Date   

Re: [Amel] Rear cabin hatch supporting arm

Melbourne <melbourne@...>
 

Chantiers Amel used to sell or provide to new SMM owners a support
arm for the aft hatch. It has two positions: about 30 deg open and
about 70 deg open (horizontal). It's simple and works great.
William Melbourne SMM 306
+++++++

On Oct 11, 2009, at 12:38 PM, gmcerillo wrote:

Has anyone come up with an arm that will support the rear cabin
hatch in a 1/2 or 3/4 position? Either you open the hatch entirely
or prop it open half way with a handy item.

Kim & George
SM #353 Indecent


Rear cabin hatch supporting arm

george cerillo
 

Has anyone come up with an arm that will support the rear cabin hatch in a 1/2 or 3/4 position? Either you open the hatch entirely or prop it open half way with a handy item.

Kim & George
SM #353 Indecent


Re: [Amel] Re: Suggestion on Super Maramu

Ric <ric@...>
 

Kent, i have 7 euro style jerry cans you can have. They stack like
cubes. I can drop them off sunday if interested. My step sister used
to own a house on stingray point for 25+ years. Also have a spcl
silicone to seal hatches. Up to u, just taking up space & got free.
Safe too

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 10, 2009, at 7:34 PM, "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@yahoo.com>
wrote:


Hi, Nilo,
There are a lot of other owners who have way more experience with
the SM than I do. I thought I'd give you a quick perspective from a
relatively inexperienced owner who sails short handed most of the
time. I recently purchased a 1999 SM and have sailed it across the
Gulf of Mexico, to the Bahamas, and up to/in the Chesapeake for
another few weeks. I've had only one or two other crew most of the
time and have found that she's easy to sail even single-handed. I
haven't set the double headsail downwind rig yet, but I suspect that
will be a challenge singlehanded. The autopilot is your other crew
member...it works like a dream in all sea conditions I've
experienced thus far. The bow thruster makes docking easy in most
conditions.

I'm struggling a bit (as you know if you've read some of the
postings on this website) with learning all the systems and figuring
out how to maintain and repair things, but this website has been a
great resource for all ?'s about Amels, they are a different breed.

Have fun with your search.
Kent
SM 243 Kristy


Re: Rubber companionway seal

karkauai
 

Hi, Ian,
I've been trying to find this part in the US by looking under Renault, but am not having any luck. Does anyone have a source for these in the US? I was thinking about ordering several so others wouldn't have to spend so much time finding them.
Thanks,
Kent
SM 243 Kristy

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Marc,

the companionway seal is indeed a Renault part. I can't tell you what it is used for, but I have one in front of me, which as you suggest, was very expensive from Amel. The Renault part number is
77 00 640 249 followed by the letters UV 1. There is also another number on the label which is 1MDXPG. I cannot find the invoice right now but I believe that the Amel price for this seal was round 80 Euros plus shipping!

I would be interested to know the Renault price if you track one down in Trinidad.

Good luck

Ian SM 414 Crusader


Re: Suggestion on Super Maramu

karkauai
 

Hi, Nilo,
There are a lot of other owners who have way more experience with the SM than I do. I thought I'd give you a quick perspective from a relatively inexperienced owner who sails short handed most of the time. I recently purchased a 1999 SM and have sailed it across the Gulf of Mexico, to the Bahamas, and up to/in the Chesapeake for another few weeks. I've had only one or two other crew most of the time and have found that she's easy to sail even single-handed. I haven't set the double headsail downwind rig yet, but I suspect that will be a challenge singlehanded. The autopilot is your other crew member...it works like a dream in all sea conditions I've experienced thus far. The bow thruster makes docking easy in most conditions.

I'm struggling a bit (as you know if you've read some of the postings on this website) with learning all the systems and figuring out how to maintain and repair things, but this website has been a great resource for all ?'s about Amels, they are a different breed.

Have fun with your search.
Kent
SM 243 Kristy


Flir Infrared Camera

luvkante
 

Hi all,

I am about to get my new Amel 54 next year.

Does anybody have experience with a Flir Navigator II Camera in the masttop?

Any Information will be highly appreciated.

Martin
(Switzerland)


Re: [Amel] Re: Preparing for a winter aboard.

