Date   

Re: [Amel] Verical Batons

Paul LaFrance <pflafrance@...>
 

Jim
We had new sails made by Omar Sails in Beaufort North Carolina. They are HydraNet radial , main with battens, Amel Logo, SM362 in Blue,
Mizzen has 4 battens ,Amel Logo and the Name "Nomad" in Blue,
both sails have leech and foot lines, UV cover at clew, bag with boat
name, and telltales.
Price is $5600
The vertical battens maintain the shape of the sails. The material is stronger than Dacron and more UV resistant. We received the sails in Oct 2008 and sailed from RI to the Caribbean for the winter and are now on our way back to RI. During this time the sails have worked flawlessly. They furl with no problem. We have been in a gale with 67 knot winds on the way south and encountered no problems.
Paul at Omar has all the measurements from Amel for the SM as Henry Amel supplied them to him. Their work ios first rate along with their service as to time commitments and delivery.
He has made sails for a number of other Amel owners.

Paul LaFrance
SV Nomad #362


To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: symoondog@hotmail.com
Date: Sun, 17 May 2009 19:19:24 +0000
Subject: RE: [Amel] Verical Batons


Jim, another thought, the in mast batten free sail is a proven passage maker. Battens in the main with some roach in it will improve your windward performance I will agree to that. Just remember when you have to reef the main you'll have to go head to wind. When you get hit by heavy air you release the jib and main sheets. you then must get in all the jib to put the boat head to wind. The boom will be flailing out on your beam and will be head to wind but your bow isn't. If its blowing 45 knots the bow won't come to windward unless you sheet it back in, but you have a full main and you'l be trying to sheet it in while standing the boat on its beam ends. You will end up starting the motor to drive the boat up so you can get the boom lined up with the slot in the main, if there's any main left by now it just might work. This scenario is so easy with Amels way, we just ease the main out hawl and roll up some sail and never change course regardless of wind speed or direction. If I had a reverse gear in my electric jib sheet winch, I'd never leave the helmsmen seat to do anything. What part of this do you not like? If you insist on this go a little faster ideal,make sure you don't go to the Med and get hit by one of their Mistrals, or the Atlantic and get caught in a white squall or where I just came from, 50 degree south and get blindsided by a 55 kt. williwaw blasting down a mountain.
John "Moon Dog" SM 248


To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
From: dave_benjamin@yahoo.com
Date: Tue, 12 May 2009 23:21:30 -0700
Subject: Re: [Amel] Verical Batons







Jim,

As a sailmaker I am not enthused with vertical battens although there are some vocal proponents. There are issues with vertical battens getting stuck and causing problems. On a cruising boat you really don't want that risk.

Has your sailmaker built sails for a SM before? I saw one SM where a sailmaker made the sail a bit too long on the luff and built patches that were bulky. The sail required several modifications to fit properly.



--- On Tue, 5/12/09, linda.desalvo <linda.desalvo@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: linda.desalvo <linda.desalvo@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Amel] Verical Batons
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 4:32 PM

Hello All

We are in the process of ordering a new mainsail for our Super Maramu #207 and would like any feedback that we could get in reference to vertical batons. Are they something that would enhance the sail. Does anyone out there have a mainsail with vertical baton and what kind of performance does this type of sail give? Could they get stuck in the roller furling? Any advise or comments would be greatly appreciated.

Jim DeSalvo

SV Liebling











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Re: [Amel] Raymarine Linear Drive problems and J Boat sunk between New Zealand and Fiji

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

Hi Bill,
Years ago I had a similar message on my linear drive on my last boat after many thousand miles.The problem that time was that there was a huge amount of carbon dust inside the motor from the carbon brushes. After cleaning it out it worked perfectly. There was still some life left in the brushes fortunately as Raymarine UK had changed their motor supplier and had no spares and infuriatingly did not give me the details of the makers of the original motor. The other common problem was that the planetary gears in the drive were made of a nylon type material with a life of about 15000 miles. A set cost £12.50 and I had bought three sets of spares.The brass ones cost £125 a set! I sold one set to an American couple and saved their bacon. They ended up in the late nineties running a hugely successful restaurant in Vanuatu and I sold anothe set to anothr couple who were stranded somewhere in the S. Pacific. Olivier assured me that they use the brass ones but I have never checked as I also have the chain drive model as a back up.
I hope this works for you.

