Date   

Delete from group

eric freedman
 

Hey John,

Take a look at Yachtfiona dot com



My friend Eric Forsyth did the northwest passage at age 78 and just did the
Atlantic circle this year. Missed his 80th birthday in Bermuda by a few
days.

3 circumnavigations, (one backwards) multiple trips to the arctic, and
Antarctic.

He built the boat in his back yard here on long island. 42 foot westsail.



If anyone is reading this near Huntington NY , please come to the Huntington
Yacht Club 7:15 Pm October 20. Eric Forsyth will be showing his video and
speaking. Come as my guest..

Keep sailing

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Anne and John Hollamby
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 4:48 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] Delete from group





Hello Ivar,
Sorry to see that you are leaving the forum but as I also have to accept old
age I shall have to sell my SM2K 319. Can you offer any advice as to how
best to do this and a rough price guide please?

Best wishes, John, Bali Hai, Malta, hollambyjohnatgmail.com

From: ivarmylde
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 8:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Delete from group

Hello,

I have sold my Amel SM. How can I cancel the membership of the group ?.

Rgds Ivar Mylde


Re: [Amel] original cockpit and aft cabin rooftop cushions for 98/99 SM

karkauai
 

Hey John & Ruth, We'd be interested in your cushions. Do you have any pics?
Kent
Sent from my BlackBerry smartphone powered by Alltel

-----Original Message-----
From: john martin <symoondog@...>
Sender: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 21:24:40
To: amelyachtowners@...<amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] original cockpit and aft cabin rooftop cushions for 98/99 SM





Hi All,We have the original cockpit and aft cabin rooftop cushions for our SM #248 that we are offering up free to a new good home, if anyone is interested. These are cream colored vinyl, about 3" thick, vinyl on top and an open mesh on the bottom, original from Amel. They include 2 rectangular seat cushions for each side of the cockpit (total of 4) and the 4 large cushions that cover the aft cabin rooftop (in the area inboard of the handrails). These cushions came with the boat which we bought when 4 years old, and they looked hardly used and brand new at the time. Since we are not great fans of alot of cockpit cushions, we immediately took them off the boat and put them in a clean, dry storage area where they have been ever since. Time flies and we are quite sure by now that we won't put them back on the boat. They are still in great shape and anyone passing through the Norfolk Virginia (south end of Chesapeake Bay) area in the next few months (while we are at our non-floating home here) is welcome to have them. I suppose they could be shipped as they are not heavy, but since the rooftop cushions are large (4-5') it might be more expensive than makes sense. JohnMOON DOGSM 248


original cockpit and aft cabin rooftop cushions for 98/99 SM

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

Hi All,We have the original cockpit and aft cabin rooftop cushions for our SM #248 that we are offering up free to a new good home, if anyone is interested. These are cream colored vinyl, about 3" thick, vinyl on top and an open mesh on the bottom, original from Amel. They include 2 rectangular seat cushions for each side of the cockpit (total of 4) and the 4 large cushions that cover the aft cabin rooftop (in the area inboard of the handrails). These cushions came with the boat which we bought when 4 years old, and they looked hardly used and brand new at the time. Since we are not great fans of alot of cockpit cushions, we immediately took them off the boat and put them in a clean, dry storage area where they have been ever since. Time flies and we are quite sure by now that we won't put them back on the boat. They are still in great shape and anyone passing through the Norfolk Virginia (south end of Chesapeake Bay) area in the next few months (while we are at our non-floating home here) is welcome to have them. I suppose they could be shipped as they are not heavy, but since the rooftop cushions are large (4-5') it might be more expensive than makes sense. JohnMOON DOGSM 248


Re: [Amel] Delete from group

John and Anne on Bali Hai
 

Hello Ivar,
Sorry to see that you are leaving the forum but as I also have to accept old age I shall have to sell my SM2K 319. Can you offer any advice as to how best to do this and a rough price guide please?

Best wishes, John, Bali Hai, Malta, hollambyjohnatgmail.com

From: ivarmylde
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 8:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Delete from group


Hello,

I have sold my Amel SM. How can I cancel the membership of the group ?.

Rgds Ivar Mylde


Delete from group

ivarmylde <mylde@...>
 

Hello,

I have sold my Amel SM. How can I cancel the membership of the group ?.

Rgds Ivar Mylde


Re: [Amel] Questions

kimberly cerillo <kcvabeach@...>
 

The best advice we were given (by Joel Potter) was don't change the Amel, sail on it for a year and learn to adapt yourself to the boat instead of adapting the boat to you. Excellent advice. The very uniqueness of the Amel is what appeals. The Amel is in a class by itself and hugely respected worldwide.