Steve Constantine <svsummerlove@...>
 

After winterizing for 4 straight winters, I've discovered that if you don't pour the antifreeze into the sea chest as quickly as the engine can draw it in, you'll burn up the impeller (genset impeller too). This means you then have to change the impeller AND remove all the broken bits from the cooling system, before you can finish winterizing. Very inconvenient. The hoses are cold and stiff, and it's a lot harder than in the summer.

I'm not sure why it would be necessary to actually winterize the engine and genset if, theoretically, the engine room will be "heated". In other words, if you have 1/2" fresh water hoses not freezing in there, it's unlikely the larger engine hoses will freeze to the extent they'll cause damage. If you did have a lengthy power failure, you could always run the engine overnight as long as the sea water at the intake wasn't frozen. The heat from the engine and genset would keep everything else in there from freezing. Probably the warmest room on the boat that night.

That said, here's what I found worked best for engine winterizing. The hole in the top of the 1 gallon antifreeze bottle isn't large enough to allow enough fluid through. I filled two 5-gallon buckets with antifreeze and set them outside the companionway. Then, I used a hand pump with at least a 1" diameter hose (1-1/2" is better) to pump the antifreeze into the sea chest. Make sure to secure the hose at the sea chest so it doesn't pop out and 'winterize' your engine room floor and bilge sump really well (done that too). Pumping from the cockpit allows you to get to the ignition shut off before the engine sucks the antifreeze in the sea chest down to the outlet hose level (about 5 seconds). This is difficult if you're doing the pumping from the engine room, unless you have a 3rd person to attend to the ignition (the 2nd is out on the dock watching for the exhaust water to turn pink). Even if you have a 3rd person, communication is difficult with
the engine running... and timing is crucial. You can then use what's left in the bucket to winterize the A/C system and anchor/deck wash (plus the heads if you're doing a full winterization).

Don't forget to winterize the cockpit shower (hot and cold) in the starboard locker. I've never "partially winterized" to continue living onboard, but I'm guessing you'll have to disconnect the feed hoses from inside the engine room, and cap the pressurized side of the fresh water system so you can continue to use it. I usually just winterize the entire system.

Make sure you use the correct mixture of glycerin and water for the water maker. An 8:1 ratio may work in France, but not necessarily Boston. You may want to check what specific gravity is required for the temperatures you expect. I was also told by Dessalateur, that the "pink" antifreeze will not harm the membranes, but since glycerin is the standard pickling fluid, and you already have it available, it would make more sense to use that.

Hope this helps.

Steve
Summer Love
SM340







________________________________
From: seastate9 <peacock@nhms.biz>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2009 4:51:02 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Preparing for a winter aboard.


Unfortunately we have a lot of experience winterizing our SM, in Maryland, a little warmer than Boston.

Assuming your boat is in the water, the water tank should be protected from freezing by the bubbler in the marina; if the water she sits in is not frozen, the tank should not be either.

The engine compartment might be kept safe by a small light bulb on at all times, but it can get pretty cold in Boston.

Winterizing the engine compartment is fairly straightforward: close the main sea cock, and unscrew the top of the sea chest; someone up top starts the engine, while you frantically pour from many already opened pink antifreeze jugs into the sea chest as quickly as possible (the engine is quite thirsty); when the top person sees pink coming out the exhaust, stop the engine. Repeat for the generator.

Don't forget to also winterize the AC plumbing; turn on the AC, pour into the sea chest again, watch for pink from the exit in the bow; if someone accidentally turns on the AC, you will have to re-winterize; heat only will not circulate the water.

One other thought: most marinas shut off all fresh water in the late fall; your water tank may not last the whole winter, you may need to bring in fresh water by hand.

I hope this is my last winterization.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 "Aletes"

--- In amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com, "Jose" <jgvenegas@. ..> wrote:

My wife and I are going live aboard our SM2K at Constitution Marina in Boston Harbor this winter. Aside from the 3 built in electric heaters we plan to have three more connected to the 110V electric outlet of the slip, plus an extra one on the engine room. We also plan to shrink rap the boat with transparent plastic and winterize the engine.

We would greatly appreciate any suggestions of how to best prepare the boat, for example:
1) Any danger that the water tank could freeze even if the boat is kept warm inside?
2) Winterize or not the generator? I thought it could be a safety in case we lose power.

Any ideas or hints of how to make this easier short of sailing south?


