Date   

Re: Speed vs. RPM

Ag Av8ter
 

Hello Vito,

Thanks for the reply. I was hoping that it was in the prop, as I
removed the ducting from the intake side of the turbo (this was when
I was first looking at her) and was able to rotate the turbine drive
wheel easily. That is where I would expect the carbon deposits, not
in the actual compressor side. Do you agree? When I went to the
Volvo manual it said that at the operating RPM I am gettng the
engine is only putting out 33HP. (This from memory so my numbers
might be off a bit. I am in Suriname right now and the boat in the
BVI) I also checcked to see if the wastegate valve was stuck, and
it appears to be working correctly.

I do appreciate you reply and any others you might suggest. This
board is a wealth of info!!!! I can't wait to have my wife read
about how to repaint the stripes on the decks!!!!!

Tony

--- In amelyachtowners@..., asm283 <no_reply@...> wrote:

Hello Tony

This is not an uncommon accurence on the Volvo 80hp. What you need
done is to have the turbo charger removed and have the carbon
inside
the turbo removed. This is not a big deal so dont let your
mechanic
make it one. What happens is that carbon deposits built up inside
the turbo housing and stop the turbo from rotating. Thus the
reduction in power. Once this is done and all things being clean
you
should be able to run at 2700 to 2800 RPM and have a speed of
about
8.5 knots.

Hope this helps

Vito

WANDERER ASM#283

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "agav8ter" <agav8ter@>
wrote:

Hello all,
We have a S/M #266 and it is fairly new to us. Question: #266
has
the
Volvo engine that has a sticker on it saying built by Perkins,
we
were
told it is 80hp. We also have the Amel autoprop. The prop
itself
is
clean and the roller bearings that are visable are clean. The
blades
rotate easily. When in calm water she will run at about 7.5 kts
wide
open, but she will only turn up 2,200 RPM. The Volvo manual
says
it
should turn up over 4000 RPM. In rough water and head winds, at
2,200
RPM we are lucky to get 3 to 4 kts. Is this a typical situation
for a
SM? Sure seems overpitched. Does not make much smoke and runs
at
90C. Ideas? Thanks for your help. Tony


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Painting deck stripes - pictures

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@..., eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:
--- In amelyachtowners@..., eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:
Eric:

Peter Grimm's Company is Super Sailmakers, of Ft. Lauderdale. He is who Joel
recommended to me. He has built lots of 110% Jibs for Amel SMs. His phone is 954
522-4663.

They call the 110% a "Carribean Blaster". It is 502 square feet, of 9.5 oz low aspect
Dacron and has a foam luff with a UV boarder. You need 135 ft of sheet. Peter
recommended 1/2 inch line for the sheets and I have found that 1/2 inch is a little too
small for our jib sheet winches. I have to put at least 5 turns on to prevent slippage.

I purchased the sail last year and the price was $ 2,684 USD with Joel's referral discount. I
had a chance to use it for the first time last month in the BVI. What a great sail. I find I
can point about 5 to 8 degrees higher (about 45 degrees), have speeds that match the
Gateff 155% and it seems to be more foregiving of poor trimming. I am very impressed.
Of course I was sailing in 15-25 knots of wind the whole time but I could sail completely
un-furled where I would have had the 155% furled up during most of that last trip.

Sorry to butt into your thread but I am so impressed with this sail that I couldn't resist.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Hull # 335> John,
Nice speaking to you yesterday.
Were you able to find the name of the sail maker in Ft Lauderdale that made
your 110?
Fair Winds,
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: Speed vs. RPM

asm283 <no_reply@...>
 

Hello Tony

This is not an uncommon accurence on the Volvo 80hp. What you need
done is to have the turbo charger removed and have the carbon inside
the turbo removed. This is not a big deal so dont let your mechanic
make it one. What happens is that carbon deposits built up inside
the turbo housing and stop the turbo from rotating. Thus the
reduction in power. Once this is done and all things being clean you
should be able to run at 2700 to 2800 RPM and have a speed of about
8.5 knots.

