Date   

Re: Dripless shaft seal

Arlo
 

Great minds think alike. Your comment about the tides hose use with a traditional stuffing box and the additional resistance was exactly my concern as well. I called Tides technical support this morning at 2 different times and spoke to 2 different people and they said yes it will work fine. They apparently have these hoses special made for them and that the straight tube hoses are stiffer than the traditional rubber hose. The hose is supposed to be delivered tomorrow so I will check it out then. If I am not comfortable with the hose, then I will call Buck Algonquin and ask their thoughts on using the 2 1/4 hose with some t handle clamps...my only other really viable option if neither of those pan out is to change my drive shaft over to stainless and go with a metric sized dripless system. Not a bad option but it the traditional box has worked well for 35 years and fewer failure points.... Danny suggested I call Monster hose in Miami, I have used them before, but they didnt have any 4 or 5 ply hose in stock of the 2 and 1/8 size. I am suprised that I am the first one that has had trouble in the US with this....surely.other mango, maramu, or sanitorian owners have replaced their shaft tube hose.... will post tomorrow if the hose comes in and include some pics

Great tip on the drill bits and yes I agree with the stuffing recommendation!

Thanks 
Arlo


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Paul Brown
 

Nice tip Joerg and Bill thanks

Regards, Paul... Sent from my iPhone

On 14 Dec 2019, at 09:41, Joerg Esdorn via Groups.Io <jhe1313@...> wrote:

Thanks, Arno, for this post.  I, too, have been using a wet vac and Kaercher to get the bad stuff out of the bilge.  But I found that the Kaercher makes a bit of a mess with dirty water mist everywhere (including my face) and totally shreds the insulation if you accidentally direct it on that.  So this year, I tried something different.  When I went through the Amel training, they showed me a wooden scrubber on a long stick which came with the boat and explained that I needed to cut the scrubber down to no more than 6 inches wide to have the ideal tool to clean the bilge.  I finally did just that this fall and found scrubbing to be easy and less messy than Kaerchering!  I used some degreaser and a normal hose with a nozzle to wash everything down and used the manual bilge pump to pump it out.  I flushed everything three or four times until all the water remaining at the bottom was clear.  I could have used the wet vac to clean that out but I didn't see a need since I could see the bottom and the keel bolt in good shape and no foreign objects were in sight!

I also have a tip for treating the bilge during the season which has worked very well for me.  Once a week, I add 2 espresso cups of Citric acid power to the bilge dissolved in warm water (via the galley sink).  The Citric acid neutralizes the soap residues in the bilge and it results in flakes of soap residue coming off the hoses in the bilge.  I leave the acid for 15 minutes to soak the bilge and then pump out the bilge with the manual bilge pump.  I have reduced the frequency of my bilge cleaning from every two months to once a season this way.  Much less smell, too.  Note, however, that we also clean all dishes and pots with paper towels before washing them.  So no crumbs, olive oil and sauces in the bilge!  Thanks to Bill Rouse for that tip!

Cheers Joerg

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem #53


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Joerg Esdorn
 

Thanks, Arno, for this post.  I, too, have been using a wet vac and Kaercher to get the bad stuff out of the bilge.  But I found that the Kaercher makes a bit of a mess with dirty water mist everywhere (including my face) and totally shreds the insulation if you accidentally direct it on that.  So this year, I tried something different.  When I went through the Amel training, they showed me a wooden scrubber on a long stick which came with the boat and explained that I needed to cut the scrubber down to no more than 6 inches wide to have the ideal tool to clean the bilge.  I finally did just that this fall and found scrubbing to be easy and less messy than Kaerchering!  I used some degreaser and a normal hose with a nozzle to wash everything down and used the manual bilge pump to pump it out.  I flushed everything three or four times until all the water remaining at the bottom was clear.  I could have used the wet vac to clean that out but I didn't see a need since I could see the bottom and the keel bolt in good shape and no foreign objects were in sight!

I also have a tip for treating the bilge during the season which has worked very well for me.  Once a week, I add 2 espresso cups of Citric acid power to the bilge dissolved in warm water (via the galley sink).  The Citric acid neutralizes the soap residues in the bilge and it results in flakes of soap residue coming off the hoses in the bilge.  I leave the acid for 15 minutes to soak the bilge and then pump out the bilge with the manual bilge pump.  I have reduced the frequency of my bilge cleaning from every two months to once a season this way.  Much less smell, too.  Note, however, that we also clean all dishes and pots with paper towels before washing them.  So no crumbs, olive oil and sauces in the bilge!  Thanks to Bill Rouse for that tip!