Winterizing watermaker

Ralph Caruso
 

Having just gone thru this I can give you some more insights.  My boat (not an Amel) has a Spectra watermaker, and it is located near Bordeaux in a place where the temperatures drop slightly below freezing, but the water never freezes.

When I arrived here in France in late June 2008, I pickled the watermaker using the Spectra chemicals, figuring that I would eventually get around to winterizing it later.  However, it took me 15 months to do so, partly because I could not find a reasonable source of propylene glycol (pink water-system antifreeze) here in France.  I had 2 jugs on the boat that I had managed to find in Florida just before leaving (that was also hard), and was loathe to give them up.  I figured that the pickling chemicals would keep the system from freezing as long as the temperature did not drop too much.

I called Spectra in August this year to consult them about this, and they told me that not only should I have used the pink stuff, I should not have allowed the membrane to sit in the pickling solution more than 6 months.  So, rushing off to the boat, I unpickled the watermaker and started it up, and lo-and-behold, it made great water at the design rate and pressure, with no leaks.  So, I guess that the Spectra specs are a bit conservative.  However, just to be sure, I used my 2 jugs of pink stuff to re-winterize it, and now I can sleep confortably this winter.

In summary, according to Spectra, you can use the pickling chemicals to lay up for 6 months max, but if you want to go a whole year, you have to use pink stuff, undiluted. 

Now, if I could only find a supplier of pink stuff here.  We just came back from the US, where we saw it EVERYWHERE, from West Marine to Walmart.  Sigh.  At least the food is good...

Ralph Caruso
s/v Petillant,  Jeanneau SO43DS




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


volvo d3 110

terrygrisley <terrygrisley@...>
 

Can anybody help? I am trying to find out the replacement interval for the serpentine double sided belt on the front of the Volvo d3 110. Amel tells me 400 hours, a volvo dealer said 1200 hours and an informed source claimed 600 hours. My manual makes no reference. Any experience!

Cerise


Suggestion on Super Maramu

Nilo <nilo.calvi@...>
 

Dear Amel's Owners, I'm looking to buy a blue water cruiser to be used by myself and my wife for short time cruises in the Med while awaiting the opportunity to dedicate more time to sail. We are thinking to a second hand Najad or HR, size 43-46 but because a lot of people told us the Super Maramu can fit our needs, I would be most grateful to any experienced Super Maramu sailor for sharing experiences/comments on managing this boat in a so reduced crew. While we can easily recognize the quality of this design we are obviously mainly worried by manouvering in narrow harbours, so common in the Med. Many thanks in advance for any suggestion useful to drive our choice. Yours sincerely, Nilo


Re: [Amel] Winterizing watermaker

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Give some thought to what does this do to the membrane?  Do you have to do this process every 4 weeks.  Or can you go the New England WINTER??? of 5 months and days of -10 F.?? 
   Regarding the engine room, with the battery charger and hot water heater going it should not freeze in there.  I'd be careful with a light bulb.  BE SURE very sure to hang so it can not tough anything... They get very very hot over time.
   Some marinas drop water supply hoses to the bottom with a line and twice a week they turn on the water flow to fill up the live aboards.  That how it works here in Annapolis.
   Joan suggests that you get a supply of de-humidifier bags for the lockers as they get wet from condensation too.  Keep in mind that cotton stuff is like to absorb water faster then Poly this or that.  Keep the cabinets open to keep the air flow.
  Some told us the other day to get a pair of felt boot liners for walking on frost/ice covered docks so you don't go slip sliding away with the tide.
  My sister in law live just up the street when we go to see her will stop by.
Best of the winter.. earn more faster get south....
Richard and Joan on Challenge in Annapolis SM 209

--- On Thu, 10/8/09, hollambyuk <annejohnholl@gmail.com> wrote:

From: hollambyuk <annejohnholl@gmail.com>
Subject: [Amel] Winterizing watermaker
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, October 8, 2009, 1:16 PM






 





I Googled Dessalator and found dessalator.fr.

Their website gives the answer which is to get one litre of glycerine from a pharmacy and add it to eight litres of water in a bucket. Put the inlet hose to the filters into the bucket and and run the low pressure pump until the bucket is empty.

You might wish to visit the websites of some North American Watermaker companies to check that Dessalator realise just how cold it is in Boston and places north!



