Date   

wind vane on amel kirk

brgdebakker
 

Hi,

I'm looking for a windvane on my Amel Kirk, but don't know which type
is suitable. So far I've seen a Kirk with a Pacific windvane, but
there must be others out there. Any report or experience is much
appreciated.

Kind regards, Bart.


New Amel 54

John and Anne on Bali Hai <annejohn@...>
 

Hello Peter,
Lucky you. I have no idea what the options are but when I went down to
check my boat Bali Hai today I found the a 54 Amadou has just been
moored on the same pontoon and I noticed that the gangplank was
designed to swing around and vanish into a "letterbox". However
because the rope handrail and folding stanchions were not folded the
gangplank could not close the last thirty degrees which looked a bit
unseamanlike.
The reason for this is that the stanchions etc are mounted on the
portside of the plank whereas it would appear that if they were on the
starboard side the plank would vanish.
I suppose there is some reason why the transom still only has a
moveable centre stanchion instead of half the gap being with fixed
stachion and lifelines so that there is space to mount a cradle for
the liferaft?

Just a thought in envy, John SM319


Re: ANTI ROTATION ARMS

John and Anne on Bali Hai <annejohn@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "pjppappas" <pjppappas@...> wrote:

In reference to the antirotation arms on the swivel at the head of the
jib. Should those arms point forward or aft? Thanks Peter
Pappas "Callisto" sm369
Hello Peter,
They should point aft and it is very important that the ballooner
halyard is in their V because otherwise it will have a foul lead and
will chafe/break causing the balooner or you, if you are using it to
go up the mast, to come down the very quick way.

Best wishes, Anne and John, SM 319


ANTI ROTATION ARMS

pjppappas <pjppappas@...>
 

In reference to the antirotation arms on the swivel at the head of the
jib. Should those arms point forward or aft? Thanks Peter
Pappas "Callisto" sm369


New Amel 54

peterhturner <peterhturner@...>
 

Hi, I am the owner of a SM 2000 No 403 "Asolare", and I have been
absolutly delighted with her for the 3 1/2 years I have owned her.
I have a new Amel 54 being delivered in June 2007 when I will sell my
SM. My question is to Amel 54 owners as I would very much like to have
thier recommendations as to the selection of the miriad of options
available. I know this is a very "open" question but I would like to
know of options that owners have found very useful, those that are not
on the options list (bearing mind that Amel, of course, make the
perfect yacht!) and perhaps those that have not lived up to
expectations!
Thank you in anticipation of your kind comments,
Peter Turner


Re: TDS levels

Judy Rouse
 

When and where are you taking these TDS readings? Water with
readings that high are not considered safe for human consumption. I
may be wrong, but I believe that the WHO limit is 500 and the US
standard is 300. We were getting readings of 480-495 when we stopped
using the watermaker and went to bottled water until we could obtain
replacement membranes. After replacing the membranes we get TDS
readings ranging from 97 to 160, which is very good.

Your boat may or may not have come equipped with an easily accessible
test faucet; ours did not. We installed a separate faucet at the
galley sink and diversion valves that allow us to divert the product
water into the sink until it tests and TASTES good. Then we turn the
valve and fill the water tank. We also installed another water
filter between the tank and the new faucet. We use that faucet for
our drinking water when not making water. See our photos on this
website.

