Date   

Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Kent:

Bummer, to have made water for 3 hours only to have it go overboard! Or at least that sounds like where it went. My boat doesn't have a test facet on the control panel. So a question for you, Does water come out of the test faucet only when product water is being made as witnessed by the flow gauge/tube? I am trying to get a sense of how your system is plumbed. Is the diverter solenoid downstream of the test faucet or upstream of it?

If your control circuit board is similar to mine, there are three control relays:

Relay 1. Controls the BP pump (low pressure feed pump) this is "ganged" to control a larger relay that actually controls the power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.

Relay 2. Controls the HP pump (high pressure pump), this also is ganged to control the larger relay that controls the feed power to the pump. Sounds like it is working ok.

Relay 3. Controls the bypass solenoid. When the solenoid is activated product water (fresh water produced) is diverted to the tanks. On my system the default mode is bypass (i.e. the product water goes overboard). The solenoid must be electrically actuated to divert the product water to the tank. So the question is: is the solenoid itself not working or is the control circuit that actuates the solenoid not working, or is the water being lost somewhere else?

The solenoid is merely a 24 Volt DC solenoid (on my system). You can test it by applying 24 VDC to its two wires. On my system they are the orange colored wires that go to pins 10 and 11 of plug 1 on the circuit board. The fuse that protects Relay 3 must be good because it is the same fuse that protects relay 1 and 2.

I found that my system takes anywhere from 2-5 minutes to produce good water (depending on how long it has been idle). The timer on my original circuit board sent product water to the tank long before good quality water was produced, so I wired a manual switch on the solenoid circuit. When my sensor shows EC (electrical conductivity) less than 550 microSeimens I throw the switch to divert product water to the tanks. If the alarm on the EC sensor goes off, indicating EC of over 550 mS, it sounds a 110 Decibel Sonalert and I run to the galley and throw the manual switch to off.

If you supply 24 VDC to the solenoid you should here it click (sometimes hard to do with the genset and HP pump running).

You can test the solenoid in peace an quite with the genset off by:

1. turning on the rotary control switch (this supplies 24 VDC to the control board)
2. using a multimeter check to see if you have 24 VDC on pin 10 of plug 1.
3. if you have 24 VDC on that pin, then using a piece of wire, provide a ground to pin 11 of plug 1 by shorting between pin 11 and the inboard base of fuse 3 (inboard referring to the circuit board so the end towards the center of the circuit board) . You should hear the solenoid click. The solenoid is on top of the flow gauge/tube. If you can confirm the solenoid actuating, then there may be a control relay (3) issue, a stuck solenoid or some other control issue. If that is the case you can make a work around by wiring a manual control switch like I have done. If the solenoid is stuck, gently tapping it may break it loose.

The parts location picture is in the Photos section under Amel SM Dessalator and the schematics are in the Files section.

I hope this helps. If I can be of any further assistance please post or you can give me a call at 801-543-5801.

All the best,

Gary
Amel SM 335 s/v Liahona
Un-insured (due to Lemma Insurance's bankruptcy) and on the hard in Jolly Harbor, Antigua

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hello again, everyone,
I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend.  I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on.  Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure.  He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water.  The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water.  I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water.  To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank.  I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard.  The green light was on the whole time.  Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank?  Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
Thanks in advance, Gary.  I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

