Date   

Valsat 03 GPS

tonic102004 <aebersoldp@...>
 

Hello all

My Valsat 03 GPS is 10 years old. I left the boat for 3 months and
since then the Valsat is not giving the position anymore! Has anyone
experienced the same?
Is it possible to make a reset?

Thanks for any feedback
Paul
SM 227


Hydronic Heating System

raquel0909 <raquel0909@...>
 

Hi All

We have a Sharki (1982 hull # 55) "Ray Ocean" in Kingston, ON. We are
planning to install a hydronic heating system to heat the boat, heat
our domestic hot water while at anchor and preheat our engine (4.108)
when required.

We would appreciate any input. What make and model were chosen and
why?. Are you pleased with the outcome.

We currently are waffling back and forth between a Webasto 2010 (45,000
btu/hr) the Hurricane SCH (25,000 btu/hr) and the Hurricane H2 (35,000
btu/hr).

Looking forward to hearing from you.

Thanks,
Raquel, Hank and Ocean


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cruising the South Pacific

Georges Pellegrini <dji314@...>
 

Hi John and Ann,
thanks for this nice and usefull article. I just wish to correct a
little mistake.
Bastille day is JULY 14th, not June.
Thanks again.
Georges Pellegrini

On Feb 19, 2008, at 5:15 AM, John and Anne on Bali Hai wrote:

This is the time of the year when people are preparing to cross the
Pacific planning to be in New Zealand by November to miss the cyclone
season further North so here are a few tips.Take some things that
remote islanders might be happy to receive.We were given six black
pearls by a pearl farmer in the Tuamotus. He only had one flipper but
it never occurred to us to give him ours, I wish we had given him a
pair of ours and indeed other things. We could have taken a few such
essential "luxuries". We were surprised to see that the shop on many
islands or atolls sold only the bare essentials such as tinned
meats,rice, sugar etc plus Pampers of which they had big stocks. This
puzzled us until we realised that they do not have enough fresh water
to wash the nappies that are, presumably, used at night. If you have
a good watermaker offer your hosts water. They may or may not need it
but remember that they have no rain for much of the year.
It may have changed but when we crossed nearly fifteen years ago a
visa to stop in the Galapagos took more than the eight months that we
allowed for. We were allowed to stay a week as we took the hint and
claimed that we had a serious problem as our alternator needed repair.
The man in charge there was a captain in the Equadorian navy and it
seems that this was a two year posting during which he may find ways
to increase his income. We wanted to stock up on fuel there but the
only way that we could was to buy it though the captain. We paid for
60 gallons which was delivered by the navy in an assortment of cans
etc. It was not only very dirty but it was not more than about 40
gallons which we could only ell by our dipstick as the cans were of
every size. I complained and the other 20 arrived without problems.
Gas was hard to buy in the Marquesas because the price is fixed by
the French government and does not allow the vendors ny profit. We
were able to top up our fuel direct from a supply ship which happened
to arrive whilst we were in Nuka Hiva.As a general rule of thumb it
is possible to stock up on food stuffs etc in the French islands as
the French have or had arrangements for flying in goodies from France
fairly frequently. Not cheap but frozen ready made meals were
excellent quality.
Papeete is a great place to resupply and is especially good to be at
on June 14 as this is Bastille Day (if I remember correctly) and
there was a military parade and many other diversions.
One thing not to be missed is the Festival of the South Pacific which
is an annual event which takes place in a different island or group
of islands each year. Many of the islands sent people to take part
showing facets of their own particular traditions from dancing,
singing, wood carving hut building etc.
American Samoa is a great place to have spares flown in from the
States as it is deemed part of continental USA and thus airmail is at
internal US rates. Specify priority airmail as otherwise your goods
may be offloaded in Hawiai if the plane is heavily loaded. Once off
loaded it may take ages to get on another plane! Deisel here was very
cheap but not as cheap as Venezuela.
Further west the fuel may come from Australia or Indonesian
refineries.I cannot remember which company uses the Australian
refined stuff but apparently it is much better refined and thus not
so hard on the engine.
Anchoring in atolls can be tricky as the depth may be sixty feet and
the bottom may have huge coral mushrooms which the Aussies call
bommies. You anchor with a lot of scope but the winds die out during
the night and your boat will drift around in circles until the trades
get going again next day thus the anchor chain may have been wound
around a bommy several times until there is no free scope, then if a
swell builds up the chain may break the anchor winch which would be a
disaster. The way to avoid this is to tie fenders every 20 feet or so
on the chain so that the chain does not lie on the bottom but will
sink at once if a breeze comes up. This is an old trick, it used to
be done with pieces of bamboo as floats pre plastic.Before we adopted
this technique I had to put down a second anchor so that we could let
out more chain on the main anchor and then scuba down to the bottom
and unwrap the chain from the stalk of the bommy.
Finally do not use the obvious buoys as waypoints and then put the
autopilot on track as this will mean that you will meet up with every
inter-island boat or ship which has used the same waypoints.

