Date   

Re: Masthead Tri Colour LOPOLIGHT A54

Denis Elborn
 

Hi martin,

I replaced my tricolour/anchor lopolight last season without too much difficulty. it is mounted on 3 spacers which didn’t match the base of the new light but as it is plastic no probs to drill the mounting holes to suit the mast. The new light also had ‘flying leads’ and not a terminal block that the original had so terminal connectors are needed for the new installation.

I have a new lopolight available as I ended up with 2 - a long story, If you are interested in buying it email me and we can discuss further. delborn@bigpond dot com.

Denis
Ex A54 Aventura

On 26 Jan 2020, at 12:24 am, luvkante via Groups.Io <luvkante@...> wrote:

Teun, 

gladly awaiting your pics.

My masthead situation should be similar to yours, Kaj had the same FLIR masthead camera as I.

Martin


Re: Saint Maarten

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

The one in Cole Bay (or Simpson Bay Lagoon)


Here is Rhona email:
rhona@...

If you mention me, that I brought her "chocolate croissant" (then that I lost my boat), she will remember !  Just say you are a friend!

Sincerely, Alexandre





On Monday, January 27, 2020, 07:18:09 PM UTC, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <itsfun1@...> wrote:


Hi Alexandre
I found 3 Island Water Worlds in Saint Maarten can you tell me which bay the one you recommend is in?
Thanks
Courtney
Trippin


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jan 26, 2020 8:24 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten

Not sure the attachment will show, here are a few pictures post Irma.  
You can see how destroyed what this marina.  
Reminder: Irma was a Category 5 and it was a direct hit.  




On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:49:39 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt



Re: Saint Maarten

Ian Townsend
 

We stayed at IWW in the Lagoon in 2015. At that time, we were satisfied with facility and generally with the service. 

Ian & Margaret
S/V Loca Lola II 
SM153
Bahamas

On Jan 27, 2020, at 2:18 PM, Courtney Gorman via Groups.Io <Itsfun1@...> wrote:

Hi Alexandre
I found 3 Island Water Worlds in Saint Maarten can you tell me which bay the one you recommend is in?
Thanks
Courtney
Trippin


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jan 26, 2020 8:24 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten

Not sure the attachment will show, here are a few pictures post Irma.  
You can see how destroyed what this marina.  
Reminder: Irma was a Category 5 and it was a direct hit.  




On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:49:39 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt



Re: Grounding for solar panels / solar arch

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Mike,
All METAL seacocks and thruhulls need to be connected to the bonding system.
All METAL that is in constant contact with seawater must be connected to the bonding system to avoid corrosion.
Sometimes you don't see the corrosion until it is too late i.e. the fitting fails catastrophically - you don't want that to happen!
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Bill - do you mean that last section of exhaust looks modified/non-Amel or just generally speaking?

Ruslan - I like a shutoff valve because it absolutely solves the backflow problem. If I went that direction, I would prefer a basic (no switches or sensors) and non-metal part to eliminate corrosion. The only real problem, besides the hassle of installing it, is making sure it's open before starting the engine and as others have said, in an emergency it would not be good at all.

If anyone has any experience with the rubber non-return flap in the exhaust or anything similar please let me know. What does this thing look like?

If I could reach the exhaust from deck I'd probably go with the foam ball on a string method :) ...opportunity for a special tool here? Just kidding.

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ


On Mon, Jan 27, 2020, 5:23 PM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Mike,

I think you will discover that SM 23 has been modified by previous owners.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 8:14 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Thanks James! I've looked into all of those things except the internals of the injection elbow. I'll definitely check that as soon as I can. I'll give the muffler a double check while I'm at it. I'll let you know if I find anything... seems like I'm swallowing more seawater than most here.

Now something I overlooked earlier... at the through hull there is a little over a foot of extra wide pipe/hose. I'll attach a photo and hope it comes through. Looking up the exhaust from the outside, it appears to be totally hollow. This must be where the non-return rubber flap should be installed as referenced by Oliver and others.

Does anyone have any experience in replacing this? Probably best to source this part from Amel? Although given my SM is 1990, so this specific modification might be non-Amel for me. Is it just held in place with some marine adhesive?

Any advice is welcome here. Haulout is scheduled soon so it would be an ideal time to fit something.

