Date   

Re: Problem with rear state room head holding tank

drdavegoodman
 

I had the same problem with both holding tanks. Is probably is a
result of galvanic corrosion. I repaired my pipes with plumber's
putty and haven't had a problem since. Using a metal weld putty
material, preferably one that is compatible with the copper pipes,
should work well.


Re: [Amel] New Set of Sails

Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@...>
 

Kent

Perhaps we could meet after Christmas in Texas ----I have saved most
if not all my receipts-----they are very helpful in answering questions
properly. In any case give me a call anytime during the work day.
Best Jim

________________________________

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 9:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Amel] New Set of Sails



Thanks for the offer, Jim. I'm actually in Hickory, NC. Will take the
boat to S.FL this winter, sail her in keys and Bahamas till hurricane
season, then up to Chesapeake and north for the Summer. I will be going
to TX after Christmas in hopes of getting her ready to go south by the
first week in Jan.

I'm all ears about what you've done to improve Pao-San. Anything you'd
care to share by internet or phone would be great. Would you rather I
call you? When's a good time?

Thanks,
Kent

--- On Fri, 12/19/08, Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@operatingtech.com
<mailto:jim.dernehl%40operatingtech.com> > wrote:

From: Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@operatingtech.com
<mailto:jim.dernehl%40operatingtech.com> >
Subject: RE: [Amel] New Set of Sails
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, December 19, 2008, 10:30 AM

Dear Kent

I assume you live in the North Texas area-----I have owned a Super
Maramu (Pao-San) #88 since 1999 and live in Arlington Texas. If you wish
to get together some time mutually acceptable I will be pleased to share
with you what I know about the boat. Since I purchased it, I have sailed
about 30,000. miles and invested in substantial improvements to the
boat. Presently the boat is in Norfolk Virginia getting prepared for a
year long trip to the Med. in May 2009.
My office number is 817 288-2600.
Best Jim Dernehl

____________ _________ _________ __

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of karkauai
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 8:43 AM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel] New Set of Sails

Ahoy, Amel Family. New member here, just bought 1999SuperMaramu on
Lake Texoma. Trucking to Galveston this mo. and trying to get her
ready to go south by mid Jan. She needs a new set of sails, and I'd
like some opinions on what was recommended by Banks Sails Gulf Coast
after talking to Amel. He said that a 145% genoa was recommended for
anything up to 30kts of wind, and a smaller headsail ~110% for steady
winds of 20+.
145% genoa sounds like a LOT of sail. I was wondering if those you who
are sailing SuperMaramu' s are using this configuration and what you
think of it. If you're using something else, what?, and what are the
conditions your sailing in? I was thinking something more like 120-
130% genoa???

I'm going to need some hand-holding for a while, you'll probably hear a
lot from me in the coming months.

thanks in advance for your help.
Kent Robertson


Re: [Amel] New Set of Sails

karkauai
 

Thanks for the offer, Jim.  I'm actually in Hickory, NC.  Will take the boat to S.FL this winter, sail her in keys and Bahamas till hurricane season, then up to Chesapeake and north for the Summer.  I will be going to TX after Christmas in hopes of getting her ready to go south by the first week in Jan.
 
I'm all ears about what you've done to improve Pao-San.  Anything you'd care to share by internet or phone would be great.  Would you rather I call you?  When's a good time?
 
Thanks,
Kent

--- On Fri, 12/19/08, Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@operatingtech.com> wrote:


From: Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@operatingtech.com>
Subject: RE: [Amel] New Set of Sails
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, December 19, 2008, 10:30 AM






Dear Kent

I assume you live in the North Texas area-----I have owned a Super
Maramu (Pao-San) #88 since 1999 and live in Arlington Texas. If you wish
to get together some time mutually acceptable I will be pleased to share
with you what I know about the boat. Since I purchased it, I have sailed
about 30,000. miles and invested in substantial improvements to the
boat. Presently the boat is in Norfolk Virginia getting prepared for a
year long trip to the Med. in May 2009.
My office number is 817 288-2600.
Best Jim Dernehl

