the last three years cruising nonstop for two years we almost never depleted the batteries below 80%....we were able to do this with 700w solar and timing the genset run. An were not totally frugal with power.  

Anyway AGM is a proven technology and is not terrible more expensive than a wet lead acid battery.  With some care they will last.  As Joel said, newer chargers and alternators do take better care of the batteries than before.  It appears that Lifeline and Lithium batteries are "better" performance wise...but at least for me it is an open question as to whether or not they are economically better.  I guess I will be facing that question soon as my batteries are seven years old.  

Regards,  John
SV Annie  SM 37
Brunswick GA

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 11:40 AM amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:

I have an invoice from when I replaced the batteries on my Amel 54 and I am sure I replaced them with what Amel recommended at the time. The size was Group 31. There are big but sometimes small  hard to notice differences in closely numbered battery group sizes. These tiny differences become very obvious when you try to install the wrong size of 13 different new batteries in a space designed to hold Group 31’s . For what it’s worth, my batteries were maintenance free lead-calcium sealed types and  lasted almost exactly 4 years and were not  quite dead but dying. As my 54 was my demonstration boat for the North American market and was only sailed around 8,000 miles a year . It was on a dock with shore power and the 30 amp charger on 24/7 to keep the fridge/freezers happy, I got more battery life than boats that were on the hook more often than not. Steady supply to demand fosters longer battery life. I was unfortunate to only be able to be on the anchor less than a month each year. Full time jobs do this…

In having sold hundreds of brokerage Amel boats over the past 39 years, I can offer you these observations. Up until about five years ago, boats that were actively cruised at least 9 months each year and dependent on using the diesel propulsion engine or the generator for charging seemed to average about 3 years on a set of lead acid batteries. With the advent of better alternators with smart/adaptive/controllable regulation,  much more efficient solar panels and control mechanisms that are also efficient, the same lead acid batteries now days seem to be lasting about four years and sometimes five and six. Steady electrical flow in/out and not depleting the batteries into the danger zone would seem to be the logical explanation.

I am just now starting to resell boats with Firefly and Lithium Ion batteries  and, so far, nothing but love for them from selling owners. I think this is because they are rather expensive and get better care than what we thought of as disposable lead acids, as well as being technologically superior. I have also noted a phenomenon over the  four decades of selling Amel and other better quality boats that the more an emerging technology costs, the more the person who wrote the check attempts to rationalize and justify any less than stellar experiences.

Of course, there are so many variables with charging systems that this epistle should be viewed as opinion based on a wide swath of experience and certainly not absolute fact.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel    

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

Gary,

 

Thanks, yes it was the group part I was interested in. It just makes it a bit easier when researching potential replacements.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Wells
Sent: 09 November 2019 10:50
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

When I had a failure of two batteries and ended up replacing the bank Injse grp29 AC Delco lead acids. They served quite well.  
I am pretty sure that the grp27/29/30/31 are (nearly) identical in size and then differences lie ni capacity and post arrangement.
Most recently I installed a Trojan 30xhs set and am quite pleased.  
It was a snug fit but they are nice batteries. 
So, I said all that and you'll be looking at agm's but I wanted to try to answer the 'group number' part. 
Measurements are readily available from almost any manufacturer's website. A secure for matters :) .

Gary W.
SM209, Adagio
Charleston, SC


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Desperate plea for an alternator/charging problem - Amel Euros 41, 1976, MD21a engine

John Clark
 

Hi Andrew,
  no pity...you are on the boat and I am at work  ;)     As to the alternator questions On the TMD22 there are two alternators...one is 12V for the engine and starter battery, the other is 24v for the house battery bank...which on the SM powers the windlass and other loads.   

If the 24v alternator is not working that could explain the lack of power at the windlass.  Sorry the pictures of the morass of wiring isn't helpful to me....but I have a mulimeter in my pocket right now so if you send me a plane ticket I could perhaps help more effectively in person.  ;)

Regards,  John
SV Annie SM 37
Brunswick GA

On Fri, Nov 8, 2019 at 8:37 AM Andrew Eaves <andyeaves@...> wrote:
Hello all,

PLEASE HELP AND TAKE PITY :)

After 38 knots in the bay last night I am 'keen as hell' to get out of here! Apparently in 4 days next week, mother nature is going to give us a re-run for a couple of days, which may at least save us the hassle of handwashing our clothes if we put them in a large bucket before hand!