Cheers,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:30 PM James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--


Re: Saint Maarten

Courtney Gorman
 

Hi Alexandre
I found 3 Island Water Worlds in Saint Maarten can you tell me which bay the one you recommend is in?
Thanks
Courtney
Trippin


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar via Groups.Io <uster@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jan 26, 2020 8:24 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Saint Maarten

Not sure the attachment will show, here are a few pictures post Irma.  
You can see how destroyed what this marina.  
Reminder: Irma was a Category 5 and it was a direct hit.  




On Sunday, January 26, 2020, 08:49:39 PM UTC, Matt Salatino via Groups.Io <helmsmatt@...> wrote:


Good to know. I’m surprised they had much damage. The place is down a long canal, and completely surrounded.....

~~~⛵️~~~Matt



Re: Steyr motor turbocharger complete

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Jose,

I have no knowledge of the steyer motor but my volvo D275 habitually had the wastegate sticking as did the wastegate on my volvo tmd 22.

The shaft through the housing to the exterior lever gets a buildup on it that causes it to sieze. I disasembled and freed them up by mechanically moving it while adding lubricant. A slow but efective process but it always re seized. I have approached experts in Volvo and they had no solution. If you buy a new turbo the same thing will happen with the new one. I suspect there are many many siezed turbo wastegates out there but owners dont know it.

I have found the answer in a product called carbo clean. This applied to the shaft rapidly disolved the build up causing the seizing. To access it i had to remove the exhaust mixing elbow. Now  the initial problem is cleared I just apply it to the shaft externally. On the Volvo the shaft comes up from below so there isnt a gravity assist. If the steyer has the waste gate  shaft descending you will probably get results by applying carbo clean fom the exterior.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 28 January 2020 at 04:16 Jose Alegria <Josealegr@...> wrote:

Dear colleagues

My Amel has one Steyer  motor 140 hp.
The waste gate is stuck and the turbo specialist tell me- " no way- you need replace the all turbo ".
I try contact the Steyr motors ( sales , service and office ) but no one give me any answer!....
Can you give me some ideas.
My boat is at Cleopatra marina dry dock - Preveza - Greece.

kindest regards


José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37



Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

David Crisp
 

Hi Woody,
Thanks for the feedback. Based on that think I'll first experiment with the KISS approach and just hot spot with my iPhone. The reason I was erring towards a more complex (and expensive) setup was to ensure reception when anchored in more obscure places or sailing offshore. 
--
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace
Amel 54 #58


Re: Steyr motor turbocharger complete

Wolfgang Weber
 

Jose, 
Try to get in contact / repair by www.turbolader.net - new turbo is expensive.
Wolfgang 






Re: Steyr motor turbocharger complete

Arnold Mente
 

Hi, hope I can help you!

this is a big german yacht equipment dealer!! There you can order it!! Follow the link!


In May I will be in Preveza!!

Best Regards

Arnold
SY Zephyr
SM203

Am 27.01.2020 um 16:17 schrieb Jose Alegria <Josealegr@...>:

The attachments:

<Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 11.14.18.png>
<Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 17.09.33.png>
<Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 17.10.12.png>
José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37




On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 17:16, Jose Alegria <josealegr@...> wrote:
Dear colleagues

My Amel has one Steyer  motor 140 hp.
The waste gate is stuck and the turbo specialist tell me- " no way- you need replace the all turbo ".
I try contact the Steyr motors ( sales , service and office ) but no one give me any answer!....
Can you give me some ideas.
My boat is at Cleopatra marina dry dock - Preveza - Greece.

kindest regards


José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37



Arnold Mente

Urbaniweg 12
7000 Eisenstadt 

Tel: +43 660 6699019

arnold.mente@...




--
SY Zephyr SM203


Re: Super Maramu Main Mast Furling foil Sheered

 

The cause is very likely the jamming when furling or unfurling. Most often it is caused by the addition of vertical battens on a SM. 

I will send you a page from my book on the step-by-step procedure with photos. Look for it in about an hour. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Mon, Jan 27, 2020, 2:50 AM ngtnewington Newington via Groups.Io <ngtnewington=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
In my opinion you may be able to drop the whole thing down about 10 cm or whatever the depth of the gear, if necessary you could shorten the top lashing between the sail and the top bearing. But to strengthen the foil I would try and source an internal bushing that slides snugly up the foil. This would spread the load. There is quite a lot of torque onto that foil when furling the sail all concentrated at the bottom. To simply use the foil alone may not last very long.