Judy Rouse
S/V Security
Amel SM2 #387

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "Ian & Judy Jenkins"
<ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Old subject, new info sought. I have the 60 lph watermaker which
over 6
years has delivered over 70,000 litres.( Getting on for 1500 hours)
However,
armed with my new portable TDS meter I see that the water it is
now
producing has a TDS reading of 1270. You can just distinguish the
taste
against bottled water.
For comparison, the Dessalator manual says that sea water
typically has
36,000 TDS and that the watermaker should turn out water at 500
TDS. ( it
talks of filtering the water to 2%, although strictly 2% would be
closer to
720 TDS) .Our shore tap water is about 112, same as bottled water.
We cannot change our membranes until the end of the season ( we
are
cruising in Argentina and Southern Chile again) so these questions
arise:
Assuming we continue to get a reading of about 1270 ( ie about 3.6%
residue
rather than 2%)
1. What are the safe levels for drinking the water by itself? (It
tastes
ok at the moment and I ususlly mix it 50-50 with fruit juice)
2. Should there be any doubts that for all other purposes this
level is
OK? I have no reason to think that for cooking and showering this
level is
easily refined enough and I would be surprised if it was at all
troubling to
the washing machine or dishwasher. However, I would be interested
in anyone
elses view.
3. Assuming that there are no problems at the present level of
1270 TDS,
what level would be a cause of concern for drinking?
Thankfully where we are going the heavens deliver ample supplies
of water
so we have no real concerns in the short term. I am sure I can
remember how
to rig up a water catchment system.
As always,any views on the subject would be most welcome.
Fair winds and lotsa rain, Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM
302,
Argentina

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TDS levels

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Old subject, new info sought. I have the 60 lph watermaker which over 6 years has delivered over 70,000 litres.( Getting on for 1500 hours) However, armed with my new portable TDS meter I see that the water it is now producing has a TDS reading of 1270. You can just distinguish the taste against bottled water.
For comparison, the Dessalator manual says that sea water typically has 36,000 TDS and that the watermaker should turn out water at 500 TDS. ( it talks of filtering the water to 2%, although strictly 2% would be closer to 720 TDS) .Our shore tap water is about 112, same as bottled water.
We cannot change our membranes until the end of the season ( we are cruising in Argentina and Southern Chile again) so these questions arise:
Assuming we continue to get a reading of about 1270 ( ie about 3.6% residue rather than 2%)
1. What are the safe levels for drinking the water by itself? (It tastes ok at the moment and I ususlly mix it 50-50 with fruit juice)
2. Should there be any doubts that for all other purposes this level is OK? I have no reason to think that for cooking and showering this level is easily refined enough and I would be surprised if it was at all troubling to the washing machine or dishwasher. However, I would be interested in anyone elses view.
3. Assuming that there are no problems at the present level of 1270 TDS, what level would be a cause of concern for drinking?
Thankfully where we are going the heavens deliver ample supplies of water so we have no real concerns in the short term. I am sure I can remember how to rig up a water catchment system.
As always,any views on the subject would be most welcome.
Fair winds and lotsa rain, Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Argentina

_________________________________________________________________
Windows Live Messenger has arrived. Click here to download it for free! http://imagine-msn.com/messenger/launch80/?locale=en-gb


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion

michael grunstein <mgrunstein2002@...>
 

I have done this in Fort Lauderdale. Ray asked for
$1,000, I bought the materials for about $300-400. I
don't remember the outfit address off hand, you can
find it in the yellow pages, it is somwhere to the
north in F.L. East of 95, you will need nothing else.

Michael SM2000 #345




--- johnabo2003 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:

I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu
2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing
the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done
professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials
and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?
--- johnabo2003 <no_reply@...> wrote:

I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu
2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing
the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done
professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials
and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?






____________________________________________________________________________________
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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion

michael grunstein <mgrunstein2002@...>
 

I have done this in Fort Lauderdale. Ray asked for
$1,000, I bought the materials for about $300-400. I
don't remember the outfit address off hand, you can
find it in the yellow pages, it is somwhere to the
north in F.L. East of 95, you will need nothing else.

Michael SM2000 #345


--- johnabo2003 <no_reply@...> wrote:

I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu
2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing
the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done
professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials
and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?







____________________________________________________________________________________
Want to start your own business?
Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.
http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/r-index


Butane to Propane conversion

johnabo2003 <no_reply@...>
 

Having done a search on this site after I posed my origional question,
I guess I need to refine the scope of my question.

Is it sufficient when performing the conversion to simply replace the
tanks and the connectors, or do all of the lines, etc., need replacing
in order to handle the increased pressure.