Kim and George
SM2K #353 Indecent


------------------------------

On Mon, Oct 15, 2012 2:05 PM EDT Germain Jean-Pierre wrote:

Thanks. You could be right but I do want peace of mind…. :-)


JP


On 15 Oct 2012, at 20:01, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS wrote:

Dear Jean pierre,
there is a saying, there is a boat for every person, and a person for every boat. I don't think the Amel is your boat.
Regards
Danny
SM2K 299 Ocean Pearl

From: Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Monday, 15 October 2012 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Questions


Hello Ian,

Thanks for the comments. I've located a well used Oyster 54 but it would require extensive refit. I am considering other options including various Tayanas, Hylas, C & C, Van Den Stadt in alu and Najad.

A big question for me: what are the pros and cons of an SM vs SM2K… other than money differential. My problem is getting a definitive and accurate description of the improvements on the SM2K. If anyone has a complete list of the improvements from the SM to SM2K, please send it over!!!

For instance, the SM2K has a 3 zone AC/heating system and the genset is an Onan 3 Cyl (Yanmar engine) (1500rpm…. a very big plus for me as I want PEACE and QUIET!)

Lastly, the SM I'm contemplating does have a modified drive system; it uses a standard shaft drive. Looking at the ridiculous cost and complexity of the Amel C drive, the shaft drive seems a better mouse trap to me because of its simplicity and reliability. I could source, anywhere in the world, a new cutlass bearing, dripless shaft seal and shaft in 2 days for €500 …

Amel is very good but the over engineered gearbox and drive is a step backwards. To make matters more difficult, the SM I am considering is absolutely gorgeous after a refit with a light weight designer interior while retaining the Amel features worth keeping; eliminates catacomb feeling of Amel. This is a vessel with a difference and I could enjoy it without being annoyed by the dreary standard Amel interior.

I'll post photos if I buy it… me thinks all SM and SM2K owners may be jealous!

I hope I have not insulted anyone with my candid views. :-)

Jean-Pierre

On 15 Oct 2012, at 08:52, Ian Shepherd wrote:

Jean Pierre,

just before I bought my Super Maramu, I examined an Oyster 54 at a boat
show. The president of Oyster USA was on board and when I finished my
tour he asked me if I would consider buying an Oyster. I said to him
that I was not in a position to do so as I had just ordered an Amel. He
smiled and quietly said 'A very wise choice'. I think that says it all.
The Oyster was twice the Amel price and not as well equipped.

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens - till I get
the rope off my prop and head east!

On 04/10/2012 13:08, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

Hello Jean Pierre,
Interesting that the price of a non-standard engine/drive system is
above that of a genuine Amel. I think most of us would be unhappy at
the thought of changing the drive system. Over the past twelve years I
have only heard of one C drive failure.
My last boat was an Oyster 435 built 1985 and we sailed it extensively
with several Atlantic crossings and ten years in the Caribbean and the
South Pacific. We finally got rid of it because we were fed up with
the fact that we could never stop the leaks through the toe rail
fastenings and the main chain plates. The retiring Sales Director told
us that the chain plates leak problem was a design fault with that
model. Other defects included fridge insulation using exfoliated mica
which is good for loft insulation but is reduced to a sort of porridge
when soaked and freezer insulation with foamed glass which was open
cell and soaked up bilgewater to become useless as well. It is our
view that Oysters are brilliant at promoting their product but that
ours was very heavy and not suited to short handed sailing in the way
that Amel excels. Also when we got our SM2K in 2001 the cost was about
one third of the price of an Oyster 54.

Best wishes, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM319

From: ogedm688
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 10:56 AM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Questions

Greets SV BeBe, (Bill)

Having spent some time on this forum, I am already aware of your
status as a "tech guru"…> > :-). I am sure you have been thanked for your
efforts but I wish to add to the gang. Reading your clear and concise
explanations has given me a better understanding of what I am getting
into.

I asked about the C drive because the boat I am contemplating has had
a major mod done to it: the first owner, obsessed by a C drive failure
(far more free with his dosh than I) had the C drive removed, turned
the engine around then installed a ZF gearbox with a shaft drive. I've
asked for a complete description and list of each component used.. I
don't get it…> > .

However, the boat is absolutely pristine. Even more so than my present
Pegasus which is …> > by my standards…> > as new. So the vessel is worth
considering though a bit more expensive than the rank and file SM.