What material should the bushing be? If it is perfectly round then the obvious choice is aluminium, machined to fit, but it could be some kind of composite material or even in a pinch, for an at sea fix  a piece of hardwood until a machine shop is found. 

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece
On 27 Jan 2020, at 08:24, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Graham,

I would say you are fine to drill a new hole and drop the foil. As to cause I will lay odds that the  bearings in rhe swivel at the top are full of salt making it hard to turn and that extra load directly contributed to that failure.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 January 2020 at 15:28 "Graham Boyd via Groups.Io" <crwggb@...> wrote: 

SM Main mast furler foil sheered at base just above the gear box (see pictures).

This metal fatigue event rather spoilt our Chinese NY cruise yesterday. The actual sheer occurred when furling the sail head to wind in 15 kts of wind. 

Has anyone else suffered this failure? If so what was the fix?

I understand from this site that the top of the foil in the mast is unsupported. This makes me wonder if there is sufficient "extra" length of foil in the mast to just drill new holes in the foil above the sheer line and drop it back into the gear box. Would the swivel then "fall off the top" of the foil when the sail is hoisted? Failing that extending the foil at the top to support the swivel with the sail up could be the answer.

Any thoughts/experiences welcome!

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

jj


Re: Generator monitoring

 

Stefano,

You should have an Onan parts manual on your SM. The correct gauges for your model Onan will be listed in your parts manual. The gauges will not be the same for all model Onans.

If you don't have a parts manual contact your local Cummins/Onan dealer with your model and serial numbers.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 11:32 PM Stefano Silvestri <stefano.silvestri.51@...> wrote:
Thanks Bill Rouse, would you please send a link where we can find Onan instruments?
Thanks again
Stef


Re: Steyr motor turbocharger complete

Jose Alegria
 

The attachments:

Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 11.14.18.png
Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 17.09.33.png
Screenshot 2020-01-27 at 17.10.12.png
José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37




On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 at 17:16, Jose Alegria <josealegr@...> wrote:
Dear colleagues

My Amel has one Steyer  motor 140 hp.
The waste gate is stuck and the turbo specialist tell me- " no way- you need replace the all turbo ".
I try contact the Steyr motors ( sales , service and office ) but no one give me any answer!....
Can you give me some ideas.
My boat is at Cleopatra marina dry dock - Preveza - Greece.

kindest regards


José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37



Steyr motor turbocharger complete

Jose Alegria
 

Dear colleagues

My Amel has one Steyer  motor 140 hp.
The waste gate is stuck and the turbo specialist tell me- " no way- you need replace the all turbo ".
I try contact the Steyr motors ( sales , service and office ) but no one give me any answer!....
Can you give me some ideas.
My boat is at Cleopatra marina dry dock - Preveza - Greece.

kindest regards


José Alegria
A55#003MERIT
josealegr@...
Mobile: + 351 91 866 30 37



Re: Super Maramu Main Mast Furling foil Sheered

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Graham,

originally, there is around 20 cm of foil left at the top, above the swivel, with the original lashings (top and tack).
This means that in the foil's life, cutting off the bottom for new bolting can be done three times.
You may not know if the previous owners have already cut the foil at the base (for the same cause you face now). So, with your mainsail installed, and 10cm lashing between the swivel and the sail's top, you should go up the mast and look how much length of foil there is left above the swivel's top.

The cause of the bolts sheering the foil at the bottom is only using the furler (a lot!). Of course, some foils will last longer than other ones just because of the kind of use. If you handle the mainsail furler gently, the foil may last longer.
Be kind with your furlers and don't overload them (when the sail is fully in the mast, don't squeeze it by over using the furler). Don't try to adjust the mainsail under load.

You should drop the mainsail once a year to check the swivel (is it turning free?) as a seized swivel will add more load to the bottom bolt junction (and the motor and gear-box!!).

For those who have a short foil (already cut off a few times) and who cannot cut it anymore unless the swivel comes off the foil, the next step is to have a shorter mainsail made(at the luff).

Good luck and be kind with your AMEL, she will give it back to you...

Olivier


Re: Super Maramu Main Mast Furling foil Sheered

ngtnewington Newington
 

In my opinion you may be able to drop the whole thing down about 10 cm or whatever the depth of the gear, if necessary you could shorten the top lashing between the sail and the top bearing. But to strengthen the foil I would try and source an internal bushing that slides snugly up the foil. This would spread the load. There is quite a lot of torque onto that foil when furling the sail all concentrated at the bottom. To simply use the foil alone may not last very long.
