Date   

Re: [Amel] storm sails

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi Pat for off shore we generally fly an 11oz Dacron Caribbean blaster as a head sail when we've been out in heavy weather or the trades it works well it is a 110 high clue. We can shorten up and back wind it when hoving to. The main and mizzen are 10 oz and have worked well in all conditions shorting as needed.  
SM 209 FOR SALE IN NEWPORT 
Regards 
Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Dec 29, 2013, at 11:07, <sailw32@...> wrote:

 

Eric, Reading your accounts of the conditions you have encountered on several of your trips, I want to ask you or anyone else with some very heavy weather sailing experience, what if any storm sails you carry. I know you carry a drogue, but I am interested in sails ,as I have no storm sails and am preparing my boat to cruise and seeking opinions.  Thanks, Pat #123


Re: [Amel] Re: Headliner Glue

David Wallace
 

In the main cabin you can use this same basic technique but avoid a lot of work and mess by installing the panels directly over the old headliner which is left in place.  The wood strips will hold the panels securely.  I used 3/16" birch plywood and routed shallow grooves about 2" apart to give the look of tongue and groove, then painted it white.  We're very happy with the look.

Dave and Merry
s/v Air Ops
Maramu 104
Sea of Cortez

On Dec 29, 2013, at 7:44 AM, Ian Park wrote:

 

We relined the aft cabin on our Santorin. We found the best way to get rid of the glue on the fibreglass was a nylon bristle wheel on a hand drill. We didn't fancy glueing the new lining onto the roof, so we cut four panels of thin marine ply and covered them on a table (including stapling the overlap onto the back. We then put self adhesive Velcro strips on the back and on the roof to hold the panels in position and then just screwed the wooden strips back in place which securely hold the panels. If we have a future 'problem' it just means detaching the offending panel and sorting it out. We glued the window surround sections by spray glue. Important where they overlap to scrape the backing off first to get a neat fit. When we need to replace any other areas we will use the plywood panel method again.

Ian and Linda SN96 Ocean Hobo



storm sails

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric, Reading your accounts of the conditions you have encountered on several of your trips, I want to ask you or anyone else with some very heavy weather sailing experience, what if any storm sails you carry. I know you carry a drogue, but I am interested in sails ,as I have no storm sails and am preparing my boat to cruise and seeking opinions.  Thanks, Pat #123


Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric, Yes, I think the mat is just those foam tubes sewed into a piece of canvas. My question is how effective it is, does it work, is it worth the hassle of storing and deploying. Eric I have another question I would like to ask you on a different subject, so I guess I will ask under a new thread. Thanks, Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailorman
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 10:02 am
Subject: RE: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 
Hi,
I have heard of some people using the spaghetti tubes that children use in the swimming pools .
3  or 4 of them roped through and tied  off to the stern cleats seems to solve the problem.
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite
 
 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Patrick Mcaneny
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 10:00 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers
 
 
 
Craig, Since you deploy the rocker stopper ,I was wondering if you also may use the mat ( I do not know what its called) under the transom that is supposed to eliminate the slapping . I am a light sleeper and the slapping keeps me awake , I would like to hear from someone that uses a mat and know how effective the mat is in reducing noise and vibration caused by waves slapping the overhang.  Thanks, Pat SM #123
 
-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris <sangaris@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 7:47 am
Subject: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers
 
Terry & Dena,
We have used the Davis Rocker Stoppers for 14 years now.  These are the ones shaped kind of like orange plastic "sombreros" .  We hang a string of 6 from each side of the boat and they work fantastically well. 
 
Although we often use a stern anchor if there's a predictable swell, some advantages of these are: 1. you swing with the wind, rather than finding yourself sideways to your bow and stern anchor, 2. you swing with the rest of the boats in a tight anchorage, 3. we find having a breeze from the bow more pleasant, and the barbecue smoke isn't an issue as it can be with a stern anchor, and 4. you'll make new friends as folks dinghy over to check out the weird looking rig - some Norwegians even gave us 4 salmon just for a look!
 
Imo, there's no issue at all with forces on the poles, as virtually all the strain is taken by the topping lift, not the poles.  Also, the length outboard of the poles gives great leverage to make the stoppers work even better. We've tried them simply tied off the side of the boat and they don't do the job that way.
 