Hope this helps

Vito

WANDERER ASM#283

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "agav8ter" <agav8ter@...>
wrote:

Hello all,
We have a S/M #266 and it is fairly new to us. Question: #266 has
the
Volvo engine that has a sticker on it saying built by Perkins, we
were
told it is 80hp. We also have the Amel autoprop. The prop itself
is
clean and the roller bearings that are visable are clean. The
blades
rotate easily. When in calm water she will run at about 7.5 kts
wide
open, but she will only turn up 2,200 RPM. The Volvo manual says
it
should turn up over 4000 RPM. In rough water and head winds, at
2,200
RPM we are lucky to get 3 to 4 kts. Is this a typical situation
for a
SM? Sure seems overpitched. Does not make much smoke and runs at
90C. Ideas? Thanks for your help. Tony


Speed vs. RPM

Ag Av8ter
 

Hello all,
We have a S/M #266 and it is fairly new to us. Question: #266 has the
Volvo engine that has a sticker on it saying built by Perkins, we were
told it is 80hp. We also have the Amel autoprop. The prop itself is
clean and the roller bearings that are visable are clean. The blades
rotate easily. When in calm water she will run at about 7.5 kts wide
open, but she will only turn up 2,200 RPM. The Volvo manual says it
should turn up over 4000 RPM. In rough water and head winds, at 2,200
RPM we are lucky to get 3 to 4 kts. Is this a typical situation for a
SM? Sure seems overpitched. Does not make much smoke and runs at
90C. Ideas? Thanks for your help. Tony


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Painting deck stripes - pictures

eric freedman
 

John,
Nice speaking to you yesterday.
Were you able to find the name of the sail maker in Ft Lauderdale that made
your 110?
Fair Winds,
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

Roger Banks <roger.banks@...>
 

Hi Dennis

In the Perkins at least, the heat exchanger has its own zinc which should be changed each year as a service item. Low down at the aft end of the exchanger and quite accessible is a normal looking bolt which, if you unscrew it will look just a like a flat plug, because the zinc, a tube shape of a few centimetres length, will have worn away. Take the plug to a good chandlery and you should find a replacement easily. I believe there is also an exchangeable zinc plug for the water heater but not on my boat.

Regards, Roger, Zorba, Mango 28

On 03/03/2006, at 11:26 PM, DENNIS STULLER wrote:

HI ROGER,

THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION. I SOMETIMES FEEL THAT I
KNOW MORE ABOUT BOAT GROUNDING SYSTEMS THAN I
UNDERSTAND. IN MY CASE THE PROPELLOR SHAFT IS NOT
INSULATED AND IT APPEARS THAT I HAVE SOME CORROSION
PROBLEMS AS EVIDENCED AT THE TRANSMISSION COOLER AND
ENGINE HEAT EXCHANGER. I AM GOING TO DIG DEEPER AND
CHECK CONNECTEDNESS AND CONDUCTIVITY OF THE SYSTEM. I
WILL LET EVERYONE KNOW WHAT I FIND.

REGARDS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

Eric Lindholm
 

Dennis if you are having problems with your heat exchanger, the remedy will probably have nothing to do with the rest of your bonding system. The connection of the heat exchanger to your external zinc, or the conductivity of the water lines coming in and out of the exchanger, are not the issue or the problem. The heat exchanger needs its own protection separate from the rest of the metal fittings on your boat. The metal in the exchanger, and the water around it, create their own problem. A battery of sorts. The exchanger needs its own internal zinc plug. Connecting the heat exchanger and or the engine to the bonding system does nothing. Roger has given a good recap of the various theories and applications. I believe that it is better to connect everything together. More is better. The whole idea behind the connection of all the metal parts is to equalize the conductivity between each of them, and then attach the same bonding cable to the zinc which is lower on the galvanic scale so
it corrodes. Only those parts which are exposed to the same body of water are protected by the zinc which they are connected to. That is why your exchanger needs a separate system. So would your water pump, transmission cooler, etc, but you can only do so much. Connecting everything only works if there is no stray current coming from other sources. Maybe there was a problem with stray 12 volt current coming from your engine, which was causing a problem, so a previous owner severed the bonding ground to eliminate it rather than addressing the problem that was causing it. The same is true with the dockside power. Another boats electrical problems can be transferred to your boat through the ground wire in the power cord, causing your boat to become its zinc. A power cord that has dipped into the water for a period of time can get saturated with water inside and current will cross over from the hot wire to the ground. You can also get a salt bridge just inside the plug on the dock cord
from exposure to the air alone. I personally studied bonding systems intensively and although I learned a lot of theories, it is clear that the application is part science, part myth, and part luck. I think every boat has its own issues, and needs a system tailored to it. Some boats have no problem connecting the bonding system to the ac ground, some do. I think you just have to take in a much info as you can, make your own choices, and then monitor it as best you can. Eric maramu 105

