Date   
Re: Bow thruster seals

Davi Rozgonyi
 

Hey there put me down for 2 sets also please.... shipping to greece. How do I give you the info and payment? 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

Alan Leslie
 

Thank you Mark,

Very impressive

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

Scott SV Tengah
 

I can attest that the mainsail manual furling gearbox's larger, upper lip seal on my Amel54 was 45x58x7 mm OD had a machine shop remove the old bearings and seals and he called me to inform me that there was no way the 45x60x7 mm that I supplied was going to fit. Not believing him, I checked with my own eyes - 60mm was far too large.

If you can remove the manual furling gearbox first, you can probably see the text on your larger, upper lip seal as it's probably in decent condition since it's protected by the V ring seal. The fact that most other owners seem to confirm their OD is 60mm implies to me that you really should check your own seal dimensions before buying replacements.

FYI - my tapered bearing was 80% shattered and had rollers floating in what remained of the grease from the last time I checked it 18 months ago.  I'll be checking the seals far more often going forward.
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

Mark Erdos
 

Mark,

 

This is awesome. Thanks!!!

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark McGovern
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 6:30 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

 

Thanks for the information, Olivier.  Much appreciated!

As promised, here is the complete list of parts that I used to overhaul the Manual Mainsail Furler assembly on Super Maramu Cara Hull #440:

 

Bearings (ID x OD x Width):

1 x 32009 Tapered Roller Bearing; 45mm x 75mm x 20mm 

1 x 6005 Ball Bearing; 25mm x 47mm x 12mm

 

Oil Seals (aka Lip Seals): 

1 x Oil Seal; 45mm X 60mm X 7mm

1 x Oil Seal; 25mm X 33mm X 6mm  

1 x Oil Seal; 30mm x 40mm x 7mm

 

V-Ring Seal:

1 x V-Ring Shaft Seal VA-045; For Shaft Diameter 43mm-48mm; ID 40mm; OD 50mm; Width 9mm

 

O-Rings (Cross Section x ID):

1 x O-Ring 2mm x 94mm

1 x O-Ring 1.5mm x 62mm

 

Hardware:

4 x Socket Head Cap Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M6 x 50mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch

4 x Socket Head Cap Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M6 x 25mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch
1 x Set Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M5 x 6mm x 0.8 Thread Pitch


Comments and "Unusual" Tools Used:

  • Bearing Splitter/Puller Kit to remove the old bearings from the shaft.  This was especially needed for removing the rusted tapered roller bearing.
  • Hydraulic Press to press the shaft out of the housing.  It was not necessary as it did not require much force at all but I have it so I used it.
  • Hydraulic Press to press the bearings back onto the shaft.  Again, this was not necessary as I could have tapped them on with a hammer using the installation "tools" below.  In the field you can use some heat to expand the bearings (oven) and some cold to contract the shaft (freezer) to install the bearings.
  • "Tool" for mounting 32009 Tapered Roller Bearing:  Scrap piece of Stainless Steel Round Tube 51mm OD; 47.5mm ID (2.0" x 0.065") about 70mm long
  • "Tool" for mounting 6005 Ball Bearing:  Scrap piece of Aluminum Round Tube 31.8mm OD; 26.5mm ID (1.25" x 0.083") about 50mm long
  • Four (4) longer Socket Head Cap Screw; M6 x 65mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch were used to align and re-install the Delrin piece that goes around the winch socket.  They were replaced with the proper M6 x 50mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch screws.  The Delrin piece is a "press fit" into the furler housing.  Freeze the Delrin piece overnight before re-installing to shrink it and make it easier to re-install.  
  • Anti-seize (Tef-Gel) was used when re-installing the Stainless Bolts into the Aluminum housing to make it easier to disassemble in the future for me or the next owner.
  • The seals that I removed were all single lip (SC) seals. I'm sure you could use double lip (TC) seals for better sealing at only slightly higher cost.
  • All hardware was in good enough shape that I could have definitely re-used it.
  • Duane from Wanderer uploaded some great pics and information here that were a tremendous help to me:  https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/album?id=84576 


I did not add links to the specific parts that I purchased above since these links tend to change over time.  However, below is a list of some of the sources that I have used to purchase replacement components for this and other projects on my Super Maramu.  Oddly, some of the most affordable places that I found to buy bearings from are in the United Kingdom despite the fact that I live in the USA. Even when I factored in shipping costs.  All of these sites carry at least some of the better quality brands like SKF, FAG, Koyo, Timken, and NSK. I purchased SKF bearings.