As for safe ty if you need to move quickly, it's literally a ten second job to throw off the foreguy, swing the pole back and flip the stoppers onto the deck. (much faster than dealing with a stern anchor). OK, another 10 seconds to lower the poles to the rail hooks.
 
The only downside is you end up with two extra bags to store, assuming you get two sets of six, which I'd highly recommend (one set will not do the job). Nesting the stoppers, each bag is about 14" in diameter and about 18" high.  We haven't found that an issue for all these years, though - they fit nicely with the bikes and the Smart Car in the aft lazerette.   I had, howe ver, thought about looking into a flat folding model, but they were quite pricey so I passed.  These are about $12 at discount, or $144 for 12 of them, plus a couple of small anchors and some 3/8 line - all up for under $200. (We're a Santorin - for a SM you might want to use 8 per side.)
 
These work best at stopping that dreadful roll that amplifies as the boat aligns itself sideways to the wave train when the wind dies.  With the stabilizers out we're virtually steady, or with just a very slight rocking, while our neighbors are rolling gunnel to gunnel and falling out of bed.
 
Although we often have the poles out from sailing, if we don't,  it takes me about 15 minutes to set up both poles and deploy the stoppers.
 
Good luck with it,
Craig and Katherine Briggs
SN#68 - "Sangaris", Marina di Ragusa, Sicily (we're in sunny FL)


I am using the Free version of SPAMfighter.
SPAMfighter has removed 2692 of my spam emails to date.

Do you have a slow PC? Try a free scan!


Re: Headliner Glue

Ian Park
 

We relined the aft cabin on our Santorin. We found the best way to get rid of the glue on the fibreglass was a nylon bristle wheel on a hand drill. We didn't fancy glueing the new lining onto the roof, so we cut four panels of thin marine ply and covered them on a table (including stapling the overlap onto the back. We then put self adhesive Velcro strips on the back and on the roof to hold the panels in position and then just screwed the wooden strips back in place which securely hold the panels. If we have a future 'problem' it just means detaching the offending panel and sorting it out. We glued the window surround sections by spray glue. Important where they overlap to scrape the backing off first to get a neat fit. When we need to replace any other areas we will use the plywood panel method again.

Ian and Linda SN96 Ocean Hobo


Cruising tax in Greece

Rink De Haan
 

Dear all,

I requested some clarity on the Greek cruising tax topic from Kos Marina. Today I received this answer: 
"We kindly inform you that regarding the law for the new tax, as we have been informed, it is not yet final, therefore we do not know at the moment the exact tax and when it will apply.

For further information regarding this issue, boats from a European Union country should contact the port authority and the rest of the boats the custom’s office, although the while probably have more information in January.

We remain at your disposal and not hesitate to contact us for any further information.

Kind Regards,

Ferrou Christina

Front Office

Kos Marina




Op 27 dec. 2013 om 02:20 heeft "Bill & Judy Rouse" <yahoogroups@...> het volgende geschreven:

 

Craig,

Thanks for the clarity...and, of course, we will have to wait to see how this is enforced. I think that we will stick with our plan to enter Greece from Turkey in April at some point a distance from Turkey (too many horror stories about those Greek Islands close to Marmaris). If they want more than we think they deserve, we will just say, thanks, but no thanks and move on.

Bill
BeBe #387


On Thu, Dec 26, 2013 at 2:54 PM, <sangaris@...> wrote:
 

I guess the last thing we should expect from the Greek taxing authority is clarity (or any taxing authority, for that matter!).  

 

If the translation posted on the CA website is accurate it does indeed say in Section 2, “The T.P.P. is calculated on a yearly basis … from January 1st to December 31st”.  However, it then says, “and is determined as follows:”  

“… for boats over 12 meters the TPP per year is 100 euros per meter

OR per month, ten euros per meter.”


I can see how you could interpret this as being strictly annual, but I interpreted the "OR" to mean you can pay monthly for the time you're in Greek waters.  That also seems consistent with Section 5 that says you can pay in December, or either before you enter Greek waters or when you get your Transit Log (or DEKPA for EU boats).  


So, for example, if Bebe enters Greece in June, she'll get her Transit Log and pay for a month, or however long she says she'll be in Greece.  If she stays a month and then decides on longer, she'll just check in elsewhere and pay the next month.