Thank you for your comments…> > trying to choose between an Oyster and an
Amel is difficult. The Oyster is prettier (opinion of course) but the
Amel is more "user friendly"

Jean-Pierre





Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
mailto:JPGermain%40noclaf.im

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
JPGermain@...



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Smart Switch

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Bill,

thanks for the info but my problem lies with the switch that prioritizes
whether the inverter or the genset supplies the boat if both are
switched on together. I would guess the latter. There must be another
solenoid in the box marked 'convertisseur' which I will examine
tomorrow. I have a Xhristec 1600w inverter on Crusader. There was always
ample load when the problem occurred, which is annoyingly intermittent.

Now free of rope around Amels 'deep seated prop' which makes it more
susceptible to picking up mooring line leaders in those awful places
called marinas! Now in Aegina and should be passing by in about 10 days,
winds permitting.

Cheers

Ian SM2000 #414 Crusader

On 15/10/2012 09:41, Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe wrote:

Ian,

Possibly the following will help:

There is a solenoid switch that energizes when the generator is ON.
This switch turns OFF the connection to shore power and turns ON the
AC power from the generator. The concept being that the generator has
preference to the AC panel. This is discussed in section 7.5 of the
"Super Maramu Owners Manual."

There is a grey electrical box that is Labeled QUAI-GE which I believe
translates to DOCK-GE or Dock-Generator. I am certain that this will
be the box with the solenoid switch. I posted a photograph at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/1949812811/pic/1348990781/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Also, the Prosine Inverter installed on BeBe has a sleep mode called
Power Save which turns OFF the output power until a load is detected.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, Ian Shepherd
<sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I believe that the SM is fitted with a Smart Switch that determines
whether the inverter, gen set or shore power supply AC to the boat.
I am
having the occasional problem in that when the inverter is switched on
there is no AC. Starting the genset for a few seconds then switching
off
usually cures the problem. MY suspicions point to the Smart Switch, but
I cannot find it. Can anyone please tell me where it is located?
Battery
volts and loads are all normal.

IAn Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens Greece


Re: [Amel] Questions

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Thanks. You could be right but I do want peace of mind…. :-)


JP


On 15 Oct 2012, at 20:01, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS wrote:

Dear Jean pierre,
there is a saying, there is a boat for every person, and a person for every boat. I don't think the Amel is your boat.
Regards
Danny
SM2K 299 Ocean Pearl

From: Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Monday, 15 October 2012 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Questions


Hello Ian,

Thanks for the comments. I've located a well used Oyster 54 but it would require extensive refit. I am considering other options including various Tayanas, Hylas, C & C, Van Den Stadt in alu and Najad.

A big question for me: what are the pros and cons of an SM vs SM2K… other than money differential. My problem is getting a definitive and accurate description of the improvements on the SM2K. If anyone has a complete list of the improvements from the SM to SM2K, please send it over!!!

For instance, the SM2K has a 3 zone AC/heating system and the genset is an Onan 3 Cyl (Yanmar engine) (1500rpm…. a very big plus for me as I want PEACE and QUIET!)

Lastly, the SM I'm contemplating does have a modified drive system; it uses a standard shaft drive. Looking at the ridiculous cost and complexity of the Amel C drive, the shaft drive seems a better mouse trap to me because of its simplicity and reliability. I could source, anywhere in the world, a new cutlass bearing, dripless shaft seal and shaft in 2 days for €500 …

Amel is very good but the over engineered gearbox and drive is a step backwards. To make matters more difficult, the SM I am considering is absolutely gorgeous after a refit with a light weight designer interior while retaining the Amel features worth keeping; eliminates catacomb feeling of Amel. This is a vessel with a difference and I could enjoy it without being annoyed by the dreary standard Amel interior.

I'll post photos if I buy it… me thinks all SM and SM2K owners may be jealous!

I hope I have not insulted anyone with my candid views. :-)

Jean-Pierre

On 15 Oct 2012, at 08:52, Ian Shepherd wrote:

Jean Pierre,

just before I bought my Super Maramu, I examined an Oyster 54 at a boat
show. The president of Oyster USA was on board and when I finished my
tour he asked me if I would consider buying an Oyster. I said to him
that I was not in a position to do so as I had just ordered an Amel. He
smiled and quietly said 'A very wise choice'. I think that says it all.
The Oyster was twice the Amel price and not as well equipped.

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens - till I get
the rope off my prop and head east!