For those with bent anchors I think the SS ones may be made in house
by Amel because when we did our factory tour in 2000 I saw an older
man patiently funnelling lead shot into the pointed end and the hole
was then welded over.My SS one is now a garden ornament as we bought
a Beugal type one in galvanised steel in Turkey and we think it is
far superior. I think Amel have now adopted this type for the 54.

Good sailing, Anne and John SM 319


Cruising the South Pacific

John and Anne on Bali Hai <annejohn@...>
 

This is the time of the year when people are preparing to cross the
Pacific planning to be in New Zealand by November to miss the cyclone
season further North so here are a few tips.Take some things that
remote islanders might be happy to receive.We were given six black
pearls by a pearl farmer in the Tuamotus. He only had one flipper but
it never occurred to us to give him ours, I wish we had given him a
pair of ours and indeed other things. We could have taken a few such
essential "luxuries". We were surprised to see that the shop on many
islands or atolls sold only the bare essentials such as tinned
meats,rice, sugar etc plus Pampers of which they had big stocks. This
puzzled us until we realised that they do not have enough fresh water
to wash the nappies that are, presumably, used at night. If you have
a good watermaker offer your hosts water. They may or may not need it
but remember that they have no rain for much of the year.
It may have changed but when we crossed nearly fifteen years ago a
visa to stop in the Galapagos took more than the eight months that we
allowed for. We were allowed to stay a week as we took the hint and
claimed that we had a serious problem as our alternator needed repair.
The man in charge there was a captain in the Equadorian navy and it
seems that this was a two year posting during which he may find ways
to increase his income. We wanted to stock up on fuel there but the
only way that we could was to buy it though the captain. We paid for
60 gallons which was delivered by the navy in an assortment of cans
etc. It was not only very dirty but it was not more than about 40
gallons which we could only ell by our dipstick as the cans were of
every size. I complained and the other 20 arrived without problems.
Gas was hard to buy in the Marquesas because the price is fixed by
the French government and does not allow the vendors ny profit. We
were able to top up our fuel direct from a supply ship which happened
to arrive whilst we were in Nuka Hiva.As a general rule of thumb it
is possible to stock up on food stuffs etc in the French islands as
the French have or had arrangements for flying in goodies from France
fairly frequently. Not cheap but frozen ready made meals were
excellent quality.
Papeete is a great place to resupply and is especially good to be at
on June 14 as this is Bastille Day (if I remember correctly) and
there was a military parade and many other diversions.
One thing not to be missed is the Festival of the South Pacific which
is an annual event which takes place in a different island or group
of islands each year. Many of the islands sent people to take part
showing facets of their own particular traditions from dancing,
singing, wood carving hut building etc.
American Samoa is a great place to have spares flown in from the
States as it is deemed part of continental USA and thus airmail is at
internal US rates. Specify priority airmail as otherwise your goods
may be offloaded in Hawiai if the plane is heavily loaded. Once off
loaded it may take ages to get on another plane! Deisel here was very
cheap but not as cheap as Venezuela.
Further west the fuel may come from Australia or Indonesian
refineries.I cannot remember which company uses the Australian
refined stuff but apparently it is much better refined and thus not
so hard on the engine.
Anchoring in atolls can be tricky as the depth may be sixty feet and
the bottom may have huge coral mushrooms which the Aussies call
bommies. You anchor with a lot of scope but the winds die out during
the night and your boat will drift around in circles until the trades
get going again next day thus the anchor chain may have been wound
around a bommy several times until there is no free scope, then if a
swell builds up the chain may break the anchor winch which would be a
disaster. The way to avoid this is to tie fenders every 20 feet or so
on the chain so that the chain does not lie on the bottom but will
sink at once if a breeze comes up. This is an old trick, it used to
be done with pieces of bamboo as floats pre plastic.Before we adopted
this technique I had to put down a second anchor so that we could let
out more chain on the main anchor and then scuba down to the bottom
and unwrap the chain from the stalk of the bommy.
Finally do not use the obvious buoys as waypoints and then put the
autopilot on track as this will mean that you will meet up with every
inter-island boat or ship which has used the same waypoints.