If it does mean it's strictly an annual tax, they're tacking on a hefty 20% extra charge for paying by credit card (12 months at 10 Euro per month vs 100 euros for the year.) Which also begs the question of how one would pay for a year on a credit card when entering mid-year - do they keep charging his card after he leaves?  That seems too bizarre even for the Greeks.

 

Will look forward to further info, Rink, from your inquiry, and, of course, it will be helpful to hear from anyone with “feet on the ground”, now that the new year is about here and the tax is in force.

 

Speaking of which, 

Happy New Year to all,

Craig Briggs, SN#68



Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

eric freedman
 

Hi,

I have heard of some people using the spaghetti tubes that children use in the swimming pools .

3  or 4 of them roped through and tied  off to the stern cleats seems to solve the problem.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Patrick Mcaneny
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 10:00 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 

 

 

Craig, Since you deploy the rocker stopper ,I was wondering if you also may use the mat ( I do not know what its called) under the transom that is supposed to eliminate the slapping . I am a light sleeper and the slapping keeps me awake , I would like to hear from someone that uses a mat and know how effective the mat is in reducing noise and vibration caused by waves slapping the overhang.  Thanks, Pat SM #123

 

-----Original Message-----

From: sangaris
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 7:47 am
Subject: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 

Terry & Dena,

We have used the Davis Rocker Stoppers for 14 years now.  These are the ones shaped kind of like orange plastic "sombreros" .  We hang a string of 6 from each side of the boat and they work fantastically well. 

 

Although we often use a stern anchor if there's a predictable swell, some advantages of these are: 1. you swing with the wind, rather than finding yourself sideways to your bow and stern anchor, 2. you swing with the rest of the boats in a tight anchorage, 3. we find having a breeze from the bow more pleasant, and the barbecue smoke isn't an issue as it can be with a stern anchor, and 4. you'll make new friends as folks dinghy over to check out the weird looking rig - some Norwegians even gave us 4 salmon just for a look!

 

Imo, there's no issue at all with forces on the poles, as virtually all the strain is taken by the topping lift, not the poles.  Also, the length outboard of the poles gives great leverage to make the stoppers work even better. We've tried them simply tied off the side of the boat and they don't do the job that way.

 

As for safe ty if you need to move quickly, it's literally a ten second job to throw off the foreguy, swing the pole back and flip the stoppers onto the deck. (much faster than dealing with a stern anchor). OK, another 10 seconds to lower the poles to the rail hooks.

 

The only downside is you end up with two extra bags to store, assuming you get two sets of six, which I'd highly recommend (one set will not do the job). Nesting the stoppers, each bag is about 14" in diameter and about 18" high.  We haven't found that an issue for all these years, though - they fit nicely with the bikes and the Smart Car in the aft lazerette.   I had, howe ver, thought about looking into a flat folding model, but they were quite pricey so I passed.  These are about $12 at discount, or $144 for 12 of them, plus a couple of small anchors and some 3/8 line - all up for under $200. (We're a Santorin - for a SM you might want to use 8 per side.)

 

These work best at stopping that dreadful roll that amplifies as the boat aligns itself sideways to the wave train when the wind dies.  With the stabilizers out we're virtually steady, or with just a very slight rocking, while our neighbors are rolling gunnel to gunnel and falling out of bed.

 

Although we often have the poles out from sailing, if we don't,  it takes me about 15 minutes to set up both poles and deploy the stoppers.

 

Good luck with it,

Craig and Katherine Briggs

SN#68 - "Sangaris", Marina di Ragusa, Sicily (we're in sunny FL)


Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

Patrick McAneny
 


Craig, Since you deploy the rocker stopper ,I was wondering if you also may use the mat ( I do not know what its called) under the transom that is supposed to eliminate the slapping . I am a light sleeper and the slapping keeps me awake , I would like to hear from someone that uses a mat and know how effective the mat is in reducing noise and vibration caused by waves slapping the overhang.  Thanks, Pat SM #123

-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 7:47 am
Subject: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 
Terry & Dena,
We have used the Davis Rocker Stoppers for 14 years now.  These are the ones shaped kind of like orange plastic "sombreros" .  We hang a string of 6 from each side of the boat and they work fantastically well. 