____________ _________ _________ __

From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of karkauai
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 8:43 AM
To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [Amel] New Set of Sails

Ahoy, Amel Family. New member here, just bought 1999SuperMaramu on
Lake Texoma. Trucking to Galveston this mo. and trying to get her
ready to go south by mid Jan. She needs a new set of sails, and I'd
like some opinions on what was recommended by Banks Sails Gulf Coast
after talking to Amel. He said that a 145% genoa was recommended for
anything up to 30kts of wind, and a smaller headsail ~110% for steady
winds of 20+.
145% genoa sounds like a LOT of sail. I was wondering if those you who
are sailing SuperMaramu' s are using this configuration and what you
think of it. If you're using something else, what?, and what are the
conditions your sailing in? I was thinking something more like 120-
130% genoa???

I'm going to need some hand-holding for a while, you'll probably hear a
lot from me in the coming months.

thanks in advance for your help.
Kent Robertson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] New Set of Sails

Jim Dernehl <jim.dernehl@...>
 

Dear Kent

I assume you live in the North Texas area-----I have owned a Super
Maramu (Pao-San) #88 since 1999 and live in Arlington Texas. If you wish
to get together some time mutually acceptable I will be pleased to share
with you what I know about the boat. Since I purchased it, I have sailed
about 30,000. miles and invested in substantial improvements to the
boat. Presently the boat is in Norfolk Virginia getting prepared for a
year long trip to the Med. in May 2009.
My office number is 817 288-2600.
Best Jim Dernehl

________________________________

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of karkauai
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2008 8:43 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] New Set of Sails



Ahoy, Amel Family. New member here, just bought 1999SuperMaramu on
Lake Texoma. Trucking to Galveston this mo. and trying to get her
ready to go south by mid Jan. She needs a new set of sails, and I'd
like some opinions on what was recommended by Banks Sails Gulf Coast
after talking to Amel. He said that a 145% genoa was recommended for
anything up to 30kts of wind, and a smaller headsail ~110% for steady
winds of 20+.
145% genoa sounds like a LOT of sail. I was wondering if those you who
are sailing SuperMaramu's are using this configuration and what you
think of it. If you're using something else, what?, and what are the
conditions your sailing in? I was thinking something more like 120-
130% genoa???

I'm going to need some hand-holding for a while, you'll probably hear a
lot from me in the coming months.

thanks in advance for your help.
Kent Robertson


Re: [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage

Patrick McAneny
 

If you can see the bare glass than it can't be polished out. Last spring I
had to do major glass repair to my rub rail and than painted the entire rail.It
sounds as though you are probably going to have to color match the gel coat
and repair the dings. I often wonder why Amel did'nt put a proper rub rail on
these boats. Pat

In a message dated 12/18/2008 8:05:23 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
bootlegger@mailasail.com writes:






I have just received some rubbing strake damage on my otherwise well
maintained
and preserved SM 2000; specifically a small section where the brown
surface
coating has chipped off completely revealing the bare fibre glass
moulding
as well as long abrasions, some of which penetrate the outer brown
coating.

Can anyone please advise me a) can the surface covering be abrasions be
polished out?
b) how best to repair the chipped off area to achieve the same brown
finish?
c) is there a specific color reference for this brown? Together with any

other advice. Such would be greatly appreciated.

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann
# 321

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




**************One site keeps you connected to all your email: AOL Mail,
Gmail, and Yahoo Mail. Try it now.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000025)


New Set of Sails

karkauai
 

Ahoy, Amel Family. New member here, just bought 1999SuperMaramu on
Lake Texoma. Trucking to Galveston this mo. and trying to get her
ready to go south by mid Jan. She needs a new set of sails, and I'd
like some opinions on what was recommended by Banks Sails Gulf Coast
after talking to Amel. He said that a 145% genoa was recommended for
anything up to 30kts of wind, and a smaller headsail ~110% for steady
winds of 20+.
145% genoa sounds like a LOT of sail. I was wondering if those you who
are sailing SuperMaramu's are using this configuration and what you
think of it. If you're using something else, what?, and what are the
conditions your sailing in? I was thinking something more like 120-
130% genoa???