For those with bent anchors I think the SS ones may be made in house
by Amel because when we did our factory tour in 2000 I saw an older
man patiently funnelling lead shot into the pointed end and the hole
was then welded over.My SS one is now a garden ornament as we bought
a Beugal type one in galvanised steel in Turkey and we think it is
far superior. I think Amel have now adopted this type for the 54.

Good sailing, Anne and John SM 319


Re: Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Miles
Do you have the WASI anchor? Mine is not a WASI anchor, rather it is a
CQR like anchor made from polished stainless. I don't know the manufacturer.
The applicable metallurgical principles would cross over to almost
any 316 SS.

Gary

Miles wrote: ....."I would suggest that someone correspond directly with WASI in
Germany and then inform this group. WASI seems to be proud of their
metallurgy and products and should be able to tell us how best to deal with
this problem."


Re: Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

Miles Bidwell <mbidwell@...>
 

I also had my anchor shaft bend after I caught it under a rock. Amel in
Hyeres straightened it and I hope that it is not weakened. Given the
questions about the affect of bending and of welding on the underlying
strength, I would suggest that someone correspond directly with WASI in
Germany and then inform this group. WASI seems to be proud of their
metallurgy and products and should be able to tell us how best to deal with
this problem.



I am not volunteering to do this because I am on my boat in the Caribbean
and do not have good internet access.



Miles Bidwell s/y/ LADYBUG

SM 216


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Richard Wrote : "If you pre heat the SS that is going to be welded and the
"I" beam and let it cool slow you will HAVE issues. "

HAVE is my emphasis added.

Richard: Hi, is this correct or did you mean to say you would NOT have
issues (annealing like on copper or is it like heat treating on SS??)

Please verify that HAVE is correct.

Thanks for your reply, Gary Silver


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

If you pre heat the SS that is going to welded and the
"I" beam and let it cool slow you will have issues.
Be VERY SURE that the welder uses 316 SS rods which is
the same metal that anchor should have been made of..
remember that SS it tough. not hard, yes it does work
harden however it can take lots of heat but not a lot
of rubbing/work hardening.
good luck
Richard on Challenge in St Maartin SM 209
--- amelliahona <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi Murray:

Murray Seidel wrote: ".... then we welded top and
bottom SS plates to make a new I-beam on
top of the old and thicked the areas between the top
and bottom plates on both sides"

Murray, can you give more specifics about the
thickness of the material welded on as
doublers to the shank on the top and bottom of the I
beam cap plate and base plate? Also,
how far along the shank did you carry the doublers?
A photo would be helpful if you are
near the boat.

" Do I need to trash the anchor despite the welding?
Any thoughts? "

I am as worried about welding causing stress risers
as I am about work hardening of the
metal by bending it back into shape. Seems we need
a metallurgist to help us sort this
al out.

Thanks, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Amel SM2000
Hull # 335



____________________________________________________________________________________
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know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Murray:

Murray Seidel wrote: ".... then we welded top and bottom SS plates to make a new I-beam on
top of the old and thicked the areas between the top and bottom plates on both sides"

Murray, can you give more specifics about the thickness of the material welded on as
doublers to the shank on the top and bottom of the I beam cap plate and base plate? Also,
how far along the shank did you carry the doublers? A photo would be helpful if you are
near the boat.

" Do I need to trash the anchor despite the welding? Any thoughts? "

I am as worried about welding causing stress risers as I am about work hardening of the
metal by bending it back into shape. Seems we need a metallurgist to help us sort this
al out.

Thanks, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Amel SM2000 Hull # 335


Re: Painting deck stripes

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hello Caspar,

I posted the pictures of the deck stripe painting. Sorry my e-mail
link was not attached to the pictures.
As usual, Gary Silver has done an excellent job of explaining the
process. Thank you, Gary, and I'm glad you're happy with the results.
Caspar, if you have any questions, please post them, and I'm sure
you will get useful advice. As far as I know, about a dozen owners
have painted the deck stipes, all using the same basic approach.