Although we often use a stern anchor if there's a predictable swell, some advantages of these are: 1. you swing with the wind, rather than finding yourself sideways to your bow and stern anchor, 2. you swing with the rest of the boats in a tight anchorage, 3. we find having a breeze from the bow more pleasant, and the barbecue smoke isn't an issue as it can be with a stern anchor, and 4. you'll make new friends as folks dinghy over to check out the weird looking rig - some Norwegians even gave us 4 salmon just for a look!

Imo, there's no issue at all with forces on the poles, as virtually all the strain is taken by the topping lift, not the poles.  Also, the length outboard of the poles gives great leverage to make the stoppers work even better. We've tried them simply tied off the side of the boat and they don't do the job that way.

As for safe ty if you need to move quickly, it's literally a ten second job to throw off the foreguy, swing the pole back and flip the stoppers onto the deck. (much faster than dealing with a stern anchor). OK, another 10 seconds to lower the poles to the rail hooks.

The only downside is you end up with two extra bags to store, assuming you get two sets of six, which I'd highly recommend (one set will not do the job). Nesting the stoppers, each bag is about 14" in diameter and about 18" high.  We haven't found that an issue for all these years, though - they fit nicely with the bikes and the Smart Car in the aft lazerette.   I had, howe ver, thought about looking into a flat folding model, but they were quite pricey so I passed.  These are about $12 at discount, or $144 for 12 of them, plus a couple of small anchors and some 3/8 line - all up for under $200. (We're a Santorin - for a SM you might want to use 8 per side.)

These work best at stopping that dreadful roll that amplifies as the boat aligns itself sideways to the wave train when the wind dies.  With the stabilizers out we're virtually steady, or with just a very slight rocking, while our neighbors are rolling gunnel to gunnel and falling out of bed.

Although we often have the poles out from sailing, if we don't,  it takes me about 15 minutes to set up both poles and deploy the stoppers.

Good luck with it,
Craig and Katherine Briggs
SN#68 - "Sangaris", Marina di Ragusa, Sicily (we're in sunny FL)


Re: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

eric freedman
 

HI ,

WHERE DID they mount the second course computer? The grey one?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Colin Streeter
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 8:10 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

 

 

Hi Eric

 

Yes. you are correct about the colours of the old and new units. The rudder references are both mounted on opposite sides of the rudder TBar. Basically we have two completely separate full autopilot systems with the quick change over switch.

 

Before purchasing Island Pearl II we had viewed at least 20+ other Amels and in that sample there were at least 5 or 6 with the same dual autopilot setup, but mainly on the better set up 54's that we viewed.

 

Fair Winds

Colin & Lauren Streeter

Island a Pearl II , SK2K #332

Newport, QLD, Australia 


On 29 Dec 2013, at 7:21 pm, Sailorman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

 

Is your original course computer a black  finned unit marked model 300?

Probably mounted behind the rotary autopilot.

I assume the new one is a grey plastic unit.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Sailorman
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 4:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

 

 

Thanks,

My friend just bought Joel Potters Amel 54 and he was interested in how he could do the wind angle. I told him I thought it could be done via the NMEA bus.

 

Another question.

Where is your second course computer and rudder reference transducer mounted?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Colin Streeter
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 2:21 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Cc: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

 

 

Eric

 

We have a similar arrangement to Alan with NMEA output from B&G Hydra 2000 providing wind etc data to our two Raymarine autopilots one being the original 2001 ST7000+ Series and the other a 2012 Raymarine smart pilot X30.

 

We used the steer to wind feature extensively on our previous vessel so wanted that feature on the Amel too.

 

Fair winds

Colin & Lauren Streeter

Island Pearl II. Sm2k#332

 




On 29 Dec 2013, at 4:25 pm, <divanz620@...> wrote:

 

Sorry Eric,

 

and yes, we can set either Raymarine pilot to sail to an apparent wind angle......

 

Cheers

Alan

SV Elyse SM437


Re: Headliner Glue

Duane Siegfri
 

I replaced the headliner in my (non-Amel) boat, and reglued the old headliner in the V-Berth.  

My advice from this experience is DO NOT use spray glue.  It is much easier/faster/cheaper/cleaner to use contact cement that is rolled on (fast for large areas) or brushed on (good for small areas).  It wasn't up long enough to comment on the longevity though.

Duane


Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

connwilliamson@...
 