Best wishes, Anne and John, SM 319

----- Original Message -----
From: svbebe
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2009 11:56 PM
Subject: [Amel] Raymarine Linear Drive problems and J Boat sunk between New Zealand and Fiji





One of my fears is having to manually steer on a long passage with only 2 of us. We recently made a 1,000 mile passage from New Zealand to Vanuatu. About 200 miles into our passage, The Raymarine Autopilot went to alarm status with a message "drive stopped." The linear drive unit had failed.

Well, I donned my "chief engineer" cap and turned the A/B switch to the Rotary drive unit...problem solved, but a bit noisy as you know.

Since arriving in New Caledonia I have determined that the clutch on the linear drive unit is faulty and slipping causing it to go to alarm status. I have decided to make the next 1,000 miles to Australia with only one drive (fingers crossed) because there is a Raymarine service repair facility in Australia:

Raymarine Asia Service Workshop
aus.support@raymarine.com
Suite 301, 2 Minna Close,
Belrose, NSW, 2085
Australia

As a side note, we met a couple on a Hallberg-Rassy here in New Caledonia who had the same problem about the same time as us, however their solution did not include an A/B switch, they manually steered about 800 miles.

Also we are acquainted with a couple who were sailing a very fast J Boat departing New Zealand several days after us; they were sailing to Fiji. About 300 miles into the 1200 mile passage they also lost their autopilot (cause unknown). Additionally they began taking on water near the rudder post (but never found the actual source). The J Boat sank within 2 hours and is resting on the ocean floor with all of their belongings in about 6,000 feet of water. They could not stop the water and had no way to compartmentalize the problem. Fortunately they were rescued by a nearby boat which we also know.

Sometimes we take A/B switches and water tight compartments for granted. I thought you would like to hear these stories.

Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe SM2 #387


Re: Raymarine Linear Drive problems and J Boat sunk between New Zealand and Fiji

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Sorry...forgot that Yahoo strips out the email addresses:


Raymarine Asia Service Workshop
aus.support"at"raymarine.com
Suite 301, 2 Minna Close,
Belrose, NSW, 2085
Australia

Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe SM2 #387


Re: Amel service support in the Pacific

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Sorry, forgot about Yahoo protecting us from spammers...

the address is:
Noumea Yacht Services in Noumea, New Caledonia Herve MOAL and Eva DUMAS, email:nys22s"at"hotmail.com phone: (+687)24 01 23

Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe SM2 #387
Noumea New Caledonia


Raymarine Linear Drive problems and J Boat sunk between New Zealand and Fiji

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

One of my fears is having to manually steer on a long passage with only 2 of us. We recently made a 1,000 mile passage from New Zealand to Vanuatu. About 200 miles into our passage, The Raymarine Autopilot went to alarm status with a message "drive stopped." The linear drive unit had failed.

Well, I donned my "chief engineer" cap and turned the A/B switch to the Rotary drive unit...problem solved, but a bit noisy as you know.

Since arriving in New Caledonia I have determined that the clutch on the linear drive unit is faulty and slipping causing it to go to alarm status. I have decided to make the next 1,000 miles to Australia with only one drive (fingers crossed) because there is a Raymarine service repair facility in Australia:

Raymarine Asia Service Workshop
aus.support@raymarine.com
Suite 301, 2 Minna Close,
Belrose, NSW, 2085
Australia

As a side note, we met a couple on a Hallberg-Rassy here in New Caledonia who had the same problem about the same time as us, however their solution did not include an A/B switch, they manually steered about 800 miles.

Also we are acquainted with a couple who were sailing a very fast J Boat departing New Zealand several days after us; they were sailing to Fiji. About 300 miles into the 1200 mile passage they also lost their autopilot (cause unknown). Additionally they began taking on water near the rudder post (but never found the actual source). The J Boat sank within 2 hours and is resting on the ocean floor with all of their belongings in about 6,000 feet of water. They could not stop the water and had no way to compartmentalize the problem. Fortunately they were rescued by a nearby boat which we also know.