 

Bearings:

 

Oil Seals:

 

V-Ring Seals:

 

O-Rings:

www.theoringstore.com (excellent selection and usually a low Minimum Order Quantity)

 

Hardware:


As many of you already know, the last three companies listed (McMaster, Grainger, and MSC) are big online "MRO" companies.  They carry pretty much all of the items you need for this project but for the most part you don't know what brand you are buying and the parts tend to cost higher than they do on the sites that I listed for the bearings, seals, and o-rings.

I hope this helps some of you gather all the parts, tools, and other bits you need to tackle this job.  Good luck!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: Annapolis Boat Show

Mike Ondra
 

Rob,

 

Pat (Shenanigans) is putting together a dinner Friday downtown at Magnia’s. He will undoubtedly have updates on specifics.

 

Some of us may not still be in town Friday evening, or may be interested in getting together several times. It would be nice to put faces to the names we see on this BB, and swap stories.

 

Aletes plans to be anchored at the mouth of Back Creek Thursday, off the Sailing School and Maritime Museum. If there is interest in another Amel gathering Thursday evening also, I suggest Davis’. Its on Back Creek near the Maritime Museum. Please advise.

 

In any case Aletes looks forward to visits from other Amelians at any time.

 

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Cell for texts: 610-442-7551

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hughes via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 5:13 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Annapolis Boat Show

 

So is there any official place and time we can all meet up?

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main Sail Furling Motor Issue

Mark McGovern
 

Thanks for the information, Olivier.  Much appreciated!

As promised, here is the complete list of parts that I used to overhaul the Manual Mainsail Furler assembly on Super Maramu Cara Hull #440:
 
Bearings (ID x OD x Width):
1 x 32009 Tapered Roller Bearing; 45mm x 75mm x 20mm 
1 x 6005 Ball Bearing; 25mm x 47mm x 12mm
 
Oil Seals (aka Lip Seals): 
1 x Oil Seal; 45mm X 60mm X 7mm
1 x Oil Seal; 25mm X 33mm X 6mm  
1 x Oil Seal; 30mm x 40mm x 7mm
 
V-Ring Seal:
1 x V-Ring Shaft Seal VA-045; For Shaft Diameter 43mm-48mm; ID 40mm; OD 50mm; Width 9mm
 
O-Rings (Cross Section x ID):
1 x O-Ring 2mm x 94mm
1 x O-Ring 1.5mm x 62mm
 
Hardware:
4 x Socket Head Cap Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M6 x 50mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch
4 x Socket Head Cap Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M6 x 25mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch
1 x Set Screw; 316L Stainless Steel; M5 x 6mm x 0.8 Thread Pitch

Comments and "Unusual" Tools Used:
  • Bearing Splitter/Puller Kit to remove the old bearings from the shaft.  This was especially needed for removing the rusted tapered roller bearing.
  • Hydraulic Press to press the shaft out of the housing.  It was not necessary as it did not require much force at all but I have it so I used it.
  • Hydraulic Press to press the bearings back onto the shaft.  Again, this was not necessary as I could have tapped them on with a hammer using the installation "tools" below.  In the field you can use some heat to expand the bearings (oven) and some cold to contract the shaft (freezer) to install the bearings.
  • "Tool" for mounting 32009 Tapered Roller Bearing:  Scrap piece of Stainless Steel Round Tube 51mm OD; 47.5mm ID (2.0" x 0.065") about 70mm long
  • "Tool" for mounting 6005 Ball Bearing:  Scrap piece of Aluminum Round Tube 31.8mm OD; 26.5mm ID (1.25" x 0.083") about 50mm long
  • Four (4) longer Socket Head Cap Screw; M6 x 65mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch were used to align and re-install the Delrin piece that goes around the winch socket.  They were replaced with the proper M6 x 50mm x 1.0 Thread Pitch screws.  The Delrin piece is a "press fit" into the furler housing.  Freeze the Delrin piece overnight before re-installing to shrink it and make it easier to re-install.  
  • Anti-seize (Tef-Gel) was used when re-installing the Stainless Bolts into the Aluminum housing to make it easier to disassemble in the future for me or the next owner.
  • The seals that I removed were all single lip (SC) seals. I'm sure you could use double lip (TC) seals for better sealing at only slightly higher cost.
  • All hardware was in good enough shape that I could have definitely re-used it.
  • Duane from Wanderer uploaded some great pics and information here that were a tremendous help to me:  https://amelyachtowners.groups.io/g/main/album?id=84576 