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...> wrote: HI ROGER,

THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION. I SOMETIMES FEEL THAT I
KNOW MORE ABOUT BOAT GROUNDING SYSTEMS THAN I
UNDERSTAND. IN MY CASE THE PROPELLOR SHAFT IS NOT
INSULATED AND IT APPEARS THAT I HAVE SOME CORROSION
PROBLEMS AS EVIDENCED AT THE TRANSMISSION COOLER AND
ENGINE HEAT EXCHANGER. I AM GOING TO DIG DEEPER AND
CHECK CONNECTEDNESS AND CONDUCTIVITY OF THE SYSTEM. I
WILL LET EVERYONE KNOW WHAT I FIND.

REGARDS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186


--- Roger Banks <roger.banks@...> wrote:

Hi Dennis

Yes, I've spent quite a bit of time looking at the
grounding systems
and there a few good articles in magazines and on
the internet, but
some how they never quite get down to specifics of
every situation.
There are four grounds which need to be kept
separate, subject to
certain approved interactions: AC, DC, HF, and
lightning. Regarding
the DC ground, which is the subject of your enquiry,
the logic not
many years ago was to connect together every metal
thru-hull, which
Amel have done elegantly with the grounding bus you
describe, which
connects to the zinc anodes mounted either side of
the rudder (at
least it's so on my Mango); this system still holds
good if you spend
your whole time in remote anchorages, but entering a
modern marina
exposes your boat to stray electrical currents from
and between other
boats (DC) and pontoon services (AC). This can set
up a galvanic
corrosion reaction, in which the current enters by
one thru-hull and
exits by another, taking with it some metal. This is
also a problem
where two or more metals are in contact in an
electrolyte, e.g. sea
water.

Therefore the common wisdom has altered since your
boat was built to
say that thru-hulls should not be linked together.
Bronze thru-hulls,
such as for toilet water intakes below the water
line, are considered
stable and may happily be left alone, i.e. not
connected via a strap
to any other thru-hull which would expose it to the
corrosion effects
described above.

There are some situations where connection is
unavoidable, such as
stainless steel (itself an alloy) prop shaft mounted
in bronze tube
and with copper propellor. It's essential to ensure
the grounding bus
is connected to both the prop shaft and its mounting
tube which, as I
recall, is visible inside the engine room, between
the engine and
stern gland. If you look further you will find that
the engine water
intake cock is connected by water to the raw water
manifold and to
the engine itself and, if I observe it correctly, to
the diesel
supply system via that fluid and to the fresh water
heater. Some of
the bus gets pretty inaccessible in these places.
I'm not 100% sure
of the electrical connectivity via fluids of some of
these items and
would be glad of contributions by others. It seems
to me that whether
the engine etc should be connected to the grounding
strap, and thus
the zinc anodes, is a question if there is more than
one connection
to the sea water, i.e. via the raw water intake and
what else? I
believe the prop shaft is isolated from the engine
by a flexible
coupling. The exhaust water exits above the water
line (as do all
basins and toilet water exit points), so does not
count. Thus if the
only connection point between the engine and sea
water is the raw
water inlet, it may be correct that the ground strap
was severed.

If your model of Maramu has a ground strap
connection to a keel bolt,
unlike my Mango where the rudder anodes are the
single point of
protection, then you may need to restore the
connection and make sure
the keel bolt is protected by an anode, but it may
be your analysis
of this is not correct.