Thanks
John


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion

eric freedman
 

Congratulations,

All you have to do is change the regulator and tank hoses in the locker.

if I remember correctly the locker holds a 20 and 10 lb aluminum tank.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of johnabo2003
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 9:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion



I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu 2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion

eric freedman
 

Congratulations,

All you have to do is change the regulator and tank hoses in the locker.

if I remember correctly the locker holds a 20 and 10 lb aluminum tank.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite







_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of johnabo2003
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 9:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Butane to propane conversion



I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu 2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?


Butane to propane conversion

johnabo2003 <no_reply@...>
 

I am the proud new owner of an Amel Super Maramu 2003 that needs a
butane to propane conversion. I am debating doing the conversion
myself. Has anybody had this conversion done professionally, and if so
do you know the breakdown of costs between materials and labour
assuming the conversion is done in the US?


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: air conditioning maramu

Eric Lindholm
 

Thanks to all. I will start with the saloon, and install smaller separate AC's in the V berth and aft cabin. There are some very compact units available, which should do the job in the sleeping quarters.
Eric, "Maramu" 105

amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:
Eric:
The Amel Super Maramu comes standards with three (3) Clima 9EH =
9,000 BTU Air conditioners with Electric Heat. There is one unit in
the forward cabin that cools the forward cabin and forward head
very well. There is one unit in the aft cabin that does an admirable
job of cooling that cabin and head. The unit in the saloon is not
adequate to cool the saloon especially in the tropics. Joel tells me
that he installs a fourth unit in the saloon on all of his boats. The
quarter berth has poor cooling by both the AC from the saloon and
by opening ports. I am in the process of installing a fourth Clima
unit (a 10,000 BTU with EH). Most of it's output will be directed into
the galley to help my poor hard working cook (wife), and if I can
figure a way to duct some air to the quarter berth I will do that.
I am also considering installing another opeing port into the
quarter berth area.
I don't think you need 16,000 BTU in the aft cabin. 16,000 BTU
is about right for the saloon in my opinion. Each unit has only
one vent outlet on the SM. Simple, but a small outlet in the aft
head (which doesn't have a hatch like the forward head), and
two outlets in the forward cabin would give better cool air
distribution. Two outlets are definitely needed in the saloon.

Hope these thoughts help.

Regards, Gary Silver Amel SM 2000 # 395

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "eric lindholm" <etlindholm@...> wrote:

I am thinking about installing air conditioning on my Maramu. My plan
was to install a 16,000 BTU unit in the forward, outside bottom
portion of the cockpit storage, just outside of the waterheater. I
could then cut a duct through to the waste box under the stove and use
that for my return duct. I don't use the waste cabinet anyway, and I
won't be cutting holes in anything else. I was then going to run the
output straight up into the fresh aire ducting, right where the fans
are presently. I removed the heater some time ago as I don't/won't
sail where it is cold. Question, is 16,000 BTU enough? I think it may
be marginal, and I will need 2 units, one perhaps under the settee,
and another in the rear stateroom if I want to keep the whole boat
cool, or just one in the main cabin, and not worry about the rear.
Next is the current ducting going to provide enough output? I was
going to install an additional vent in the main cabin so there are at
least 2 or maybe 3. Any suggestions, comments?

Eric Maramu 105


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: air conditioning maramu

Eric Lindholm
 

I am most concerned about the saloon, and I felt that the vents might be too small, but was hoping someone had found it worked. I will probably focus on the saloon then, and install the large ducts there. Thank you for the imput. Good sailing.
Eric, "Maramu"