On 04/10/2012 13:08, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

Hello Jean Pierre,
Interesting that the price of a non-standard engine/drive system is
above that of a genuine Amel. I think most of us would be unhappy at
the thought of changing the drive system. Over the past twelve years I
have only heard of one C drive failure.
My last boat was an Oyster 435 built 1985 and we sailed it extensively
with several Atlantic crossings and ten years in the Caribbean and the
South Pacific. We finally got rid of it because we were fed up with
the fact that we could never stop the leaks through the toe rail
fastenings and the main chain plates. The retiring Sales Director told
us that the chain plates leak problem was a design fault with that
model. Other defects included fridge insulation using exfoliated mica
which is good for loft insulation but is reduced to a sort of porridge
when soaked and freezer insulation with foamed glass which was open
cell and soaked up bilgewater to become useless as well. It is our
view that Oysters are brilliant at promoting their product but that
ours was very heavy and not suited to short handed sailing in the way
that Amel excels. Also when we got our SM2K in 2001 the cost was about
one third of the price of an Oyster 54.

Best wishes, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM319

From: ogedm688
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 10:56 AM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Questions

Greets SV BeBe, (Bill)

Having spent some time on this forum, I am already aware of your
status as a "tech guru"…> > :-). I am sure you have been thanked for your
efforts but I wish to add to the gang. Reading your clear and concise
explanations has given me a better understanding of what I am getting
into.

I asked about the C drive because the boat I am contemplating has had
a major mod done to it: the first owner, obsessed by a C drive failure
(far more free with his dosh than I) had the C drive removed, turned
the engine around then installed a ZF gearbox with a shaft drive. I've
asked for a complete description and list of each component used.. I
don't get it…> > .

However, the boat is absolutely pristine. Even more so than my present
Pegasus which is …> > by my standards…> > as new. So the vessel is worth
considering though a bit more expensive than the rank and file SM.

Thank you for your comments…> > trying to choose between an Oyster and an
Amel is difficult. The Oyster is prettier (opinion of course) but the
Amel is more "user friendly"

Jean-Pierre

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
mailto:JPGermain%40noclaf.im





Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
JPGermain@...


Re: [Amel] Questions

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Dear Jean pierre,
there is a saying, there is a boat for every person, and a person for every boat. I don't think the Amel is your boat.
Regards
Danny
SM2K 299 Ocean Pearl

From: Germain Jean-Pierre <jp.germain@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Monday, 15 October 2012 8:33 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Questions

 
Hello Ian,

Thanks for the comments. I've located a well used Oyster 54 but it would require extensive refit. I am considering other options including various Tayanas, Hylas, C & C, Van Den Stadt in alu and Najad.

A big question for me: what are the pros and cons of an SM vs SM2K… other than money differential. My problem is getting a definitive and accurate description of the improvements on the SM2K. If anyone has a complete list of the improvements from the SM to SM2K, please send it over!!!

For instance, the SM2K has a 3 zone AC/heating system and the genset is an Onan 3 Cyl (Yanmar engine) (1500rpm…. a very big plus for me as I want PEACE and QUIET!)

Lastly, the SM I'm contemplating does have a modified drive system; it uses a standard shaft drive. Looking at the ridiculous cost and complexity of the Amel C drive, the shaft drive seems a better mouse trap to me because of its simplicity and reliability. I could source, anywhere in the world, a new cutlass bearing, dripless shaft seal and shaft in 2 days for €500 …

Amel is very good but the over engineered gearbox and drive is a step backwards. To make matters more difficult, the SM I am considering is absolutely gorgeous after a refit with a light weight designer interior while retaining the Amel features worth keeping; eliminates catacomb feeling of Amel. This is a vessel with a difference and I could enjoy it without being annoyed by the dreary standard Amel interior.

I'll post photos if I buy it… me thinks all SM and SM2K owners may be jealous!

I hope I have not insulted anyone with my candid views. :-)

Jean-Pierre

On 15 Oct 2012, at 08:52, Ian Shepherd wrote:

Jean Pierre,

just before I bought my Super Maramu, I examined an Oyster 54 at a boat
show. The president of Oyster USA was on board and when I finished my
tour he asked me if I would consider buying an Oyster. I said to him
that I was not in a position to do so as I had just ordered an Amel. He
smiled and quietly said 'A very wise choice'. I think that says it all.
The Oyster was twice the Amel price and not as well equipped.

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens - till I get
the rope off my prop and head east!