I'm going to need some hand-holding for a while, you'll probably hear a
lot from me in the coming months.

thanks in advance for your help.
Kent Robertson


Re: {Disarmed} [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage

Frank Newton <bootlegger@...>
 

John

Many thanks for yours. Presently in Martinique and getting anyone
to do anything here at present is impossible with it being start of
local sailing season. The local specialist in this field did'nt want
to know when approached. Advice neverthless appreciated.

Best regards,

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann
#321

-----Original Message-----
From: John and Anne Hollamby [mailto:annejohn@melita.net.mt]
Sent: 18 December 2008 13:17
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: {Disarmed} [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage


Hello Frank,
Just to say that here in Malta there is a small specialist company which
does perfect repairs. I imagine there are such companies in most
yachting centres and DIY is unlikely to give a perfect result.

Happy Christmas from Anne and John SM 319
----- Original Message -----
From: Frank Newton
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2008 2:03 PM
Subject: {Disarmed} [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage




I have just received some rubbing strake damage on my otherwise well
maintained
and preserved SM 2000; specifically a small section where the brown
surface
coating has chipped off completely revealing the bare fibre glass
moulding
as well as long abrasions, some of which penetrate the outer brown
coating.

Can anyone please advise me a) can the surface covering be abrasions
be
polished out?
b) how best to repair the chipped off area to achieve the same brown
finish?
c) is there a specific color reference for this brown? Together with
any

other advice. Such would be greatly appreciated.

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann
# 321








------------------------------------------------------------------------
------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.19/1854 - Release Date:
17/12/2008 19:21


Problem with rear state room head holding tank

linda.desalvo <linda.desalvo@...>
 

Hello All:

I'm having a problem with a leak in my rear state room head holding
tank.

The aft head holding tank is leaking into the boat and when I
checked it out I determined that it was coming from a leak in the
pipe at the bottom of the fiberglass holding tank just above where
the flexible hose from below is connected to the pipe. The pipe is
brass I think.

There is a green wire (I assume from the zinks) that was pressed
against the pipe with a hose clamp just below the fiberglass holding
tank. About ¼" of wire was stripped and pressed against the pipe.
On either side of the wire vertical slits/holes have developed a
trough threw the pipe causing the leak. The slits were wide enough
to fit a pin into them and move it up at down. I am brainstorming
ideas as to how to seal the slits but I was wondering how this could
happen and maybe I should be checking other similar type connections
elsewhere on the boat.

Has anyone else had a similar problem and what do you suggest as a
corrective measure?

Jim and Linda DeSalvo, SM 207


Re: [Amel] Photos AMEL 54 at the Paris Boat Show Dez 2008

jlmertz@free.fr <jlmertz@...>
 

Thank's for all the photos,
If you go to La Rochelle (it's realy great) go to COUITENCEAU a good
restaurant..
Jluc
CottonBay
SM316
------------------------------------------------------------------------
, ralph.heilig a écrit :


Dear Forum members,

I just came back from a trip to the Nautique in Paris. I visited AMEL,
because my wife and I are planning to purchase a new boat very soon
and the AMEL 54 is currently one of our favorites.

The AMEL Team was great! The next step will be that we visit the AMEL
yard.

Since this forum is so useful for me as a potential new owner I want
to share some of the photos I have taken of the AMEL 54.

Ralph


Photos AMEL 54 at the Paris Boat Show Dez 2008

ralph.heilig <ralph.heilig@...>
 

Dear Forum members,

I just came back from a trip to the Nautique in Paris. I visited AMEL,
because my wife and I are planning to purchase a new boat very soon
and the AMEL 54 is currently one of our favorites.

The AMEL Team was great! The next step will be that we visit the AMEL
yard.

Since this forum is so useful for me as a potential new owner I want
to share some of the photos I have taken of the AMEL 54.