Regards, Roger, Zorba, Mango 28


On 02/03/2006, at 1:15 PM, DENNIS STULLER wrote:


HAS ANYONE DELVED DEEPLY INTO THE AMEL GROUNDING
SYSTEM? IN THE
PROCESS OF CLEANING UP THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT ON
MY 1985 MARAMU HULL
#186 I HAVE FOUND THAT THE GROUND STRAP BETWEEN
THE ENGINE AND THE
GROUND BUS HAS BEEN SEVERED, APPARENTLY ON
PURPOSE. ALSO WHERE THE
GROUNDING BUSS PASSES IN FRONT OF THE ENGINE, IT
APPEARS AS IF THE
BUSS ORIGINALLY WAS EXTENED DOWN INTO THE BILGE
AND WAS BOLTED TO THE
KEEL BOLT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BILGE. THIS MAKES
SOME SENSE, BUT ON MY
BOAT BOTH CONNECTIONS ARE SEVERED.

THANKS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186 "CHEECHAKO"






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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...>
 

HI ROGER,

THANKS FOR THE INFORMATION. I SOMETIMES FEEL THAT I
KNOW MORE ABOUT BOAT GROUNDING SYSTEMS THAN I
UNDERSTAND. IN MY CASE THE PROPELLOR SHAFT IS NOT
INSULATED AND IT APPEARS THAT I HAVE SOME CORROSION
PROBLEMS AS EVIDENCED AT THE TRANSMISSION COOLER AND
ENGINE HEAT EXCHANGER. I AM GOING TO DIG DEEPER AND
CHECK CONNECTEDNESS AND CONDUCTIVITY OF THE SYSTEM. I
WILL LET EVERYONE KNOW WHAT I FIND.

REGARDS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186


--- Roger Banks <roger.banks@...> wrote:

Hi Dennis

Yes, I've spent quite a bit of time looking at the
grounding systems
and there a few good articles in magazines and on
the internet, but
some how they never quite get down to specifics of
every situation.
There are four grounds which need to be kept
separate, subject to
certain approved interactions: AC, DC, HF, and
lightning. Regarding
the DC ground, which is the subject of your enquiry,
the logic not
many years ago was to connect together every metal
thru-hull, which
Amel have done elegantly with the grounding bus you
describe, which
connects to the zinc anodes mounted either side of
the rudder (at
least it's so on my Mango); this system still holds
good if you spend
your whole time in remote anchorages, but entering a
modern marina
exposes your boat to stray electrical currents from
and between other
boats (DC) and pontoon services (AC). This can set
up a galvanic
corrosion reaction, in which the current enters by
one thru-hull and
exits by another, taking with it some metal. This is
also a problem
where two or more metals are in contact in an
electrolyte, e.g. sea
water.

Therefore the common wisdom has altered since your
boat was built to
say that thru-hulls should not be linked together.
Bronze thru-hulls,
such as for toilet water intakes below the water
line, are considered
stable and may happily be left alone, i.e. not
connected via a strap
to any other thru-hull which would expose it to the
corrosion effects
described above.

There are some situations where connection is
unavoidable, such as
stainless steel (itself an alloy) prop shaft mounted
in bronze tube
and with copper propellor. It's essential to ensure
the grounding bus
is connected to both the prop shaft and its mounting
tube which, as I
recall, is visible inside the engine room, between
the engine and
stern gland. If you look further you will find that
the engine water
intake cock is connected by water to the raw water
manifold and to
the engine itself and, if I observe it correctly, to
the diesel
supply system via that fluid and to the fresh water
heater. Some of
the bus gets pretty inaccessible in these places.
I'm not 100% sure
of the electrical connectivity via fluids of some of
these items and
would be glad of contributions by others. It seems
to me that whether
the engine etc should be connected to the grounding
strap, and thus
the zinc anodes, is a question if there is more than
one connection
to the sea water, i.e. via the raw water intake and
what else? I
believe the prop shaft is isolated from the engine
by a flexible
coupling. The exhaust water exits above the water
line (as do all
basins and toilet water exit points), so does not
count. Thus if the
only connection point between the engine and sea
water is the raw
water inlet, it may be correct that the ground strap
was severed.

If your model of Maramu has a ground strap
connection to a keel bolt,
unlike my Mango where the rudder anodes are the
single point of
protection, then you may need to restore the
connection and make sure
the keel bolt is protected by an anode, but it may
be your analysis
of this is not correct.