On 04/10/2012 13:08, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

Hello Jean Pierre,
Interesting that the price of a non-standard engine/drive system is
above that of a genuine Amel. I think most of us would be unhappy at
the thought of changing the drive system. Over the past twelve years I
have only heard of one C drive failure.
My last boat was an Oyster 435 built 1985 and we sailed it extensively
with several Atlantic crossings and ten years in the Caribbean and the
South Pacific. We finally got rid of it because we were fed up with
the fact that we could never stop the leaks through the toe rail
fastenings and the main chain plates. The retiring Sales Director told
us that the chain plates leak problem was a design fault with that
model. Other defects included fridge insulation using exfoliated mica
which is good for loft insulation but is reduced to a sort of porridge
when soaked and freezer insulation with foamed glass which was open
cell and soaked up bilgewater to become useless as well. It is our
view that Oysters are brilliant at promoting their product but that
ours was very heavy and not suited to short handed sailing in the way
that Amel excels. Also when we got our SM2K in 2001 the cost was about
one third of the price of an Oyster 54.

Best wishes, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM319

From: ogedm688
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 10:56 AM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Questions

Greets SV BeBe, (Bill)

Having spent some time on this forum, I am already aware of your
status as a "tech guru"…> :-). I am sure you have been thanked for your
efforts but I wish to add to the gang. Reading your clear and concise
explanations has given me a better understanding of what I am getting
into.

I asked about the C drive because the boat I am contemplating has had
a major mod done to it: the first owner, obsessed by a C drive failure
(far more free with his dosh than I) had the C drive removed, turned
the engine around then installed a ZF gearbox with a shaft drive. I've
asked for a complete description and list of each component used.. I
don't get it…> .

However, the boat is absolutely pristine. Even more so than my present
Pegasus which is …> by my standards…> as new. So the vessel is worth
considering though a bit more expensive than the rank and file SM.

Thank you for your comments…> trying to choose between an Oyster and an
Amel is difficult. The Oyster is prettier (opinion of course) but the
Amel is more "user friendly"

Jean-Pierre





Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
mailto:JPGermain%40noclaf.im

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Maramu Hatch Support and Adjusters

Andy Croney
 

Dear Amel Maramu owners, one of the saloon hatch supports on my Maramu needs to be replaced. Do any of you have any ideas where I can obtain a replacement or something similar ?? Thanks for your thoughts, Andy


Re: Rudder cables

mikon18084 <mkbiz@...>
 

Hello Graham,

that is good to know. But is there any statement about the expected lifetime of the cables ?

Michael

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Graham Johnston <grahamjohnston42@...> wrote:

Dave,
I have a reply from Ultraflex regarding lubrication of the steering cable which confirms what I thought. By the way the same applies to the engine control cables, lubrication is not recommended.
 
 ' The cables are designed to have a lifetime grease with no additional lubrication required.'
 
Regards
Graham


________________________________
From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Saturday, 6 October 2012, 20:05
Subject: Re: [Amel] Rudder cables

 
Graham,

Thank you for responding. I thought the same thing but the owner's manual I have for the boat mentions periodic lubrication. Maybe it was lost in translation?

Cheers,
Dave

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "GrahamJohnston42" <grahamjohnston42@> wrote:

Hi Dave,
Although it is a very long time since I used to install Teleflex steering systems I seem to recall that the cables are sealed for life and have a plastic/teflon type liner and lubrication was not recommended as mineral oils would damage the liner. There are no obvious lubrication points on our Ultraflex cables, so perhaps the same applies. I could be wrong though it is over 25 years since I last worked with them!

Regards
Graham




--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Since we're discussing rudder cables again, I'm hoping someone can offer clues on lubrication points on a Maramu. I have not figured out how to lube the system.

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "svbebe" <yahoogroups@> wrote:

Dave,

I believe Graham's explanation is very accurate and very clear. I would add to check quadrant tightness to the rudder post.

On Super Maramu #387, the quadrant is attached to the rudder post with a clamp and two bolts. We found that slightly loose bolts/nuts on the quadrant clamp allowed for 2-3" of helm movement.

How this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey



--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, Graham Johnston <grahamjohnston42@> wrote:

Hi Dave,
We had similar play in our system when we bought Zephyr. The cables are just standard Teleflex type steering cables, in our case Ultraflex M53 19ft F53, and are easily adjusted. At the rudder end of each cable you will find that the cable is mounted in the bulkhead with a circular threaded flange. Simply use a pair of pipe grips to rotate the tubular metal end fitting and adjust both cables equally to remove most of the play. If you go too far the steering with become stiff. We have less than an inch play and the steeering is smooth and free.
 
I hope that I have explained this well enough if not let me know and I will send some photos.
 