Ralph


Re: Downwind System

rapp.jeffrey <rapp.jeffrey@...>
 

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Bob Fritz
<sailboatdelivery@...> wrote:


I'll try to recapitulate setting of the downwind (twin pole)
system as best I can from memory. Set up the port pole first for the
genoa. It's easiest to do this with the genoa furled.

1.Take the short pole and put it through the hoop on the port shroud
so that
the socket is outboard. Attach the other end to the mast. Attach
the long pole to the socket on the short pole. The aft end of the long
pole has an S hook that hooks over the lifeline to hold the pole in
place.

2. Attach the blue line to the forward metal tab on the long pole.
Run it
outside of the shrouds through the block on the deck aft the pulpit.
take it
back to the cleat on the coachroof. Attach the yellow line to the
bottom
tab on the pole and run it through the midship cleat. Attach the
red line
to aft tab on the pole and run it through the deck cleat on the rail
just aft
of the cockpit. Attach the topping lift (white line on the mast) and
cleat it in the small self tailing winch on the port side of the mast.
Each line should be marked with a whipping at the approximate point
where it
should be cleated. Run the port genoa sheet outside of everything and
through the end of the pole. The sheet has to be attached between genoa
car and the end of the pole. Loop it back to do this. If you get it
wrong it will be obvious when you try to set the pole.

3. To set the pole take up on the topping lift just enough to lift
the pole off
the rail with one person holding it steady. The second person should be
ready to pull hard on the blue line. If the boat is rolling, wait
until you
roll to port then the person holding the long pole gives it hard shove
outboard. If you time it right the roll of the bost will work to swing
it. When it is in line with the short pole cleat the blue line,
then raise
the topping lift so the the long and short pole are in a straight line.

4. Unfurl the genoa and pull in the port sheet until the clew of the
genoa is
about a meter from the end of the pole. This sounds complicated, but it
gets easier each time you do it. Now you are ready to set up the
starboard pole for the ballooner. This is done in the identical manner.

To set the ballooner.

The headfoil has 3 grooves. The genoa should be set in the port
groove. The ballooner will be set in the starboard groove and the
middle
groove will be free

5. At the head of the ballooner there will be a plastic piece as
shown on
p. 46 of the owners manual. Attach the halyard as shoun in the
picture. Run the small line through the loop in the halyard prior to
attaching the loop of the halyard to the plstic piece. . Put the
plastic piece on the starboard groove and run the boltrope of the
sail up the
groove for a half meter or so. Cleat the halyard off . Run the
ballooner
sheet through the end of the starboard pole in the same manner as
you did the
with the genoa sheet on the port pole. Push the pole out in place
and set
it up like the port pole.

6. Pull the ballooner up with the halyard until the plastic piece
clicks
in place on the swivel. You can feel this happen. The pull
the halyard back down. If all went well the sail will remain in
place. If not pull it up again.

7. Tighten the ballooner sheet as you did the jib sheet. Furl the
mainsail and you are all set to go downwind. If the wind rises, you can
furl the genoa and the ballooner simultaneously by easing both
sheets engaging
the furler. The manual suggests that one or two wraps should be
taken if
the win rises above 15 or so knots.

To get the ballooner down, attach the halyard to the "mouse" as shown
on p. 49 of the owners manual. run the mouse up the center groove
of the
headfoil until it releases the ballooner from the swivel. The sail will
come down very rapidly, so you want to be ready to catch it. It works
best to turn the boat to starboard so that the ballooner backwinds
before
releasing the sail. This allows the sail to fall onto the foredeck
rather
than into the water.

To get the poles back in release the topping lift to lower rhe pole
to about
lifeline height. Release the blue line and pull on the red line to get
the pole to swing in. Time the roll so that the boat is rolling to
starboard if you are bringing in the starboard pole. If you pull in the
pole when the boat is rolling to port, the starboard pole will come
in much
faster than you like and could cause damage to the person or the boat.