eric freedman
 

Graham,the only difference is that we used nylon bolts instead of grease fittings on the furlersericsm 376----- Original Message -----From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS Date: Monday, October 29, 2012 5:31 pmSubject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo: "amelyachtowners@..." > Hi Graham, I pioneered the grease nipple idea and posted photos > and instructions that you should be able to access on the forum.> Regards> Danny> SM 299 Ocean pearl> Currently Vuda Point marina> Fiji> > From: "kimberlite@..." > To: amelyachtowners@... > Sent: Tuesday, 30 October 2012 5:45 AM> Subject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance> >   > i believe there are some photos under kimberlite or some other > boat in te photo section.> i will send photos when i return home in a few days.> there are no grease fitttings on the stock furler.> eric> sm 376> > ----- Original Message -----> From: Graham > Date: Monday, October 29, 2012 10:11 am> Subject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance> To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> > > Hi Eric,> > > > Thanks alot for the info. I took the main metal cover that is > > roped to the pulpit off today and all looked fine in there. > Any > > chance you could send pics of your grease nipple locations. I > > note that at the bottom of the foil there are several pop > > rivets, but also 3 screws that are moved using allen keys. > These > > wouldnt by any chance be greasing pionts? > > > > Graham> > SM140 Sula> > Hong Kong> > > > --- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, > kimberlite@... wrote:> > >> > > Hi,I drilled and taped two holes in the furler on high and > one > > low using a 5 mm tap..I use the autoprop grease adapter > togrease > > the furler and then screw in 2 nylon bolts. I also did this to > > the furling motor and outhaul.Ericsm 376 Kimberliet----- > > Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Wednesday, October > 24, > > 2012 6:22 amSubject: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo: > > mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> Can anyone tell me > what > > maintainance one should be doing to the > headsail furler > > motor/gear box assembly on the SM. I have had my > boat for 7 > > years now this must be one of the very few bits I > haven't > > taken to pieces yet!> > Graham Boyd > SM 140 SULA> > > > > > > > > > > > > >> > > > > > > > > > > > > > >


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Graham, I pioneered the grease nipple idea and posted photos and instructions that you should be able to access on the forum.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean pearl
Currently Vuda Point marina
Fiji

From: "kimberlite@..." <kimberlite@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Tuesday, 30 October 2012 5:45 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

 
i believe there are some photos under kimberlite or some other boat in te photo section.
i will send photos when i return home in a few days.
there are no grease fitttings on the stock furler.
eric
sm 376

----- Original Message -----
From: Graham
Date: Monday, October 29, 2012 10:11 am
Subject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com

Hi Eric,

Thanks alot for the info. I took the main metal cover that is
roped to the pulpit off today and all looked fine in there. Any
chance you could send pics of your grease nipple locations. I
note that at the bottom of the foil there are several pop
rivets, but also 3 screws that are moved using allen keys. These
wouldnt by any chance be greasing pionts?

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, kimberlite@... wrote:

Hi,I drilled and taped two holes in the furler on high and one
low using a 5 mm tap..I use the autoprop grease adapter togrease
the furler and then screw in 2 nylon bolts. I also did this to
the furling motor and outhaul.Ericsm 376 Kimberliet-----
Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Wednesday, October 24,
2012 6:22 amSubject: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo:
mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> Can anyone tell me what
maintainance one should be doing to the > headsail furler
motor/gear box assembly on the SM. I have had my > boat for 7
years now this must be one of the very few bits I > haven't
taken to pieces yet!> > Graham Boyd > SM 140 SULA> >


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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Ground Strap and Chlorine

Ian Shepherd
 

This is why I have never in 12 years of Amel ownership, filled the water
tank from a shore tap. Every drop has been made with the water maker, so
I can back flush with confidence knowing that there is no chlorine in
the water.

Incidentally the only time I do back flush is for 3 minutes at the end
of the season or when it is probable that I will not use the water maker
for a period of more that three weeks. Mr Wagner from Dessalator
recommended that this is all that is required, and he also believes that
picking and other chemicals do more harm than good. I used to use
chemicals on my first boat and on this boat at first, and had to replace
the membranes after a year on the first boat (27 months continuous
cruising), and two years on this one. Since giving up the use of
chemicals, I am now using membranes that are seven years old, and which
are still going strong. I run my water maker almost every day when
cruising. Membranes are from Air, Ice & Water. They will ship to Europe.

Regarding the bilge pump, it is beneficial to pump the bilge out with
the hand pump once in a while. The pick up is lower and you will
scavenge the food particles out of the bilge better than the electric
pump. The only time my electric bilge pump has given trouble is when a
small plastic screw cap found its way into one of the no return valves.
As for the shower filters, as they say, it's a dirty job but someone has
to do it! As soon as I notice the water is not draining away easily, I
scrub them with a brush. No chlorine.