Sometimes we take A/B switches and water tight compartments for granted. I thought you would like to hear these stories.

Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe SM2 #387


Amel service support in the Pacific

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

I apologize if this sounds like a commercial, but when you are in remote places the following information can be very helpful:

When we arrived in New Caledonia we used Agents with Noumea Yacht Service for the customs/immigration process. Herve MOAL and Eva DUMAS, email: nys22@hotmail.com phone: (+687)24 01 23, offer very reasonably priced clearance services. On our arrival, Eva even met us at the dock and helped us with lines...great people.

Here is the really good part:
For years Herve was the Pacific Service Agent for Amel yachts and knows Amels thoroughly. He sailed many times with Henri Amel and he has circumnavigated in an Amel. Noumea Yacht Service also offers car rentals, tours, repairs, fuel arrangements, parts receipt, laborers, etc.

Best,

Bill
s/v Bebe SM2 #387
Noumea New Caledonia


Re: Disabled guest

Bob Fritz
 

Kent,
The website for the Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating is http://www.crab-sailing.org/ Each year my community sailing center (not on the Chesapeake) devotes a day to sailboat rides for disabled persons. I can only say that these days are among the most rewarding sailing that I've done. The joy of our guests out on the water is almost beyond belief. I've even taken a quadriplegic person out sailing. He couldn't wait to get back to his facility to tell everyone about his day on the water.

I can't help with specifics as to how to get your uncle on and off the boat as we have students from the physical therapy program at a local university assist with loading and unloading our guests, and my boat, a non-Amel 35 footer, has lifelines that can be detached, so that bringing someone onboard from the dock is realtively easy.

Bob


Re: Disabled guest

sherman.gifford
 

There is an organization in the northern Chesapeake Bay area for sailors with disabilities to sail on one-designs - the name is C.R.A.B. - I could try to locate their correspondence if you can't find it. And another absolutely incredible organization is the Jubilee Sailing Trust in the UK that operates two tall ships completely equipped for, and half crewed by, sailors with disabilities. They may have suggestions. Good luck!

Sherman Gifford
SM291 BREVIS
Richmond, VA

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "karkauai" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, again gang,
Different kind of problem this time. I have a 90 year old uncle who had polio as a kid, did pretty well for most of his life despite some weakness in his legs, and has deteriorated a lot over the last 10+ years due to post polio syndrome. His mind is very sharp. He is an absolute NUT about boats and the water and has gushed ever since he found out about my new SM. My aunt tells me he's more animated and excited than she's seen him in a long time.

I want to take him for a sail in the Chesapeake this Summer for at least a day, hopefully more. His son is willing to come along to help, but isn't a sailor. I'm hoping someone else has tackled the problem of getting on and off the boat, and up and down the companionway, and over bulkheads to get to the head and stateroom. He lives in WA state, so I haven't observed him myself, but it sounds like he's able to get onto and off a motorized "scooter" type wheelchair, but not able to walk more than a few steps.

I feel like I can get him on and off the dock using a halyard and bosun's chair, and maybe up and down the companionway using the extra halyard on the mizzen. Getting around in the boat may be an even bigger problem with the cabin sole moving all the time and not much room for one of us to be at his side. I'm sending pics of the boat and have encouraged him to talk to his rehab doc and/or therapist for some evaluation and maybe a mockup "boat" for him to see how he does.

Does anyone have any experience with disabled people aboard? Are there any sailing programs for disabled folks like there are for snow skiing and many other activities? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Kent
"Kristy" SM243