Regards
Graham


________________________________
From: spritoaffine <captaingrey@>
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, 3 October 2012, 21:01
Subject: [Amel] Rudder cables



 

Hello All
I have been reading old posts with regard to rudder cables hoping to find some information on the adjustment process. I have about 4 or 5 inches of free movement at the wheel rim before the rudder moves and this seems to me to be excessive

The Neco autopilot which I'm sure does not have the most sophisticated electronics by today's standards is easily confused by anything other than a smooth sea state and I wonder whether the aforementioned play is a contributory factor. Your thoughts please

I was happy to read in the posts of the system being able to work on one cable, let's hope it's never needed

David Worthington
Sharki148 Spirito Affine
Preveza Greece




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





Re: Smart Switch

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ian,

Possibly the following will help:

There is a solenoid switch that energizes when the generator is ON. This switch turns OFF the connection to shore power and turns ON the AC power from the generator. The concept being that the generator has preference to the AC panel. This is discussed in section 7.5 of the "Super Maramu Owners Manual."

There is a grey electrical box that is Labeled QUAI-GE which I believe translates to DOCK-GE or Dock-Generator. I am certain that this will be the box with the solenoid switch. I posted a photograph at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/1949812811/pic/1348990781/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

Also, the Prosine Inverter installed on BeBe has a sleep mode called Power Save which turns OFF the output power until a load is detected.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

I believe that the SM is fitted with a Smart Switch that determines
whether the inverter, gen set or shore power supply AC to the boat. I am
having the occasional problem in that when the inverter is switched on
there is no AC. Starting the genset for a few seconds then switching off
usually cures the problem. MY suspicions point to the Smart Switch, but
I cannot find it. Can anyone please tell me where it is located? Battery
volts and loads are all normal.

IAn Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens Greece


Re: [Amel] Smart Switch

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Eric,

a bit busy with the diver coming any moment. I cannot see where the
shore power lead is but it probably routes to the voltage selector box
first as Crusader is 220/110. There are two boxes on the wall, one named
Convertisseur (Inverter), and the other Quai -GE. I guess it's the
latter. Probably the contactor needs cleaning, though I am now not clear
what determines whether the gen set or the inverter supplies AC? I
presume like most simple AC installations they cannot be paralleled.
There may be a relay elsewhere that stops the inverter supplying power
when the gen set is running. That may be the other box. I will have a
look later.

Thanks for your help

Ian SM2000 #414 Crusader Athens

On 15/10/2012 07:26, Sailormon wrote:

Hi Ian,

On my boat it is a box about 6 inches square, behind the middle of the
generator, Standard European plastic box with a twist screw in each
corner.
It is I believe ,technically, called a transfer switch. If you follow the
shore power cord into the engine room it goes directly into that box.

It has a sensor/timer and a contactor in it.

When the sensor senses gen power, it excites the contactor and
switches over
to gen power after about 10-15 seconds

Fair Winds

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Ian Shepherd
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 3:13 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Smart Switch

I believe that the SM is fitted with a Smart Switch that determines
whether the inverter, gen set or shore power supply AC to the boat. I am
having the occasional problem in that when the inverter is switched on
there is no AC. Starting the genset for a few seconds then switching off
usually cures the problem. MY suspicions point to the Smart Switch, but
I cannot find it. Can anyone please tell me where it is located? Battery
volts and loads are all normal.

IAn Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens Greece




Re: [Amel] Questions

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Hello Ian,

Thanks for the comments. I've located a well used Oyster 54 but it would require extensive refit. I am considering other options including various Tayanas, Hylas, C & C, Van Den Stadt in alu and Najad.

A big question for me: what are the pros and cons of an SM vs SM2K… other than money differential. My problem is getting a definitive and accurate description of the improvements on the SM2K. If anyone has a complete list of the improvements from the SM to SM2K, please send it over!!!

For instance, the SM2K has a 3 zone AC/heating system and the genset is an Onan 3 Cyl (Yanmar engine) (1500rpm…. a very big plus for me as I want PEACE and QUIET!)

Lastly, the SM I'm contemplating does have a modified drive system; it uses a standard shaft drive. Looking at the ridiculous cost and complexity of the Amel C drive, the shaft drive seems a better mouse trap to me because of its simplicity and reliability. I could source, anywhere in the world, a new cutlass bearing, dripless shaft seal and shaft in 2 days for €500 …

Amel is very good but the over engineered gearbox and drive is a step backwards. To make matters more difficult, the SM I am considering is absolutely gorgeous after a refit with a light weight designer interior while retaining the Amel features worth keeping; eliminates catacomb feeling of Amel. This is a vessel with a difference and I could enjoy it without being annoyed by the dreary standard Amel interior.