Cheers Joerg

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem #53


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Arno Luijten
 

For those that are interested:

Shop Vac:

https://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-0880-20-18-Volt-Cordless-Vacuum/dp/B001AHMQ90/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=milwaukee+m18+shop+vac&qid=1576267974&sr=8-1

Pressure Cleaner:

https://www.amazon.com/Karcher-Electric-Power-Pressure-Washer/dp/B01BMETE6I/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=Karcher%2Bk2&qid=1576268072&sr=8-2&th=1

Both work nice and perform a variety of task on our Amel. The shop vac has amazing performance. For those that are into the Makita or DeWalt system, I think there are similar devices from those manufacturers as well. I like the Milwaukee because all parts (hose, mouthpieces) are contained in a single "suitcase".

Regards,

Arno
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Paul Brown
 

Hello Arno,

I also this year went on the same treasure hunt and found the same items, amazing.

I first had the issue of a regular smelly bilge and Engine room but was trying chemicals, then one day the bilge pump became clogged, then with my trusty 220v high powered large 50 euro wet/dry I sucked it clean along with my small Kartcher, rinsing and sucking several times till it became almost new again.

I will be repeating this every few months at least in future,,, hopefully I’ll find a tool kit by the end of next season..

I will test a portable 18v wet/dry vac, but expect they don’t collect as much water or as powerful, however they may do the job and smaller to store?

If there’s an easier method I would like to know.

Regards, Paul... Fortuna II A55/17

On 14 Dec 2019, at 05:28, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Re: Dripless shaft seal

James Alton
 

Arlo,

  I was wondering if it might be a good idea to ask Tides if the hose you are ordering is meant for use with the traditional stuffing box?  I could be wrong but it appears that the hose in the link given  is used for the dripless shaft seal that they sell as I did not see a mention of it being used in regular stuffing boxes.   I think that a traditional stuffing box that is dry, overtightened or grossly out of alignment can develop a lot more resistance than a shaft seal so a heavier/stronger hose might be desirable.  The Algonquin Shaft Log Hose is 3/8” wall and has 5 layers of reinforcement in it and seems to be pretty bullet proof,  unfortunately I don’t see the exact size listed that you need, 1/8” off.  Since the hose does not have any wire in it perhaps you can squeeze the 1/8” gap but I would ask someone knowledgeable at Buck Algonquin on this before trying it.   

  I would suggest going with the teflon impregnated packing and get a good quality.  The size needed is normally related to the shaft size.  An easy way to check the size packing needed is to back off the packing nut completely,  hold the packing nut square to the shaft and to then insert  drill bits of various sizes until you find the correct one.  With the butt of the correct sized drill bit inserted the packing nut should be in alignment with the shaft.  

Best of luck,

James
Maramu #220

On Dec 13, 2019, at 12:55 PM, Arlo <svplanb@...> wrote:

I called Tides this morning and they plan to ship the hose to me today for delivery tomorrow. Anyone know what size flax to use with the stock stuffing box ?


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

James Alton
 

Arno,

   A portable wet dry vac that can suck up screw drivers out of the bilge? It sounds like you may possibly have found the Ultimate “Amel Vacuum”!  Bill R. has pointed out many times on the board the value of having a wet dry vac on the boat and after getting a big clunky 220V unit that we can unfortunately only run dockside I am convinced that he is on target.  I had no idea that the portable battery powered units had reached the level of suction that you are reporting.  How nice it would be to have a wet dry that did not rely on dockside or genset power so was available for use anytime.  Thanks Arno  for taking the time to post your cleaning solution, I am going to see about getting one of these vacuums to replace the big 220V unit we are now carrying. Hopefully they are available in Greece…

   I would also like to add that while regular bilge cleaning is less critical on my Maramu with the overboard galley sink drain it is still IMO really important to keep the bilge clear of any foreign objects that can clog a pump in an emergency.  With the depth of the bilge in my Maramu a wet dry vac is probably the only way to really pick up those potential pump cloggers.  

   I am always amazed at how much one can learn from the amazing group of people on the Amel board.  Thanks to all that contribute and Happy Holidays!

James and Joann
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

   

On Dec 13, 2019, at 1:00 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Most of us really like our Amels. We like the clever way it has been thought out and such. However some choices have their drawbacks.