Yep we had the same problem Ian, the chain would jam on retrieval requiring the V berth to be dismantled to access the locker in a panic especially when in a crowded anchorage. I think the locker was too small. I have noticed the locker is larger on Super Marumu's. Anyway I ended up using the deck locker which the hawse pipe ran through, Removing the pipe and fiberglassing the hole up. the locker it is quite deep on a Mango. Had no problems since, I can wash the chain whenever easily, the mud and crap drains out the side not to the bilge. The chain also sits on a type of plastic mesh I had fitted which is 50mm thick so it doesn't touch the bottom and also spreads the weight out.



---In amelyachtowners@{{emailDomain}}, <parkianj@...> wrote:

Hi James and Leah

We bought our 46' Santorin this year and were surprised to find only 8mm chain plus the ubiquitous CQR. We changed up to a 10mm gypsy and 100m of 10mm chain. We brought the anchor with us from the previous boat - a Spade. It is a great anchor, very much better than a CQR and stows and deploys easily from the bow roller. It has the advantage of being very easy to disassemble for easy stowage in a locker if you need to secure it from theft while in a marina our hauled out.
Anyone else reading this thread with advice for us on our 100m chain - it piles up on itself in the locker and frequently jams once 40 metres are out. It also piles up on retrieval and blocks the hawse hole jamming the chain on the gypsy on deck. Has anyone found a way to get the chain to self store inside the chain locker?

Ian and Linda. SN 96 Ocean Hobo


Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

j.lochhead@...
 

Thanks all for the advice.  John that is exactly the info I was after. Basically what size new generation anchor will fit.  I am not a fantastic sleeper at the moment when on anchor so anything to help when we move aboard will be worth it. Our "plan" is also to head up to the barrier reef, although not sure how far up this next year.  We are in perth at the moment and will be driving from perth to Brisbane in February.


Thanks again.



Re: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Eric

Yes. you are correct about the colours of the old and new units. The rudder references are both mounted on opposite sides of the rudder TBar. Basically we have two completely separate full autopilot systems with the quick change over switch.

Before purchasing Island Pearl II we had viewed at least 20+ other Amels and in that sample there were at least 5 or 6 with the same dual autopilot setup, but mainly on the better set up 54's that we viewed.

Fair Winds
Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island a Pearl II , SK2K #332
Newport, QLD, Australia 

On 29 Dec 2013, at 7:21 pm, Sailorman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

 

Is your original course computer a black  finned unit marked model 300?

Probably mounted behind the rotary autopilot.

I assume the new one is a grey plastic unit.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Sailorman
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 4:09 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

 

 

Thanks,

My friend just bought Joel Potters Amel 54 and he was interested in how he could do the wind angle. I told him I thought it could be done via the NMEA bus.

 

Another question.

Where is your second course computer and rudder reference transducer mounted?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Colin Streeter
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 2:21 AM
To:
amelyachtowners@...
Cc: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] position of 2nd fluxgate compass for 2nd Autopilot on Super Maramu?

 

 

Eric

 

We have a similar arrangement to Alan with NMEA output from B&G Hydra 2000 providing wind etc data to our two Raymarine autopilots one being the original 2001 ST7000+ Series and the other a 2012 Raymarine smart pilot X30.

 

We used the steer to wind feature extensively on our previous vessel so wanted that feature on the Amel too.

 

Fair winds

Colin & Lauren Streeter

Island Pearl II. Sm2k#332

 




On 29 Dec 2013, at 4:25 pm, <divanz620@...> wrote:

 

Sorry Eric,

 

and yes, we can set either Raymarine pilot to sail to an apparent wind angle......

 

Cheers

Alan

SV Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel] Anchor size Maramu 46

Veit Mueller <veitm@...>
 

James & Leah:

We upgraded to a 40kg Rocna after having all kinds of problems at our first Bahamas visit.
It holds. Every time, all the time. Tested up to 65kn in a Derecho in Maryland.
Fits fine - Super Maramu.

