Date   

Eno 4 burner Stove grate and standoffs

eric freedman
 

We have had a perpetual problem trying different methods of retaining the grate above the burners. We have the stove that came with the deluxe package on our SM2000. The grate does not stay in place . The plastic standoffs are worn and I wonder if anyone has had new ones fabricated out of stainless.  The other problem we have is that a frying pan will slip under the bar on the front of the stove. We have fabricated a piece of 1/2 inch dowel rod that is suspended from the front bar by cup hooks and held in place by seizing wire. Our solution is rather amateurish looking. Any better ideas?

Fair Winds,

Eric SM 376 Kimberlite


Re: Chesapeake Surveyor

Ian Townsend
 

Hi Alan. Apparently Mike is retiring in a couple weeks so we won’t be able to use him. Hope you, Laura and Ora Pai are well. 

Ian & Margaret
Loca Lola II
SM153

On Sep 20, 2020, at 10:39 AM, Alan Grayson <bazgrayson@...> wrote:


Hi Ian, hope you guys are doing well, we just got an insurance survey from Mike Previti based out of Solomon's. Very happy with the results.
His number +1 410-610-8761
Regards
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Annapolis

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...>
Sent: Saturday, 19 September 2020 11:27 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Chesapeake Surveyor
 

Looking for a surveyor in the vicinity of Deltaville, VA for an insurance valuation. Any suggestions.contact details?

Ian
SM153
Loca Lola II


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Scott SV Tengah
 

Joerg,

As I mentioned before, I believe, it is recommended (and I do) charge to full once a month. That resets the battery monitor to 100% and also balances the batteries since for every battery I know, balancing only occurs when nearly full. That has to do with the very flat voltage vs. SOC curve. There's bottom balancing, too, but that's beyond my comfort level.

There is a significant difference between charging full once a month and keeping it full. The former is recommended, the latter is generally accepted to be detrimental with no known benefits. 

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Joerg Esdorn
 

An interesting tidbit from the manual for my MV batteries. One of the „events“ causing an alarm on the Masterbus system is that the batteries HAVE NOT been fully charged for a period - default 31 days:  „ Last time fully charged serves as an event source. To prevent damage the batteries must be charged to the full 100% regularly. It is a common misconception that Lithium- Ion batteries should not be fully charged.“   


Joerg Esdorn
Amel 55 #53 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain


Re: Chesapeake Surveyor

Alan Grayson
 

Hi Ian, hope you guys are doing well, we just got an insurance survey from Mike Previti based out of Solomon's. Very happy with the results.
His number +1 410-610-8761
Regards
Alan Grayson
SM 406 Ora Pai
Annapolis


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Ian Townsend <smlocalola@...>
Sent: Saturday, 19 September 2020 11:27 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Chesapeake Surveyor
 

Looking for a surveyor in the vicinity of Deltaville, VA for an insurance valuation. Any suggestions.contact details?

Ian
SM153
Loca Lola II


Re: Wind Vane Autopilot

Ian Park
 

I had a hydrovane on my Santorin. It was there when I bought it.  It worked well most of the time, but on occasions (especially downwind in a blow) it would veer off course badly and I would have to free the wheel to manually steer back. Also when we encountered sargasso weed crossing the Atlantic the vertical rudder collected the weed and could not work .
removing the rudder is awkward, but putting it on at sea even in light swell is very difficult. You do need a system for locking the steering wheel.

I have since removed it and sold it. On removal the gel coat on the stern has been worn away badly, and the holes elongated. I did have to tighten the six securing bolts on occasion. I think it would be preferable to add extra layers of glass inside the lazarette as well as the wooden supports on the outside. I did also change the penny washers for stainless steel backing plates. The lazarette on the Sn and I believe the SM is not the main stern bulkhead (its the bulkhead between the lazarette and the aft cabin). It seems to be a lighter build than the rest of the boat. It is also why it is recommended not to over tighten the back stays on the mizzen, other wise you will get hairline fractures where they are bolted on the stern.  I am happy with the prop shaft alternator which keeps the fridge, autopilot and instruments running without any battery drain. I carry a spare type 2 rotary drive which takes 10 minutes to swap over. I also have 200watts of solar panel on the aft rails which can be tilted towards the sun. I have never had my batteries drop below a 90% charge, and then only at anchor. 

But - I have not had a lightening strike. 