So something is amiss with our charging system, as such the windlass can't retrieve the anchor and neither can the mrs by hand. Batteries are shot and I have limited ah till I replace. I suspect regulator diode issue but please read and chip in with thoughts/experiences.

It's an Amel Euros 41, 1976, MD21a engine.
It had two alternators when I purchased the boat a couple of months ago, but pictures show only one now as of today. I've started stripping dodgy batteries and the discovered dodgy alternator to simplify the matter.
The picture shows what I believe is the OEM design, a single alternator connected to the starter.
The upper alternator was faulty, (bracket showing) tested at 2 places as it happens. I 'think' this has an external regulator and no idea what the relay would be for given that also shown in the pictures.

I actually don't need at this stage the upper broken 2nd alternator repaired and in the situation. With solar/wind and shore power when connected, it should have enough charge, providing I don't need to crank the engine diagnosing other issues, but that's another day. Being in the Greek islands for now, we are never going to be far from land, if this changes, I'll readdress moving forward.

So thoughts;

- Is there a way to confirm the diode block, if I am correct pointing at that is faulty? 
- If found to be the problem are there local fixes/alternatives suitable for a wiring monkey at best as my surname is not Faraday? I understand the Volvo part which is sealed is expensive and on an island in Greece, probably not quick to get other than priority pigeon from Athens.
- If I am off course here, what else can I consider?
- The Amel switch also shown in the pictures is due for being replaced, but I don't want to change too much too soon unless I just pay for someone to do it all. It's not just purely $$ but knowledge too. This is part of the reason for purchasing this ark. Does anyone have schematics for this switch so I can understand the terminals please?
- The other picture showing a wire that clearly looks like it should be connected to the starter, wasn't previously. The connection had to be widened to get on the terminal, and when I did that, it sounds I think a low-pressure alarm, but it looks aftermarket. Either way, having this on or not made no difference to V or A at the battery.

Thanks in advance.

Regards

Andrew

Re: Cracks on bow sprit

John Clark
 

Ha, I love reading Joel's posts....and to join the choir, Annie SM 37 (1990) also sports the same "cracks" at the bow.   Previous owner who purchased her in 2002 reported that the cracks were present then and did not get worse or interfere with two circumnavigations.   My surveyor was not worried and looked to the underside of the bowsprit to verify there was no structural issue.  The three SMs I visited before purchasing Annie also had the cracks.  

Regards,  John

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 11:16 AM Stephane Thomaso <thomaso.steph@...> wrote:
That’s exactly what , Gilles from Karin team , Amel specialist , told me about that . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 9 nov. 2019 à 16:56, amelforme <jfpottercys@...> a écrit :

MORE THAN YOU EVER WANTD TO KNOW ABOUT AMEL GEL COAT CRACKS.

 

The reason that the gel coat cracks at the bow and other places is purely cosmetic and is simply caused by the gel coat being too thick. Gel coat is essentially just polyester resin with pigment to add color and perhaps some ultra violet inhibitors. It has very little strength on its own and is extremely brittle if a thickness of more than about 20 mils is exceeded. For my metric based friends out there, a ‘mil’ is one thousandth of an inch. Amel thickened up the gel coat in several places to level or seal a seam/joint instead of using polyester fairing compound with the proper gel coat thickness on top of that. The gel coat is also way too thick at the aft end of the ‘rub rail’ on the Fango, Santorin, Super Maramu and Amel 54. Also, up until the production of the Amel 55, the gel coat used on all Amel boats to simulate the raised grain of weathered teak is also too thick. Go look at 51’ Mango or 48’  Maramu and unless the boat has been very well cared for or never ventured much below 45 degrees latitude, you will find hairline cracks and worse as the gel coat loses esters and dries out from sun exposure and other factors . 303 spray on sun protection and Polytrol both do a good job at delaying the onslaught of gel coat degradation. With Polytrol, go easy. Enough is good. More than enough is not better.