"Golden Daze (Ken & Judy)" <goldendaze@...> wrote:
We have Maramu 192 and it came with a 16000 btu mermaid reverse cycle
installed in the aft of the saloon settee.
There are 2 outlets, one blowing aft through the tunnel towards the aft
cabin, at the nav table bulkhead
(across your legs if you are at the nav.). The other blows across the
saloon in the foot area between
the saloon table and freezer. The return is in the fore/aft walkway just in
front of the nav table bulkhead.
Thermostat is just above the nav table.
We lived in Fort Lauderdale (now live on boat). In summer when boat was
closed up and hot(100f) it would take quite
awhile to cool it down. We shut forward saloon door and hung a plastic
shower curtain over the aft passage
(tunnel) to keep the air in the saloon. After while we would open the
back. Cooling in the back in the
day was never very good, we put a fan in tunnel if working in back to get
air back there. At night it
was more than enough without a fan.
We are now in the Cheasapeak getting ready to go to spain next May. It was
plenty good for the summer
here.
We are using the diesel heater now. You would never get enough air for
cooling through those small ducts.
The Mermaid output ducts are 6" and the return is right at the unit. You
need to move a lot of air and
I don't think the ducts are where you need them, nor large enough. You'll
want most of the air dumping
into the saloon. (perhaps 4 4" ducts)
Since we are heading for the Med. and don't plan on anymore S Florida
summers we are satisfied with our
with the one 16000 btu.
To live in S.Florida you would want 2 units to be cool throughout the boat
during the day. The aft
could be smaller. The v berth was never very cool, except at night. (entire
boat open with fan)
Don't forget about the extra amps and your load. We are still using 30 amp
service. With hot water, etc
it adds up fast.
We turn off all at night, so on cold mornings we turn on the reverse cycle
mermaid, and the diesel heater,
which we just replaced, and it gets warm in 15 min.
We also just replaced or rebuilt everything from the deck up, and I'll post
some info on that adventure
when we get all the details finished.

Ken & Judy
Golden Daze M192


Re: air conditioning maramu

Golden Daze \(Ken & Judy\) <goldendaze@...>
 

We have Maramu 192 and it came with a 16000 btu mermaid reverse cycle
installed in the aft of the saloon settee.
There are 2 outlets, one blowing aft through the tunnel towards the aft
cabin, at the nav table bulkhead
(across your legs if you are at the nav.). The other blows across the
saloon in the foot area between
the saloon table and freezer. The return is in the fore/aft walkway just in
front of the nav table bulkhead.
Thermostat is just above the nav table.
We lived in Fort Lauderdale (now live on boat). In summer when boat was
closed up and hot(100f) it would take quite
awhile to cool it down. We shut forward saloon door and hung a plastic
shower curtain over the aft passage
(tunnel) to keep the air in the saloon. After while we would open the
back. Cooling in the back in the
day was never very good, we put a fan in tunnel if working in back to get
air back there. At night it
was more than enough without a fan.
We are now in the Cheasapeak getting ready to go to spain next May. It was
plenty good for the summer
here.
We are using the diesel heater now. You would never get enough air for
cooling through those small ducts.
The Mermaid output ducts are 6" and the return is right at the unit. You
need to move a lot of air and
I don't think the ducts are where you need them, nor large enough. You'll
want most of the air dumping
into the saloon. (perhaps 4 4" ducts)
Since we are heading for the Med. and don't plan on anymore S Florida
summers we are satisfied with our
with the one 16000 btu.
To live in S.Florida you would want 2 units to be cool throughout the boat
during the day. The aft
could be smaller. The v berth was never very cool, except at night. (entire
boat open with fan)
Don't forget about the extra amps and your load. We are still using 30 amp
service. With hot water, etc
it adds up fast.
We turn off all at night, so on cold mornings we turn on the reverse cycle
mermaid, and the diesel heater,
which we just replaced, and it gets warm in 15 min.
We also just replaced or rebuilt everything from the deck up, and I'll post
some info on that adventure
when we get all the details finished.

Ken & Judy
Golden Daze M192


Re: air conditioning maramu

Judy Rouse
 

Gary,

You are absolutely correct about the saloon/galley A/C output for the
tropics.

Where will you locate unit number 4?