I did not add links to the specific parts that I purchased above since these links tend to change over time.  However, below is a list of some of the sources that I have used to purchase replacement components for this and other projects on my Super Maramu.  Oddly, some of the most affordable places that I found to buy bearings from are in the United Kingdom despite the fact that I live in the USA. Even when I factored in shipping costs.  All of these sites carry at least some of the better quality brands like SKF, FAG, Koyo, Timken, and NSK. I purchased SKF bearings.
 
Bearings:
 
Oil Seals:
 
V-Ring Seals:
 
O-Rings:
www.theoringstore.com (excellent selection and usually a low Minimum Order Quantity)
 
Hardware:

As many of you already know, the last three companies listed (McMaster, Grainger, and MSC) are big online "MRO" companies.  They carry pretty much all of the items you need for this project but for the most part you don't know what brand you are buying and the parts tend to cost higher than they do on the sites that I listed for the bearings, seals, and o-rings.

I hope this helps some of you gather all the parts, tools, and other bits you need to tackle this job.  Good luck!

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: Bow thruster seals

JOHN HAYES
 

Hi from Noumea 

We made replacements using wet suit material 

So far worked perfectly across a couple of thousand miles of the pacific

John Hayes 

NGA Waka 


On 26/09/2019, at 5:50 AM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Bob, facinating memories. It would have been 2009. As to bow thruster. On 299 there is open access from the bow thruster to the bilge beside the forward head. Any leak accumulates there. However I dont wait for that volume. I just have a look periodically at where the thruster tube comes through the hull. If there is the slightest trickle I replace the lip seal. However this time I found some water in the bilge when I went to remove the speed log transducer when it blocked as we sailed through floating pumice from an undersea eruption near Tonga. As i said before, it would be only the third time in 11 years I have done this between haulouts.

Kind regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 26 September 2019 at 04:07 rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Hi Danny,
I've wondered about this.  How do you spot water in the bow thruster?
Bob, KAIMI SM 429

Flashback:  Years ago (12?) our Santorin we were anchored near Ocean Pearl outside the Annapolis boat show.  Earlier I had mentioned that we always leave a note with our names and cell phone numbers near our helm.  Got a call from Danny as we were headed to our dingy from the show....a Pinky Schooner was on a rope rode and wandering around smacking into boats.....Danny had remembered this and located our number and called us.  The schooner had bent our lifeline tubing but we were able to prevent another attack (with his help) and warn other boats!  We've always left our number in the cockpit--actually had a plastic placard made up-- AND we use magic marker to put our cell numbers on the dingy transom.  

Re: Converting my Amel 54 to lithium batteries: what I did, what I like and what I don't like (after one year of full time live aboard use)

Sv Garulfo
 

ML disconnect relay: 
product number 7702B, rated 500A. I have one for each of the 2 batteries. The relays draw no current in ON or OFF state. There are wires to set the relay states depending on what the default state should be. In our setup, the wiring to the battery’s BMS ports is specified explicitly in the documentation so there is no head scratching to do. 


Solar:
We have produced about 100KWh a month historically (~140Ah@24V a day). We are having very good sun at the moment so I’ll measure a max production day today. The max Amps I saw going in was 36A in Curaçao last summer. Our production during the Pacific crossing, Gambier and southern Tuamotus in April-July was pretty poor with cloudy conditions and relatively low sun elevation.

Our wet locker doesn’t get wet. We are lucky to cruise in places were we don’t need foul weather clothes. We quickly vacuum packed and stowed those away. And the Amel cockpit helps with that. 

Yes, breakfast toasts, 2mins of microwave here and there to reheat food, boiling water in 60s or cooking smelly food outside on the portable induction stove. All good examples of how it changes life onboard. 

Long term storage or dock: 
I would say, if we are aboard at the dock, I would let the solar deal with the batteries and use shore power for the others appliances of required. If we are off the boat for a long time, we would just switch everything off and not keep the shore power on. We left the boat in Curaçao for 2months last year and with everything off, the batteries lost less than 5% SOC.

Best,
Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Rangiroa, French Polynesia 




On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 at 09:13, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:
Thomas, 

Thanks for the reply!

