Date   

Dessalator Watermaker 24 volt motor

 

Thomas,

Thanks for your posting. Did you try Dessalator.com for these brushes? I think this is important to know.


CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar


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On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 2:00 PM Sv Garulfo <svgarulfo@...> wrote:
Hello 

There are 4 brushes on the motor. They are held in place by rubber covers that you unscrew. 
I find it easier to bring the motor out of the engine room to work on the brushes. 

I cleaned the carbon dust twice in the space of a couple of weeks and eventually replaced the brushes. Looking at the new ones, I noticed the old ones were slightly cracked lengthways, which could have explained why they wouldn’t slide so freely in their housing and would eventually lose conductivity. I guess i could have sanded them down a little to fix the issue. 

We sourced the brushes here:
vendite@...

Product code SP1812MC50

They’re not cheap (about €15 each) and they had a minimum order of €180 and would only
ship dhl which was €60. The company was a bit of a pain to work with, as they usually only work with companies, not individuals. 

We got a discount for ordering 3 sets of 4 brushes n springs, and still have a spare one.


Hope that helps

Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Nuku Hiva, Marquesas, French Polynesia 




On 4 Feb 2020, at 13:24, ofer magen <ofermagen@...> wrote:

Hallo,
I have the same problem now with the 24v motor not working.
Can you please explain where the brushes are and how to remove them?
Thanks, 
Ofer
SV Alba
Amel 54 #160
Cyprus 


Re: ZF25M shifting problem

Brent Cameron
 

I don’t have an Amel yet but I had similar issues with my old Yanmar and it turned out to be the cable. You might want to disconnect it and try the shifter manually to rule it out. 

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Feb 15, 2020, 6:29 AM -0500, Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica <oliver.henrichsen@...>, wrote:
Hello,

Did you check your gear oil? 

Any water in it? 

Did you service the gear oil cooler? 

Oliver from Vela Nautica Amel54 #39 
Martinique 

On Sat, Feb 8, 2020, 09:12 Arnold Mente via Groups.Io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Amelians,
 
does anyone already have the problem that the shifting of the ZF25M gearbox is very difficult? It has occurred and the boat has not been used.
Would be grateful someone knows the problem so that I can initiate the necessary measures from a distance. The Morse switch is checked and maintained.
 
Thank you very much
Arnold
 

--
SY Zephyr SM203


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada


Re: ZF25M shifting problem

Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

Hello,

Did you check your gear oil? 

Any water in it? 

Did you service the gear oil cooler? 

Oliver from Vela Nautica Amel54 #39 
Martinique 

On Sat, Feb 8, 2020, 09:12 Arnold Mente via Groups.Io <Arnold.mente=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Amelians,
 
does anyone already have the problem that the shifting of the ZF25M gearbox is very difficult? It has occurred and the boat has not been used.
Would be grateful someone knows the problem so that I can initiate the necessary measures from a distance. The Morse switch is checked and maintained.
 
Thank you very much
Arnold
 

--
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: turning direction of prop and thread pitch - Santorin

JOHN HAYES
 

My Santorin is turning clockwise........ if you believe the direction of the prop alternator 

John Hayes 
Ngawaka sn 41


On 15/02/2020, at 4:07 PM, Volker Hasenauer <volker.hasenauer@...> wrote:


Hi Daniel,

thanks for your reply.

I have now 2 replies...one say right, the other say left. Leaving me with no other choice as to wait until I get my boat out of the water and physically check what I got....

I have checked as well with Maud, however so far no reply from her.

Many thanks for your effort,

Greetings from Langkawi,

Volker
SY Aquamarine, Santorin 027
Borneo, Malaysia 

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 11:37 PM Daniel Frey <Daniel.m.frey@...> wrote:
On my Santorins prop it says: L 19 x 14

L = left turning

19 = 19 inch = diameter of the prop

14 = 14 inch = theoretical distance achieved with 1 turn

Daniel Frey, SN 64 / 1992


Re: turning direction of prop and thread pitch - Santorin

Volker Hasenauer
 

Hi Daniel,

thanks for your reply.

I have now 2 replies...one say right, the other say left. Leaving me with no other choice as to wait until I get my boat out of the water and physically check what I got....

I have checked as well with Maud, however so far no reply from her.

Many thanks for your effort,

Greetings from Langkawi,

Volker
SY Aquamarine, Santorin 027
Borneo, Malaysia 

On Tue, Feb 11, 2020 at 11:37 PM Daniel Frey <Daniel.m.frey@...> wrote:
On my Santorins prop it says: L 19 x 14

L = left turning

19 = 19 inch = diameter of the prop

14 = 14 inch = theoretical distance achieved with 1 turn

Daniel Frey, SN 64 / 1992


Re: Novamar Insurance

Eric Meury
 

amazing...as i was just in the process of talking with them.  I have the same issue with pantan.