Bill Rouse
SM2 #387
Anchored St. James USVI



--- In amelyachtowners@..., amelliahona <no_reply@...>
wrote:

Eric:
...Joel tells me
that he installs a fourth unit in the saloon on all of his boats.
...I am in the process of installing a fourth Clima
unit (a 10,000 BTU with EH). Most of it's output will be directed into
the galley to help my poor hard working cook (wife), and if I can
figure a way to duct some air to the quarter berth I will do that.


Re: air conditioning maramu

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Eric:
The Amel Super Maramu comes standards with three (3) Clima 9EH =
9,000 BTU Air conditioners with Electric Heat. There is one unit in
the forward cabin that cools the forward cabin and forward head
very well. There is one unit in the aft cabin that does an admirable
job of cooling that cabin and head. The unit in the saloon is not
adequate to cool the saloon especially in the tropics. Joel tells me
that he installs a fourth unit in the saloon on all of his boats. The
quarter berth has poor cooling by both the AC from the saloon and
by opening ports. I am in the process of installing a fourth Clima
unit (a 10,000 BTU with EH). Most of it's output will be directed into
the galley to help my poor hard working cook (wife), and if I can
figure a way to duct some air to the quarter berth I will do that.
I am also considering installing another opeing port into the
quarter berth area.
I don't think you need 16,000 BTU in the aft cabin. 16,000 BTU
is about right for the saloon in my opinion. Each unit has only
one vent outlet on the SM. Simple, but a small outlet in the aft
head (which doesn't have a hatch like the forward head), and
two outlets in the forward cabin would give better cool air
distribution. Two outlets are definitely needed in the saloon.

Hope these thoughts help.

Regards, Gary Silver Amel SM 2000 # 395

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "eric lindholm" <etlindholm@...> wrote:

I am thinking about installing air conditioning on my Maramu. My plan
was to install a 16,000 BTU unit in the forward, outside bottom
portion of the cockpit storage, just outside of the waterheater. I
could then cut a duct through to the waste box under the stove and use
that for my return duct. I don't use the waste cabinet anyway, and I
won't be cutting holes in anything else. I was then going to run the
output straight up into the fresh aire ducting, right where the fans
are presently. I removed the heater some time ago as I don't/won't
sail where it is cold. Question, is 16,000 BTU enough? I think it may
be marginal, and I will need 2 units, one perhaps under the settee,
and another in the rear stateroom if I want to keep the whole boat
cool, or just one in the main cabin, and not worry about the rear.
Next is the current ducting going to provide enough output? I was
going to install an additional vent in the main cabin so there are at
least 2 or maybe 3. Any suggestions, comments?

Eric Maramu 105


Wanted:

Ag Av8ter
 

Hello all,

I need to replace the remote handset on a Shipmate (Simrad) RS8300.
Has anyone updated their VHF and still have an old one? Anyone
planning to do that? All I need is the remote handset, and I have not
found one on Ebay or Google - ing. Thanks in advance!

Tony and Heidi
WORLD CITIZEN
SM 266


air conditioning maramu

Eric Lindholm
 

I am thinking about installing air conditioning on my Maramu. My plan
was to install a 16,000 BTU unit in the forward, outside bottom
portion of the cockpit storage, just outside of the waterheater. I
could then cut a duct through to the waste box under the stove and use
that for my return duct. I don't use the waste cabinet anyway, and I
won't be cutting holes in anything else. I was then going to run the
output straight up into the fresh aire ducting, right where the fans
are presently. I removed the heater some time ago as I don't/won't
sail where it is cold. Question, is 16,000 BTU enough? I think it may
be marginal, and I will need 2 units, one perhaps under the settee,
and another in the rear stateroom if I want to keep the whole boat
cool, or just one in the main cabin, and not worry about the rear.
Next is the current ducting going to provide enough output? I was
going to install an additional vent in the main cabin so there are at
least 2 or maybe 3. Any suggestions, comments?

Eric Maramu 105