Regards, John SM319































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Winterizing watermaker

hollambyuk <annejohnholl@...>
 

I Googled Dessalator and found dessalator.fr.
Their website gives the answer which is to get one litre of glycerine from a pharmacy and add it to eight litres of water in a bucket. Put the inlet hose to the filters into the bucket and and run the low pressure pump until the bucket is empty.
You might wish to visit the websites of some North American Watermaker companies to check that Dessalator realise just how cold it is in Boston and places north!

Regards, John SM319


Re: [Amel] Re: Preparing for a winter aboard.

Anthony Dawkins <nearlynothing@...>
 

I had a bad experience in January in Boston. It can get very cold. Amel hulls and decks provide no insulation. The on-board electric heaters are nearly useless for New England winter cold. You need very reliable supplementary heaters connected to reliable shore power. I emphasize reliable shore power because at the same marina I lost power and within 12 hours had significant freezing damage (there was no one on board), during a cold snap.
Oil-filled electric heaters--rather than fan type heaters--can be excellent, giving an even heat and providing some residual warmth for a time if a power outage is not too long. If you haven't "shut down" the boat, the diesel heater can be a very effective back-up, in a pinch.
I do not think a light bulb will suffice in the engine room.
Finally, if the boat is properly heated--and you are sure of the reliability--you may not need to further winterize, but for this you ought to check with someone who has specific experience.
Good luck.

--- On Wed, 10/7/09, seastate9 <peacock@nhms.biz> wrote:


From: seastate9 <peacock@nhms.biz>
Subject: [Amel] Re: Preparing for a winter aboard.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 4:51 PM


 



Unfortunately we have a lot of experience winterizing our SM, in Maryland, a little warmer than Boston.

Assuming your boat is in the water, the water tank should be protected from freezing by the bubbler in the marina; if the water she sits in is not frozen, the tank should not be either.

The engine compartment might be kept safe by a small light bulb on at all times, but it can get pretty cold in Boston.

Winterizing the engine compartment is fairly straightforward: close the main sea cock, and unscrew the top of the sea chest; someone up top starts the engine, while you frantically pour from many already opened pink antifreeze jugs into the sea chest as quickly as possible (the engine is quite thirsty); when the top person sees pink coming out the exhaust, stop the engine. Repeat for the generator.

Don't forget to also winterize the AC plumbing; turn on the AC, pour into the sea chest again, watch for pink from the exit in the bow; if someone accidentally turns on the AC, you will have to re-winterize; heat only will not circulate the water.

One other thought: most marinas shut off all fresh water in the late fall; your water tank may not last the whole winter, you may need to bring in fresh water by hand.

I hope this is my last winterization.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 "Aletes"

--- In amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com, "Jose" <jgvenegas@. ..> wrote:

My wife and I are going live aboard our SM2K at Constitution Marina in Boston Harbor this winter. Aside from the 3 built in electric heaters we plan to have three more connected to the 110V electric outlet of the slip, plus an extra one on the engine room. We also plan to shrink rap the boat with transparent plastic and winterize the engine.

We would greatly appreciate any suggestions of how to best prepare the boat, for example:
1) Any danger that the water tank could freeze even if the boat is kept warm inside?
2) Winterize or not the generator? I thought it could be a safety in case we lose power.

Any ideas or hints of how to make this easier short of sailing south?


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Preparing for a winter aboard.

seastate9 <peacock@...>
 

Unfortunately we have a lot of experience winterizing our SM, in Maryland, a little warmer than Boston.

Assuming your boat is in the water, the water tank should be protected from freezing by the bubbler in the marina; if the water she sits in is not frozen, the tank should not be either.

The engine compartment might be kept safe by a small light bulb on at all times, but it can get pretty cold in Boston.

Winterizing the engine compartment is fairly straightforward: close the main sea cock, and unscrew the top of the sea chest; someone up top starts the engine, while you frantically pour from many already opened pink antifreeze jugs into the sea chest as quickly as possible (the engine is quite thirsty); when the top person sees pink coming out the exhaust, stop the engine. Repeat for the generator.

Don't forget to also winterize the AC plumbing; turn on the AC, pour into the sea chest again, watch for pink from the exit in the bow; if someone accidentally turns on the AC, you will have to re-winterize; heat only will not circulate the water.

One other thought: most marinas shut off all fresh water in the late fall; your water tank may not last the whole winter, you may need to bring in fresh water by hand.