Regarding your ML disconnect relay, which model are you using? For their disconnect relays, I only see 120amp max
https://www.bluesea.com/products/category/37/Non-Critical_Load_Disconnects

Or did you use this charge disconnect? If so, any idea how I could use it with my system? 500amps may just be enough! The VE.BUS BMS load disconnect sends out 27v (more or less) when all is good and goes to open circuit when there is a problem with the batteries and the load needs to be disconnected. The other option, as someone suggested, is to buy THREE Victron BP-220 and attach one to each 25.8v pair. I presume that would give me 660 amps total?

Regarding your solar setup, any idea how many AH per day you average? Curious how that compares to our setup. We have a bit more rated capacity and we're doing parallel as noted before.  Also, do you have any concerns with your MPPT getting wet? We definitely use that wet locker for...wet items. 

The Victron Quattro also allows you to limit the input on both the 230v inputs. I leave the genset at 50amps but adjust the shore power as appropriate. That was very useful in Greece when we were "plugged into" someone's house circuit. Limiting it to 8 amps prevented constantly tripping their circuit breaker. :)

Regarding your shop vac'ing the engine room, we all get our kicks from somewhere I guess! My joy is in using the electric kettle and the microwave when I'm too lazy to do a proper meal and not having to fire up the genset.

To figure out SOC and charging voltage, I just played around. For example, my Mastervolt Alpha Pro2 set at 27.5v absorption will stop charging at about 90-93% SOC as reported on the Victron BMV-712 monitor. As you probably know, lifepo4 has very stable voltage until you hit the "knees" at near 0% SOC and 100% SOC. So you just have to play with it. I bet at 26.8v absorption, it'd be just about right for long term storage/docking.

I probably sound like a Victron rep, too, but like you, I just continued with choices made prior. My ecosystem lock-in with Victron started with the BlueSolar MPPT, which ironically I don't love!

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

Re: Annapolis Boat Show

Rob Hughes
 

So is there any official place and time we can all meet up?

Re: Lithium and the "first mover" dilemma

Paul Osterberg
 

Thomas, I considering converting this winter to Li batteries, From Ev Powers I got an offer
for Winstone cells  24X 130 Ah i.e 390 Ah 24 for 5200 Euro including BMS. My old Victron 24/70/3000 combined charger inverter can be re programmed,Victron solar MPPT controllers I believe can be re programmed, but no big deal to buy two new <300 Euro for two.. The alternator might need a new regulator say another 600 Euro. miscellaneous say total 6000 Euro add 1000 Euro for unforeseen . should not be fare from that number to convert I believe. The big question will it last for 3000 cycles or more? 
The reason for having 3x130 Ah is if one or more cells go bad I still have 260 Ah capacity. 
Paul on SYKerpa SM#259 Lagos Portugal

Re: Lithium and the "first mover" dilemma

Scott SV Tengah
 
Edited

I think the key is to design the system effectively to avoid battery killing events: 

1) Overvoltage
2) Undervoltage
3) Overtemperature

You probably noticed that the subtext of my long post was mostly "what can I do so I do not kill these expensive batteries??"

I would argue that lifepo4 users today are not early adopters. The technology has been around since 1996, so over 20 years. Cruisers, in general, are understandably conservative and we're the same. If one just wants a simple system that you don't have to plan out and can take user error and keep going, lead is probably still the way to go.

The benefits of lithium were just too numerous for us to consider buying another set of lead batteries that may last two years and I don't mind a little advance planning/thinking to ensure we don't kill our lifepo4 batteries prematurely. But we're also realistic and I am confident I can replace the batteries with a set of lead acid if we're stuck in the middle of nowhere and need new batteries. It just takes knowing your chargers.

But you're right, if they die prematurely, my tone may be very different. That said, I've heard people tell me, "Yeah, you may like your furling main, just wait until you're in a storm and it jams on you - your tone will change then." That hasn't happened, but I guess I can't prove a negative.

You have to decide for yourself if the reward is worth the risk.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

Re: Converting my Amel 54 to lithium batteries: what I did, what I like and what I don't like (after one year of full time live aboard use)

Scott SV Tengah
 

Thomas, 

Thanks for the reply!