On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 1:17 PM Duane Siegfri via Groups.Io <carlylelk=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I received a notice of non-renewal from Novamar today.  They stated in the letter that the reason for non-renewal was a change in their underwriting practices.  They also said that the non-renewal was not due to anything pertaining to me.  Thought I'd let people know here in case you have novamar insurance.  My agent was unable to give me an explanation for Novamars change in policy. It could be just for boats down in the Caribbean, or they might be getting out of the marine recreational insurance industry altogether.

Duane
Wanderer SM#477


Novamar Insurance

Duane Siegfri
 

I received a notice of non-renewal from Novamar today.  They stated in the letter that the reason for non-renewal was a change in their underwriting practices.  They also said that the non-renewal was not due to anything pertaining to me.  Thought I'd let people know here in case you have novamar insurance.  My agent was unable to give me an explanation for Novamars change in policy. It could be just for boats down in the Caribbean, or they might be getting out of the marine recreational insurance industry altogether.

Duane
Wanderer SM#477


Re: Mizzen furler

VICTOR MOLERO
 

Hello all.
My name is Victor Molero and this is my first apprearance in this group that I have been following for a while. I am overwhelmed by the accumulated knowledge and experience that is shared here, so my thanks to everyone for the valuable contributions. 
I lost the piece that holds the shaft of the mizzen furler; so I have 3D printed one to replace it; this required me to do a design with a 3D program that I didn't know how to use; fortunately a friend of mine did it for me. So I am sharing here the file with the design in two different formats for anyone to use it in case you also need to 3D print it.
Best.
Victor 
SM#314


Re: rub rail insert

 

This is a perfect example of why we need to continue to support SAV at Amel. This particular part is for a rub rail that has been out of production by Amel for over 20 years. I believe it was replaced near the beginning of the production of the SM 2000.

Just Amazing! 

BTW, I remember trying to order a simple part from Beneteau when my Oceanis 46 was about 6 months old. Not only did Beneteau not have the com[ponent, they could not tell me where they sourced it. 

CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
View My Training Calendar
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On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 10:06 AM Jarek Zemlo via Groups.Io <noa_blue=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
To All interested,

I just got the top seal lifted from the rub-rail on my SM #201 (1997). Fits the profile that I received from Maud (AMEL). Attached see pictures:


 
Jarek Zemlo
NOA BLUE
SM #201


Re: rub rail insert

Jarek Zemlo
 

To All interested,

I just got the top seal lifted from the rub-rail on my SM #201 (1997). Fits the profile that I received from Maud (AMEL). Attached see pictures:


 
Jarek Zemlo
NOA BLUE
SM #201


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Dan,

 

We found most of the people in Curacao had no plans to head west after the season during our 6 month stay living aboard in the ABCs. They took full advantage of the Nov-Dec SE winds to sail the 500 miles (3-4 days) to the Virgin Islands on a beam reach positioning themselves for another loop through the eastern Caribbean.

 

In addition, I think I should mention the safety precautions a boat needs to take in order to passage to Trinidad.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Galapagos

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dan Carlson
Sent: Friday, February 14, 2020 8:56 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

 

Good morning,. If you go to Peake in Trinidad, there is a good chance you will see us there this year.  We hauled there in 2017 and are planning to head back.  We also hauled in Curacao in 2018 and that was good for is as well. That decision should be based on your cruising plans for the next year.  Curacao is a good stop if you are heading west, but not if you want another pass up and down the eastern Caribbean. 

 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, sm#387, currently in Cartagena, Columbia 

 

 

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 8:28 PM Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: 220 volt exhaust blower replacement

JOHN HAYES
 

Mike we run them only when the motor is running
And have put in a seperate switch to turn them on and off

Currently we heading south to bluff before the entrails of the cyclone gets there and then will head south to the Auckland islands

Our issue the reverse of yours spent the day fiddling with the fuel flow to the diesel heater eventually getting it right .... we need heat not cold for the next few weeks

Give me a shout if you are coming to Wellington 


On 14/02/2020, at 3:29 PM, Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:


Thanks John.

I do have the normal engine room blowers that run when the ignition key is turned, but maybe you're on to something with the inexpensive 12V fans.

The Onan genset has a 12V alternator so could a simple 12V fan do the job here? Then it's just a matter of having it power on automatically, or remembering if it's manual.