Re: [Amel] Disabled guest

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Kent, this is Danny from SM 299. I ran my previous boat as a charter vessel (very low key, in a small harbour in New Zealand) I would encourage you to take your uncle. I took a number of disabled/elderly people out at different times and always with great results, eg "the best day of my life" My boat was a 42 ft tiller steer light weight (6 tonne) open transom New Zealand design racer cruiser with the emphasis on racer. I will tell you about one old chap we took out. He was 90 and had been disabled by a stroke. He could only walk with a man either side supporting him. Our harbour had no loading area deep enough for my keel so we had to load the old chap into my inflatable at a ramp then get him from the inflateable onto the open transom and onto the cockpit seats. I quizzed his son and daughter if this was what they really wanted and it was so my task was to make it happen.To get him from the ramp to the dinghy we placed the inflateable side on, got the old chap standing facing it. Then a man either side bent down and linked hands under his knees, the other arm around his back. One foot in the dinghy, one foot on the ramp, quick lift over the sde and sit him down. Got his daughter sitting opposite him holding his hands to stop him falling backwards during the trip out to the mooring. Secured the dinghy across the transom and lifted him aboard by the same method.
We sat him on the cockpit seat and off we went. The stroke had effected his speach and he couldn't talk but he sure communicated the excitement he felt. I was sailing conservatively but he indicated he wanted more action so we put a rope around his waist to prevent him slipping off the seat, sheeted in and got some spead and heeling over going. He loved it. In common with most men of his age the bladder had limited capacity. To get him down the companion way was not going to happen so one man either sde holding him up, facing the stern and he peed in a bucket. He didn't mind and nor did we. I was so grateful to have had the opportunity to give him such a good day. He had been one of the original surf life savers, a real action man. When we see an old disabled person it is so easy to forget that the "action man" is still in there and they love the chance to "do it again" I encourage you to go for it and make it happen for your uncle .
Regards
Danny

---- Original Message -----
From: Dave Benjamin
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2009 5:45 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Disabled guest





Kent,

Maybe these folks can help with some ideas - http://baads.org/

--- On Wed, 5/20/09, karkauai <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: karkauai <karkauai@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Amel] Disabled guest
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 9:37 PM

Hi, again gang,

Different kind of problem this time. I have a 90 year old uncle who had polio as a kid, did pretty well for most of his life despite some weakness in his legs, and has deteriorated a lot over the last 10+ years due to post polio syndrome. His mind is very sharp. He is an absolute NUT about boats and the water and has gushed ever since he found out about my new SM. My aunt tells me he's more animated and excited than she's seen him in a long time.

I want to take him for a sail in the Chesapeake this Summer for at least a day, hopefully more. His son is willing to come along to help, but isn't a sailor. I'm hoping someone else has tackled the problem of getting on and off the boat, and up and down the companionway, and over bulkheads to get to the head and stateroom. He lives in WA state, so I haven't observed him myself, but it sounds like he's able to get onto and off a motorized "scooter" type wheelchair, but not able to walk more than a few steps.

I feel like I can get him on and off the dock using a halyard and bosun's chair, and maybe up and down the companionway using the extra halyard on the mizzen. Getting around in the boat may be an even bigger problem with the cabin sole moving all the time and not much room for one of us to be at his side. I'm sending pics of the boat and have encouraged him to talk to his rehab doc and/or therapist for some evaluation and maybe a mockup "boat" for him to see how he does.

Does anyone have any experience with disabled people aboard? Are there any sailing programs for disabled folks like there are for snow skiing and many other activities? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Kent

"Kristy" SM243


Re: [Amel] First Post Sharki leak

Jean Boucharlat
 

Don’t you worry !

This is the way the boat is designed.

As there is always some amount of water running down from the inside or
outside of a mast, rather than making futile attempts to stop this water at
deck level (any seal will start leaking with time), Amel made the wise
decision to channel it to the shower pan where it is harmless and eventually
drains to the bilge sump. Simple but effective.



All the best,



Jean Boucharlat

(Formerly SM N° 232)



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of marknjoanna55
Sent: jeudi 21 mai 2009 00:30
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] First Post Sharki leak








I have been reading and learning from the people on this list for a while
now. Thanks guys! My wife and I recently bought a Sharki. The more we learn
about and sail our baby Amel the more we love her.
We just got back from 3 weeks aboard her. During that time we experienced
very heavy rains. The only leak we ever saw was coming from the inside of a
vertical conduit of wires from the main mast. (spreader lights, masthead
tricolor etc) The leak drains into the shower/head bilge so it is no real
problem. The drains at the base of the mast seem open on deck so I do not
believe the mast is filling with water. Is this leak into the shower sump
normal? Or, how do I fix this?
Thanks,
Mark and Joanna Hanna
Amel Sharki sv: Marguerite


Re: [Amel] Disabled guest

Dave_Benjamin
 

Kent,

Maybe these folks can help with some ideas - http://baads.org/

--- On Wed, 5/20/09, karkauai <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: karkauai <karkauai@yahoo.com>
Subject: [Amel] Disabled guest
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 9:37 PM

















Hi, again gang,

Different kind of problem this time. I have a 90 year old uncle who had polio as a kid, did pretty well for most of his life despite some weakness in his legs, and has deteriorated a lot over the last 10+ years due to post polio syndrome. His mind is very sharp. He is an absolute NUT about boats and the water and has gushed ever since he found out about my new SM. My aunt tells me he's more animated and excited than she's seen him in a long time.