Roy on Excalibur, SM #195


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

Dr. Seidel <mseidel@...>
 

I read with interest the anchor shank bending. SM349 's shank bent 90 degrees this summer anchored in four foot plus seas starting a race for our organization. It took a 30 ton press to straighten it, then we welded top and bottom SS plates to make a new I-beam on top of the old and thicked the areas between the top and bottom plates on both sides. I been sailing for 40 myears and never seen that happen. Makes you wonder about the anchor strength?. Do I need to trash the anchor despite the welding? Any thoughts?
Sundance sm 349 Murray Seidel.

----- Original Message -----
From: dlm48@aol.com
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 10:21 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend



YEP WE managed that on Bill and Judy's SM200 just off the entrance to the
Moorings base in Road Town Tortola - they had it straightened no problem - i am
sure Judy or Bill will post and give you chapter and verse on the repair. It
would appear to my engineering brain that the shank need to be upsized
considerably as it cant handle the load that the flukes can generate with an SM200
leaping about in a boisterous anchorage

regards

David

In a message dated 14/02/2008 15:03:27 GMT Standard Time,
no_reply@yahoogroups.com writes:

Hi Folks:

On a recent bit of sailing in Barbuda, West Indies, we were anchored
overnight in a bit of a
windy anchorage (about 25 knots, gusts to 30 knots). We were anchored in a
sand bottom as
far as we know and the boat would sail about somewhat as is customary. We
had a nylon
anchor snubber in place. Upon weighing anchor (the anchor broke out with the
normal
amount of resistance) we found the bent anchor shank depicted in the photo
that I have
posted in the photo's section.

Has anybody else had this problem? I have delivered the anchor to a shop in
Antigua that
says they can straighten the shank in their hydraulic press. I am concerned
about work
hardening of the metal from the bending forces. Anybody have thoughts about
the
advisability of straightening the shaft. The shank is welded in place so
replacement would be
a major undertaking. There is no deformation of the blade of the anchor.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Amel SM2000 Hull # 335


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

dlm48@...
 

I think turning the shank into an I-beam will solve this 'issue' without any
need to add more material to the shank.

Stainless Steel is more malleable than cast steel so will bend - as you and
others have discovered - i dont think this is a 'strength' issue - it is
just that 'the flat' SS shank will bend before it manages to reset the anchor
flukes.

IF you look at a CQR for instance you will see a cast/forged I-beam.

Your modification to create the SS I-beam shank will stop it bending
'certainly not at the same loads' so the anchor will turn and reset in line with
the new direction of pull.

regards

David

In a message dated 17/02/2008 15:46:25 GMT Standard Time, mseidel@ec.rr.com
writes:

I read with interest the anchor shank bending. SM349 's shank bent 90
degrees this summer anchored in four foot plus seas starting a race for our
organization. It took a 30 ton press to straighten it, then we welded top and bottom
SS plates to make a new I-beam on top of the old and thicked the areas
between the top and bottom plates on both sides. I been sailing for 40 myears and
never seen that happen. Makes you wonder about the anchor strength?. Do I
need to trash the anchor despite the welding? Any thoughts?
Sundance sm 349 Murray Seidel.
----- Original Message -----
From: _dlm48@aol.com_ (mailto:dlm48@aol.com)
To: _amelyachtowners@amelyachtowname_
(mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com)
Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 10:21 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

YEP WE managed that on Bill and Judy's SM200 just off the entrance to the
Moorings base in Road Town Tortola - they had it straightened no problem - i
am
sure Judy or Bill will post and give you chapter and verse on the repair. It
would appear to my engineering brain that the shank need to be upsized
considerably as it cant handle the load that the flukes can generate with an
SM200
leaping about in a boisterous anchorage

regards

David


Re: Painting deck stripes

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Caspar:

There is a lot of information of this site about painting the deck stripes. Just enter
"stripes" in the search window of the messages area and you will find about 50 messages.
Start at the beginning (oldest calendar date) and you will find all you need to know.