How do I know this? Jacques Carteau, who at the time was not only the technical manager at Amel but the Chairman as well, was giving me some routine technical training when I asked him about the gel coat failures I was beginning to see more often on older boats. He gave me pretty much the explanation above.  When I asked him why they didn’t fair with fairing compound and use 20 mils of gel coat as the top coat I got the look I often received when I had exceeded either my question quota for the day or his patience, That time I think it was both…

To properly repair the cracks you need to sand the gel coat that has the crack until you see that the crack is gone and the surrounding gel coat is almost all gone in order to get rid of the too thick gel coat. Use a compatible polyester or better yet epoxy filing/fairing compound to level or to allow shaping of the repair area then apply the proper 20 mil thickness of new gel coat. Hint, use gel coat with wax mixed in to avoid having to use pvc or similar to form an atmospheric barrier that will allow the gel coat to cure properly.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel     

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 8:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Cracks on bow sprit

 

Jarek

 

   Fiberglass that is fractured does not break along nice straight lines per your photo.  Those look like joints to me.   Oliver could probably tell you for sure but I suspect that the parts forming the outer rail portions of the anchor platform were fabricated and installed as separate parts and the “cracks” you see are the mating/bonding lines. 

James

 

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Nov 8, 2019, at 7:16 PM, Jarek Zemlo <zemlo.jarek@...> wrote:

 

Hello to all,

I am doing a survey on Amel SM and found 2 cracks on the bow which looks serious. Like to ask if somebody had experience similar situation and if this is something to worry about or just easy repair issue? See attached picture.

Best regards
--
Jarek Zemlo

<C1B7F5A3-4713-41C5-B670-F3EF136935AD.jpeg>

 

Re: Antal 120x18 Composite Fibre jib block

John Clark
 

Hi Duane,
   I am replacing the cars on Annie, currently awaiting shipment from EuroMarine Trading.  My original cars and sheaves were a little coarse but opening them up and cleaning them eliminated a lot of the resistance.  At least on Annie the sheaves are ball bearing supported and opening them up and cleaning them was all that was needed.  

Regards,  John

SV Annie SM 37
Brunswick GA

PS: I a replacing them because one sheave sidewall(the metal part) failed while sailing in fair wind.  The stainless steal looked to have been damaged by years of flapping back and forth when the genoa flogs.  I think they were original.

On Sat, Nov 9, 2019 at 8:26 AM Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm wondering if the Antal 120x18 jib blocks on Wanderer need some TLC.  If you try to spin the sheave, there is too much friction to permit it to spin.  It can be turned with thumb and forefinger with enough resistance that one must grip tightly.

I looked on the Antal site but did not find a maintenance manual.  

Can anyone comment on the maintenance for this block?

Thanks,
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

FW: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

amelforme
 

I have an invoice from when I replaced the batteries on my Amel 54 and I am sure I replaced them with what Amel recommended at the time. The size was Group 31. There are big but sometimes small  hard to notice differences in closely numbered battery group sizes. These tiny differences become very obvious when you try to install the wrong size of 13 different new batteries in a space designed to hold Group 31’s . For what it’s worth, my batteries were maintenance free lead-calcium sealed types and  lasted almost exactly 4 years and were not  quite dead but dying. As my 54 was my demonstration boat for the North American market and was only sailed around 8,000 miles a year . It was on a dock with shore power and the 30 amp charger on 24/7 to keep the fridge/freezers happy, I got more battery life than boats that were on the hook more often than not. Steady supply to demand fosters longer battery life. I was unfortunate to only be able to be on the anchor less than a month each year. Full time jobs do this…

In having sold hundreds of brokerage Amel boats over the past 39 years, I can offer you these observations. Up until about five years ago, boats that were actively cruised at least 9 months each year and dependent on using the diesel propulsion engine or the generator for charging seemed to average about 3 years on a set of lead acid batteries. With the advent of better alternators with smart/adaptive/controllable regulation,  much more efficient solar panels and control mechanisms that are also efficient, the same lead acid batteries now days seem to be lasting about four years and sometimes five and six. Steady electrical flow in/out and not depleting the batteries into the danger zone would seem to be the logical explanation.