I hope this is my last winterization.

Tom Peacock
SM 240 "Aletes"

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Jose" <jgvenegas@...> wrote:

My wife and I are going live aboard our SM2K at Constitution Marina in Boston Harbor this winter. Aside from the 3 built in electric heaters we plan to have three more connected to the 110V electric outlet of the slip, plus an extra one on the engine room. We also plan to shrink rap the boat with transparent plastic and winterize the engine.

We would greatly appreciate any suggestions of how to best prepare the boat, for example:
1) Any danger that the water tank could freeze even if the boat is kept warm inside?
2) Winterize or not the generator? I thought it could be a safety in case we lose power.

Any ideas or hints of how to make this easier short of sailing south?


Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel

Ric <ric@...>
 

I know deltaville well, sisterinlaw owned house on stingray point.
Call office at 410-923-5800 if I can be of help.

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 6, 2009, at 11:45 PM, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

That's a great offer, Ric. Unfortunately, I don't think I'll get up
there again before heading south. I'm only going to be able to work
on her on the weekends between now and mid-Nov. She'll be in
Deltaville 'till then if you get down that way.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, Ric <ric@kitchenmagic.net> wrote:

From: Ric <ric@kitchenmagic.net>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/
Extra Fuel
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com"
<amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 10:23 PM



When sailing offshore I always take everything off the deck I even
take off dorades. Some folks dont have the storage of an Amel & have
no choice for fuel. The raft should be on deck, secured, & ready. Try
lifting it in perfect conditions, tough. Follow "the grab bag" book by
howorth to set up your ditch bag. If your around Annapolis before nov
5, i'd be happy to meet you & go over the boat.

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 6, 2009, at 8:27 PM, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com>
wrote:

Aha! See, I don't know what I'd do without you guys. Seems like I
see people carrying thier gerry cans along the rail all the time.
You probably just saved me from myself again. Thanks.

Hmmm, so do you keep your life raft, drogue, and sea anchor in the
aft locker or somewhere else? My aft locker is filling up with
bicycles and extra sails and dinghy, etc.

Does the 55 gal of fuel on one side make her list at all?

Thanks again,
Kent


--- On Tue, 10/6/09, kimberlite <kimberlite@optonlin e.net> wrote:

From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonlin e.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /
Extra Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 6:50 PM



Kent,

We carry 11 cans in the port cockpit locker.

Lashing cans to the rail is a bad idea. When you get hit by a big
wave you
can kiss the rail goodbye puls anything it is connected to.

Some people keep the cans in the rope locker in the cockpit

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtow ners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kent
Robertson
Sent: Monday, October 05, 2009 5:10 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel

Hi again, folks,
It's actually looking like I'll have everything ready to go by Nov
for my
trip out to Bermuda and S to the Caribbean. Thank you for all your
advice
and help.
I've got a couple of other questions:
1. A couple of you have said I should take "plenty" of extra fuel.
Just how
much is "plenty"? In looking at places to lash Gerry cans on deck,
I'm only
seeing the spaces between the last three aft staunchions that I
could lash
them without interfering with access to either cleats or jib cars or
downwind poles. That would be only 95 inches, or about ?4 cans on
each side.
That's about 40 gallons if I don't tie some dinghy fuel there,
too...enough
to motor ~140nm. Is that worth all the effort, or do you just carry
a couple
of cans as emergency fuel and save them for coming into harbors/
docks or
maneuvering in a storm situation?
2. Does anyone have a favorite freeze dried brand that they carry
for
offshore passages? I'm thinking it'd be nice to have something that
I could
just heat up some water and have a hot meal if it's too rough to
really cook
under way. How much would you carry with you? I was thinking enough
to feed
the crew a hot meal a day for half the anticipated time of passage.

Thanks for you thoughts.
Kent
Kristy SM2000#243










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Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel

karkauai
 

That's a great offer, Ric.  Unfortunately, I don't think I'll get up there again before heading south.  I'm only going to be able to work on her on the weekends between now and mid-Nov.  She'll be in Deltaville 'till then if you get down that way.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, Ric <ric@kitchenmagic.net> wrote:


From: Ric <ric@kitchenmagic.net>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 10:23 PM


 



When sailing offshore I always take everything off the deck I even
take off dorades. Some folks dont have the storage of an Amel & have
no choice for fuel. The raft should be on deck, secured, & ready. Try
lifting it in perfect conditions, tough. Follow "the grab bag" book by
howorth to set up your ditch bag. If your around Annapolis before nov
5, i'd be happy to meet you & go over the boat.