 


Re: Anchor sizing

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Thank you so much, Nick and Jean Pierre. Your messages are really clarifying. I very much appreciate the valuable information. 
I'll request a quotation to Ultra and Cromox, and see if I survive the impact :-).
Best
Victor


Re: Bilge Tube Float Switch

eric freedman
 

Gary,
My switch from the factory was originally an all all plastic bat. No copper.
That must have been from the PO.
Fair Winds,
Eric

On September 19, 2020 at 1:25 AM Gary Wells <gary@...> wrote:

I know this was addressed before, but searching through the earlier posts I didn't run across the "answer" I was looking for.

 

This morning the bilge pump did not come on and while doing some laundry I got a high water alarm.  It only took a minute of troubleshooting to discover that the switch attached to the bilge tube float was dead.  Not a huge issue, just have to run the bilge pump manually whenever necessary ... which means keeping a close eye on it.

 

So, I don't have any pictures so will try hard to describe the assembly I have:  The switch looks to be a standard SPST (on/off) toggle that Amel (or a previous owner) has modified to have an extra long handle, or "bat".  The lengthening is accomplished with a sturdy piece of copper, apparently a tube, about 50cm long which is drilled on one end for the control strings and attached to the switch via a slip-fit which has been soldered or brazed into position.  At any rate, I could not get the "bat" apart from the switch.  

I did a lot of internet search and a couple of hours cruising Home Depot, the auto parts stores and Ace Hardware and couldn't really come up with anything I thought would be a viable solution.  There are automotive switches with longer toggles, maybe 25cm at most, but those toggles are plastic and I didn't think they would be as robust as the original.  I considered press-fitting a roll-pin over the "bat" of a standard switch and securing it with JB Weld.  That would likely be fine,but I'd have to figure a way to drill through the other end for the strings, the roll pins are mild steel so they'd rust quickly and they are heavier than the existing setup.

 

So, while I am asking if someone knows of a better solution/direct replacement (I have not written to Maud yet, wondering if anyone has already asked) I wanted to let everyone know that I solved the problem, at least temporarily, by actually disassembling the existing switch itself and scraping/cleaning the contact points.  The switch came apart with a pocket knife and some care and there was really only one moving part inside it.  Once it was cleaned and reassembled it functioned just fine. 

 

OK, that's today's essay on "the little things" aboard Adagio. 

 

Be safe!

 

Gary W.
SM 209, Adagio

Galesville, MD

 

 


 


Re: Bilge Tube Float Switch

eric freedman
 

Its just a single pole single throw switch, if it works it is fine. You just have to add something to extend its length.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

On September 19, 2020 at 2:33 PM "Courtney Gorman via groups.io" <Itsfun1@...> wrote:

Mod will have exactly what you need I replaced mine last year in the meantime I took some small tubing and made a temporary set up


On Sep 19, 2020, at 6:00 AM, Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io <southernadventurer@...> wrote:

 Merhuba,

See attached photo.

Hope you are enjoying Turkey

Kind regards
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
Currently in Turkey


<IMG_0173.jpeg>




Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, September 19, 2020, 9:36 am, Stefan Jeukendrup <sjeukendrup@...> wrote:

Hi Gary,

My bilge switch is an APEM On-Off switch with long toggle. Unfortunately the  631xxxx or 636xxxx number is no longer readable...
The number might be 631H/2-5 according to the datasheet on https://tr.farnell.com/apem/637h/toggle-switch-spdt-10a-250vac/dp/2888957


For the exact configuration please check the number on the switch that starts with 631..... and let us know.

The black nylon string is attached using polyolefin adhesive heat shrinkable tubing

Hope this helps you,


Stefan Jeukendrup
sv Malaka Queen
SM2k # 348 @Turkey
<IMG_0173.jpeg>

 

 


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Scott SV Tengah
 

I used to own and race BMWs and was a big fan of them.

Previously, they recommended oil changes every 3,000 miles. When they started including free oil changes, suddenly their recommendation was that you could go 20,000 miles or more between oil changes. Nothing changed in the engine nor the oil they used.

From a business perspective, it makes complete sense. Since BMW started including the oil changes, they rationally, as a business, determined that they could save money by only giving you 2 oil changes before your warranty ran out. Any damage due to extended oil change intervals would probably occur after that. When the customer was paying for oil changes and they wanted to protect their reputation, you were supposed to change the oil 6-7 times as often.

If I was a profit maximizing business, I would want my batteries to last the warranty period + 1 day. Or for you to get enough loss of capacity that you buy new ones. They go out of business if their customers only buy once every 10-15 years.