Regarding your ML disconnect relay, which model are you using? For their disconnect relays, I only see 120amp max
https://www.bluesea.com/products/category/37/Non-Critical_Load_Disconnects

Or did you use this charge disconnect? If so, any idea how I could use it with my system? 500amps may just be enough! The VE.BUS BMS load disconnect sends out 27v (more or less) when all is good and goes to open circuit when there is a problem with the batteries and the load needs to be disconnected. The other option, as someone suggested, is to buy THREE Victron BP-220 and attach one to each 25.8v pair. I presume that would give me 660 amps total?

Regarding your solar setup, any idea how many AH per day you average? Curious how that compares to our setup. We have a bit more rated capacity and we're doing parallel as noted before.  Also, do you have any concerns with your MPPT getting wet? We definitely use that wet locker for...wet items. 

The Victron Quattro also allows you to limit the input on both the 230v inputs. I leave the genset at 50amps but adjust the shore power as appropriate. That was very useful in Greece when we were "plugged into" someone's house circuit. Limiting it to 8 amps prevented constantly tripping their circuit breaker. :)

Regarding your shop vac'ing the engine room, we all get our kicks from somewhere I guess! My joy is in using the electric kettle and the microwave when I'm too lazy to do a proper meal and not having to fire up the genset.

To figure out SOC and charging voltage, I just played around. For example, my Mastervolt Alpha Pro2 set at 27.5v absorption will stop charging at about 90-93% SOC as reported on the Victron BMV-712 monitor. As you probably know, lifepo4 has very stable voltage until you hit the "knees" at near 0% SOC and 100% SOC. So you just have to play with it. I bet at 26.8v absorption, it'd be just about right for long term storage/docking.

I probably sound like a Victron rep, too, but like you, I just continued with choices made prior. My ecosystem lock-in with Victron started with the BlueSolar MPPT, which ironically I don't love!

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com

Re: Bow thruster seals

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Absolutely right Mark. Sorry I wasnt clear enough. Talking at cross purposes they call it.

Regards

Danny

On 26 September 2019 at 04:53 Mark McGovern <mfmcgovern@...> wrote:

Bob,

I'm pretty sure Danny is referring to the 60mm x 80mm x 12mm lip seal for the Bowthruster tube, not for the one for the Bowthruster propeller.

This one:

  
--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: Bow thruster seals

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bob, facinating memories. It would have been 2009. As to bow thruster. On 299 there is open access from the bow thruster to the bilge beside the forward head. Any leak accumulates there. However I dont wait for that volume. I just have a look periodically at where the thruster tube comes through the hull. If there is the slightest trickle I replace the lip seal. However this time I found some water in the bilge when I went to remove the speed log transducer when it blocked as we sailed through floating pumice from an undersea eruption near Tonga. As i said before, it would be only the third time in 11 years I have done this between haulouts.

Kind regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 26 September 2019 at 04:07 rossirossix4 <rossidesigngroup@...> wrote:

Hi Danny,
I've wondered about this.  How do you spot water in the bow thruster?
Bob, KAIMI SM 429

Flashback:  Years ago (12?) our Santorin we were anchored near Ocean Pearl outside the Annapolis boat show.  Earlier I had mentioned that we always leave a note with our names and cell phone numbers near our helm.  Got a call from Danny as we were headed to our dingy from the show....a Pinky Schooner was on a rope rode and wandering around smacking into boats.....Danny had remembered this and located our number and called us.  The schooner had bent our lifeline tubing but we were able to prevent another attack (with his help) and warn other boats!  We've always left our number in the cockpit--actually had a plastic placard made up-- AND we use magic marker to put our cell numbers on the dingy transom.  

Re: Lithium and the "first mover" dilemma

Mark McGovern
 

Tom,

You are not alone in your trepidation as to when to pull the trigger on LiFePO4.  I am right there with you.  I have read the posts from Scott (Tengah), Paul (Fortuna II), Thomas (Garulfo) and Peregrinus with rapt interest.  Thank you all for sharing the details of your setups and your experiences.  It has been truly invaluable.  I have also consumed as much information as I can about the technology outside of this forum. 

Thankfully, I somewhat forced myself into waiting a few years to make the switch.  Right after I purchased Cara about 2 years ago I found that I needed to replace the entire bank of 12 batteries.  At the time the whole boat was new to me and I had so much else to learn about that I knew I was not ready to commit the time, energy, and $$$ necessary to research, learn, and install a whole new electrical generating/storing/inverting system.  So I purchased twelve inexpensive Deka Marine Master DC31DT wet cell lead acid batteries for a whopping total of ~$1500.  This relatively minor but not inconsequential investment forced me to wait and bought me some time to research and learn.  Thanks to the help of the guys above and others sharing their experiences here and other places I think I will be ready when the time comes to replace my reliable wet cell lead acid dinosaurs in a few more years. I really can't wait - but I will.