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 6, 2009, at 8:27 PM, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com> wrote:

Aha! See, I don't know what I'd do without you guys. Seems like I
see people carrying thier gerry cans along the rail all the time.
You probably just saved me from myself again. Thanks.

Hmmm, so do you keep your life raft, drogue, and sea anchor in the
aft locker or somewhere else? My aft locker is filling up with
bicycles and extra sails and dinghy, etc.

Does the 55 gal of fuel on one side make her list at all?

Thanks again,
Kent


--- On Tue, 10/6/09, kimberlite <kimberlite@optonlin e.net> wrote:

From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonlin e.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /
Extra Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 6:50 PM



Kent,

We carry 11 cans in the port cockpit locker.

Lashing cans to the rail is a bad idea. When you get hit by a big
wave you
can kiss the rail goodbye puls anything it is connected to.

Some people keep the cans in the rope locker in the cockpit

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtow ners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Monday, October 05, 2009 5:10 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel

Hi again, folks,
It's actually looking like I'll have everything ready to go by Nov
for my
trip out to Bermuda and S to the Caribbean. Thank you for all your
advice
and help.
I've got a couple of other questions:
1. A couple of you have said I should take "plenty" of extra fuel.
Just how
much is "plenty"? In looking at places to lash Gerry cans on deck,
I'm only
seeing the spaces between the last three aft staunchions that I
could lash
them without interfering with access to either cleats or jib cars or
downwind poles. That would be only 95 inches, or about ?4 cans on
each side.
That's about 40 gallons if I don't tie some dinghy fuel there,
too...enough
to motor ~140nm. Is that worth all the effort, or do you just carry
a couple
of cans as emergency fuel and save them for coming into harbors/
docks or
maneuvering in a storm situation?
2. Does anyone have a favorite freeze dried brand that they carry for
offshore passages? I'm thinking it'd be nice to have something that
I could
just heat up some water and have a hot meal if it's too rough to
really cook
under way. How much would you carry with you? I was thinking enough
to feed
the crew a hot meal a day for half the anticipated time of passage.

Thanks for you thoughts.
Kent
Kristy SM2000#243

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel

karkauai
 

I'll check it out this trip and post my findings.  thanks Eric
Kent
SM 243 Kristy

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net> wrote:


From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 10:11 PM


 



Don't know about your engine , I have the yanmar 1 gallon at about 1800 rpm
almost 7 knots in flat water -red line is 3600 rpm. Correct engine speed
for cruising on my engine is 2800 rpm.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 9:44 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra Fuel

Volvo TMD22

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, kimberlite <kimberlite@ optonlin
<mailto:kimberlite% 40optonline. net> e.net> wrote:

From: kimberlite <kimberlite@ optonlin <mailto:kimberlite% 40optonline. net>
e.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtow ners%40yahoogrou ps.com>
yahoogroups. com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 8:27 PM

What engine do you have?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtow ners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 8:05 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel

I haven't actually calculated my "mileage", but was going on what my Amel
owners' CD said..."6 l/hr fuel consumption at cruising speed". I think I'm
doing better than that, but figured I might be motoring into a heavy sea and
was being conservative. What should I really expect to average?
Thanks,
Kent

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, David Mackintosh <dlm48@aol.com
<mailto:dlm48% 40aol.com>
<mailto:dlm48% 40aol.com> > wrote:

From: David Mackintosh <dlm48@aol.com <mailto:dlm48% 40aol.com>
<mailto:dlm48% 40aol.com> >
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtow ners%40yahoogrou ps.com>
yahoogroups. com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 4:56 PM

you wrote "That's about 40 gallons if I don't tie some dinghy fuel there,
too...enough to motor ~140nm."