For this reason, I rely on statistically valid research from people who are not conflicted to make my decisions. When I leave the boat, I setup a simple programmable relay that drives a load will keep the SOC between 40-70%. Sure, there's one guy who seemed to do ok (in 1 out of 2 tests) when he goes against the non-conflicted researchers' advice...but he also sells lithium related products. It's not much effort and there's very little known downside to doing what the research says.

Or you can trust the guys trying to sell you stuff and who have a strong incentive for you to buy from them again once the warranty period ends.



--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Porter McRoberts
 

Mark. I think your insights are spot on. Both #1 and # 2. 

However, It seems to me that with access to solar or other power a charger should be able to be programmed to perfectly care for a battery, so that degradation likelihood is at its lowest potential. 

I’m sure the lack of data is from your 1 and 2. 

Interesting the difference in suggestions for parking. 


Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On Sep 19, 2020, at 6:44 AM, Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:



Porter,

That's part of the issue.  If you read each manufacturers instructions for how to store their LiFePO4 batteries you will get very different answers.  There is some level of commonality between some of them, but the specific recommendations are quite different from manufacturer to manufacturer.  See below for the details. 
Given that these batteries are all made from cells of the same chemistry (LiFePO4) and, in some cases, possibly the same exact cell manufacturer, that just doesn't make sense to me.  There should be one "best way" to store these batteries.  My conclusions from this lack of consensus seven or eight years into selling these batteries commercially are:

1.  The battery manufacturers don't really know for sure what the best storage method is

and

2.  The storage method does not affect the longevity/capacity of the batteries significantly enough to warrant investing the time and resources to figure it out

I am not stating that storage method does not affect the longevity/capacity of LiFePO4 batteries.  I actually believe that it does based on the reading and research that I have done.  But what I am saying is that if storage method was significantly affecting the manufacturers warranty costs and/or reputation, I believe that they would have figured that out by now and they would all have very similar recommendations for how to best store these batteries.  

Contrast this complete lack of consensus on storage method to the manufacturers recommended/built-in Low Voltage Cutoffs and High Voltage Cutoffs.  It is accepted fact that over-charging (voltage too high) and over-discharging (voltage too low) is what kills LiFePO4 batteries prematurely.  Every LiFePO4 battery manufacturer that I have researched has set a High Voltage Cutoff at 3.75-3.90 volts per cell and Low Voltage Cutoff at 2.5-2.8 volts per cell. While they are not exactly the same voltages, they are all based on a defined voltage level and they all are within the consensus "acceptable" voltage of 2.5 to 4.0 volts per cell for LiFePO4.

As I stated earlier in this thread, I've only seen one person actually experiment on what happens to LiFePO4 batteries when stored at a high SOC% (link referenced earlier in this thread).  The two experiments he conducted showed a permanent capacity loss of 4-12%.  This was after leaving LiFePO4 cells that were charged to 100% SOC for about 12-13 months with no charging or discharging during that time.  To me, 4-12% is not a huge loss of capacity given how long the batteries were completely neglected.  After all, most of us would never leave our boats unattended for 12-13 months at a time (at least on purpose).  And most notably, that capacity loss is well below any threshold that I have seen where a manufacturer would have to replace the battery under warranty.


If anyone is interested in the details on the various LiFePO4 manufacturers storage recommendations, below are some links and "copied and pasted" excerpts from some of the better known LiFePO4 battery manufacturers for your reference.  I've bolded and italicized some of the more pertinent information:  

Battle Born:  https://battlebornbatteries.com/faq/

The storage temperature range is -10°F to 140°F (-23°C to 60°C). We recommend bringing the Battle Born Batteries to a 100% charge and then disconnecting them completely for storage. After six months in storage your batteries will remain 75 – 80% charged. 

Victron:  https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/Manual-Lithium-iron-phosphate-batteries-Smart-EN-NL-FR-DE-ES-IT.pdf

Recommended storage/float voltage: 13,5V resp. 27V per battery. Batteries must be regularly (at least once every month) charged to 14V (max. 14,4V) in order to fully balance the cells. Two or four batteries in series should be charged regularly to 28V resp. 56V.

MasterVolt:  https://images.mastervolt.nl/files/10000015396_14_manualMLIUltra27505500_EN.pdf

The battery should be stored in a dry and well-ventilated environment. The rate of self-discharge is less than 5% per month. High or low ambient temperature affects the self-discharge rate of the batteries and natural aging. If the battery will not be used for a period exceeding 3 months, we advise the following:

If external AC power is available switch off all loads and switch on the charger. Apply a float voltage as specified in the following table.
Model - Float voltage setting
12V - 13.5V 
24V - 27.0V

If no external AC power is available: - Charge the battery to > 80% of its capacity before storage. - Set the safety relay knob to “LOCK OFF”, see page 12. - Make sure MasterBus powering is not set to "Always on" (see Configuration tab in MasterAdjust). In this setup the batteries can be kept at least 6 months without maintenance. However, it is highly recommended to charge the battery to > 80% of its capacity every 100 days.

RELiON:  https://ceb8596f236225acd007-8e95328c173a04ed694af83ee4e24c15.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/docs/product/RelionInstallationManual-8.5x5.5-081720.pdf

5. BATTERY STORAGE

5.1. Storage Temperature LiFePO4 can be stored between 23 to 95°F (-5 to 35°C). For storage longer than 3 months, the recommended temperature range is from 32 to 77°F (25 to 40°C).

5.2. Storage Conditions It is recommended to store LiFePO4 batteries at 50% state of charge (SOC). If batteries are stored for long periods of time, cycle the batteries at least every 6 months.

Lithionics:  https://lithionicsbattery.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Lithionics-Battery-Storage-Procedure.pdf

Storing your battery at the correct specifications is important as it keeps the battery in the healthiest state possible for the fastest deployment when needed. Consult the table below for proper storage conditions.

Typical storage scenario < 3 months:
1. Fully charge the battery.
2. Turn the battery OFF by the On/Off/Storage switch.
3. Keep the battery in an environment according to the specifications shown above.

Typical storage scenario > 3 months:
1. Reduce the battery SOC to 3.3V/cell which is 50% ±10% SOC. Note: See chart below for cell voltage calculation.
2. Turn the battery OFF via the On/Off/Storage switch.
3. Keep the battery in an environment according to the specifications shown above.
4. Every 6 months charge the battery to 100% SOC, then discharge the battery to LVC, then charge it back to 50% ±10% SOC. 


Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


Re: Bilge Tube Float Switch

Courtney Gorman
 

Mod will have exactly what you need I replaced mine last year in the meantime I took some small tubing and made a temporary set up


On Sep 19, 2020, at 6:00 AM, Ross Hickey & Donna Hammond via groups.io <southernadventurer@...> wrote:

 Merhuba,

See attached photo.

Hope you are enjoying Turkey

Kind regards
Ross and Donna
SV Intrepid Kiwi
Currently in Turkey


<IMG_0173.jpeg>




Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, September 19, 2020, 9:36 am, Stefan Jeukendrup <sjeukendrup@...> wrote:

Hi Gary,

My bilge switch is an APEM On-Off switch with long toggle. Unfortunately the  631xxxx or 636xxxx number is no longer readable...
The number might be 631H/2-5 according to the datasheet on https://tr.farnell.com/apem/637h/toggle-switch-spdt-10a-250vac/dp/2888957


For the exact configuration please check the number on the switch that starts with 631..... and let us know.

The black nylon string is attached using polyolefin adhesive heat shrinkable tubing

Hope this helps you,


Stefan Jeukendrup
sv Malaka Queen
SM2k # 348 @Turkey
<IMG_0173.jpeg>


Re: deck leak

Thomas Peacock
 

We have also experienced a small deck leak, albeit forward of yours. 
What I have found is the screws that hold in the metal plating associated with the windows can work loose a little bit, allowing water to come in through the screw hole. This can happen even if the screw looks okay on the outside. 

Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes 
Chesapeake Bay

On Sep 19, 2020, at 12:52 PM, Miles <milesbid@...> wrote:



Deck leak.

Hello All,

My boat has developed a small deck leak over the chart table.  So far it is small and is visible only by looking at the slight bubbling and dampness in the head liner.  I suspect the main traveler track, but I am hoping that someone else has had a similar problem and can offer suggestions. 
Miles
Ladybug  sm216  Newport, RI 


--
Tom Peacock
SM 240 Aletes
Chesapeake Bay


Re: Wind Vane Autopilot

Dennis Johns
 

Hi Bernd,

If you don't have a solar arch that sticks out over your stern, you should look at the Hydrovane option. They have brackets that work well on the many different stern configurations and their product can be offset from the centerline: https://hydrovane.com/

Dennis Johns
Libertad
Maramu 121

On Sat, Sep 19, 2020 at 7:48 AM Bernd Spanner <bernd.spanner@...> wrote:

Hi!

I am looking for opinions and recommendations to make my SN independent of electricity in case of eg a lightning strike frying my electronics in the middle of the NAT or PAC.
Navigation is clear, revert to basics. But how about wind vane Auto Pilot.
yout thoughts, experiences and recommendations please.


--
Bernd
SN 119 / Cascais, Portugal


Re: Fuel Line

Mark McGovern
 

Mark,

Can you be more specific on which copper fuel line you are talking about?  If so, let me know I will try to take a measurement for you.  

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


deck leak

Miles
 

Deck leak.

Hello All,

My boat has developed a small deck leak over the chart table.  So far it is small and is visible only by looking at the slight bubbling and dampness in the head liner.  I suspect the main traveler track, but I am hoping that someone else has had a similar problem and can offer suggestions. 
Miles
Ladybug  sm216  Newport, RI 


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Porter,

That's part of the issue.  If you read each manufacturers instructions for how to store their LiFePO4 batteries you will get very different answers.  There is some level of commonality between some of them, but the specific recommendations are quite different from manufacturer to manufacturer.  See below for the details. 
Given that these batteries are all made from cells of the same chemistry (LiFePO4) and, in some cases, possibly the same exact cell manufacturer, that just doesn't make sense to me.  There should be one "best way" to store these batteries.  My conclusions from this lack of consensus seven or eight years into selling these batteries commercially are:

1.  The battery manufacturers don't really know for sure what the best storage method is

and

2.  The storage method does not affect the longevity/capacity of the batteries significantly enough to warrant investing the time and resources to figure it out

I am not stating that storage method does not affect the longevity/capacity of LiFePO4 batteries.  I actually believe that it does based on the reading and research that I have done.  But what I am saying is that if storage method was significantly affecting the manufacturers warranty costs and/or reputation, I believe that they would have figured that out by now and they would all have very similar recommendations for how to best store these batteries.  

Contrast this complete lack of consensus on storage method to the manufacturers recommended/built-in Low Voltage Cutoffs and High Voltage Cutoffs.  It is accepted fact that over-charging (voltage too high) and over-discharging (voltage too low) is what kills LiFePO4 batteries prematurely.  Every LiFePO4 battery manufacturer that I have researched has set a High Voltage Cutoff at 3.75-3.90 volts per cell and Low Voltage Cutoff at 2.5-2.8 volts per cell. While they are not exactly the same voltages, they are all based on a defined voltage level and they all are within the consensus "acceptable" voltage of 2.5 to 4.0 volts per cell for LiFePO4.

As I stated earlier in this thread, I've only seen one person actually experiment on what happens to LiFePO4 batteries when stored at a high SOC% (link referenced earlier in this thread).  The two experiments he conducted showed a permanent capacity loss of 4-12%.  This was after leaving LiFePO4 cells that were charged to 100% SOC and then left alone for about 12-13 months with no charging or discharging during that time.  To me, 4-12% is not a huge loss of capacity given how long the batteries were completely neglected.  After all, most of us would never leave our boats unattended for 12-13 months at a time (at least on purpose).  And most notably, that capacity loss is well below any threshold that I have seen where a manufacturer would have to replace the battery under warranty.


If anyone is interested in the details on the various LiFePO4 manufacturers storage recommendations, below are some links and "copied and pasted" excerpts from some of the better known LiFePO4 battery manufacturers for your reference.  I've bolded and italicized some of the more pertinent information:  

Battle Born:  https://battlebornbatteries.com/faq/

The storage temperature range is -10°F to 140°F (-23°C to 60°C). We recommend bringing the Battle Born Batteries to a 100% charge and then disconnecting them completely for storage. After six months in storage your batteries will remain 75 – 80% charged. 

Victron:  https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/Manual-Lithium-iron-phosphate-batteries-Smart-EN-NL-FR-DE-ES-IT.pdf

Recommended storage/float voltage: 13,5V resp. 27V per battery. Batteries must be regularly (at least once every month) charged to 14V (max. 14,4V) in order to fully balance the cells. Two or four batteries in series should be charged regularly to 28V resp. 56V.

MasterVolt:  https://images.mastervolt.nl/files/10000015396_14_manualMLIUltra27505500_EN.pdf

The battery should be stored in a dry and well-ventilated environment. The rate of self-discharge is less than 5% per month. High or low ambient temperature affects the self-discharge rate of the batteries and natural aging. If the battery will not be used for a period exceeding 3 months, we advise the following:

If external AC power is available switch off all loads and switch on the charger. Apply a float voltage as specified in the following table.
Model - Float voltage setting
12V - 13.5V 
24V - 27.0V

If no external AC power is available: - Charge the battery to > 80% of its capacity before storage. - Set the safety relay knob to “LOCK OFF”, see page 12. - Make sure MasterBus powering is not set to "Always on" (see Configuration tab in MasterAdjust). In this setup the batteries can be kept at least 6 months without maintenance. However, it is highly recommended to charge the battery to > 80% of its capacity every 100 days.

RELiON:  https://ceb8596f236225acd007-8e95328c173a04ed694af83ee4e24c15.ssl.cf5.rackcdn.com/docs/product/RelionInstallationManual-8.5x5.5-081720.pdf

5. BATTERY STORAGE

5.1. Storage Temperature LiFePO4 can be stored between 23 to 95°F (-5 to 35°C). For storage longer than 3 months, the recommended temperature range is from 32 to 77°F (25 to 40°C).

5.2. Storage Conditions It is recommended to store LiFePO4 batteries at 50% state of charge (SOC). If batteries are stored for long periods of time, cycle the batteries at least every 6 months.

Lithionics:  https://lithionicsbattery.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Lithionics-Battery-Storage-Procedure.pdf

Storing your battery at the correct specifications is important as it keeps the battery in the healthiest state possible for the fastest deployment when needed. Consult the table below for proper storage conditions.

Typical storage scenario < 3 months:
1. Fully charge the battery.
2. Turn the battery OFF by the On/Off/Storage switch.
3. Keep the battery in an environment according to the specifications shown above.

Typical storage scenario > 3 months:
1. Reduce the battery SOC to 3.3V/cell which is 50% ±10% SOC. Note: See chart below for cell voltage calculation.
2. Turn the battery OFF via the On/Off/Storage switch.
3. Keep the battery in an environment according to the specifications shown above.
4. Every 6 months charge the battery to 100% SOC, then discharge the battery to LVC, then charge it back to 50% ±10% SOC. 


Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Steve Bell
 

There is an interesting detailed article on www.marinehowto.com website on lithium batteries. check it out


Re: Additional filter in raw water intake for the engine before the heat exchanger

Randall Walker
 

Joerg,
Good point. There should be two flushing attachment points on the engine, one just after the water pump and one before the exhaust so you can run a flush, with a barnacle slash calcium cleaning solution there are many brands. I recently rigged up a system to do just this. It should be standard on all ocean boats.

Randall
A54#56
Gibraltar

On Sat, Sep 19, 2020 at 4:49 PM Joerg Esdorn via groups.io <jhe1313=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It has been a surprise to me how much seaweed and other dirt accumulates in the heat exchanger for the gear box even though there is a strainer at the intake point.  Amel recommends that the heat exchanger be cleaned out yearly and it‘s definitely necessary.   I checked the manual for my Volvo D3-110 engine and it says the following on page 104:

„Volvo Penta recommends that a seawater filter be fit- ted to guarantee the correct cooling water flow to the engine and reverse gear. Otherwise there is a risk of contaminants in the seawater blocking the reverse gear cooler and other cooling system components.“ I read this to suggest that there should be a second filter in the engine intake line after the main intake strainer and before the heat exchanger.  I wonder why Amel isn‘t doing that and if anyone has done so.  Cleaning out the heat exchanger is a difficult task, cleaning out a second filter would be a simple thing to do on a regular basis.       

Joerg Esdorn
Amel 55 #53 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain


Additional filter in raw water intake for the engine before the heat exchanger

Joerg Esdorn
 

It has been a surprise to me how much seaweed and other dirt accumulates in the heat exchanger for the gear box even though there is a strainer at the intake point.  Amel recommends that the heat exchanger be cleaned out yearly and it‘s definitely necessary.   I checked the manual for my Volvo D3-110 engine and it says the following on page 104:

„Volvo Penta recommends that a seawater filter be fit- ted to guarantee the correct cooling water flow to the engine and reverse gear. Otherwise there is a risk of contaminants in the seawater blocking the reverse gear cooler and other cooling system components.“ I read this to suggest that there should be a second filter in the engine intake line after the main intake strainer and before the heat exchanger.  I wonder why Amel isn‘t doing that and if anyone has done so.  Cleaning out the heat exchanger is a difficult task, cleaning out a second filter would be a simple thing to do on a regular basis.       

Joerg Esdorn
Amel 55 #53 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain

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