I think that is about it. It sounds much more difficult than it is.
With a bit of practice it is quite easy. I have done it several times
singlehanded. Just take it slow and easy. You'll make some mistakes
early on, but none will lead to disaster. I may have forgotten some
critical step as I write this 900 miles from the nearest ocean with snow
blowing about the house. If so, someone else may be able to fill
you in.

The twin headsails make for easy downwind sailing. No worry about
gybing. I've gone as long as 9 days without adjusting sheets except for
moving them slightly to avoid chafe.

Bob Fritz





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Thanks to everyone who helped with this. The info was just what I was
looking for
Jeffrey Rapp


Re: {Disarmed} [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage

John and Anne Hollamby <annejohn@...>
 

Hello Frank,
Just to say that here in Malta there is a small specialist company which does perfect repairs.
I imagine there are such companies in most yachting centres and DIY is unlikely to give a perfect result.

Happy Christmas from Anne and John SM 319

----- Original Message -----
From: Frank Newton
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2008 2:03 PM
Subject: {Disarmed} [Amel] Brown rubbing strake damage




I have just received some rubbing strake damage on my otherwise well
maintained
and preserved SM 2000; specifically a small section where the brown
surface
coating has chipped off completely revealing the bare fibre glass
moulding
as well as long abrasions, some of which penetrate the outer brown
coating.

Can anyone please advise me a) can the surface covering be abrasions be
polished out?
b) how best to repair the chipped off area to achieve the same brown
finish?
c) is there a specific color reference for this brown? Together with any

other advice. Such would be greatly appreciated.

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann
# 321








------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
Version: 8.0.176 / Virus Database: 270.9.19/1854 - Release Date: 17/12/2008 19:21


Brown rubbing strake damage

Frank Newton <bootlegger@...>
 

I have just received some rubbing strake damage on my otherwise well
maintained
and preserved SM 2000; specifically a small section where the brown
surface
coating has chipped off completely revealing the bare fibre glass
moulding
as well as long abrasions, some of which penetrate the outer brown
coating.

Can anyone please advise me a) can the surface covering be abrasions be
polished out?
b) how best to repair the chipped off area to achieve the same brown
finish?
c) is there a specific color reference for this brown? Together with any

other advice. Such would be greatly appreciated.

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann
# 321


Downwind System

Bob Fritz
 

I'll try to recapitulate setting of the downwind (twin pole)
system as best I can from memory. Set up the port pole first for the
genoa. It's easiest to do this with the genoa furled.

1.Take the short pole and put it through the hoop on the port shroud so that
the socket is outboard. Attach the other end to the mast. Attach
the long pole to the socket on the short pole. The aft end of the long
pole has an S hook that hooks over the lifeline to hold the pole in place.

2. Attach the blue line to the forward metal tab on the long pole. Run it
outside of the shrouds through the block on the deck aft the pulpit. take it
back to the cleat on the coachroof. Attach the yellow line to the bottom
tab on the pole and run it through the midship cleat. Attach the red line
to aft tab on the pole and run it through the deck cleat on the rail just aft
of the cockpit. Attach the topping lift (white line on the mast) and
cleat it in the small self tailing winch on the port side of the mast.
Each line should be marked with a whipping at the approximate point where it
should be cleated. Run the port genoa sheet outside of everything and
through the end of the pole. The sheet has to be attached between genoa
car and the end of the pole. Loop it back to do this. If you get it
wrong it will be obvious when you try to set the pole.

3. To set the pole take up on the topping lift just enough to lift the pole off
the rail with one person holding it steady. The second person should be
ready to pull hard on the blue line. If the boat is rolling, wait until you
roll to port then the person holding the long pole gives it hard shove
outboard. If you time it right the roll of the bost will work to swing
it. When it is in line with the short pole cleat the blue line, then raise
the topping lift so the the long and short pole are in a straight line.

4. Unfurl the genoa and pull in the port sheet until the clew of the genoa is
about a meter from the end of the pole. This sounds complicated, but it
gets easier each time you do it. Now you are ready to set up the
starboard pole for the ballooner. This is done in the identical manner.

To set the ballooner.