I cant believe you can only motor for 140 miles on 40 gallons of diesel.
Even at a gallon an hour that is 40 hours motoring at i would assume 6 knots
assuming calm weather 40x6 is 240 miles.

regards

David

2009/10/6 Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo. com>



Thanks for the input, Ric & Gary. Two extremes on the spectrum of what's
"enough" fuel for the passage. Anyone else care to weigh in?
Kent

--- On Tue, 10/6/09, Ric <ric@kitchenmagic. net <ric%40kitchenmagic .net>>
wrote:

From: Ric <ric@kitchenmagic. net <ric%40kitchenmagic .net>>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel
To: "amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com <amelyachtowners% 40yahoogroups.
com>"
<amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com <amelyachtowners% 40yahoogroups. com>>
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 8:39 AM



I would forget freeze dried. If its rough & no one feels like cooking,
open.a soup can. Some die hard sailors will try to sail even when
going 3 knots. I have a 4-5 knot rule & motorsail at times. 200 to 250
gals gives you enough. Keep a fuel log with engine & genset hours.
Bring lots of oil, antifreeze too

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 5, 2009, at 5:10 PM, "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@yahoo. com> wrote:

Hi again, folks,
It's actually looking like I'll have everything ready to go by Nov
for my trip out to Bermuda and S to the Caribbean. Thank you for all
your advice and help.
I've got a couple of other questions:
1. A couple of you have said I should take "plenty" of extra fuel.
Just how much is "plenty"? In looking at places to lash Gerry cans
on deck, I'm only seeing the spaces between the last three aft
staunchions that I could lash them without interfering with access
to either cleats or jib cars or downwind poles. That would be only
95 inches, or about ?4 cans on each side. That's about 40 gallons if
I don't tie some dinghy fuel there, too...enough to motor ~140nm. Is
that worth all the effort, or do you just carry a couple of cans as
emergency fuel and save them for coming into harbors/docks or
maneuvering in a storm situation?
2. Does anyone have a favorite freeze dried brand that they carry
for offshore passages? I'm thinking it'd be nice to have something
that I could just heat up some water and have a hot meal if it's too
rough to really cook under way. How much would you carry with you?
I was thinking enough to feed the crew a hot meal a day for half the
anticipated time of passage.

Thanks for you thoughts.
Kent
Kristy SM2000#243



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.

eric freedman
 

Sorry,

I missed that.

I guess you will have to keep the engine room and the boat warm.

I would still winterize the engine and genset/c unit .and anchor wash.

Being that you will have the seacock open and some of the antifreeze will
probably exchange itself with sea water, you might have to winterize it a
few times. I believe there is a separate seacock for the engine that could
be closed after winterizing. I do not remember the anchor wash or the genset
seacocks..

Fair Winds

Eric





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jose
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 10:15 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.





Eric,
I don't think I made clear that I was going to live aboard!
I would need running water and functioning heads to do that.
Thanks

Jose and Magnolia
Ipanema SM278
Marblehead, Massachusetts

--- In amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com, kimberlite <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Sail south it is a lot easier..



However it should be easy to winterize the boat being that you have one
sea
chest. I would run the a lot of the pink drinkable antifreeze into the sea
chest with the seacock closed. There are instructions in the Amel book
about
putting up the boat for a few months. It will be the same except you use
antifreeze instead of fresh water. I would also winterize the genset. If
you
need it in an emergency you just have to open the seacock.



Don't forget the a/c system, toilets, and anchor wash and the wet bilge,
and
main engine...



I would empty most of the water tank and pour in gallons of antifreeze.

Also some antifreeze in the sink traps.

I am sure I forgot many things but I think this will be a good start



I don't know about the batteries freezing.



Fair Winds

Eric









_____

From: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jose
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 9:35 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.





My wife and I are going live aboard our SM2K at Constitution Marina in
Boston Harbor this winter. Aside from the 3 built in electric heaters we
plan to have three more connected to the 110V electric outlet of the slip,
plus an extra one on the engine room. We also plan to shrink rap the boat
with transparent plastic and winterize the engine.

We would greatly appreciate any suggestions of how to best prepare the
boat,
for example:
1) Any danger that the water tank could freeze even if the boat is kept
warm
inside?
2) Winterize or not the generator? I thought it could be a safety in case
we
lose power.

Any ideas or hints of how to make this easier short of sailing south?







Re: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.

eric freedman
 

The sea chest is the big seacock and thing above it on the starboard aft end
of the engine with the sea strainer in it..

Jose, the water maker is a good question and I forgot about that as I have
never winterized kimberlite. Possibly someone on the site will know how to
winterize it. Or you might write to Amel.

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jose
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 10:12 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.