I am just now starting to resell boats with Firefly and Lithium Ion batteries  and, so far, nothing but love for them from selling owners. I think this is because they are rather expensive and get better care than what we thought of as disposable lead acids, as well as being technologically superior. I have also noted a phenomenon over the  four decades of selling Amel and other better quality boats that the more an emerging technology costs, the more the person who wrote the check attempts to rationalize and justify any less than stellar experiences.

Of course, there are so many variables with charging systems that this epistle should be viewed as opinion based on a wide swath of experience and certainly not absolute fact.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel    

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

Gary,

 

Thanks, yes it was the group part I was interested in. It just makes it a bit easier when researching potential replacements.

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gary Wells
Sent: 09 November 2019 10:50
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 battery group

 

When I had a failure of two batteries and ended up replacing the bank Injse grp29 AC Delco lead acids. They served quite well.  
I am pretty sure that the grp27/29/30/31 are (nearly) identical in size and then differences lie ni capacity and post arrangement.
Most recently I installed a Trojan 30xhs set and am quite pleased.  
It was a snug fit but they are nice batteries. 
So, I said all that and you'll be looking at agm's but I wanted to try to answer the 'group number' part. 
Measurements are readily available from almost any manufacturer's website. A secure for matters :) .

Gary W.
SM209, Adagio
Charleston, SC


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Cracks on bow sprit

Stephane Thomaso
 

That’s exactly what , Gilles from Karin team , Amel specialist , told me about that . 

Envoyé de mon iPhone

Le 9 nov. 2019 à 16:56, amelforme <jfpottercys@...> a écrit :

MORE THAN YOU EVER WANTD TO KNOW ABOUT AMEL GEL COAT CRACKS.

 

The reason that the gel coat cracks at the bow and other places is purely cosmetic and is simply caused by the gel coat being too thick. Gel coat is essentially just polyester resin with pigment to add color and perhaps some ultra violet inhibitors. It has very little strength on its own and is extremely brittle if a thickness of more than about 20 mils is exceeded. For my metric based friends out there, a ‘mil’ is one thousandth of an inch. Amel thickened up the gel coat in several places to level or seal a seam/joint instead of using polyester fairing compound with the proper gel coat thickness on top of that. The gel coat is also way too thick at the aft end of the ‘rub rail’ on the Fango, Santorin, Super Maramu and Amel 54. Also, up until the production of the Amel 55, the gel coat used on all Amel boats to simulate the raised grain of weathered teak is also too thick. Go look at 51’ Mango or 48’  Maramu and unless the boat has been very well cared for or never ventured much below 45 degrees latitude, you will find hairline cracks and worse as the gel coat loses esters and dries out from sun exposure and other factors . 303 spray on sun protection and Polytrol both do a good job at delaying the onslaught of gel coat degradation. With Polytrol, go easy. Enough is good. More than enough is not better.

How do I know this? Jacques Carteau, who at the time was not only the technical manager at Amel but the Chairman as well, was giving me some routine technical training when I asked him about the gel coat failures I was beginning to see more often on older boats. He gave me pretty much the explanation above.  When I asked him why they didn’t fair with fairing compound and use 20 mils of gel coat as the top coat I got the look I often received when I had exceeded either my question quota for the day or his patience, That time I think it was both…

To properly repair the cracks you need to sand the gel coat that has the crack until you see that the crack is gone and the surrounding gel coat is almost all gone in order to get rid of the too thick gel coat. Use a compatible polyester or better yet epoxy filing/fairing compound to level or to allow shaping of the repair area then apply the proper 20 mil thickness of new gel coat. Hint, use gel coat with wax mixed in to avoid having to use pvc or similar to form an atmospheric barrier that will allow the gel coat to cure properly.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel     

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 8:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Cracks on bow sprit

 

Jarek

 

   Fiberglass that is fractured does not break along nice straight lines per your photo.  Those look like joints to me.   Oliver could probably tell you for sure but I suspect that the parts forming the outer rail portions of the anchor platform were fabricated and installed as separate parts and the “cracks” you see are the mating/bonding lines. 

James

 

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Nov 8, 2019, at 7:16 PM, Jarek Zemlo <zemlo.jarek@...> wrote:

 

Hello to all,

I am doing a survey on Amel SM and found 2 cracks on the bow which looks serious. Like to ask if somebody had experience similar situation and if this is something to worry about or just easy repair issue? See attached picture.