I'll post photos if I buy it… me thinks all SM and SM2K owners may be jealous!

I hope I have not insulted anyone with my candid views. :-)

Jean-Pierre


On 15 Oct 2012, at 08:52, Ian Shepherd wrote:

Jean Pierre,

just before I bought my Super Maramu, I examined an Oyster 54 at a boat
show. The president of Oyster USA was on board and when I finished my
tour he asked me if I would consider buying an Oyster. I said to him
that I was not in a position to do so as I had just ordered an Amel. He
smiled and quietly said 'A very wise choice'. I think that says it all.
The Oyster was twice the Amel price and not as well equipped.

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens - till I get
the rope off my prop and head east!

On 04/10/2012 13:08, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

Hello Jean Pierre,
Interesting that the price of a non-standard engine/drive system is
above that of a genuine Amel. I think most of us would be unhappy at
the thought of changing the drive system. Over the past twelve years I
have only heard of one C drive failure.
My last boat was an Oyster 435 built 1985 and we sailed it extensively
with several Atlantic crossings and ten years in the Caribbean and the
South Pacific. We finally got rid of it because we were fed up with
the fact that we could never stop the leaks through the toe rail
fastenings and the main chain plates. The retiring Sales Director told
us that the chain plates leak problem was a design fault with that
model. Other defects included fridge insulation using exfoliated mica
which is good for loft insulation but is reduced to a sort of porridge
when soaked and freezer insulation with foamed glass which was open
cell and soaked up bilgewater to become useless as well. It is our
view that Oysters are brilliant at promoting their product but that
ours was very heavy and not suited to short handed sailing in the way
that Amel excels. Also when we got our SM2K in 2001 the cost was about
one third of the price of an Oyster 54.

Best wishes, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM319

From: ogedm688
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 10:56 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Questions

Greets SV BeBe, (Bill)

Having spent some time on this forum, I am already aware of your
status as a "tech guru"…> :-). I am sure you have been thanked for your
efforts but I wish to add to the gang. Reading your clear and concise
explanations has given me a better understanding of what I am getting
into.

I asked about the C drive because the boat I am contemplating has had
a major mod done to it: the first owner, obsessed by a C drive failure
(far more free with his dosh than I) had the C drive removed, turned
the engine around then installed a ZF gearbox with a shaft drive. I've
asked for a complete description and list of each component used. I
don't get it…> .

However, the boat is absolutely pristine. Even more so than my present
Pegasus which is …> by my standards…> as new. So the vessel is worth
considering though a bit more expensive than the rank and file SM.

Thank you for your comments…> trying to choose between an Oyster and an
Amel is difficult. The Oyster is prettier (opinion of course) but the
Amel is more "user friendly"

Jean-Pierre

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Jean-Pierre Germain
Director Flight Operations
NOCLAF Limited
+44 7825 635 917
JPGermain@...



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Smart Switch

eric freedman
 

Hi Ian,

On my boat it is a box about 6 inches square, behind the middle of the
generator, Standard European plastic box with a twist screw in each corner.
It is I believe ,technically, called a transfer switch. If you follow the
shore power cord into the engine room it goes directly into that box.

It has a sensor/timer and a contactor in it.

When the sensor senses gen power, it excites the contactor and switches over
to gen power after about 10-15 seconds

Fair Winds

Eric





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Ian Shepherd
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 3:13 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Smart Switch





I believe that the SM is fitted with a Smart Switch that determines
whether the inverter, gen set or shore power supply AC to the boat. I am
having the occasional problem in that when the inverter is switched on
there is no AC. Starting the genset for a few seconds then switching off
usually cures the problem. MY suspicions point to the Smart Switch, but
I cannot find it. Can anyone please tell me where it is located? Battery
volts and loads are all normal.

IAn Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens Greece


How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

eric freedman
 

Bill.

If you remove the stops on the door you can raise it up to the dodger with a
foot under the door open. You will see in the photos a piece of wood holding
the door up.



I made a rail that I clamped parallel to the edge of the door which is shown
in the photos.

It is the same height as the door rails. This allowed me to rout right up to
the rails where the door slides.

I had to find an extra long router bit for this.

This also allowed me to rout the door deeper than the veneer to accommodate
the thicker Formica. After some sanding and making a template it fit
perfectly and is a nice match to the teak, once I re do the teak.