My least favorite parts to clean on our 54 are the Grey water bilge and the raw water strainer.
Having tried a few ways to perform the tasks I think I have found a fairly good way to do it now that I would like to share for those that are still trying to make the task easier.
It involves a Milwaukee M18 battery operated wet/dry portable vacuum cleaner and a small (Kärcher) high pressure cleaner. The latter is one of the smallest you can buy and is also excellent in removing the salt of the deck and things after a (rough) sail)
I connect the HP cleaner to the water outlet at the helm seat.

To clean the water strainer I close the sea-cock (turn off Fridges and A/C first), open the lid of the strainer and BEFORE removing the strainer-insert I first use the shop-vac to suck out the the water and crud. Next I remove the insert and use the shop vac to suck out as much as possible water and crud as I can. Next clean the insert (it can be separated into two halves to make it easier). Put the strainer back together and Bob is your Uncle. This way you prevent the crud from entering the outlet pipe when you remove the insert.

For the grey water bilge use your manual bilge pump first to get a much as possible water out. Next use the pressure washer to do a first clean of the bilge. This can be very smelly! Remove the water with the manual bilge pump. Again use the pressure washer to stir things up in the bilge. Now use the shop vac with a piece of hose attached to suck the water and crud out of the bilge. Keep the end of the hose just at the waterline so the shop-vac sucks a water-air mixture. When empty use the pressure washer again to clean the bottom of the bilge and the Shop-vac to suck out the water/crud mixture. Do not forget to empty the shop-vac regularly as it fills up quite fast!
Repeat the process until the bilge is clean.
The fist time I did this it was almost a treasure hunt. I retrieved screws, bolts, nuts and even a screwdriver from the abyss. It also enables you to inspect the grounding strap and keel bolt that sits at the bottom.

Hopefully the story above is to someones help.

Regards,

Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Porter McRoberts
 

This is a very good process!  Thank you Arno!  We would like a high pressure water sprayer (looking for a small one) but good dockside pressure can work as well.  A little simple green overnight in the bilge can help emulsify. The crazy part of the process is that your Siri knew I had an Uncle Bob!  

Made me laugh!

Anyway. Great summary and thank you!

Porter 
A-54-152 off the boat in Fort Lauderdale. 




Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 
Www.fouribis.com

On Dec 13, 2019, at 12:00 PM, Arno Luijten <arno.luijten@...> wrote:

Most of us really like our Amels. We like the clever way it has been thought out and such. However some choices have their drawbacks.

My least favorite parts to clean on our 54 are the Grey water bilge and the raw water strainer.
Having tried a few ways to perform the tasks I think I have found a fairly good way to do it now that I would like to share for those that are still trying to make the task easier.
It involves a Milwaukee M18 battery operated wet/dry portable vacuum cleaner and a small (Kärcher) high pressure cleaner. The latter is one of the smallest you can buy and is also excellent in removing the salt of the deck and things after a (rough) sail)
I connect the HP cleaner to the water outlet at the helm seat.

To clean the water strainer I close the sea-cock (turn off Fridges and A/C first), open the lid of the strainer and BEFORE removing the strainer-insert I first use the shop-vac to suck out the the water and crud. Next I remove the insert and use the shop vac to suck out as much as possible water and crud as I can. Next clean the insert (it can be separated into two halves to make it easier). Put the strainer back together and Bob is your Uncle. This way you prevent the crud from entering the outlet pipe when you remove the insert.

For the grey water bilge use your manual bilge pump first to get a much as possible water out. Next use the pressure washer to do a first clean of the bilge. This can be very smelly! Remove the water with the manual bilge pump. Again use the pressure washer to stir things up in the bilge. Now use the shop vac with a piece of hose attached to suck the water and crud out of the bilge. Keep the end of the hose just at the waterline so the shop-vac sucks a water-air mixture. When empty use the pressure washer again to clean the bottom of the bilge and the Shop-vac to suck out the water/crud mixture. Do not forget to empty the shop-vac regularly as it fills up quite fast!
Repeat the process until the bilge is clean.
The fist time I did this it was almost a treasure hunt. I retrieved screws, bolts, nuts and even a screwdriver from the abyss. It also enables you to inspect the grounding strap and keel bolt that sits at the bottom.

Hopefully the story above is to someones help.

Regards,

Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Cleaning the worst parts of an Amel

Arno Luijten
 

Most of us really like our Amels. We like the clever way it has been thought out and such. However some choices have their drawbacks.