I want to take him for a sail in the Chesapeake this Summer for at least a day, hopefully more. His son is willing to come along to help, but isn't a sailor. I'm hoping someone else has tackled the problem of getting on and off the boat, and up and down the companionway, and over bulkheads to get to the head and stateroom. He lives in WA state, so I haven't observed him myself, but it sounds like he's able to get onto and off a motorized "scooter" type wheelchair, but not able to walk more than a few steps.



I feel like I can get him on and off the dock using a halyard and bosun's chair, and maybe up and down the companionway using the extra halyard on the mizzen. Getting around in the boat may be an even bigger problem with the cabin sole moving all the time and not much room for one of us to be at his side. I'm sending pics of the boat and have encouraged him to talk to his rehab doc and/or therapist for some evaluation and maybe a mockup "boat" for him to see how he does.



Does anyone have any experience with disabled people aboard? Are there any sailing programs for disabled folks like there are for snow skiing and many other activities? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.



Thanks in advance,

Kent

"Kristy" SM243




























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Disabled guest

karkauai
 

Hi, again gang,
Different kind of problem this time. I have a 90 year old uncle who had polio as a kid, did pretty well for most of his life despite some weakness in his legs, and has deteriorated a lot over the last 10+ years due to post polio syndrome. His mind is very sharp. He is an absolute NUT about boats and the water and has gushed ever since he found out about my new SM. My aunt tells me he's more animated and excited than she's seen him in a long time.

I want to take him for a sail in the Chesapeake this Summer for at least a day, hopefully more. His son is willing to come along to help, but isn't a sailor. I'm hoping someone else has tackled the problem of getting on and off the boat, and up and down the companionway, and over bulkheads to get to the head and stateroom. He lives in WA state, so I haven't observed him myself, but it sounds like he's able to get onto and off a motorized "scooter" type wheelchair, but not able to walk more than a few steps.

I feel like I can get him on and off the dock using a halyard and bosun's chair, and maybe up and down the companionway using the extra halyard on the mizzen. Getting around in the boat may be an even bigger problem with the cabin sole moving all the time and not much room for one of us to be at his side. I'm sending pics of the boat and have encouraged him to talk to his rehab doc and/or therapist for some evaluation and maybe a mockup "boat" for him to see how he does.

Does anyone have any experience with disabled people aboard? Are there any sailing programs for disabled folks like there are for snow skiing and many other activities? Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Kent
"Kristy" SM243


First Post Sharki leak

marksharki
 

I have been reading and learning from the people on this list for a while now. Thanks guys! My wife and I recently bought a Sharki. The more we learn about and sail our baby Amel the more we love her.
We just got back from 3 weeks aboard her. During that time we experienced very heavy rains. The only leak we ever saw was coming from the inside of a vertical conduit of wires from the main mast. (spreader lights, masthead tricolor etc) The leak drains into the shower/head bilge so it is no real problem. The drains at the base of the mast seem open on deck so I do not believe the mast is filling with water. Is this leak into the shower sump normal? Or, how do I fix this?
Thanks,
Mark and Joanna Hanna
Amel Sharki sv: Marguerite


Looking for crew

Miles Bidwell <mbidwell@...>
 

I am looking for a crew person to help me sail my Amel Super Maramu, LADYBUG, from Irvington, VA. to Newport. Depending on weather, I would like to leave VA around the 26th May. I expect that the trip will take 3 days or less if we have decent wind.
The boat is well found and has made three Atlantic crossings.
Please contact Miles Bidwell, mbidwell@attglobal.net

SM 216, LADYBUG


[Amel] Re: Verical Battens, Volvo RPMs, and Watermaker hoses

karkauai
 

Thanks, Vito,
I've made a list of the things all of you have suggested as possible causes of my Volvo problem to give to the Volvo rep who is coming to check Kristy's power plant in Charleston, SC in a couple of days. If I get an answer, I'll let you all know. I'm such a dunce when it comes to working on engines of any kind I'm going to watch a few times before I start taking things apart. Guess I'll look into taking a course on deisel maintenance and repair.