I still think the best choice is tapping into the excess 220V power. But perhaps the 12V starter circuit is an easier and less expensive option. Any reason to not do this? Obviously maintaining the shared 12V starter battery is essential and not something you want to mess up.

Regards,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua, NZ


On Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 3:17 PM JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:
Hi Mike

I have 2 new 12 volt fans in my Santorin purchased in Wellington last year they were about nz$ 30 each and a common industrial type and performed well during 4 months in the pacific and are going well as we motor towards banks peninsula without any wind on our way to the Auckland islands

On the Santorin one fan sucks air in the other pushes it out through the port cockpit coaming 

The 2 fans  move a significant volume of air

Best

John Hayes
Nga Waka
Sn 41


On 13/02/2020, at 2:56 PM, Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Hi Thomas, Bob and Suzanne, anyone else with advice here,

Did you find a suitable 220V fan that you are happy with? I need to install something to keep the engine room cool while generator, water maker, battery charger, etc. are running. Currently I leave the engine room cover open when I can, not a good set up.

Thomas, I like your idea of a less expensive industrial type fan. Did you find one that works? Can you recommend a brand, model, CFM rating?

I'm currently in New Zealand if anyone has any suggestions of where to look.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Dan Carlson
 

Good morning,. If you go to Peake in Trinidad, there is a good chance you will see us there this year.  We hauled there in 2017 and are planning to head back.  We also hauled in Curacao in 2018 and that was good for is as well. That decision should be based on your cruising plans for the next year.  Curacao is a good stop if you are heading west, but not if you want another pass up and down the eastern Caribbean. 

Daniel and Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, sm#387, currently in Cartagena, Columbia 


On Wed, Feb 12, 2020, 8:28 PM Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:
Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: 220 volt exhaust blower replacement

Craig Briggs
 

Mike - I've rewired mine so the standard fans operate when either main engine or genset is operating plus I have a manual "on" position so I can run the fans with no engine (when working in the engine room or to cool it after motoring). Use a couple of diodes in the circuit to isolate the engines.
Cheers, Craig


Re: 220 volt exhaust blower replacement

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Thanks John.

I do have the normal engine room blowers that run when the ignition key is turned, but maybe you're on to something with the inexpensive 12V fans.

The Onan genset has a 12V alternator so could a simple 12V fan do the job here? Then it's just a matter of having it power on automatically, or remembering if it's manual.

I still think the best choice is tapping into the excess 220V power. But perhaps the 12V starter circuit is an easier and less expensive option. Any reason to not do this? Obviously maintaining the shared 12V starter battery is essential and not something you want to mess up.

Regards,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy SM23
Opua, NZ


On Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 3:17 PM JOHN HAYES <johnhayes862@...> wrote:
Hi Mike

I have 2 new 12 volt fans in my Santorin purchased in Wellington last year they were about nz$ 30 each and a common industrial type and performed well during 4 months in the pacific and are going well as we motor towards banks peninsula without any wind on our way to the Auckland islands

On the Santorin one fan sucks air in the other pushes it out through the port cockpit coaming 

The 2 fans  move a significant volume of air

Best

John Hayes
Nga Waka
Sn 41


On 13/02/2020, at 2:56 PM, Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy) <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:

Hi Thomas, Bob and Suzanne, anyone else with advice here,

Did you find a suitable 220V fan that you are happy with? I need to install something to keep the engine room cool while generator, water maker, battery charger, etc. are running. Currently I leave the engine room cover open when I can, not a good set up.

Thomas, I like your idea of a less expensive industrial type fan. Did you find one that works? Can you recommend a brand, model, CFM rating?

I'm currently in New Zealand if anyone has any suggestions of where to look.

Cheers,
Mike Longcor
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Matt Salatino
 

Trinidad has Peake’s (we hauled out their), Power Boats, also very good, and Coral Cove. A bit less expensive, but they are all negotiable.
It’s out of the hurricane zone.

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Feb 13, 2020, at 8:09 PM, Eamonn Washington <eamonn.washington@...> wrote:

Hi

thanks to all for the great advice.  Your personal experiences are a great help.  I had not considered that the cleat on the foredeck might get ripped out.

So I will not leave the boat in Grenada and consider Trinidad (Peake) or Curacao (Curacao Marine), on the hard with tie downs.  I am aware that they are not fully out of the hurricane zone, but the risk is much lower there.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada.


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Eamonn Washington
 

Hi

thanks to all for the great advice.  Your personal experiences are a great help.  I had not considered that the cleat on the foredeck might get ripped out.