The headfoil has 3 grooves. The genoa should be set in the port
groove. The ballooner will be set in the starboard groove and the middle
groove will be free

5. At the head of the ballooner there will be a plastic piece as shown on
p. 46 of the owners manual. Attach the halyard as shoun in the
picture. Run the small line through the loop in the halyard prior to
attaching the loop of the halyard to the plstic piece. . Put the
plastic piece on the starboard groove and run the boltrope of the sail up the
groove for a half meter or so. Cleat the halyard off . Run the ballooner
sheet through the end of the starboard pole in the same manner as you did the
with the genoa sheet on the port pole. Push the pole out in place and set
it up like the port pole.

6. Pull the ballooner up with the halyard until the plastic piece clicks
in place on the swivel. You can feel this happen. The pull
the halyard back down. If all went well the sail will remain in
place. If not pull it up again.

7. Tighten the ballooner sheet as you did the jib sheet. Furl the
mainsail and you are all set to go downwind. If the wind rises, you can
furl the genoa and the ballooner simultaneously by easing both sheets engaging
the furler. The manual suggests that one or two wraps should be taken if
the win rises above 15 or so knots.

To get the ballooner down, attach the halyard to the "mouse" as shown
on p. 49 of the owners manual. run the mouse up the center groove of the
headfoil until it releases the ballooner from the swivel. The sail will
come down very rapidly, so you want to be ready to catch it. It works
best to turn the boat to starboard so that the ballooner backwinds before
releasing the sail. This allows the sail to fall onto the foredeck rather
than into the water.

To get the poles back in release the topping lift to lower rhe pole to about
lifeline height. Release the blue line and pull on the red line to get
the pole to swing in. Time the roll so that the boat is rolling to
starboard if you are bringing in the starboard pole. If you pull in the
pole when the boat is rolling to port, the starboard pole will come in much
faster than you like and could cause damage to the person or the boat.

I think that is about it. It sounds much more difficult than it is.
With a bit of practice it is quite easy. I have done it several times
singlehanded. Just take it slow and easy. You'll make some mistakes
early on, but none will lead to disaster. I may have forgotten some
critical step as I write this 900 miles from the nearest ocean with snow
blowing about the house. If so, someone else may be able to fill you in.

The twin headsails make for easy downwind sailing. No worry about
gybing. I've gone as long as 9 days without adjusting sheets except for
moving them slightly to avoid chafe.

Bob Fritz


Re: santorin slup

Craig Briggs
 

With the Amel roller furling a hanked on staysail would require you
to add a separate stay, for which the boat is not designed and which I
would not recommend. A great solution that Joel Potter suggested is
the "Gale Sail", that goes over the furled headsail. Here's the link -
http://www.atninc.com/gale.html
At the same time, we've done quite well with "jib and jigger" in up
to 40+ knots. We roll out the genoa to about the equivalent of a #4 jib
and reef the mizzen to just above the spreader. Good balance,
surprisingly good upwind ability and no need to go forward.
Cheers, Craig


Re: santorin slup

c_fruendt
 

You are right SLUP is the german spelling. sorry for that. I am
interested in the Sloop because i found a quite interesting santorin
and it seems that the price reflects this "uncommon" Amel design. i
only wonder that the mast is still at the same position and not taller.
According to my santorin darwing they only lenghten the boom by on
meter and increase the genoa sail area by some square meters.
to my knowledge the sloop mast should be moved backwards when taken
away the mizzen .
in heavy condition i like to install a hanked on staysail but not sure
if this is common amel practice


Re: santorin slup

Craig Briggs
 

We've got Santorin #68, "Sangaris", which is a ketch, and have not
sailed the Santorin sloop (which certainly should be spelled slup ;-)

I suspect the differences between the Santorin sloop vs. Santorin
ketch are simply the generic differences between all sloops and
ketches, some real, some simply preference.

Coming from years in sloops, I have developed a strong preference for
the ketch for cruising - the flexibilty of sail plan and ease of
changing it far offset the slight decrease in pointing ability and,
arguably, speed. "Arguably" because one can "tweak" the sail plan
more easily and keep the overall speed up.