My least favorite parts to clean on our 54 are the Grey water bilge and the raw water strainer.
Having tried a few ways to perform the tasks I think I have found a fairly good way to do it now that I would like to share for those that are still trying to make the task easier.
It involves a Milwaukee M18 battery operated wet/dry portable vacuum cleaner and a small (Kärcher) high pressure cleaner. The latter is one of the smallest you can buy and is also excellent in removing the salt of the deck and things after a (rough) sail)
I connect the HP cleaner to the water outlet at the helm seat.

To clean the water strainer I close the sea-cock (turn off Fridges and A/C first), open the lid of the strainer and BEFORE removing the strainer-insert I first use the shop-vac to suck out the the water and crud. Next I remove the insert and use the shop vac to suck out as much as possible water and crud as I can. Next clean the insert (it can be separated into two halves to make it easier). Put the strainer back together and Bob is your Uncle. This way you prevent the crud from entering the outlet pipe when you remove the insert.

For the grey water bilge use your manual bilge pump first to get a much as possible water out. Next use the pressure washer to do a first clean of the bilge. This can be very smelly! Remove the water with the manual bilge pump. Again use the pressure washer to stir things up in the bilge. Now use the shop vac with a piece of hose attached to suck the water and crud out of the bilge. Keep the end of the hose just at the waterline so the shop-vac sucks a water-air mixture. When empty use the pressure washer again to clean the bottom of the bilge and the Shop-vac to suck out the water/crud mixture. Do not forget to empty the shop-vac regularly as it fills up quite fast!
Repeat the process until the bilge is clean.
The fist time I did this it was almost a treasure hunt. I retrieved screws, bolts, nuts and even a screwdriver from the abyss. It also enables you to inspect the grounding strap and keel bolt that sits at the bottom.

Hopefully the story above is to someones help.

Regards,

Arno Luijten,
SV Luna,
A54-121


Re: Dripless shaft seal

Arlo
 

I called Tides this morning and they plan to ship the hose to me today for delivery tomorrow. Anyone know what size flax to use with the stock stuffing box ?


Re: Manuals and instructions of the Amel Sharki 1982 Nr 53.

Aras <aras.grinius@...>
 

As a Sharki owner (163) I spoke to Bill Rouse about adding sections in for Maramu’s and Sharki’s. He thought it might be a good idea.
If you perform repairs you need to document the steps you take and take pictures of those steps. I have done some, but they need editing. This is where Bill is great. His Amel book has been extremely helpful in sorting out stuff on Amel.

Hopefully I’ll get some time to organize my pics and get Bill to help publish them.

Aras
Sharki # 163 1988


Re: Stern tube hose

Danny Rico <danny.rico@...>
 

Amazonhose.com. it’s in north miami.


Re: Sidepower SP 155 TCi needed

JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Alex,
They may refurbish your existing motor. You would need to remove it, and ship it to them. They would look it over to determine whether it is worth doing or not and let you know their opinion.
Considering you'll be laid up for a while, it may be worth considering.
Just a thought.
Best Regards,
Jeff s/v Spirit 54 #14 Puerto Real, PR

On December 12, 2019 at 12:45 PM Alexander Ramseyer <alexramseyer@...> wrote:

I'm looking for a refurbished SP 155 TCi bow thruster motor.
IMTRA in the U.S. said they only have the new SE170 available.
Does anyone on this forum have experience with the SE 170? Is it a seamless replacement or are there changes to consider?

In any case I would prefer to stick with a refurbished unit of a SP155TCi. If anyone has an idea where I could find that, please let me know (I already asked in Martinique..)
Best,
Alex
SV NO STRESS
AMEL54#15, currently in St. Martin

 


Re: refrigeration compressor

JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Thanks Mark, your information was helpful.

Best Regards,

Jeff

On December 11, 2019 at 9:27 AM Mark & Debbie Mueller <brass.ring@...> wrote:

Hi Jeff,

 

On our boat the compressor is mounted underneath the refrigerator, underneath the chest refrigerator/freezer, and to the port side of the refrigerator/freezer under the salon seat.  The Danfoss compressor controller is attached to the side of each compressor.

 

To gain access to the refrigerator compressor remove the “thumbscrew” on the inside of the under sink cabinet, it is toward the top.  I believe the unit will slide forward into the small under floor storage area between the refrigerator and chest.  I do not remember if there are any attachment points at the bottom of the refrigerator.  To access the chest compressor remove the trim panel at the floor at the base of the chest and you will be able to reach in to access the compressor.  To get to the under seat unit remove the salon seat cushion at the port side of the boat then remove the wood cover on the aft port side.