What material should the bushing be? If it is perfectly round then the obvious choice is aluminium, machined to fit, but it could be some kind of composite material or even in a pinch, for an at sea fix  a piece of hardwood until a machine shop is found. 

Nick

Amelia AML 54-019

Kilada Greece

On 27 Jan 2020, at 08:24, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Graham,

I would say you are fine to drill a new hole and drop the foil. As to cause I will lay odds that the  bearings in rhe swivel at the top are full of salt making it hard to turn and that extra load directly contributed to that failure.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 January 2020 at 15:28 "Graham Boyd via Groups.Io" <crwggb@...> wrote: 

SM Main mast furler foil sheered at base just above the gear box (see pictures).

This metal fatigue event rather spoilt our Chinese NY cruise yesterday. The actual sheer occurred when furling the sail head to wind in 15 kts of wind. 

Has anyone else suffered this failure? If so what was the fix?

I understand from this site that the top of the foil in the mast is unsupported. This makes me wonder if there is sufficient "extra" length of foil in the mast to just drill new holes in the foil above the sheer line and drop it back into the gear box. Would the swivel then "fall off the top" of the foil when the sail is hoisted? Failing that extending the foil at the top to support the swivel with the sail up could be the answer.

Any thoughts/experiences welcome!

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

jj


Re: Super Maramu Main Mast Furling foil Sheered

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Graham,

I would say you are fine to drill a new hole and drop the foil. As to cause I will lay odds that the  bearings in rhe swivel at the top are full of salt making it hard to turn and that extra load directly contributed to that failure.

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 27 January 2020 at 15:28 "Graham Boyd via Groups.Io" <crwggb@...> wrote:

SM Main mast furler foil sheered at base just above the gear box (see pictures).

This metal fatigue event rather spoilt our Chinese NY cruise yesterday. The actual sheer occurred when furling the sail head to wind in 15 kts of wind. 

Has anyone else suffered this failure? If so what was the fix?

I understand from this site that the top of the foil in the mast is unsupported. This makes me wonder if there is sufficient "extra" length of foil in the mast to just drill new holes in the foil above the sheer line and drop it back into the gear box. Would the swivel then "fall off the top" of the foil when the sail is hoisted? Failing that extending the foil at the top to support the swivel with the sail up could be the answer.

Any thoughts/experiences welcome!

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong

jj


Re: Generator monitoring

Stefano Silvestri <stefano.silvestri.51@...>
 

Thanks Bill Rouse, would you please send a link where we can find Onan instruments?
Thanks again
Stef


Re: Amel's suggestion to run the Volvo D3-110 (A54) daily while on passage

 

Mike,

I think you will discover that SM 23 has been modified by previous owners.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 8:14 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Thanks James! I've looked into all of those things except the internals of the injection elbow. I'll definitely check that as soon as I can. I'll give the muffler a double check while I'm at it. I'll let you know if I find anything... seems like I'm swallowing more seawater than most here.

Now something I overlooked earlier... at the through hull there is a little over a foot of extra wide pipe/hose. I'll attach a photo and hope it comes through. Looking up the exhaust from the outside, it appears to be totally hollow. This must be where the non-return rubber flap should be installed as referenced by Oliver and others.

Does anyone have any experience in replacing this? Probably best to source this part from Amel? Although given my SM is 1990, so this specific modification might be non-Amel for me. Is it just held in place with some marine adhesive?

Any advice is welcome here. Haulout is scheduled soon so it would be an ideal time to fit something.

Cheers,
Mike
SV Trilogy - SM23
Opua, NZ

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 3:30 PM James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mike,

   A few things that you might check on your exhaust system that could be the cause:

1.  Check to be sure that the exhaust hose is looped as high as possible between the muffler and the discharge.  Perhaps a previous owner used less hose and lowered the loop from the original design?  In order for seawater to enter from the exhaust port it has to climb over this loop so the higher is better.

2.  Insure that your muffler is working properly.  Run the engine, shut down and then remove the exhaust hose to the muffler.  I like to see the muffler less than 1/3 full due to the drain back from the exhaust hose.  In order for the engine to flood from the exhaust port the muffler first has to fill with water.  If the muffler has more water than this, you could have a problem inside the muffler that does not allow the engine to properly clear the muffler usually due to corrosion. 