Regards, Roger, Zorba, Mango 28


On 02/03/2006, at 1:15 PM, DENNIS STULLER wrote:


HAS ANYONE DELVED DEEPLY INTO THE AMEL GROUNDING
SYSTEM? IN THE
PROCESS OF CLEANING UP THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT ON
MY 1985 MARAMU HULL
#186 I HAVE FOUND THAT THE GROUND STRAP BETWEEN
THE ENGINE AND THE
GROUND BUS HAS BEEN SEVERED, APPARENTLY ON
PURPOSE. ALSO WHERE THE
GROUNDING BUSS PASSES IN FRONT OF THE ENGINE, IT
APPEARS AS IF THE
BUSS ORIGINALLY WAS EXTENED DOWN INTO THE BILGE
AND WAS BOLTED TO THE
KEEL BOLT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BILGE. THIS MAKES
SOME SENSE, BUT ON MY
BOAT BOTH CONNECTIONS ARE SEVERED.

THANKS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186 "CHEECHAKO"






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asymmetrical spinnaker or Ballooner ???

nautilus06 <nautilus06@...>
 

I am going to buy my first Amel : a 1989 Maramu but there is only on
board genoa, mainsail and mizzen.

I wonder if it is better to buy an asymmetrical spinnaker or a
ballooner ?


Do you also think the mizzen "genoa" is useful

Thank you


Re: Mango Grounding

Roger Banks <roger.banks@...>
 

Hi Michael

Nice to hear from a Mango owner; there don't seem to be too many of
us participating in the forum.

I wouldn't describe myself as an expert, but am happy to help you
with some suggestions. The zincs rapid disappearance definitely
indicates something is wrong. After 18 months my rudder anodes were
slightly used, and of course I changed them anyway. I was puzzled
about why the only anodes are those on the rudder and was worried how
I could place a suitable anode to protect the propshaft and engine.
Investigation revealed that the rudder anodes are connected to the
grounding strap which can be seen emerging by the rudder post (under
the aft bunk), passing along the locker under the aft bunk, then
appearing again in the engine room close to the prop shaft, tacked
along the bilges under the engine, across to the engine earthing
point, and so on through the boat. Thus no other zincs should be
required. I've tested this with a multimeter and can report there was
no resistance between the rudder anodes and the grounding strap
sampled at several places through the boat.

Your situation indicates that there is regular electrical activity
through your anodes into the sea water; perhaps also your anti-
fouling is copper-based (as is common), which might be producing the
paint blistering you describe. It's important to recall that the DC
grounding system to the anodes is intended to connect your anodes
together for protection from galvanic corrosion, i.e. it is not
necessary or desirable in the context of your DC battery circuits,
particularly the services side. With regard to the services side,
unlike a car, where a single wire leads to, say, a lamp and the
return wire is grounded to the car body, on a boat all DC circuits
should return via a negative cable to the battery (bearing in mind
that many services cables lead back to the common earthing point in
the electrical cupboard above the galley, and thence by a heavy-duty
cable to the service batteries). The engine, being an automotive
component, does have a number of electrical contacts, mainly sensors,
which run to earth via the engine casting; however these circuits are
completely separate from the services-side circuits and, when the
engine batteries are isolated, are inert. In operation there should
be no reason for earth leakage unless there is a resistance or break
in the route back to earth, so perhaps you should check your main
fuse (mounted on a tray at the aft end of the engine) and all
connections on the route from there back via the starter-motor to the
batteries (on my boat it's to a services battery negative post and
thus via heavy-duty cable to the engine batteries); check all the
connections around the starter-motor especially as inability of the
commutator cranking current to return to battery negative would
result, presumably, in a heavy discharge via the grounding strap into
the sea (consistent with your description); similarly if the services-
side to engine battery negative connection is not good. (Did you do
your protection check also while the engine was running?) If in
doubt, clean or replace all these cables until your problem disappears.

The services and engine battery banks should have completely separate
electrical wiring systems except for the one heavy-duty cable direct
between the battery bank negatives. There should be one position only
at which the DC system interconnects with the grounding strap, which
is at the engine earthing point; on my Perkins 4.236 this is forward
on the port side of the engine. Thus, when the engine batteries have
been isolated, which is presumably most of the time, there is no
cause for electricity to be circulating via the engine into the
grounding strap and so on to the rudder anodes.