 

You may be able to check voltage at the pump interface in the engine compartment to determine if you have a relay problem or Danfoss controller problem.  Refer to the attached schematic from Coastal Climate Control for the interconnection of the relays.  Good luck.
--
Mark Mueller
Brass Ring  A54

 


Re: What is this black gasket

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks Bill

Danny

On 13 December 2019 at 17:16 CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

Danny, you are correct. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Wed, Dec 11, 2019, 9:43 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS < simms@...> wrote:

Hi Bill. I would suggest it goes under the cap. Sometimes the material used expands with age.

Regards and wishing you and Judy all the best for Christmas and the new year. I hope your new career alows you some time to enjoy yourselves.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl


On 12 December 2019 at 10:52 CW Bill Rouse < brouse@...> wrote:

See the black gasket in the attached picture. It was found inside the C-drive oil reservoir. At first glance I thought it was the gasket for the top, but obviously not. It is too large. 

I think I have seen this gasket before.

Any help would be appreciated. 

Best,
Bill
CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

 

 


Re: Prop to Zinc Connection

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Stephan,

It's nice to hear from you. I remember the handover of your SM in la Rochelle... How many nautical miles since?

The 2 to 50 ohms findings look like a bad contact issue. First check your measurements contacts. Did you check the zincs on the zinc but also on the stainless steel bolt. I once checked a rudder zinc that was held with a stainless steel bolt and...a plastic washer!!
Make sure all places where you connect your meter are very clean.

You should also try to check the resistance between one zinc(and bolt) and the rudder shaft at pintle bearing. If you still have this 2 to 50 ohm measurement, it means that the bolt connection to the rudder inside plates is not good. You should then drill a new hole and tap it to relocate your zinc.
Did you check the connection of the yellow/green cable at top of the rudder shaft, on quadrant?
You should last ly check the resistance between the rudder shaft's top and the engine cradle, as the cable between could be damaged.

Good luck.

Olivier.
.

On Thursday, December 12, 2019, 06:26:21 PM GMT+1, Stephan Regulinski via Groups.Io <stephreg@...> wrote:


Bonjour Olivier,

I carefully cleaned the prop shaft to get good measurements. I read zero Ohms between prop shaft and the prop.

But from prop shaft to zincs on the rudder I got a range of measurements between 2 and 50 Ohms, depending on movement of the propeller. I measured 0.2 Ohms from bonding wire on the C Drive to zincs on the rudder. Any idea why this could occur? Should I do something to correct?

Merci beaucoup,

Stephan Regulinski
s/v Hanalei SMM #266



Re: What is this black gasket

 

Danny, you are correct. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Wed, Dec 11, 2019, 9:43 PM Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Hi Bill. I would suggest it goes under the cap. Sometimes the material used expands with age.

Regards and wishing you and Judy all the best for Christmas and the new year. I hope your new career alows you some time to enjoy yourselves.

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl


On 12 December 2019 at 10:52 CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

See the black gasket in the attached picture. It was found inside the C-drive oil reservoir. At first glance I thought it was the gasket for the top, but obviously not. It is too large. 

I think I have seen this gasket before.

Any help would be appreciated. 

Best,
Bill
CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


Re: What is this black gasket

 

Pat 

I think you have it. Thanks

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Thu, Dec 12, 2019, 7:17 AM Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io <sailw32=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Bill , Might the gasket fit over the threaded opening and rest on top of the reservoir and the cap tighten down on top of it ,I see black marks on the bottom of the cap as though it had been in contact with the rubber gasket. Not the typical gasket/cap contact point , but may be. Does the gasket fit over the threaded part of the reservoir ? The diameter looks about right .
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>
To: main <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Dec 11, 2019 4:53 pm
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] What is this black gasket

See the black gasket in the attached picture. It was found inside the C-drive oil reservoir. At first glance I thought it was the gasket for the top, but obviously not. It is too large. 

I think I have seen this gasket before.

Any help would be appreciated. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Owners Yacht School - www.AmelOwnersYachtSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Stern tube hose

Arlo
 

Thanks Matt. I will give them a call tomorrow...


Re: Dripless shaft seal

Arlo
 

Thanks Matt, I was not aware that they carried that hose. I will call them tomorrow and see if its recommended for the application. Stay tuned....really appreciate the assistance