Best regards
--
Jarek Zemlo

<C1B7F5A3-4713-41C5-B670-F3EF136935AD.jpeg>

 

Re: Amel 54 battery group

Matt Salatino
 

Strange, I wonder why they are installing gel batteries on our new 50?

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 9, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Alexander Hofmann <DACJ@...> wrote:

Hi Paul, Sharon, Courtney
AMEL has changed its advice for the batteries in about 2015. They advice the AGM 12V/110Ah. I have them onboard since years and I am very satisfied. Will change them after more than 4 years in spring. The general adive is to change them each 3 years. I would reccomend to anyone to change the 13 batteries at the same time, the starter battery and the 6 pairs of 12V batteries in serie, producing 24V. AMEL dis-advices Sol/Gel batteries. See https://www.victronenergy.com/batteries/gel-and-agm-batteries
You can prolong the batteries lifetime with 6 battery balancers (see https://www.victronenergy.com/batteries/battery-balancer) which equalizes the state of charge of the 2 batteries connected.
Alexander Hofmann
SY Oceanica I - Amel 54#156
<Datasheet-GEL-and-AGM-Batteries-EN.pdf>

Re: Cracks on bow sprit

amelforme
 

MORE THAN YOU EVER WANTD TO KNOW ABOUT AMEL GEL COAT CRACKS.

 

The reason that the gel coat cracks at the bow and other places is purely cosmetic and is simply caused by the gel coat being too thick. Gel coat is essentially just polyester resin with pigment to add color and perhaps some ultra violet inhibitors. It has very little strength on its own and is extremely brittle if a thickness of more than about 20 mils is exceeded. For my metric based friends out there, a ‘mil’ is one thousandth of an inch. Amel thickened up the gel coat in several places to level or seal a seam/joint instead of using polyester fairing compound with the proper gel coat thickness on top of that. The gel coat is also way too thick at the aft end of the ‘rub rail’ on the Fango, Santorin, Super Maramu and Amel 54. Also, up until the production of the Amel 55, the gel coat used on all Amel boats to simulate the raised grain of weathered teak is also too thick. Go look at 51’ Mango or 48’  Maramu and unless the boat has been very well cared for or never ventured much below 45 degrees latitude, you will find hairline cracks and worse as the gel coat loses esters and dries out from sun exposure and other factors . 303 spray on sun protection and Polytrol both do a good job at delaying the onslaught of gel coat degradation. With Polytrol, go easy. Enough is good. More than enough is not better.

How do I know this? Jacques Carteau, who at the time was not only the technical manager at Amel but the Chairman as well, was giving me some routine technical training when I asked him about the gel coat failures I was beginning to see more often on older boats. He gave me pretty much the explanation above.  When I asked him why they didn’t fair with fairing compound and use 20 mils of gel coat as the top coat I got the look I often received when I had exceeded either my question quota for the day or his patience, That time I think it was both…

To properly repair the cracks you need to sand the gel coat that has the crack until you see that the crack is gone and the surrounding gel coat is almost all gone in order to get rid of the too thick gel coat. Use a compatible polyester or better yet epoxy filing/fairing compound to level or to allow shaping of the repair area then apply the proper 20 mil thickness of new gel coat. Hint, use gel coat with wax mixed in to avoid having to use pvc or similar to form an atmospheric barrier that will allow the gel coat to cure properly.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel     

 

             JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2019 8:41 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Cracks on bow sprit

 

Jarek

 

   Fiberglass that is fractured does not break along nice straight lines per your photo.  Those look like joints to me.   Oliver could probably tell you for sure but I suspect that the parts forming the outer rail portions of the anchor platform were fabricated and installed as separate parts and the “cracks” you see are the mating/bonding lines. 

James

 

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Nov 8, 2019, at 7:16 PM, Jarek Zemlo <zemlo.jarek@...> wrote:

 

Hello to all,

I am doing a survey on Amel SM and found 2 cracks on the bow which looks serious. Like to ask if somebody had experience similar situation and if this is something to worry about or just easy repair issue? See attached picture.

Best regards
--
Jarek Zemlo

<C1B7F5A3-4713-41C5-B670-F3EF136935AD.jpeg>