So I will not leave the boat in Grenada and consider Trinidad (Peake) or Curacao (Curacao Marine), on the hard with tie downs.  I am aware that they are not fully out of the hurricane zone, but the risk is much lower there.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada.


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Mark Erdos
 

Eamonn,

 

I am very familiar with the options in Grenada. If your thought is to leave the boat in Prickly Bay unattended, this is a very bad idea. Beside the boat burglaries, the bay is very open and offers not protection from anything  southerly. In a named storm with rotation this bay will be treacherous. I addition, I seriously doubt if the moorings in this bay are maintained to any standard. Many cruisers stay there during the storm season but the main reason being it is cheap.

 

The St. Louis Marina has good protection and is protected by a mountain range on three sides. However, you are at the mercy of other owners securing their vessels. We were there for a tropical storm threat and very few boats had someone tending them. (our plan while in Grenada for a big named storm was to run south).

 

The boat yards in Grenada are also questionable. They do have the ability to strap down boats but again, not the best idea. Look back at the pictures of Ivan.

 

The bottom line, I do not think I would leave a boat unattended in Grenada during the hurricane season.

 

Have you considered Curacao in the ABCs they are on the bottom edge of the hurricane belt with a lower probability of being hit than Grenada. There is a great yard the with excellent security: Curacao Marine. To fly out, hop to Aruba where you can fly direct cheaply to pretty much anywhere. When back on the boat after hurricane season, you can easily sail to the Eastern Caribbean again on a beam reach. Curacao Marine also has the capability for you to bring back parts duty free.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Galapagos

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eamonn Washington
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 9:28 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

 

Hi

A mooring ball is rated in terms of holding power but I don’t understand what that means.  I also don’t know what holding power is required to hold a Super Maramu in a hurricane.  Could someone please explain if a 5t holding power would be sufficient or inadequate? 

I am trying to figure out what is the best option, to leave the boat on the hard (chocked and tied down) or in a marina (spider web of lines) or on a mooring ball.  We wish to leave our boat in Grenada during the hurricane season while we will be away the entire time.  (We will have someone check it regularly.)

Should the water tank be full or empty?  I guess if storing on land more weight is better, and in water less weight is better, but I am guessing.

Thanks
Eamonn Washington
Travel Bug
Super Maramu #151
Currently in Grenada


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Gary Silver
 

Hi Eamonn:

I can speak to the "in a marina (spider web of lines" idea.  DON'T DO IT!!!!  I was in Puerto Del Rey marina during Irma and Maria (cat 4 & 5),  Boat stripped, spider web of lines (11), many doubled up,  many many fenders (14) (tied to dock and the boat).  Liahona survived but was damaged.  Half of the fenders weren't found, the remaining half were destroyed.  Boats on either side of me sank. YOU ARE NOT SAFE IN A SLIP NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO. Cloud Street (an Amel SM on the dock behind me had a 65 boat break free from, out dock and come down on her.  As a testament to how stout Amel boats are, Cloud street survived with repairable damage while the boat that hit her sunk next to her.

In a slip you are dealing with storm surge and wind as well as other boats and flying debris.  In PDR (Puerto Del Rey) some boats floated up over top of their docks due to surge.  You are also hazarded by other boats around you.  There is only one of this hazards you can mitigate, on the hard you do away with storm surge issues.   On the hard the boat must be strapped down onto deep set anchors.  The jack stands will fall away/be washed away, or sink in the wet ground.  Only the straps will save you.  Even jack stands welded together is no guarantee.   Many boats on the hard in PDR had the jack stands gone and were supported only by the tie down straps following the storm. In PDR they have a re-inforced concrete grid of footings/anchors buried many feet deep in the ground.  Those proved themselves.  Even a cradle is no guarantee unless it is strapped down.   

I concur that leaving a boat on a mooring in a storm is extremely unwise no matter how big the mooring.

The above is hard earned from my actual experience. 

Wish you the best, 

Gary S. Silver, M.D.
s/v Liahona
Amel SM 2000  #335
Puerto Del Rey Marina, Puerto Rico


Re: Holding power of Mooring Ball required for hurricanes

Giorgio Ardrizzi
 

In May I will return to the third consecutive season at Trinidad where I will leave the boat at the Peake' Shipyard. I always found myself very well, the staff is efficient, the security service is very effective and prices are lower than in Grenada or in the other islands.
I will be away for at least 6 months and I want to sleep quietly without worrying about possible hurricane or mooring or marinas at risk.
Some yachtman was impressed by the news of probable attacks by pirates, but the coast guard is carefully wandering the coast and no such cases were reported in the last year.

Giorgio Ardrizzi
sy Saudade III - Sharki #1
currently in Martinique