Regarding the vertical battens, I can only say that so far furling in 20+ kt winds required only heading up a little and easing the main a little. They roll right in without a hitch. Mine are flat battens about 1 1/4 inch wide and maybe 3/16 inch thick. Another sailor told me his were round rod-shaped battens and that they were much more persnickity about having just the right angle and tension to enter the mast.

I'm making water!!!! After climbing in and out of the cockpit locker and taking the hoses on and off several times after Eric Meury and I accidentally pulled some of the low pressure hoses off the back of the control box before we figured out we could access it from the locker, the membranes appear to be in good shape and it makes the 60 l/h it's supposed to. The watermaker dunce has actually fixed something! (-: I found a hydrolics supply place here in Charleston (Charleston Rubber and Gasket www.chasragco.com) who made two new hoses for me from food grade tubing with stainless outer cover, stainless fittings ( 3/8" JIC fittings), and plastic covers for total of $71 US. The old tubing was deteriorated to the point that the original fittings just wouldn't bite into the outer covers any more. The company in New Jersey who is recommended by Dessalator offered to send me two new hoses, not stainless, same old fittings, for $200 each.

Thanks again for all your advice and encouragement.
Kent
"Kristy" SM 243


Re: Small cracks in helm spokes

karkauai
 

Interesting that you posted this now. I just noticed similar cracks in my helm wheel yesterday. While I haven't looked closer yet, I have to believe there is a sturdy steel wheel underneath the plastic Amel cover. I look forward to hearing what others say about this.
Kent
"Kristy" SM 243


Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104

Dave_Benjamin
 

David,
Thanks for the link. I didn't think that article ever got published in the US. We use CSF for much of our production, especially high tech sails.

--- On Tue, 5/19/09, David Mackintosh <dlm48@aol.com> wrote:

From: David Mackintosh <dlm48@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, May 19, 2009, 5:29 AM

















tis China Sail Factory



http://www.proboat- digital.com/ proboat/20071011 /?pg=159



enjoy



David



2009/5/19 Charmed II <amel.sharki. charmedii@ gmail.com>



I'd like to have that copy...
Thx, Hajé
From: Dave Benjamin
Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 7:40 PM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com <amelyachtowners% 40yahoogroups. com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104
The sailmakers you mention have their sails built in China but they use
another loft, one that I am quite familiar with. In fact Nigel Calder
wrote an in depth article about the loft for a British periodical. I'd
be happy to send a copy to anyone interested. The article even names those
sailmakers.
Teijin is not well regarded by most sailmakers. Lee Sails Northeast
advertises on their website that they use Challenge and Bainbridge.It' s a
far cry from the higher end cloth from Dimension Polyant, Bainbridge,
Challenge, and Contender. It is cheap though. I've used Teijin cloth on
occasion for some small boat projects like a set of sails for a 13 foot
daysailer that is used by children for daysailing on a lake. There are
several lofts using Teijin produced cloth for small boat and Hobie Cat
sails. It allows them to keep the costs way down. For instance there is a
supplier here in the US that sells Laser sails for about $170 USD that uses
Teijin. Another loft sells Hobie Cat sails starting as low as $400 or so. It
is an appropriate cloth when cost is the primary consideration.
The amount you paid for your sails is less than the cost of cloth and
shipping finished sails from Asia to Europe or North America. If Teijin put
out a good quality cloth that was comparable with the manufacturers I
mentioned, reptuable sailmakers would be using it in quantity.
Caution is in order for anyone ordering direct from Lee Sails in China.
They require payment by wire transfer or bank check. You should never buy
anything like a sail unless you can use a credit card as there is no
recourse in the event of problems. You can contest a charge made with a
credit card successfully. I had a dock neighbor who tried to save some money
and ordered a sail from a loft quite some distance away. The sail was a
disaster and when the sailmaker failed to address the issue he was able to
contest the chrage and get his money refunded.
--- On Sun, 5/17/09, etske <amel.sharki. charmedii@ gmail.com<amel.sharki. charmedii% 40gmail.com> >
wrote:
From: etske <amel.sharki. charmedii@ gmail.com<amel.sharki. charmedii% 40gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com <amelyachtowners% 40yahoogroups. com>
Date: Sunday, May 17, 2009, 1:57 PM
Dear Dave,
Your misinterpretating my words (maybe because of the quality of my
english). I did not say the are flat without shape I said they are flat
without loosing their shape.
But even when you misunderstood your comments are wrong.
First, the sails are made from 1st quality dracron It comes from Tejin wich
is Du pont (the founder of dracron)(since they use 250000 sq metres per
annum I don't think there's enough B quality ;-))
Second, I tried to explain that I found it very good they understood I
wanted a different kind of sail GI GII in character. The GI is great for
average cruising but for (dutch average 4 a 5 SW) sportive sailing the GII
is flatter and better upwind.
Before I ordered I did some research and in Holland they are pretty well
known (the produce for Quantum, Elvstrom and UK sails to name a few. The
runner up of the IJspegelcup (biggest winter matches in Holland) had 3 year
old Leesails. When I spoke with him he told me this was the first time he
could use sails more than a season.
Without getting into a discussion about this company (I don't own them)
;-)). In files I put an article about Lee Sails.
And in Pictures you cen see us sailing with the new sails...
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104