3.  Engines can also flood from the seawater intake side of things.  The line should be looped as high above the WL as practical and there should be a vent at the top of the loop that must function or seawater can be siphoned over the loop and into the engine.   Insure that the vent is working properly. 

4.  Ensure that the seawater injection elbow normally located at the connection between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust hose is not corroded through.

My boat is a Maramu so our systems are probably somewhat different.  I have removed the exhaust hose a few times after a rough passage and before starting the engine to see how much water had accumulated in the muffler and so far the level has always been nominal, or about the same as after shutting down the engine while dockside.  I have therefore not been too concerned about running my engine on passage and have not had any water in the engine to date.  

There are a number of low pressure check valves that you can install in the exhaust system to help prevent seawater from being driven in the exhaust port that you could look into but I suspect your problem is due to a faulty component or some change that has been made in the design of the exhaust system.  Best of luck to you, seawater can sure do a lot of damage to your engine so I hope that you can find the cause and rectify it.

Best,

James

SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Jan 25, 2020, at 4:56 PM, Ruslan Osmonov <rosmonov@...> wrote:

Hi Mike and everyone, this is the page where Charles Doane explains what he did at the end to deal with his flooded engine on his Boreal 47. 
His solution was a valve with electric switch to avoid accidental start with the valve closed. 
I’m a potential buyer and would like to understand if such a solution applicable in Amel’s setup. 
It would be great to eliminate one more worry to run an engine on a passage especially when seas are rough. Additionally when seas are rough diesel gunk can mix up and clog fuel filters, yet another problem to deal with. 


On Sat, Jan 25, 2020 at 4:22 PM SV Trilogy <svtrilogy53@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

Sorry to bring this topic up again, but I thought I should share our recent experiences on the issue...

We have experienced seawater backflow twice this year while on multiday passages in the South Pacific. The first time, we were unaware of Amel's suggestion to run the engine while sailing. The second time, armed with the knowledge that one should run the engine once a day, we had a crankcase full of seawater after 18 hours. It's now clear, as explained by Oliver, that under certain conditions, the running of the engine needs to happen more often.

Because we have a 1990 SM, there doesn't seem to be anything in the exhaust line to block/baffle/slow down sea water from backflowing toward the engine. We also have a stainless muffler without a drain. The old Perkins Prima M80T, still alive and well, may have survived simply by being old and worn, allowing the incompressible seawater to escape around the rings before bending any rods, blowing gaskets, or cracking the engine...?

At any rate, wouldn't the simplest solution be one that prevents seawater from entering the crankcase altogether? To me, the variables involved in deciding when and how often to run the engine are more complicated than something more bulletproof, like a valve. One has no way of knowing really how much seawater is being pushed up the exhaust in a given seaway. Let alone the fact that we are burning diesel for the sole purpose of producing exhaust gasses.

All that considered, I don't yet have an ideal solution. A muffler with a drain would probably cover it. Then depending on the passage, one can decide to pull the plug or to run the engine at certain intervals. For us, we will probably run the engine every couple of hours in a rough sea until I add a drain to the muffler or come up with something better. An engine full of seawater is a terrible thing to experience while making landfall after a long passage... I'm just grateful the engine survived and that we were carrying enough fresh oil.

If I do come up with a simple and "bulletproof" solution, I'll be sure to report back.

Cheers,
Mike & Hannah
SV TRILOGY
Opua, NZ

On Mon, Jan 13, 2020, 9:10 AM CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:
Thanks, Scott. I agree completely



On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:46 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
Agree, seems quite a few of us are on the same pages on this KISS
Cheers 
Alan 
Elyse SM 437 






--


Re: Generator monitoring

 

Two things:

Onan sells the instrument add-on. It is plug and play.

The Onan sensors and pcb control are designed to shut down the generator before damage. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Jan 26, 2020, 6:35 PM william reynolds <sail23692@...> wrote:
Being new to my SM2000 I was surprised at the lack of instrumentation
for the generator. Having had 2 generator equipped boats that had oil pressure, temp. and 
A/C load I am curious if all SM are missing these vital instruments. They give advance warning of an oil leak, bad impeller
or A/C overload. I'm also a commercial pilot and would not fly without this instrumentation. Is this the norm for these boats?
Bill Reynolds
Cloudstreet SM #331