You may want to check your wiring carefully to see if any other DC/
grounding interconnects have been made; check that each grounding
system (DC, AC, HF, lightning) is separate from the others, subject
to sensible interconnects, e.g. if the HF counterpoise is grounded to
the engine or the grounding system, there needs to be a gap of one
tenth of an inch (by fastening to a piece of phrenolic or electrical
circuit board), bridged by suitable capacitors (which are transparent
to HF but block DC); consider cutting the grounding strap from the
aft head intake and from any other "passive" thru-hulls below the
water line (I'm afraid I'm not familiar with a MaxProp). I addressed
this sort of thing in my previous posting.

They're great boats but in all these years many pairs of hands have
been doing stuff. I'm amazed at what I find even professionals have
done wrong. For instance, only recently in hunting down the cause of
excess gassing in the service batteries, I found the regulator on
some new solar panels I had installed last year is undersized; and
just last week I found through detailed enquiry on the manufacturer's
website that the regulator on my wind generator is under-sized too. I
do everything myself now!

Have fun and don't forget to report back if you have a success.

Regards, Roger, Zorba, Mango 28

On 03/03/2006, at 1:40 AM, Silkair@... wrote:

Roger
I was reading your note about grounding. I have been chasing down
grounding issues on my Mango #15 for 2 1/2 years. I have a few
questions for you. How often do you need to change the zincs on
your rudder? Is the rudder ground strapped to something?
My boat has a big divers dreram zinc on the starboard side under
the entry to the aft head. The grounds terminate here. I also have
a zinc on a Max Prop. These zincs go fast, 2-3 months. I installed
an Isolation Transformer to help with the dock issues. It seems to
have helped at the dock. I have had bottom paint blistering around
the divers dream and the rudder. I have been told by pros this is
due to overprotection. I then checked various spots with a silver/
silver chloride half cell and I seemed to be protected just right.
So I am a bit confused whether I am doing OK or not. Any insight
on your experiences with these issues would be appreciated.
We love our Mango but alas all of our kids are now off to
college so we will be selling our vessel. It is a great boat.
Thanks ! Michael P. McCarthy SV Eshamy
.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

Eric Lindholm
 

Dennis, I am doing the same thing, and trying to figure out what was intended to be bonded to what in my maramu as well. I didn't know that there was a bonding ground attached to the rudder until I read a response to your question. I have been having my dive service install the zincs, but I thought they were a stand alone system. Now I really have to look. I will watch the reply's to your question, and supply my own info when I figure it out. Eric Maramu 105

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...> wrote:
HAS ANYONE DELVED DEEPLY INTO THE AMEL GROUNDING SYSTEM? IN THE
PROCESS OF CLEANING UP THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT ON MY 1985 MARAMU HULL
#186 I HAVE FOUND THAT THE GROUND STRAP BETWEEN THE ENGINE AND THE
GROUND BUS HAS BEEN SEVERED, APPARENTLY ON PURPOSE. ALSO WHERE THE
GROUNDING BUSS PASSES IN FRONT OF THE ENGINE, IT APPEARS AS IF THE
BUSS ORIGINALLY WAS EXTENED DOWN INTO THE BILGE AND WAS BOLTED TO THE
KEEL BOLT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BILGE. THIS MAKES SOME SENSE, BUT ON MY
BOAT BOTH CONNECTIONS ARE SEVERED.

THANKS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186 "CHEECHAKO"






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Sailing Sailing yacht Amel Boating sailing

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---------------------------------


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

Roger Banks <roger.banks@...>
 

Hi Dennis

Yes, I've spent quite a bit of time looking at the grounding systems
and there a few good articles in magazines and on the internet, but
some how they never quite get down to specifics of every situation.
There are four grounds which need to be kept separate, subject to
certain approved interactions: AC, DC, HF, and lightning. Regarding
the DC ground, which is the subject of your enquiry, the logic not
many years ago was to connect together every metal thru-hull, which
Amel have done elegantly with the grounding bus you describe, which
connects to the zinc anodes mounted either side of the rudder (at
least it's so on my Mango); this system still holds good if you spend
your whole time in remote anchorages, but entering a modern marina
exposes your boat to stray electrical currents from and between other
boats (DC) and pontoon services (AC). This can set up a galvanic
corrosion reaction, in which the current enters by one thru-hull and
exits by another, taking with it some metal. This is also a problem
where two or more metals are in contact in an electrolyte, e.g. sea
water.