David Mackintosh <dlm48@...>
 

tis China Sail Factory

http://www.proboat-digital.com/proboat/20071011/?pg=159

enjoy

David

2009/5/19 Charmed II <amel.sharki.charmedii@gmail.com>



I'd like to have that copy...

Thx, Hajé

From: Dave Benjamin
Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 7:40 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104

The sailmakers you mention have their sails built in China but they use
another loft, one that I am quite familiar with. In fact Nigel Calder
wrote an in depth article about the loft for a British periodical. I'd
be happy to send a copy to anyone interested. The article even names those
sailmakers.

Teijin is not well regarded by most sailmakers. Lee Sails Northeast
advertises on their website that they use Challenge and Bainbridge.It's a
far cry from the higher end cloth from Dimension Polyant, Bainbridge,
Challenge, and Contender. It is cheap though. I've used Teijin cloth on
occasion for some small boat projects like a set of sails for a 13 foot
daysailer that is used by children for daysailing on a lake. There are
several lofts using Teijin produced cloth for small boat and Hobie Cat
sails. It allows them to keep the costs way down. For instance there is a
supplier here in the US that sells Laser sails for about $170 USD that uses
Teijin. Another loft sells Hobie Cat sails starting as low as $400 or so. It
is an appropriate cloth when cost is the primary consideration.

The amount you paid for your sails is less than the cost of cloth and
shipping finished sails from Asia to Europe or North America. If Teijin put
out a good quality cloth that was comparable with the manufacturers I
mentioned, reptuable sailmakers would be using it in quantity.

Caution is in order for anyone ordering direct from Lee Sails in China.
They require payment by wire transfer or bank check. You should never buy
anything like a sail unless you can use a credit card as there is no
recourse in the event of problems. You can contest a charge made with a
credit card successfully. I had a dock neighbor who tried to save some money
and ordered a sail from a loft quite some distance away. The sail was a
disaster and when the sailmaker failed to address the issue he was able to
contest the chrage and get his money refunded.

--- On Sun, 5/17/09, etske <amel.sharki.charmedii@gmail.com<amel.sharki.charmedii%40gmail.com>>
wrote:

From: etske <amel.sharki.charmedii@gmail.com<amel.sharki.charmedii%40gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sunday, May 17, 2009, 1:57 PM

Dear Dave,

Your misinterpretating my words (maybe because of the quality of my
english). I did not say the are flat without shape I said they are flat
without loosing their shape.

But even when you misunderstood your comments are wrong.