The entire panel was replaced except the small area that is under the area
where the door slides up and down.



I am not worried about this area as it is out of the sun and is never seen.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Judy and Bill aboard
SV BeBe
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 2:05 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: How to change the veneer on the companionway without
removing the dodger





Eric,

Thanks for the photos on the companionway door. I have 2 questions:

How did you raise the door higher as shown in the photographs?

How did you get to the far right and far left edges to sand, etc?

Bill
BeBe

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
wrote:

If you go to the photo section of our site and look at the large file of
Kimberlite. You will see a series of photos of how I replaced the veneer
on
the companionway without removing the dodger. It took about 6 hours.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







Smart Switch

Ian Shepherd
 

I believe that the SM is fitted with a Smart Switch that determines whether the inverter, gen set or shore power supply AC to the boat. I am having the occasional problem in that when the inverter is switched on there is no AC. Starting the genset for a few seconds then switching off usually cures the problem. MY suspicions point to the Smart Switch, but I cannot find it. Can anyone please tell me where it is located? Battery volts and loads are all normal.

IAn Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens Greece


Re: [Amel] Questions

Ian Shepherd
 

Jean Pierre,

just before I bought my Super Maramu, I examined an Oyster 54 at a boat
show. The president of Oyster USA was on board and when I finished my
tour he asked me if I would consider buying an Oyster. I said to him
that I was not in a position to do so as I had just ordered an Amel. He
smiled and quietly said 'A very wise choice'. I think that says it all.
The Oyster was twice the Amel price and not as well equipped.

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Crusader Kalamaki Marina Athens - till I get
the rope off my prop and head east!

On 04/10/2012 13:08, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

Hello Jean Pierre,
Interesting that the price of a non-standard engine/drive system is
above that of a genuine Amel. I think most of us would be unhappy at
the thought of changing the drive system. Over the past twelve years I
have only heard of one C drive failure.
My last boat was an Oyster 435 built 1985 and we sailed it extensively
with several Atlantic crossings and ten years in the Caribbean and the
South Pacific. We finally got rid of it because we were fed up with
the fact that we could never stop the leaks through the toe rail
fastenings and the main chain plates. The retiring Sales Director told
us that the chain plates leak problem was a design fault with that
model. Other defects included fridge insulation using exfoliated mica
which is good for loft insulation but is reduced to a sort of porridge
when soaked and freezer insulation with foamed glass which was open
cell and soaked up bilgewater to become useless as well. It is our
view that Oysters are brilliant at promoting their product but that
ours was very heavy and not suited to short handed sailing in the way
that Amel excels. Also when we got our SM2K in 2001 the cost was about
one third of the price of an Oyster 54.

Best wishes, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM319

From: ogedm688
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2012 10:56 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel] Questions

Greets SV BeBe, (Bill)

Having spent some time on this forum, I am already aware of your
status as a "tech guru"… :-). I am sure you have been thanked for your
efforts but I wish to add to the gang. Reading your clear and concise
explanations has given me a better understanding of what I am getting
into.

I asked about the C drive because the boat I am contemplating has had
a major mod done to it: the first owner, obsessed by a C drive failure
(far more free with his dosh than I) had the C drive removed, turned
the engine around then installed a ZF gearbox with a shaft drive. I've
asked for a complete description and list of each component used. I
don't get it….

However, the boat is absolutely pristine. Even more so than my present
Pegasus which is … by my standards… as new. So the vessel is worth
considering though a bit more expensive than the rank and file SM.

Thank you for your comments… trying to choose between an Oyster and an
Amel is difficult. The Oyster is prettier (opinion of course) but the
Amel is more "user friendly"

Jean-Pierre





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Eric,

Thanks for the photos on the companionway door. I have 2 questions:

How did you raise the door higher as shown in the photographs?

How did you get to the far right and far left edges to sand, etc?

Bill
BeBe

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Sailormon <kimberlite@...> wrote:

If you go to the photo section of our site and look at the large file of
Kimberlite. You will see a series of photos of how I replaced the veneer on
the companionway without removing the dodger. It took about 6 hours.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







Re: [Amel] How to change the veneer on the companionway without removing the dodger

eric freedman
 

I forgot to mention the photos are at the end of the file.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite



_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Sailormon
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 1:02 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] How to change the veneer on the companionway without
removing the dodger





If you go to the photo section of our site and look at the large file of
Kimberlite. You will see a series of photos of how I replaced the veneer on
the companionway without removing the dodger. It took about 6 hours.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite