Date   

Re: After market engine mounts ? #replacement

rossirossix4
 
Edited

Hi Paul,
I believe the 200 refers to a capacity of 200 kg.  When Didier, an experienced Amel mechanic in Le Marin replaced our original mounts for our 2004 Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine he suggested increasing the capacity of original Vetus mounts to the 300 kg model, Yanmar part number 120149-08441 -- https://photos.app.goo.gl/sZ5QSSX4HzJTtexh9 .  He told me that he felt it was a better match for the engine, especially with the extra weight of our heavier Leece-Neville alternators and double v-belt assemblies. Didier told us that it was possible that more vibration would be transmitted by these mounts but I did not detect any increase and he agreed when we sea-trialed the new mounts and (more importantly) his engine alignment.  The new mounts looked much the same as the original Vetus mounts except they were a bit "beefier".  Didier can be reached at vaguesca@... (best to use French).
Bob and Suzanne, KAIMI  SM429


Re: Pasarelle / swim ladder SM

David Kurtz
 

I have mine set up now and I’ll be on my SM2 on Friday.  I’ll send photos.  I am also going to make a new plank for the passerelle because mine is coming apart. I’ll send along a dimensioned drawing.  (Might be a week or two.)
--
Dave Kurtz
SM2 #380
S/V Celtic Cross

Detroit, Michigan


Re: Turbo question

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Question??? Are you sure of the engine desig?  TMD22 is the usual engine , not the TAMD...

Jean-Pierre Germain, Eleuthera, SM007, OPUA,NZ


On 24/09/2020, at 10:10 AM, Rob Hughes via groups.io <svluna01@...> wrote:


<Screenshot_20200923-170405.png>


This is my 6 yr old turbo from Volvo tamd22 after being cleaned. I have a loss of rpm only able to get 2200. Is this rust color normal? I'm wondering about all the pitting. I have a new turbo on order. Just want to see if I have another issue that needs addressing. And if anyone has pictures of their turbo after cleaning could you share that please.


Re: After market engine mounts ? #replacement

eric freedman
 

I always use Factory supplied parts for both the engine and generator.
With respect to the engine mounts do the mounting holes line up with
your existing mounts.
Do you have the alignment tool for your engine?
Are you just changing 2 mounts?
Fair winds,
Eric
SM 376

On September 23, 2020 at 2:32 PM "Paul Guenette via groups.io" <paulguenette@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am looking at replacing the engine mounts on my 2004 Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine.

The current Yanmar mounts, (on the fuel and oil filter side), are labeled 200 which I believe would mean they are Yanmar part number  YAN 129670-08351.

There are other companies like R & D  and Poly Flex that make after market  engine mounts.

Have any of you tried any of the aftermarket engine mounts ?

If so, what has your experience been ?

Thank you.

Paul

Aramis, SM 2000,  444

Comox, BC, Canada




 


Re: Pasarelle / swim ladder SM

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Alan, I have them and if you dont get help elsewhere I can pull it all out and photograph it for you. Let me know.

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

Mangonui

New Zealand

On 24 September 2020 at 12:27 Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

Hi all SM owners,

Our swim ladder is just that, we have the wheels and the deck step end but none of the parts to make it into a usable pasarelle.
Does anyone have the specifications for the original pasarelle board and handrail tubes for the swim ladder on an SM?
Even some clear  pictures would be good.

Thanks
Cheers
Alan
ELYSE SM437


Pasarelle / swim ladder SM

Alan Leslie
 

Hi all SM owners,

Our swim ladder is just that, we have the wheels and the deck step end but none of the parts to make it into a usable pasarelle.
Does anyone have the specifications for the original pasarelle board and handrail tubes for the swim ladder on an SM?
Even some clear  pictures would be good.

Thanks
Cheers
Alan
ELYSE SM437


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Scott,

Don't get me wrong. I'm not against Lithium. I'm just trying to bring some nuance to the many über-happy stories about Lithium. These things are bloody expensive and people should know what they are getting into.
Actually I'm really happy that you bought Lithium because that means you can tell me about how this works in the long term 😎.

In the electric car world you see similar discussions about charging speed and charging level. People are now starting to find out that these batteries are degrading much faster when you are a super-charging junkie and keep pushing it to 100% SOC
So if you buy a used Tesla from a predominately home charging person that doesn't use his car as racing vehicle you are much better off then when you buy a mostly supercharged race-car. There is a reason Tesla keeps all these metrics on their cars.
Latest EV cars are charging with more then 2C (250 kW) using water cooled charging cables. I really wonder how that will work out on the long term.

Anyway I don't want to talk anyone out of Lithium and if my use case was different I probably would have bough an all singing and dancing Lithium pack by now. But I would expect a 8-10 year lifespan of it.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


Turbo question

Rob Hughes
 



This is my 6 yr old turbo from Volvo tamd22 after being cleaned. I have a loss of rpm only able to get 2200. Is this rust color normal? I'm wondering about all the pitting. I have a new turbo on order. Just want to see if I have another issue that needs addressing. And if anyone has pictures of their turbo after cleaning could you share that please.


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Scott SV Tengah
 

Arno,

My Victron BMS reports cell level voltage down to 0.01v. I can view it via bluetooth and have seen it vary by 0.01v.  I can attest that when I had an imbalance, up to 90% SOC, the cells had the exact same voltage, down to 0.01v. Above that, the variance reared its ugly head. This is not theory - this is my experience living with this system fulltime for 2 years. So I would be very skeptical of any active balancer that has the same resolution as you may be unknowingly exacerbating an imbalance by relying on marketing promises.

If I haven't stated before, I do agree that if you want a system that requires no planning and very little monitoring aside from making sure you don't go below 50% SOC, then lead batteries are fine. If I were in your position and spent most of my time plugged into marinas, I would probably NOT get lithium even if someone paid me to take it. 

One guy may have had his gel batteries last 9 years, but longevity is not the main reason we got lithium. As we speak, I am running the dishwasher and washing machine and the admiral just turned on the microwave - all on battery/inverter. The continuous draw is around 160amps and the voltage is quite stable. Because of the huge boost in charge efficiency compared to lead, I won't be running the genset to recharge the batteries, either. Our solar is more than enough.

But as economists like to say - there is no free lunch. Lithium requires planning and thinking prior to implementation and if you plan it right, it is set it and forget it. I am not quite there but moving in that direction slowly. The same thing applies if you compare roller electric in-mast furling vs. manual stacking mainsails. The former requires some thinking but, at least to me, is well worth the effort. For my use case, lithium is the same. 

I hope my contribution to this forum is useful in that those who are off-grid and would rather not run the genset all the time are given some useful info that they can use to plan their systems. It is beyond my risk tolerance to try to assemble battery cells and rely on them in the middle of the ocean, so I went with a mostly-one-brand solution that allows me to monitor every single of the 24 cells via bluetooth and if a cell fails, quickly remove that battery pair and continue on with my trip. Luckily I haven't had to do that yet.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 9:34 AM Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:
Hi Scott,

Typically good BMS-es can measure at 0.01 resolution. So even at lower SOC you will be able to see differences. Charging up to 100% can be postponed longer with continuous balancing. Active balancing means you are using the charge of the fuller cell to charge the less full cell. That improves the speed of balancing and prevents useless heat generation.
Obviously it's not as world of difference all together but if you design a BMS for lithium you may as well make it top notch. The system is expensive enough to push it to the limits of longevity.
Your battery-monitor has a easier life with lithium as the charge/discharge losses are far less so it will keep an accurate reading longer, especially if you can set the Peukert value yourself.

If you are less concerned about those things than I think the Battle Born 24V batteries are a good choice, just do not expect 10-15 years of life. If you do achieve 10-15 years you can always celebrate at that time, but at least you will not be disappointed.
As said before and as said by others as well; there is still so much development in this area that I prefer to wait a few years to see what the next best will be. I just read something about a person managing 9 years on some Gel batteries so it's not that all other chemistries are useless.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Scott,

Typically good BMS-es can measure at 0.01 resolution. So even at lower SOC you will be able to see differences. Charging up to 100% can be postponed longer with continuous balancing. Active balancing means you are using the charge of the fuller cell to charge the less full cell. That improves the speed of balancing and prevents useless heat generation.
Obviously it's not as world of difference all together but if you design a BMS for lithium you may as well make it top notch. The system is expensive enough to push it to the limits of longevity.
Your battery-monitor has a easier life with lithium as the charge/discharge losses are far less so it will keep an accurate reading longer, especially if you can set the Peukert value yourself.

If you are less concerned about those things than I think the Battle Born 24V batteries are a good choice, just do not expect 10-15 years of life. If you do achieve 10-15 years you can always celebrate at that time, but at least you will not be disappointed.
As said before and as said by others as well; there is still so much development in this area that I prefer to wait a few years to see what the next best will be. I just read something about a person managing 9 years on some Gel batteries so it's not that all other chemistries are useless.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


After market engine mounts ? #replacement

Paul Guenette
 

Hello,

I am looking at replacing the engine mounts on my 2004 Yanmar 4JH3-HTE engine.

The current Yanmar mounts, (on the fuel and oil filter side), are labeled 200 which I believe would mean they are Yanmar part number  YAN 129670-08351.

There are other companies like R & D  and Poly Flex that make after market  engine mounts.

Have any of you tried any of the aftermarket engine mounts ?

If so, what has your experience been ?

Thank you.

Paul

Aramis, SM 2000,  444

Comox, BC, Canada




Re: Bow Thruster Amel 54

 

Doug, 

Thanks. 

The A-54 bow thruster controls went through several changes during the production of the 54. This is great information for some 54 owners. Thanks again!

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 12:56 PM Porter McRoberts via groups.io <portermcroberts=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Doug. 
Very helpful. A great addition. Thank you

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206

On Sep 23, 2020, at 7:43 AM, Doug Smith via groups.io <dugsmith98=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:



I have spent the last couple of days trying to debug the side-power bow thruster on my boat, and the up/down 4 relay system.  My motor for up/down had a bad bearing and was blowing a fuse.  It appears to also have cooked a relay or two.

In my efforts at fixing, I redrew some of the electrical diagrams to make them a bit easier to follow, and thought it might help some of the others who have a similar problem.

Mine has the magnetic switches, instead of the pushbutton stop switches, and importantly, they are ‘normally closed’ switches, that open when the thruster is in the required position.

 

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Deltaville, VA USA

<Bow Thruster electrical diagram.pdf>


Re: Bow Thruster Amel 54

Porter McRoberts
 

Doug. 
Very helpful. A great addition. Thank you

Porter McRoberts 
S/V IBIS A54-152
WhatsApp:+1 754 265 2206
Www.fouribis.net

On Sep 23, 2020, at 7:43 AM, Doug Smith via groups.io <dugsmith98@...> wrote:



I have spent the last couple of days trying to debug the side-power bow thruster on my boat, and the up/down 4 relay system.  My motor for up/down had a bad bearing and was blowing a fuse.  It appears to also have cooked a relay or two.

In my efforts at fixing, I redrew some of the electrical diagrams to make them a bit easier to follow, and thought it might help some of the others who have a similar problem.

Mine has the magnetic switches, instead of the pushbutton stop switches, and importantly, they are ‘normally closed’ switches, that open when the thruster is in the required position.

 

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Deltaville, VA USA

<Bow Thruster electrical diagram.pdf>


Bow Thruster Amel 54

Doug Smith
 

I have spent the last couple of days trying to debug the side-power bow thruster on my boat, and the up/down 4 relay system.  My motor for up/down had a bad bearing and was blowing a fuse.  It appears to also have cooked a relay or two.

In my efforts at fixing, I redrew some of the electrical diagrams to make them a bit easier to follow, and thought it might help some of the others who have a similar problem.

Mine has the magnetic switches, instead of the pushbutton stop switches, and importantly, they are ‘normally closed’ switches, that open when the thruster is in the required position.

 

 

Doug Smith

S/V Aventura, Amel 54-113

Deltaville, VA USA


locked Re: Batteries starting to get weak - MMM - What to do -

Scott SV Tengah
 

Does anyone understand "continuous cell balancing", because I don't?

When I have had unbalanced batteries, the batteries are look perfectly balanced until you get to 90% + SOC. This is because of the flat voltage curve of lifepo4. Above that, the imbalances show up. How does an active balancer reliably detect an imbalance continuously when things look perfect below 90%? Through coulomb counting to determine amps out to see if the imbalance shows up during discharge? That wouldn't be reliable as cells age at different rates. 

Note that imbalanced batteries generally just reduce your total capacity until the imbalance is corrected. This is because if one of the 4 cells in the battery see an overvoltage condition, the BMS should stop charging altogether, even though the other cells could still accept more charge. Charging is restarted once the overvoltage cell drops below the high voltage threshold, either through a resistor to draw charge from it or a method to transfer that excess voltage to the other cells. Then the charging resumes. The charging will start and stop multiple times as during the cell balancing process. I have seem this before on my Victron setup and have been assured by Victron techs and my own research that it is totally normal.

The desire for active cell balancing seems a bit misplaced. Even if somehow they detect cell imbalances when there is no voltage difference, you still need to fully charge once in a while to reset the battery monitor as I believe all battery monitors use (amps in - amps out) to determine SOC and as batteries age, that needs to be recalibrated if you want any sort of accuracy. So solving the former problem still leaves the latter.


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Richiesta libera pratica sanitaria SY Euploia

ste.dente
 

Stefania Dente


Re: servicing mainsail fuller and outhaul

ngtnewington Newington
 

Thanks Bill, mine never had a cover.

Great I am on the right track.

Nick


On 23 Sep 2020, at 16:47, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Nick,

<image.png>
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
  
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:45 AM CW Bill Rouse via groups.io <brouse=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Nick,

Maybe I was not clear...I was talking about the forward-facing cover that you fabricated. I think all the 54's I have seen have a loose-fitting cover on the forward end...maybe yours was lost, or maybe Amel did not have one for the early 54s.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
  
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:35 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill,

So the GRP cover was always there. I took it off and bedded it back with silicone. The odd thing is that the front end was left open for spay to go straight in. I decided to glue on a pvc fabric and try and make it as close to water tight as possible but with the drain hole. We shall have to see, but I think it will help especially as the gear is well covered in grease. In heavy rain it is possible some water might come down the shaft but again I think not really.

I will cut open the pvc front to have a look after I have been out sailing a while and report. This is the before photo.<IMG_3987.jpeg>

Ironically the worm gear on this was fine but a bit of an eyesore and a mess. 

Nick

S/Y Amelia Aml 54-019


On 23 Sep 2020, at 16:18, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Nick,

I thought all A-54s had a cover where you made one, but maybe it was later model 54s. I do have an issue about the cover I have seen on 54s and that is there is not a good seal around the circumference of the end-cover to the motor/gearbox housing.

I believe that there is no way that sealing this will create too much heat.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
  
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 5:54 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<IMG_3990.jpeg><IMG_3991.jpeg><IMG_3992.jpeg>

I recently serviced both main furling and outhaul gears and motors. I found the aluminium shaft on the furling motor very difficult to remove. It was soaked 48  hours in diesel and then pressed out with a hydraulic press, but it took a lot of pressure.  Eventually it came free. Whilst the outhaul shaft came up and out with some gentle taps, being stainless steel! I think that this mast furler should be pulled apart more often to avoid the aluminium seizing in place, maybe every two years, just drop it, move the shaft up and down, check the gear box and lip seal. Alternatively have a stainless shaft made.

Fortunately I had a spare gear box on board as one was in very poor shape with bad corrosion on the aluminium. However all went well and both are back and fully functional with new shaft seals. Although I now do not have a spare aboard. Something that I would like to have if I go off the beaten track.

I decided to make a cover out of some PVC I had kicking around to protect the boom furling one from the elements, as shown in the pictures. There is a drain hole at the bottom of the GRP cover in case some water gets in. It is quite small maybe 8mm. It could be widened to say 12mm if required.

Has anyone tried this? If so was it a success or does it just deprive the gear box of ventilation?

Nick back in the UK with Amelia ashore in Leros, Greece

AML 54-019











Re: In case you missed the QSails ZOOM

Cathy & Guillaume
 

Brilliant! Thank you Bill. These zoom meetings are incredibly valuable!

Guillaume
Carpathia III - SM2K #293
Now in Athens


Re: servicing mainsail fuller and outhaul

 

Nick,

image.png
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:45 AM CW Bill Rouse via groups.io <brouse=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Nick,

Maybe I was not clear...I was talking about the forward-facing cover that you fabricated. I think all the 54's I have seen have a loose-fitting cover on the forward end...maybe yours was lost, or maybe Amel did not have one for the early 54s.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:35 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill,

So the GRP cover was always there. I took it off and bedded it back with silicone. The odd thing is that the front end was left open for spay to go straight in. I decided to glue on a pvc fabric and try and make it as close to water tight as possible but with the drain hole. We shall have to see, but I think it will help especially as the gear is well covered in grease. In heavy rain it is possible some water might come down the shaft but again I think not really.

I will cut open the pvc front to have a look after I have been out sailing a while and report. This is the before photo.

Ironically the worm gear on this was fine but a bit of an eyesore and a mess. 

Nick

S/Y Amelia Aml 54-019


On 23 Sep 2020, at 16:18, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Nick,

I thought all A-54s had a cover where you made one, but maybe it was later model 54s. I do have an issue about the cover I have seen on 54s and that is there is not a good seal around the circumference of the end-cover to the motor/gearbox housing.

I believe that there is no way that sealing this will create too much heat.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 5:54 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<IMG_3990.jpeg><IMG_3991.jpeg><IMG_3992.jpeg>

I recently serviced both main furling and outhaul gears and motors. I found the aluminium shaft on the furling motor very difficult to remove. It was soaked 48  hours in diesel and then pressed out with a hydraulic press, but it took a lot of pressure.  Eventually it came free. Whilst the outhaul shaft came up and out with some gentle taps, being stainless steel! I think that this mast furler should be pulled apart more often to avoid the aluminium seizing in place, maybe every two years, just drop it, move the shaft up and down, check the gear box and lip seal. Alternatively have a stainless shaft made.

Fortunately I had a spare gear box on board as one was in very poor shape with bad corrosion on the aluminium. However all went well and both are back and fully functional with new shaft seals. Although I now do not have a spare aboard. Something that I would like to have if I go off the beaten track.

I decided to make a cover out of some PVC I had kicking around to protect the boom furling one from the elements, as shown in the pictures. There is a drain hole at the bottom of the GRP cover in case some water gets in. It is quite small maybe 8mm. It could be widened to say 12mm if required.

Has anyone tried this? If so was it a success or does it just deprive the gear box of ventilation?

Nick back in the UK with Amelia ashore in Leros, Greece

AML 54-019






Re: servicing mainsail fuller and outhaul

 

Nick,

Maybe I was not clear...I was talking about the forward-facing cover that you fabricated. I think all the 54's I have seen have a loose-fitting cover on the forward end...maybe yours was lost, or maybe Amel did not have one for the early 54s.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:35 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bill,

So the GRP cover was always there. I took it off and bedded it back with silicone. The odd thing is that the front end was left open for spay to go straight in. I decided to glue on a pvc fabric and try and make it as close to water tight as possible but with the drain hole. We shall have to see, but I think it will help especially as the gear is well covered in grease. In heavy rain it is possible some water might come down the shaft but again I think not really.

I will cut open the pvc front to have a look after I have been out sailing a while and report. This is the before photo.

Ironically the worm gear on this was fine but a bit of an eyesore and a mess. 

Nick

S/Y Amelia Aml 54-019


On 23 Sep 2020, at 16:18, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:


Nick,

I thought all A-54s had a cover where you made one, but maybe it was later model 54s. I do have an issue about the cover I have seen on 54s and that is there is not a good seal around the circumference of the end-cover to the motor/gearbox housing.

I believe that there is no way that sealing this will create too much heat.

Bill
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 5:54 AM ngtnewington Newington via groups.io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
<IMG_3990.jpeg><IMG_3991.jpeg><IMG_3992.jpeg>

I recently serviced both main furling and outhaul gears and motors. I found the aluminium shaft on the furling motor very difficult to remove. It was soaked 48  hours in diesel and then pressed out with a hydraulic press, but it took a lot of pressure.  Eventually it came free. Whilst the outhaul shaft came up and out with some gentle taps, being stainless steel! I think that this mast furler should be pulled apart more often to avoid the aluminium seizing in place, maybe every two years, just drop it, move the shaft up and down, check the gear box and lip seal. Alternatively have a stainless shaft made.

Fortunately I had a spare gear box on board as one was in very poor shape with bad corrosion on the aluminium. However all went well and both are back and fully functional with new shaft seals. Although I now do not have a spare aboard. Something that I would like to have if I go off the beaten track.

I decided to make a cover out of some PVC I had kicking around to protect the boom furling one from the elements, as shown in the pictures. There is a drain hole at the bottom of the GRP cover in case some water gets in. It is quite small maybe 8mm. It could be widened to say 12mm if required.

Has anyone tried this? If so was it a success or does it just deprive the gear box of ventilation?

Nick back in the UK with Amelia ashore in Leros, Greece

AML 54-019





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