Thanks you Eric, I wish we could but some of us less fortunate still have to
work for a few more years before heading south for good.
I agree that it is a good idea to winterize the generator.
Can you clarify what is and were is the sea chest?

What about the water desalinator. Any special treatment for it?

Jose and Magnolia

Ipanema SM2K 278

--- In amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com, kimberlite <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Sail south it is a lot easier..



However it should be easy to winterize the boat being that you have one
sea
chest. I would run the a lot of the pink drinkable antifreeze into the sea
chest with the seacock closed. There are instructions in the Amel book
about
putting up the boat for a few months. It will be the same except you use
antifreeze instead of fresh water. I would also winterize the genset. If
you
need it in an emergency you just have to open the seacock.



Don't forget the a/c system, toilets, and anchor wash and the wet bilge,
and
main engine...



I would empty most of the water tank and pour in gallons of antifreeze.

Also some antifreeze in the sink traps.

I am sure I forgot many things but I think this will be a good start



I don't know about the batteries freezing.



Fair Winds

Eric









_____

From: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jose
Sent: Tuesday, October 06, 2009 9:35 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Preparing for a winter aboard.





My wife and I are going live aboard our SM2K at Constitution Marina in
Boston Harbor this winter. Aside from the 3 built in electric heaters we
plan to have three more connected to the 110V electric outlet of the slip,
plus an extra one on the engine room. We also plan to shrink rap the boat
with transparent plastic and winterize the engine.

We would greatly appreciate any suggestions of how to best prepare the
boat,
for example:
1) Any danger that the water tank could freeze even if the boat is kept
warm
inside?
2) Winterize or not the generator? I thought it could be a safety in case
we
lose power.

Any ideas or hints of how to make this easier short of sailing south?







Re: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/Extra Fuel

Ric <ric@...>
 

When sailing offshore I always take everything off the deck I even
take off dorades. Some folks dont have the storage of an Amel & have
no choice for fuel. The raft should be on deck, secured, & ready. Try
lifting it in perfect conditions, tough. Follow "the grab bag" book by
howorth to set up your ditch bag. If your around Annapolis before nov
5, i'd be happy to meet you & go over the boat.

Ric Gottschalk
Bali Hai SN24

On Oct 6, 2009, at 8:27 PM, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

Aha! See, I don't know what I'd do without you guys. Seems like I
see people carrying thier gerry cans along the rail all the time.
You probably just saved me from myself again. Thanks.

Hmmm, so do you keep your life raft, drogue, and sea anchor in the
aft locker or somewhere else? My aft locker is filling up with
bicycles and extra sails and dinghy, etc.

Does the 55 gal of fuel on one side make her list at all?

Thanks again,
Kent


--- On Tue, 10/6/09, kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net> wrote:

From: kimberlite <kimberlite@optonline.net>
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning/
Extra Fuel
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2009, 6:50 PM



Kent,

We carry 11 cans in the port cockpit locker.

Lashing cans to the rail is a bad idea. When you get hit by a big
wave you
can kiss the rail goodbye puls anything it is connected to.

Some people keep the cans in the rope locker in the cockpit

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Monday, October 05, 2009 5:10 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel] Re: Heading South for the Winter/Provisioning /Extra
Fuel

Hi again, folks,
It's actually looking like I'll have everything ready to go by Nov
for my
trip out to Bermuda and S to the Caribbean. Thank you for all your
advice
and help.
I've got a couple of other questions:
1. A couple of you have said I should take "plenty" of extra fuel.
Just how
much is "plenty"? In looking at places to lash Gerry cans on deck,
I'm only
seeing the spaces between the last three aft staunchions that I
could lash
them without interfering with access to either cleats or jib cars or
downwind poles. That would be only 95 inches, or about ?4 cans on
each side.
That's about 40 gallons if I don't tie some dinghy fuel there,
too...enough
to motor ~140nm. Is that worth all the effort, or do you just carry
a couple
of cans as emergency fuel and save them for coming into harbors/
docks or
maneuvering in a storm situation?
2. Does anyone have a favorite freeze dried brand that they carry for
offshore passages? I'm thinking it'd be nice to have something that
I could
just heat up some water and have a hot meal if it's too rough to
really cook
under way. How much would you carry with you? I was thinking enough
to feed
the crew a hot meal a day for half the anticipated time of passage.

Thanks for you thoughts.
Kent
Kristy SM2000#243