Cheers,
Veit
ATMAN SM215

Sent from my vm iPad

On Dec 29, 2013, at 6:39 AM, John Edmondson <jjjk12s@...> wrote:

 

James and Leah,

We changed a 45 lb CQR that our boat arrived with to a 60 lb Manson Supreme. It's roller bar touches the pulpit when it is snug but it fits ok. We have just returned from 3 months up the Far North Great Barrier Reef to Thursday Island with many nights on exposed anchorages surrounded by bommies. The anchor is a vast improvement and we trust it far more for a good nights sleep. 
John, Maramu  Popeye


On Sunday, 29 December 2013 5:21 PM, "j.lochhead@..." <j.lochhead@...> wrote:


Hi, we are a family that have just bought a Maramu 46 and plan on going cruising for a while.  One thing I am looking at upgrading is the anchor (currently cqr copy I think). We have not yet moved aboard and are a long way from the boat at the moment so my problem is I am not sure what size anchors will fit the bow roller.  Will be spending most of the time at anchor.

Thanks for any advice.  James & Leah





Re: Flopper Stoppers

Craig Briggs
 

Terry & Dena,

We have used the Davis Rocker Stoppers for 14 years now.  These are the ones shaped kind of like orange plastic "sombreros" .  We hang a string of 6 from each side of the boat and they work fantastically well. 


Although we often use a stern anchor if there's a predictable swell, some advantages of these are: 1. you swing with the wind, rather than finding yourself sideways to your bow and stern anchor, 2. you swing with the rest of the boats in a tight anchorage, 3. we find having a breeze from the bow more pleasant, and the barbecue smoke isn't an issue as it can be with a stern anchor, and 4. you'll make new friends as folks dinghy over to check out the weird looking rig - some Norwegians even gave us 4 salmon just for a look!


Imo, there's no issue at all with forces on the poles, as virtually all the strain is taken by the topping lift, not the poles.  Also, the length outboard of the poles gives great leverage to make the stoppers work even better. We've tried them simply tied off the side of the boat and they don't do the job that way.


As for safety if you need to move quickly, it's literally a ten second job to throw off the foreguy, swing the pole back and flip the stoppers onto the deck. (much faster than dealing with a stern anchor). OK, another 10 seconds to lower the poles to the rail hooks.


The only downside is you end up with two extra bags to store, assuming you get two sets of six, which I'd highly recommend (one set will not do the job). Nesting the stoppers, each bag is about 14" in diameter and about 18" high.  We haven't found that an issue for all these years, though - they fit nicely with the bikes and the Smart Car in the aft lazerette.   I had, however, thought about looking into a flat folding model, but they were quite pricey so I passed.  These are about $12 at discount, or $144 for 12 of them, plus a couple of small anchors and some 3/8 line - all up for under $200. (We're a Santorin - for a SM you might want to use 8 per side.)


These work best at stopping that dreadful roll that amplifies as the boat aligns itself sideways to the wave train when the wind dies.  With the stabilizers out we're virtually steady, or with just a very slight rocking, while our neighbors are rolling gunnel to gunnel and falling out of bed.


Although we often have the poles out from sailing, if we don't,  it takes me about 15 minutes to set up both poles and deploy the stoppers.


Good luck with it,

Craig and Katherine Briggs

SN#68 - "Sangaris", Marina di Ragusa, Sicily (we're in sunny FL)


Re: [Amel] Headliner Glue

John Edmondson <jjjk12s@...>
 

Just a note to anyone with an older Amel that needs the vinyl replacing rather than re-gluing what is already there. The choice of vinyl is as important as the glue. I have had great success with Naugasoft whereas using the same techniques and 3M spray glue on another vinyl has failed in heat after a couple of seasons (tropics). Naugasoft claims to have "non-migrating" plasticizers (the stuff that makes the vinyl soft and pliable). I think this is the crucial difference when the vinyl gets hot due to sun on the deck.

Regards
John, Maramu, Popeye


On Monday, 4 November 2013 1:33 AM, "jm7graf@..." wrote:


What glue (mastic?) works on the old vinyl headliners?  I remember that sometime in the past year there was a post by someone who had found an effective way to stick the liner back to the ceiling on older Amels after the foam disintegrates.  Mine is in generally good shape but the port corner in the V is coming loose.




Re: [Amel] Anchor size Maramu 46

John Edmondson <jjjk12s@...>
 

James and Leah,

We changed a 45 lb CQR that our boat arrived with to a 60 lb Manson Supreme. It's roller bar touches the pulpit when it is snug but it fits ok. We have just returned from 3 months up the Far North Great Barrier Reef to Thursday Island with many nights on exposed anchorages surrounded by bommies. The anchor is a vast improvement and we trust it far more for a good nights sleep. 
John, Maramu  Popeye


On Sunday, 29 December 2013 5:21 PM, "j.lochhead@..." wrote:


Hi, we are a family that have just bought a Maramu 46 and plan on going cruising for a while.  One thing I am looking at upgrading is the anchor (currently cqr copy I think). We have not yet moved aboard and are a long way from the boat at the moment so my problem is I am not sure what size anchors will fit the bow roller.  Will be spending most of the time at anchor.