Specifically comparing a Santorin sloop vs a Santorin ketch, I should
think:
- lower mast height may be beneficial for bridge clearance, depending
on your cruising grounds
- the mizzen shrouds provide very secure handholds when working the
boat underway, which, of course, you don't get with the sloop.
- less weight aft may be good with the sloop if, like us, you carry
too much stuff in the aft lazarette.
- I don't know if the sloop boom swings over the entire cockpit - it
does not on the ketch which makes it quite safe to go onto the deck.
- it's probably much easier to walk across the stern area with the
sloop as you don't have to duck the mizzen boom.

Other than that, you're pretty much back to the generic sloop vs
ketch comparison - and there's nothing better looking than a ketch
power reaching with 4 sails drawing!

Cheers,
Craig Briggs, Santorin #68 - "Sangaris", in Siracusa


Re: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon

eric freedman
 

Hi,

My muffler melted due to a slight air leak in the raw water pump on the
Yanmar. You can melt the muffler before the overheat alarm goes off on the
engine. I installed a BOREL exhaust water alarm on the exhaust and have not
had any more problems.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of svbebe
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 8:41 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon



John,

A starboard tack will limit the waterflow. See Kimberlite's muffler
in the photo section of this group. I believe Eric was motor sailing
on a starboard tack when the lack of waterflow melted it.

Have you checked the transmission cooler? If not, loosen the clamp on
the forward side of the cooler and slide the boot forward...use a shop
vac to get all of the debris out.

Bill
s/v BeBe SM2 #387
Auckland, NZ for the cyclone season

remove the

-----Original Message-----
From: jfolino901 <jfolino901@...>
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 11:56 am
Subject: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon

I have sailed Sulajon since 2002 in the Caribbean. This being my first

cruise of this season, I noticed the temp gauge approaching 100 degrees

C while motorsailing at a slight heal on starboard tack, with no such

similar overheating while motorsailing on port tack, or just motoring

along. I checked the sea chest intake & found it clear of any growth.

Does anyone have an opinion, or suggestion short of not motoring?

John on Sulajon, currently in Culebra


Re: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon

eric freedman
 

The sea chest is located to starboard of the centerline of the hull. If you
motor sail more than 15 degrees on starboard tack you will take in air with
the water and the engine will overheat, same with the generator.

Also you will find that the watermaker circuit breaker trips if you try to
make water on starboard tack.

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jfolino901
Sent: Tuesday, December 16, 2008 6:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon



I have sailed Sulajon since 2002 in the Caribbean. This being my first
cruise of this season, I noticed the temp gauge approaching 100 degrees
C while motorsailing at a slight heal on starboard tack, with no such
similar overheating while motorsailing on port tack, or just motoring
along. I checked the sea chest intake & found it clear of any growth.
Does anyone have an opinion, or suggestion short of not motoring?
John on Sulajon, currently in Culebra


Re: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

John,

A starboard tack will limit the waterflow. See Kimberlite's muffler
in the photo section of this group. I believe Eric was motor sailing
on a starboard tack when the lack of waterflow melted it.

Have you checked the transmission cooler? If not, loosen the clamp on
the forward side of the cooler and slide the boot forward...use a shop
vac to get all of the debris out.

Bill
s/v BeBe SM2 #387
Auckland, NZ for the cyclone season

remove the

-----Original Message-----
From: jfolino901 <jfolino901@...>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tue, 16 Dec 2008 11:56 am
Subject: [Amel] Overheating Yanmar on starboard tack SM #347 Sulajon

I have sailed Sulajon since 2002 in the Caribbean. This being my first

cruise of this season, I noticed the temp gauge approaching 100 degrees

C while motorsailing at a slight heal on starboard tack, with no such

similar overheating while motorsailing on port tack, or just motoring

along. I checked the sea chest intake & found it clear of any growth.

Does anyone have an opinion, or suggestion short of not motoring?

John on Sulajon, currently in Culebra