Therefore the common wisdom has altered since your boat was built to
say that thru-hulls should not be linked together. Bronze thru-hulls,
such as for toilet water intakes below the water line, are considered
stable and may happily be left alone, i.e. not connected via a strap
to any other thru-hull which would expose it to the corrosion effects
described above.

There are some situations where connection is unavoidable, such as
stainless steel (itself an alloy) prop shaft mounted in bronze tube
and with copper propellor. It's essential to ensure the grounding bus
is connected to both the prop shaft and its mounting tube which, as I
recall, is visible inside the engine room, between the engine and
stern gland. If you look further you will find that the engine water
intake cock is connected by water to the raw water manifold and to
the engine itself and, if I observe it correctly, to the diesel
supply system via that fluid and to the fresh water heater. Some of
the bus gets pretty inaccessible in these places. I'm not 100% sure
of the electrical connectivity via fluids of some of these items and
would be glad of contributions by others. It seems to me that whether
the engine etc should be connected to the grounding strap, and thus
the zinc anodes, is a question if there is more than one connection
to the sea water, i.e. via the raw water intake and what else? I
believe the prop shaft is isolated from the engine by a flexible
coupling. The exhaust water exits above the water line (as do all
basins and toilet water exit points), so does not count. Thus if the
only connection point between the engine and sea water is the raw
water inlet, it may be correct that the ground strap was severed.

If your model of Maramu has a ground strap connection to a keel bolt,
unlike my Mango where the rudder anodes are the single point of
protection, then you may need to restore the connection and make sure
the keel bolt is protected by an anode, but it may be your analysis
of this is not correct.

Regards, Roger, Zorba, Mango 28

On 02/03/2006, at 1:15 PM, DENNIS STULLER wrote:


HAS ANYONE DELVED DEEPLY INTO THE AMEL GROUNDING SYSTEM? IN THE
PROCESS OF CLEANING UP THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT ON MY 1985 MARAMU HULL
#186 I HAVE FOUND THAT THE GROUND STRAP BETWEEN THE ENGINE AND THE
GROUND BUS HAS BEEN SEVERED, APPARENTLY ON PURPOSE. ALSO WHERE THE
GROUNDING BUSS PASSES IN FRONT OF THE ENGINE, IT APPEARS AS IF THE
BUSS ORIGINALLY WAS EXTENED DOWN INTO THE BILGE AND WAS BOLTED TO THE
KEEL BOLT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BILGE. THIS MAKES SOME SENSE, BUT ON MY
BOAT BOTH CONNECTIONS ARE SEVERED.

THANKS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186 "CHEECHAKO"






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AMEL MARAMU GROUNDING SYSTEM

DENNIS STULLER <svcheechako@...>
 

HAS ANYONE DELVED DEEPLY INTO THE AMEL GROUNDING SYSTEM? IN THE
PROCESS OF CLEANING UP THE ENGINE COMPARTMENT ON MY 1985 MARAMU HULL
#186 I HAVE FOUND THAT THE GROUND STRAP BETWEEN THE ENGINE AND THE
GROUND BUS HAS BEEN SEVERED, APPARENTLY ON PURPOSE. ALSO WHERE THE
GROUNDING BUSS PASSES IN FRONT OF THE ENGINE, IT APPEARS AS IF THE
BUSS ORIGINALLY WAS EXTENED DOWN INTO THE BILGE AND WAS BOLTED TO THE
KEEL BOLT AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BILGE. THIS MAKES SOME SENSE, BUT ON MY
BOAT BOTH CONNECTIONS ARE SEVERED.

THANKS, DENNIS STULLER MARAMU #186 "CHEECHAKO"


Charter an Amel SM-2000 in Greece

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

As I have recently sold all my other business interests in Greece, I wish to
advise all of you that you can Charter ALMA LIBRE SM-2000 ( 2002 Model) in
Greece. I believe that this a good opportunity to charter the boat in Greece
for sailing in the Aegean Sea which is a sailing paradise.