--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: Why has the Amel 54 no boom vang?

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Arno;

I have my own assumptions as to why the 54 does not have a vang but do not know the exact reason why Amel chose not install one.

As far as usage, we typically rig a preventer that has lines running back to the cockpit and use the secondary winches to adjust the preventer from the cockpit and therefore eliminate the need for some one going out on deck. This gives us full sail shape control even with the boom sheeted out past the end of the traveler. 

Respectfully;


Mohammad And Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099

On Sep 25, 2019, at 4:24 PM, Arno Luijten via Groups.Io <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Dear forum,

Our Amel 54 is the first sailboat we own that lacks a boom vang. Why is this? I notice the A55 and the A64 both do have a vang and I think I've seen some SMs with a vang as well.
How do you limit excessive twist in the main at broad reach. Rigging a preventer may be a way to do this by seems to be unpractical as you will need to adjust it in combination with the main sheet making that almost a two person job.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

Re: OG Maramu Mizzen Sheet Cars

sbmesasailor
 

Miles,

I delivered the entire car assembly to the machine shop, explained how it was supposed to work and they machined a new pin and disk which worked perfectly.  (actually I could have several made for the same price, so I did).

Dennis

Re: Bow thruster seals

Mark McGovern
 
Edited

Bob,

I'm pretty sure Danny is referring to the 60mm x 80mm x 12mm lip seal for the Bowthruster tube, not the one for the Bowthruster propeller.

This one:

  
--
Mark McGovern
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD USA

Re: Lithium and the "first mover" dilemma

Paul Brown
 

Hi Tom, 

I can share my experience using the Mastervolt MLI Ultra 24/5000 x4  = 720ah and the range of MV chargers, including MV solar charger and MV management system on board Fortuna for the past 5 years, I have found it to be an truly amazing experience after owning 5 other vessels over the last 16 years and 100% reliable.

Also with the support from mastervolt providing peace of mind and as they have suggested the batteries could last 20+ years by their account with ample cycles specified, If this is to be the case I expect it to be a most realistic and worth while investment compared to previous technology and the most economic outlay long term.

I would suggest you should consider speaking with a reliable mastervolt technician and ask questions.

All the best 

Regards Paul - Fortuna II 55/17


On 25 Sep 2019, at 6:06 pm, Thomas Kleman <lorient422@...> wrote:

I've read with great interest the insightful posts of the group on this topic. Like most Amelians, I envision L'ORIENT (SM2K 422) with a lithium battery system in the future. But when ? This space seems to be still evolving and the costs of conversion are intimidating. A few recent posts included conversion costs (others have not). More than $20k is the placeholder I keep in my head. And the missing data point in all these impressive technical posts is the 600 pound gorilla in the room....how long does all this stuff last ? While saving fuel and running A/C off batteries is mind blowing stuff, $20k buys 8 lead acid battery banks (of 12 each). The health of the lithium batteries seems to depend on quite a bit of peripheral technology and there are undeniably some unknowns out there that impact this question. I'm sure the tone of the very comprehensive "one year out" update would change if the batteries failed in 4 years. Anyway, I would count myself in the group wanting to be a late adopter vs a last adopter. Wondering how others perceive this ?

Tom and Kirstin
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K 422
Bocas del Toro Panama

Re: Bow thruster seals

rossirossix4
 

Hi Danny,
I've wondered about this.  How do you spot water in the bow thruster?
Bob, KAIMI SM 429

Flashback:  Years ago (12?) our Santorin we were anchored near Ocean Pearl outside the Annapolis boat show.  Earlier I had mentioned that we always leave a note with our names and cell phone numbers near our helm.  Got a call from Danny as we were headed to our dingy from the show....a Pinky Schooner was on a rope rode and wandering around smacking into boats.....Danny had remembered this and located our number and called us.  The schooner had bent our lifeline tubing but we were able to prevent another attack (with his help) and warn other boats!  We've always left our number in the cockpit--actually had a plastic placard made up-- AND we use magic marker to put our cell numbers on the dingy transom.