First, the sails are made from 1st quality dracron It comes from Tejin wich
is Du pont (the founder of dracron)(since they use 250000 sq metres per
annum I don't think there's enough B quality ;-))

Second, I tried to explain that I found it very good they understood I
wanted a different kind of sail GI GII in character. The GI is great for
average cruising but for (dutch average 4 a 5 SW) sportive sailing the GII
is flatter and better upwind.

Before I ordered I did some research and in Holland they are pretty well
known (the produce for Quantum, Elvstrom and UK sails to name a few. The
runner up of the IJspegelcup (biggest winter matches in Holland) had 3 year
old Leesails. When I spoke with him he told me this was the first time he
could use sails more than a season.

Without getting into a discussion about this company (I don't own them)
;-)). In files I put an article about Lee Sails.

And in Pictures you cen see us sailing with the new sails...



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Vertical Battens

Bob Fritz
 

My experience with verical battens in the Amel 54 mainsail does not mirror the negative comments. In over 10,000 miles of ocean sailing and winds of 0 to 60+ knots, I have had no trouble reefing the sail. I have never had to go head to wind to reef, and I have never had the battens jam in the mast. I found little difference between the SM with no battens and the 54 with vertical battens with respect to ease of mainsail handling.

Bob


Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104

Hajé Weisfelt
 

I'd like to have that copy...

Thx, Hajé


From: Dave Benjamin
Sent: Monday, May 18, 2009 7:40 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104





The sailmakers you mention have their sails built in China but they use
another loft, one that I am quite familiar with. In fact Nigel Calder
wrote an in depth article about the loft for a British periodical. I'd
be happy to send a copy to anyone interested. The article even names those sailmakers.

Teijin is not well regarded by most sailmakers. Lee Sails Northeast advertises on their website that they use Challenge and Bainbridge.It's a far cry from the higher end cloth from Dimension Polyant, Bainbridge, Challenge, and Contender. It is cheap though. I've used Teijin cloth on occasion for some small boat projects like a set of sails for a 13 foot daysailer that is used by children for daysailing on a lake. There are several lofts using Teijin produced cloth for small boat and Hobie Cat sails. It allows them to keep the costs way down. For instance there is a supplier here in the US that sells Laser sails for about $170 USD that uses Teijin. Another loft sells Hobie Cat sails starting as low as $400 or so. It is an appropriate cloth when cost is the primary consideration.

The amount you paid for your sails is less than the cost of cloth and shipping finished sails from Asia to Europe or North America. If Teijin put out a good quality cloth that was comparable with the manufacturers I mentioned, reptuable sailmakers would be using it in quantity.

Caution is in order for anyone ordering direct from Lee Sails in China. They require payment by wire transfer or bank check. You should never buy anything like a sail unless you can use a credit card as there is no recourse in the event of problems. You can contest a charge made with a credit card successfully. I had a dock neighbor who tried to save some money and ordered a sail from a loft quite some distance away. The sail was a disaster and when the sailmaker failed to address the issue he was able to contest the chrage and get his money refunded.

--- On Sun, 5/17/09, etske <amel.sharki.charmedii@gmail.com> wrote:

From: etske <amel.sharki.charmedii@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] Lee Sails for Sharki 104
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, May 17, 2009, 1:57 PM

Dear Dave,

Your misinterpretating my words (maybe because of the quality of my english). I did not say the are flat without shape I said they are flat without loosing their shape.

But even when you misunderstood your comments are wrong.

First, the sails are made from 1st quality dracron It comes from Tejin wich is Du pont (the founder of dracron)(since they use 250000 sq metres per annum I don't think there's enough B quality ;-))

Second, I tried to explain that I found it very good they understood I wanted a different kind of sail GI GII in character. The GI is great for average cruising but for (dutch average 4 a 5 SW) sportive sailing the GII is flatter and better upwind.

Before I ordered I did some research and in Holland they are pretty well known (the produce for Quantum, Elvstrom and UK sails to name a few. The runner up of the IJspegelcup (biggest winter matches in Holland) had 3 year old Leesails. When I spoke with him he told me this was the first time he could use sails more than a season.

Without getting into a discussion about this company (I don't own them) ;-)). In files I put an article about Lee Sails.

And in Pictures you cen see us sailing with the new sails...











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]