More information at www.almalibre.gr/chartering/index.htm . All the details
and inventory of the boat are at the website www.almalibre.gr I will be
glad to welcome you onboard and please refer this also to your friends that
wish to charter a well found boat in this part of the world.

Regards

Dimitris Krassopoulos
dkra@...


Re: Amel at Guadalupe

Mark Pitt
 

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "markmpitt" <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "agav8ter" <agav8ter@> wrote:

Hello,

Can anyone tell me where the Amel facility in Guadalupe is located?
We are currently in the BVI's and as new S/M owners (with no manuals)
we thought we might sail to the Amel Service Center and get a proper
briefing on our boat. Thanks for your help.

Tony and Heidi
WORLD CITIZEN S/M 266
They are in Marina Bas du Fort near Point-a-Pitre.
Their email is marina@...
You come up the main shipping channel toward
Point-a-Pitre and it is to your left. It is well
marked on charts.

Mark Pitt "Sabbatical III" ASM #419
Sorry, that is the email for the marina in my earlier post. The email
for Amel in Guadeloupe that I have is:

amel.caraibes@...

Mark Pitt "Sabbatical III" ASM #419


Re: Amel at Guadalupe

Mark Pitt
 

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "agav8ter" <agav8ter@...> wrote:

Hello,

Can anyone tell me where the Amel facility in Guadalupe is located?
We are currently in the BVI's and as new S/M owners (with no manuals)
we thought we might sail to the Amel Service Center and get a proper
briefing on our boat. Thanks for your help.

Tony and Heidi
WORLD CITIZEN S/M 266
They are in Marina Bas du Fort near Point-a-Pitre.
Their email is marina@....
You come up the main shipping channel toward
Point-a-Pitre and it is to your left. It is well
marked on charts.

Mark Pitt "Sabbatical III" ASM #419


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel at Guadalupe

eric freedman
 

When I was last in Guadeloupe (2003) the agent for amel was

Laurent Colonna
His E-mail-mail address was
s-lim@...

here was his note about his location.

Our Marina is between the city Pointe à Pitre and le Gosier (16°13'
North/61°31' West)
Fifteen minutes before your coming you could call the capitainerie by VHF
channel 9.


Fair Winds,
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

-----Original Message-----
From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of agav8ter
Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 7:27 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel at Guadalupe

Hello,

Can anyone tell me where the Amel facility in Guadalupe is located?
We are currently in the BVI's and as new S/M owners (with no manuals)
we thought we might sail to the Amel Service Center and get a proper
briefing on our boat. Thanks for your help.

Tony and Heidi
WORLD CITIZEN S/M 266






Yahoo! Groups Links


Amel at Guadalupe

Ag Av8ter
 

Hello,

Can anyone tell me where the Amel facility in Guadalupe is located?
We are currently in the BVI's and as new S/M owners (with no manuals)
we thought we might sail to the Amel Service Center and get a proper
briefing on our boat. Thanks for your help.

Tony and Heidi
WORLD CITIZEN S/M 266


yacht Fiona

eric freedman
 

Hi,

For those of you who haven't been to www.yachtfiona.com
<http://www.yachtfiona.com/> I would strongly recommend it.

He is a CCA Blue water medal recipient and has circumnavigated Fiona 3
times.



My friend Eric Forsyth has over 200,000 miles on his home built boat and at
the age of 74 is heading out again for another circumnavigation. ( he is
extremely fit)

For those of you who are looking for a ride of a lifetime drop him a note.

Many legs need crew.

He will be leaving New York in May and headed for the Antarctic with stops
along the way for crew changes. Then up the west coast of Chile to Panama
and home.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite


Re: Puerto Williams

asm283 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Eric

Good to hear from you. WE are in New Zealand, waiting for the cyclone
season to end and getb back up to the islands. If you want to know
where the vents are on your boat close the valve and overflow your
tank. Thats the way I found them on Block Island.

Talk to you soon.

Vito

--- In amelyachtowners@..., eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Does anyone know of a way to contact the "yacht club" in Puerto
Williams?
fair winds,
eric