Thanks for any advice.  James & Leah





Re: [Amel] Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Ian,

On my last boat, I had a Stainless 10 MM X 80 Meters chain plus 100 meters of 2.5 inch anchor rode.

No jamming and... no piling.  Also had a Rocna and it kept my 46 footer away from all nasty bits.

The key, in my opinion is the "stainless" chain.  Galvanized will always pile.

GL & Happy New Year.

Jean-Pierre
"Boatless" for the moment.


On 29 Dec 2013, at 11:39, herbert lackner <herbert@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ian

We have 80 m 10 mm inox chain on our santorin and no problems with jamming or a pile up (i think because it is inox).  We use a rocna and never had problems with it.

Fair winds

Herbert
Kali Mera SN #120
Sukosan, croatia

Ps: Ian, i copied your autopilot mount :-) thx




Von Samsung Mobile gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Ian Park
Datum:29.12.2013 10:56 (GMT+01:00)
An: amelyachtowners@...
Betreff: [Amel] Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

 

Hi James and Leah

We bought our 46' Santorin this year and were surprised to find only 8mm chain plus the ubiquitous CQR. We changed up to a 10mm gypsy and 100m of 10mm chain. We brought the anchor with us from the previous boat - a Spade. It is a great anchor, very much better than a CQR and stows and deploys easily from the bow roller. It has the advantage of being very easy to disassemble for easy stowage in a locker if you need to secure it from theft while in a marina our hauled out.
Anyone else reading this thread with advice for us on our 100m chain - it piles up on itself in the locker and frequently jams once 40 metres are out. It also piles up on retrieval and blocks the hawse hole jamming the chain on the gypsy on deck. Has anyone found a way to get the chain to self store inside the chain locker?

Ian and Linda. SN 96 Ocean Hobo



Jean-Pierre Germain,
Chief Pilot, Cozuro Limited,
+44 7551 211 511
jp.germain@...
jgermain@...



Re: [Amel] Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

Herbert Lackner
 

Hi Ian

We have 80 m 10 mm inox chain on our santorin and no problems with jamming or a pile up (i think because it is inox).  We use a rocna and never had problems with it.

Fair winds

Herbert
Kali Mera SN #120
Sukosan, croatia

Ps: Ian, i copied your autopilot mount :-) thx




Von Samsung Mobile gesendet


-------- Ursprüngliche Nachricht --------
Von: Ian Park
Datum:29.12.2013 10:56 (GMT+01:00)
An: amelyachtowners@...
Betreff: [Amel] Re: Anchor size Maramu 46

 

Hi James and Leah

We bought our 46' Santorin this year and were surprised to find only 8mm chain plus the ubiquitous CQR. We changed up to a 10mm gypsy and 100m of 10mm chain. We brought the anchor with us from the previous boat - a Spade. It is a great anchor, very much better than a CQR and stows and deploys easily from the bow roller. It has the advantage of being very easy to disassemble for easy stowage in a locker if you need to secure it from theft while in a marina our hauled out.
Anyone else reading this thread with advice for us on our 100m chain - it piles up on itself in the locker and frequently jams once 40 metres are out. It also piles up on retrieval and blocks the hawse hole jamming the chain on the gypsy on deck. Has anyone found a way to get the chain to self store inside the chain locker?

Ian and Linda. SN 96 Ocean Hobo


Re: New to group

Ian Park
 

From my very limited experience of Amel I think an early decision might be around a 12v or 24 v system. We bought a Santorin with the 12v system and an additional prop shaft alternator ( which works very well when sailing). But we don't have a genset. But we don't have a freezer, air con, washing machine either. We love the SM 2000 which has all of these, but our way of cruising is fine without them and we anted a 14m boat.
So check out with the family what equipment you want to cruise with or without - I am guessing then that any that you listed will be more than adequate for the job. The build and engineering is pretty bulletproof.

Ian and Linda SN 96 Ocean Hobo