Ian Shepherd SM 2000 # 414 (2003) Kastelorizon Island Greece

On 25/10/2012 21:02, Richard03801 wrote:

The concern for chlorine in the dock water is in the flush water for
the water maker.

Regarding high levels of chlorine/chlorine gases is in the engine room.

Regards

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Oct 25, 2012, at 9:35, "Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe"
<yahoogroups@... <mailto:yahoogroups%40svbebe.com>> wrote:

I am not sure that chlorine is the cause of the ground strap
deterioration. We had to replace the ground strap when BeBe was about
5 years old and never had chlorine or anything else in the grey water
sump.

Additionally, I am sure that you are aware that many homes are built
with copper pipe and most US water supplies contain chlorine.

I am not trying to be argumentative, but rather I want to present
another side to this story.

If you own a SM, you may want to look at these photographs:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/138287824/pic/list
We replaced the copper strap with 1/8" X 2" solid copper because we
could not find the woven copper in Colombia.

This photo gives all of the instructions and dimensions:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/138287824/pic/1949011246/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Normally I would go with an exact replacement part. In this case, I
had difficulty sourcing the exact replacement and I believe our
substitute is better than the original.

Hope this helps someone.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, "ornella.battaglini@..."
<ornella.battaglini@...> wrote:


Hi Trevor,

sorry for your bad luck, now we are aware, but what can we add in
the water tank instead of chlorine (in Italy "Amuchina")?
Thanks in advance

Ornella

Santorin N° 122 EARENDIL

Ancona, Italy

----Messaggio originale----
Da: seafeverofcuan@...
Data: 24/10/2012 21.37
A: <amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>>
Ogg: Re: [Amel] Hair, toothpaste, soap, food particle, etc. going
to bilge.






Dear Mike,
from my own bitter and expensive experience, be aware that the
Javel tablets contain chlorine and will aggressively attack the copper
bonding strip that grounds on the keel bolt at the bottom of the bilge
box.
I destroyed my copper strip in around three seasons and have just
replaced it.
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Costa Rica

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, Mike Johnson
<mike.k.johnson@> wrote:

Hi Alexadre,
Â
We've had no problems with our bilge being clogged with hair
etc. However, we do maintain a policy of keeping the shower drain
filters in place and clean. We also avoid putting any food waste
down the galley sinks. We clean the bilge regularly to prevent nasty
smells. Finally we flush through the toilet systems with fresh water
and half fill the bilge with fresh water and a couple of Javel tablets
when leaving the boat for more than a week.
Â
Mike &amp; Peta
Solitude
SM461



________________________________
From: Alex <uster@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, 24 October 2012, 19:04
Subject: [Amel] Hair, toothpaste, soap, food particle, etc.
going to bilge.


Â

Since showers and sinks empty directly to the bilge, have any of
you had problem with hair, toothpaste, soap, food particle, etc. going
to the bilge. Do the electric or manual bilge pumps get clogged?

If so, any advice to prevent this problem?

Thanks in advance, sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT






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Re: Dessalator D60 amber light blinking

karkauai
 

Hello again, everyone,
I finally got back to KRISTY last weekend.  I sailed her out into clean water and turned the 60 l/hr Dessalator water maker on.  Martin at the Spain office of Desallator said that the blinking light should just be due to low pressure.  He suggested that I turn it on and let it run for a few minutes...sure enough, after a couple of minutes of turning the pressure knob on the panel all the way up to get it into the green zone, the blinking/clicking stopped and the "float" on the panel above the sink showed that it was producing water.  The light turned green (I know, Gary, that doesn't mean it's producing good water.  I checked the water at the test faucet on the panel, and it was OK.) So I let it run for 3 hours, then shut it off as we approached the dirty water.  To my dismay, when I checked the tank level after returning to the dock, I hadn't added any water to the tank.  I think it had to be producing water since the float level was showing 60
l/hr, so I guess it was just pumping it overboard.  The green light was on the whole time.  Does anyone know how I can test the valve that switches output to the tank?  Any other ideas about what might be wrong and how to troubleshoot?
Thanks in advance, Gary.  I figure you know more about the Dessalator units than anyone else on the forum.


Re: [Amel] Re: SM2000 Holding Tank Failure SM414 Built July 2003

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Stephan,

well just to let you know that the Teflon part has held up very well
having lived aboard for 3 months now this summer. Despite the fact that
the wall thickness is probably thicker than the original copper tube,
there have been no blockage problems. Another advantage is that you can
easily disconnect if you have to, which would be difficult if it was
banadaged with epoxy. I will modify the forward heads too over the winter.

By the way, if your holding tank valves are getting stiff to operate,
here is a sure fire solution: I was moored next to BeBe a couple of days
ago and all credit for this goes to Bill Rouse.

Empty the tank and close the valve. Pour a little hydrochloric acid into
the holding tank via the desk pump out fitting. Leaving it there for no
more than 15 seconds, work the valve handle in small increments back and
forth till it is fully open. Wash through thoroughly with a hose, close
the valve and wash again. I added a little bicarbonate of soda to
neutralise any remaining acid. The valve is now really easy to operate.
If you have modified your tank with a Teflon connector, then no need to
worry about acid damage finally eating the last of the copper pipe away.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 2000 # 414 Crusader

On 28/10/2012 20:06, stephreg wrote:

Ian,

I had this problem on Delos, SM2000 #303, albeit less dramatically. It
was discussed in a set of messages around #861 (yeah, a little while
ago). I solved it with some epoxy at the recommendation of another
Amel owner and had no problems with it for the remaining three years
of ownership. I like your solution better as it solves the root cause
rather than applying an (epoxy) band aid.

Stephan

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, "sv_crusader"
<sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I recently suffered a most unpleasant leak from the aft heads
holding tank. Investigation showed that Amel connect the holding tank
to the down pipe via a COPPER pipe that pushes into the 40mm x 5cm
hole in the base of the tank. Sealing appears to have relied on some
sort of silicon sealant. The bottom end of the copper tube is attached
to the down pipe via a single jubillee clip.

The copper pipe was seriously erroded, wafer thin and full of holes.
I have never used acid to clear the up pipe of calcium, but for those
that do, beware that unless you leave the dump valve open and flush
the tank with fresh water whilst you prime the up line with acid, then
you are likely to accelerate a similar failure.

Why Amel chose to do it this way baffles me. Why did they not use a
barbed plastic fitting as they do on the top of the dump valve instead
of using metal in a corrosive environment? The only good thing about
the design is that I was able to easily remove the rotten pipe and
replace it with a Teflon one that was machined to incorporate two
o-seals. The union is now bone dry.

I have uploaded a photo of the failed pipe and the replacement into
the Crusader photo's folder.

I wonder if anyone else has had a similar failure? I guess it is a
matter of time before the forward tank suffers the same fate.

Ian SM 2000 Crusader


Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

eric freedman
 

i believe there are some photos under kimberlite or some other boat in te photo section.
i will send photos when i return home in a few days.
there are no grease fitttings on the stock furler.
eric
sm 376

----- Original Message -----
From: Graham
Date: Monday, October 29, 2012 10:11 am
Subject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance
To: amelyachtowners@...

Hi Eric,

Thanks alot for the info. I took the main metal cover that is
roped to the pulpit off today and all looked fine in there. Any
chance you could send pics of your grease nipple locations. I
note that at the bottom of the foil there are several pop
rivets, but also 3 screws that are moved using allen keys. These
wouldnt by any chance be greasing pionts?

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

--- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite@... wrote:

Hi,I drilled and taped two holes in the furler on high and one
low using a 5 mm tap..I use the autoprop grease adapter togrease
the furler and then screw in 2 nylon bolts. I also did this to
the furling motor and outhaul.Ericsm 376 Kimberliet-----
Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Wednesday, October 24,
2012 6:22 amSubject: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo:
amelyachtowners@...> Can anyone tell me what
maintainance one should be doing to the > headsail furler
motor/gear box assembly on the SM. I have had my > boat for 7
years now this must be one of the very few bits I > haven't
taken to pieces yet!> > Graham Boyd > SM 140 SULA> >





Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

Graham Boyd
 

Hi Eric,

Thanks alot for the info. I took the main metal cover that is roped to the pulpit off today and all looked fine in there. Any chance you could send pics of your grease nipple locations. I note that at the bottom of the foil there are several pop rivets, but also 3 screws that are moved using allen keys. These wouldnt by any chance be greasing pionts?

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

--- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite@... wrote:

Hi,I drilled and taped two holes in the furler on high and one low using a 5 mm tap..I use the autoprop grease adapter togrease the furler and then screw in 2 nylon bolts. I also did this to the furling motor and outhaul.Ericsm 376 Kimberliet----- Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 6:22 amSubject: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo: amelyachtowners@...> Can anyone tell me what maintainance one should be doing to the > headsail furler motor/gear box assembly on the SM. I have had my > boat for 7 years now this must be one of the very few bits I > haven't taken to pieces yet!> > Graham Boyd > SM 140 SULA> >




Re: Re rigging a Super Maramu metric clevis pins and turnbuckles

Craig Briggs
 

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Graham" <crwggb@...> wrote:

The rig on Sula SM140 is now 17yrs old; it needs to be replaced .... having terrible trouble sourcing a supplier.....Would any of you ...know of a reliable supplier of ... metric rigging ...? Europe or USA is not a problem.
Graham Boyd
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong
Hi Graham,
Since Europe is OK, the best choice for you is ACMO, who made the original rigging for your boat. They have the exact specs, of course, including the special headstay turnbuckle. Make one minor change and ask for "standard" right handed threads on the turnbuckles, rather than the original left handed ones and you'll save about 1000Euro. Search for my earlier posts on the subject - here are a couple of excerpts:

Good luck with the project:
Craig Briggs
sv/SANGARIS SN#68 in Didyma, Turkey while I'm in sunny FL for winter.

(Here are the excerpts)
Sorry to hear that, Jose, especially with your schedule. Per my earlier post
you copied below, you'll want to contact ACMO in France, who is Amel's rigging
supplier. Call Sylvie Gazzurelli there at (33) 03.81.35.70.86. She speaks some
English and knows Amels well.

On my order this piece is called a ROCS100 with the word "Special" handwritten
in. "ROCS is Ridoir Ouvert a Chape Articulee, Sertir" which translates to
"Turnbuckle, Open-Body, Toggle, Swage". The "Special" overrides the standard
spec. The 100 is 10mm, which is the headstay wire on the Santorin - if I recall
the SM uses 12mm wire, so you'd want a "Special ROCS120".

Now, I just checked the website and they've got a new selection which is exactly
the item. It's a 1/2 Turnbuckle and the code you'd want is 1/2 RXCS120 (make
sure I'm right about the 12mm). Go to the site and click through to "Nautisme"
(Boating) to "Ridoir" (Turnbuckles) and then select the item to see details.

If you pay with a US credit card and ship to the US you won't pay VAT and ACMO
doesn't add exorbitant shipping charges like AMEL, so I should think they could
expedite this to you very quickly. I don't know the price because my quote was
just a total, but I had priced their swageless version and it was $102 - the
swage version should be less. Sylvie can, I'm sure, quickly price it for you.

Good luck - call me if you need more info - 973.968.5104
Craig

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Jose" <jvenegas@...> wrote:

Craig, as you predicted, and in spite of having alerted the yard, they send a
standard metric turnbuckle for the headstay that does not fit. Where did you
get the smaller turnbucke and how much did you pay for it.

I am preparing my boat for a transatlantic crossing scheduled for June 15 and
my boat is still on the ground!

Any connections will be greatly appreciated.

Jose

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@> wrote:



Hi Jose,

At least on my SN (and SM's I've seen up close), yes the ACMO provided
original rigging used metric cables and "standard" (inch - based) turnbuckles.
Further, the turnbuckles are "Inverse", meaning there's a left handed thread on
top, whereas US hardware is the opposite. I've never figured out if there's an
engineering reason for that, but doubt it (maybe Cap'n Henri was left handed
:-).

I think I made some earlier posts on the subject, but if you contact ACMO
(Acastillage Modern)they can likely send you the complete specifications and a
quote on the rigging. I saved about 1000 Euros by not using the "Inverse"
turnbuckles - all else was per original ACMO spec. All up it was $6,550,
including shipping to Italy from France. Katherine and I installed it ourselves
in a week.

By the way, ACMO had etched the exact length of the finished stays on the
lower eyebolts of my original ones - they've stopped doing that now and put the
date of manufacture, but it's worth a look - it's very tiny hand etched numbers
like 15885, which is my backstay length in mm.

The only "tricky" piece is the headstay turnbuckle which is "Special
Dimension" as it's shorter than normal to fit under the furler (at least on the
SN and, I belive on the SM.)

Cheers,
Craig Briggs
SN #68 "SANGARIS", in Leros Greece whilst we're in sunny Florida


Rép. : [Amel] How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Hi Ettore,
 
After disengaging the electric driven gear (moving 90deg) a small pin on the furler, you pass a line from a 90 deg pulley on the base of the main mast, engage the line in the large circle having a chanel identical to the size of the line, situate above the electric furler and bring back the line to another 90 deg pulley opposite that already used at the base of the main mast. Then the line may be joined after being rolled 3 turns over a winch at the base of the mast. In my trials, I found that the connection between the two ends of the line was to be made between one of the base pulley and the pulley on top of the electric furler. The problem encountered was that if  a solo sailor attempted to simply use a knot to tie both ends of the line, the distance between the pulley at the base of the mast and that on top of the electric furler was not sufficient to roll back a genoa but a 100% jib, and even then someone had to assure the line with the knot
did go around the large pulley on top of the furler. In my experience two strong persons are required for this operation and if one holds the line tight on a winch, the other can winch in the other side.
 
It is not easy if you are in winds above 15 -20 knots!
 
Serge V/Opera  Mango #51



--- En date de : Sam, 27.10.12, arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...> a écrit :


De : arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...>
Objet : [Amel] How to use in manual mode the furler electric?
À : "Amel Yacht Owners" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: samedi 27 octobre 2012 09 h 06



 



When we purchased in the Caribbean our Mango there was no owner's manual.

Many things we learn by themselves, indeed was the boat to teach her to us in Atlantic crossing from Caribbean to Europe: how to arm the bouncer and the spinnaker pole to build the balloner and genoa in Butterfly gaits, etc..

We have also designed a "closed circuit" to use the electric furler in manual mode, but is there anyone who can describe how the original circuit to use the electric furler manually?

Tank you very much

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: SM2000 Holding Tank Failure SM414 Built July 2003

Stephan Regulinski
 

Ian,

I had this problem on Delos, SM2000 #303, albeit less dramatically. It was discussed in a set of messages around #861 (yeah, a little while ago). I solved it with some epoxy at the recommendation of another Amel owner and had no problems with it for the remaining three years of ownership. I like your solution better as it solves the root cause rather than applying an (epoxy) band aid.

Stephan

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "sv_crusader" <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I recently suffered a most unpleasant leak from the aft heads holding tank. Investigation showed that Amel connect the holding tank to the down pipe via a COPPER pipe that pushes into the 40mm x 5cm hole in the base of the tank. Sealing appears to have relied on some sort of silicon sealant. The bottom end of the copper tube is attached to the down pipe via a single jubillee clip.

The copper pipe was seriously erroded, wafer thin and full of holes. I have never used acid to clear the up pipe of calcium, but for those that do, beware that unless you leave the dump valve open and flush the tank with fresh water whilst you prime the up line with acid, then you are likely to accelerate a similar failure.

Why Amel chose to do it this way baffles me. Why did they not use a barbed plastic fitting as they do on the top of the dump valve instead of using metal in a corrosive environment? The only good thing about the design is that I was able to easily remove the rotten pipe and replace it with a Teflon one that was machined to incorporate two o-seals. The union is now bone dry.

I have uploaded a photo of the failed pipe and the replacement into the Crusader photo's folder.

I wonder if anyone else has had a similar failure? I guess it is a matter of time before the forward tank suffers the same fate.

Ian SM 2000 Crusader


Re: [Amel] Re: How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Regards

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Oct 28, 2012, at 9:37, arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...> wrote:

Dave,

Yes, I had already unlocked the genoa furler, but I find it difficult and
impractical to leave a piece of rope free because, when it happens to use
the furler manually is because the furler has a problem, and the problems
always happen when the weather and the sea are bad!
Where is stopped and where do they pass the piece of rope that slides around
the base ring of the furler? To close the furler, throw the rope on a winch
of the cockpit?
Thank you very much.

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )

-----Messaggio originale-----
From: Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 2:16 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Ettore,

On our Nirvana genoa furler, there is a lever on the left side that allows
you to disengage the transmission and use the furler with a continuous piece
of line. If I am not mistaken, it is just a matter of unlocking the lever
and moving it 90 degrees. I have only done it once and that was in 2008.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...>
wrote:

When we purchased in the Caribbean our Mango there was no owner's manual.

Many things we learn by themselves, indeed was the boat to teach her to us
in Atlantic crossing from Caribbean to Europe: how to arm the bouncer and
the spinnaker pole to build the balloner and genoa in Butterfly gaits,
etc..

We have also designed a "closed circuit" to use the electric furler in
manual mode, but is there anyone who can describe how the original circuit
to use the electric furler manually?

Tank you very much

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re rigging a Super Maramu metric clevis pins and turnbuckles

Graham Boyd
 

The rig on Sula SM140 is now 17yrs old; it needs to be replaced before we go to the Philippines this winter. The crossing at that time of year can be pretty rough. The Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club are doing the work for me. Unfortunately all the clevis pins/turnbuckles on the Amel are metric, not something they are used to out here, (most "normal" boats have imperial rigging) and they are having terrible trouble sourcing a supplier.

I cannot believe that I am the first person to be re rigging a SM in metric sizes! Would any of you out there by any chance know of a reliable supplier of such metric rigging equipment? Europe or USA is not a problem. I am writing to Amel as well to see if they can supply a full "kit" but I suspect they will be reluctant as they will want actual measurements. If I can find a supplier of metric turnbuckles/eyes the RHKYC can make up the rigging for me on site.

I am sure many of you out there will have had experience of this issue, or even had Amel supply a new kit? I look forward to your comments, time would appear to be running out!

Graham Boyd
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong


Re: [Amel] Re: How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Arca di Noè
 

Dave,

Yes, I had already unlocked the genoa furler, but I find it difficult and
impractical to leave a piece of rope free because, when it happens to use
the furler manually is because the furler has a problem, and the problems
always happen when the weather and the sea are bad!
Where is stopped and where do they pass the piece of rope that slides around
the base ring of the furler? To close the furler, throw the rope on a winch
of the cockpit?
Thank you very much.

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )

-----Messaggio originale-----
From: Dave_Benjamin
Sent: Sunday, October 28, 2012 2:16 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Ettore,

On our Nirvana genoa furler, there is a lever on the left side that allows
you to disengage the transmission and use the furler with a continuous piece
of line. If I am not mistaken, it is just a matter of unlocking the lever
and moving it 90 degrees. I have only done it once and that was in 2008.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...>
wrote:

When we purchased in the Caribbean our Mango there was no owner's manual.

Many things we learn by themselves, indeed was the boat to teach her to us
in Atlantic crossing from Caribbean to Europe: how to arm the bouncer and
the spinnaker pole to build the balloner and genoa in Butterfly gaits,
etc..

We have also designed a "closed circuit" to use the electric furler in
manual mode, but is there anyone who can describe how the original circuit
to use the electric furler manually?

Tank you very much

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Dave_Benjamin
 

Ettore,

On our Nirvana genoa furler, there is a lever on the left side that allows you to disengage the transmission and use the furler with a continuous piece of line. If I am not mistaken, it is just a matter of unlocking the lever and moving it 90 degrees. I have only done it once and that was in 2008.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., arca noe <arcadinoesailing@...> wrote:

When we purchased in the Caribbean our Mango there was no owner's manual.

Many things we learn by themselves, indeed was the boat to teach her to us in Atlantic crossing from Caribbean to Europe: how to arm the bouncer and the spinnaker pole to build the balloner and genoa in Butterfly gaits, etc..

We have also designed a "closed circuit" to use the electric furler in manual mode, but is there anyone who can describe how the original circuit to use the electric furler manually?

Tank you very much

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )



Re: [Amel] Immarsat C H2095B

smnefeli
 

Now we are in the main harbour downtown, we'll move next week and be at Villasimius Marina (near Cagliari) from november, 5th.

Daniela

Nefeli, SM # 38 now in Sardegna

On 25 Oct 2012, at 00:00, Pitugolf Yahoo wrote:

Great! We will be there beginning of Nov. we will look for you. What marina are you in?

Thank you,

Maria
PITU

Envoy de mon iPad

Le 24 oct. 2012 08:06, Nefeli <smnefeli@...> a crit :

Hello Maria,

we are in Cagliari as well.

We do not have an Inmarsat, but an iridium phone.

However we have a Furuno SSB (BLU).

Maybe we can help,

Daniela,
SY Nefeli, SM #38


On 23 Oct 2012, at 17:46, Maria Estrada wrote:

Hello :),

When we bought our SM 148 (PITU), she had installed an Immarsat C H2095B without box.

I wonder If someone in this forum has this equipment. Does it work properly? Is it toooo old? Should it be change?

We have our SM in Cagliari,Sardinia (Italy). Would some one know a good technician that we will be able to have a look at our communication system? We are thinking to have a BLU.

Kind regards,

Maria Geiger
SY PITU


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


How to use in manual mode the furler electric?

Arca di Noè
 

When we purchased in the Caribbean our Mango there was no owner's manual.

Many things we learn by themselves, indeed was the boat to teach her to us in Atlantic crossing from Caribbean to Europe: how to arm the bouncer and the spinnaker pole to build the balloner and genoa in Butterfly gaits, etc..

We have also designed a "closed circuit" to use the electric furler in manual mode, but is there anyone who can describe how the original circuit to use the electric furler manually?

Tank you very much

Ettore e Silvana
Arca di Noè (Mango # 50 in Livorno Italy )

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Good insurance quote

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainance

eric freedman
 

Doing all 3 furlers took about an hourFair windseric sm376----- Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Friday, October 26, 2012 4:24 amSubject: Re: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo: amelyachtowners@...> Hi Eric,> > Thanks for the reply I will look at following suit when I > replace the standing rigging at Xmas> > Graham> SM140 Sula> Hong Kong> > --- In amelyachtowners@..., kimberlite@... wrote:> >> > Hi,I drilled and taped two holes in the furler on high and one > low using a 5 mm tap..I use the autoprop grease adapter togrease > the furler and then screw in 2 nylon bolts. I also did this to > the furling motor and outhaul.Ericsm 376 Kimberliet----- > Original Message -----From: Graham Date: Wednesday, October 24, > 2012 6:22 amSubject: [Amel] SM Headsail furler maintainanceTo: > amelyachtowners@...> Can anyone tell me what > maintainance one should be doing to the > headsail furler > motor/gear box assembly on the SM. I have had my > boat for 7 > years now this must be one of the very few bits I > haven't > taken to pieces yet!> > Graham Boyd > SM 140 SULA> > > > > > > > > >> > >


Re: SM waterline

Graham Boyd
 

Thanks everyone,

Looks like Sula's water line will be going up at the stern at the Xmas haul out! When I got the boat 7 years ago I painted over the orange stripe in red, much smarter. Whilst sanding in preparation for the paint I seem to remember the orange didn't come away at all which is why i thought it is part of the gel coat..(Amel seem to like that...deck stripes etc,... repainted those). I am sure my boat yard will keep me right.

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Graham" <crwggb@...> wrote:

I don't know about any one else but much as I love these boats I am fed up of the fact that they float stern down.... or perhaps the waterline was put in the wrong place at build?! When I lived in N Europe it wasn't too much of a problem but now I am in the tropics its impossible to keep her stern clean. Has any one had thier SM's water line raised at the stern, if so by how much, and was it dificult removing the orange stripe that is in the gelcoat?

I look forward to your comments

Graham Boyd
SM140 SULA