We just completed this process on our boat. Here are the highlights and what we used:

1. We used Interlux Brightside Single Part Polyurethane paint. We bought a quart of red, a
quart of green, and a quart of white. Red and Green in 50/50 mix makes a very dark
brown (almost black), added white to lighten the color to nearly match the original brown.
The mix was 20 ml green, 20 ml red, 6 ml white per batch.
2. Scrub the deck and rinse clean, then scuff sand the deck stripe grooves with about 300
grit sandpaper using a rubber eraser of something similar as a small sanding block.
3. Wipe down the groove just before painting with mineral spirits to remove sanding and
other residues and allow to dry for a minute or two.
4. Apply the paint using a pin striping tool (Google these up on the internet). We used a
Buegler tool with a wheel that was about 1/2 the width of the stripe. This is basically a
metal tube with an end fitting that has a serrated metal wheel at the end that rolls the
paint into place. Others have mentioned, and I found it to be true, that the width of the
grooves is not uniform and 2 to 4 passes will yield the best results. Start at at the least
conspicuous place because there is a learning curve and you will get better with time. Use
a very small paint brush to do the areas that you can't do with the pin striping machine.
5. Be prepared for lots of time on your knees and some aggravation as you discover every
tiny flaw in the the deck (molds were reportedly made from weathered teak and thus had
flaws as well).
6. Be ready with a small squirt bottle of mineral spirits and lots of rags to take care of
correcting errors as there will be plenty.
7. Seal the decks with Polytrol/Pentrol after the striping is completed. The decks will look
brand new. This is the single best cosmetic enhancement we have made to the boat.
8. This took about 40-50 man hours from start to finish.

As to repairs of the light brown deck, it is gel coat and will require gel coat matching and
typical fiberglass repair with careful texturing. I plan to see if Laurent in Guadeloupe has
available some of the matched gel coat for the decks as I have one small ding I would like
to repair. I know he has matched gel coat for the off white of the other areas as he made a
repair with it to an area damaged when the starboard windshield was replaced.

I hope this helps.

Gary Silver, Amel SM2000 Hull #335


I saw the pictures of "rbenven44" regarding Painting deck stripes.

As "rbenven44" does not have an email address posted, could anyone
else or "rbenven44" himself please answer the following questions:

1. How can one fill the lines with black (paint / technical), it
looks as new!
2. Can one repaint the deck as well? I contacted Amel and they told
me that I could not paint the deck. Unfortunately there are some
minor damages to the deck so I would prefer to give it some sort of
face-lift.

I would be deeply thankful if anyone could answer my questions.

Kind Regards,

Caspar Groot


Painting deck stripes

camacfinancial <camacfinancial@...>
 

Dear All,

I saw the pictures of "rbenven44" regarding Painting deck stripes.

As "rbenven44" does not have an email address posted, could anyone
else or "rbenven44" himself please answer the following questions:

1. How can one fill the lines with black (paint / technical), it
looks as new!
2. Can one repaint the deck as well? I contacted Amel and they told
me that I could not paint the deck. Unfortunately there are some
minor damages to the deck so I would prefer to give it some sort of
face-lift.

I would be deeply thankful if anyone could answer my questions.

Kind Regards,

Caspar Groot


Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Folks:

On a recent bit of sailing in Barbuda, West Indies, we were anchored overnight in a bit of a
windy anchorage (about 25 knots, gusts to 30 knots). We were anchored in a sand bottom as
far as we know and the boat would sail about somewhat as is customary. We had a nylon
anchor snubber in place. Upon weighing anchor (the anchor broke out with the normal
amount of resistance) we found the bent anchor shank depicted in the photo that I have
posted in the photo's section.

Has anybody else had this problem? I have delivered the anchor to a shop in Antigua that
says they can straighten the shank in their hydraulic press. I am concerned about work
hardening of the metal from the bending forces. Anybody have thoughts about the
advisability of straightening the shaft. The shank is welded in place so replacement would be
a major undertaking. There is no deformation of the blade of the anchor.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Amel SM2000 Hull # 335


Re: Wanting to buy

billklein48 <sidecar1@...>
 

Bill, I have a 1981 Maramu hull # 91 for sale. She is in very good
mechanical condition. I have her listed with Samalot Marine of
Haverstraw New York, but have reserved the right to sell on my own. The
listed price is $159,000 (well within your budget). Contact me at
sidecar1@verizon.net or call at (845)641-7549--regards, Bill Klein

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "bill.young20" <bill99@...>
wrote:

Hi,
I have been looking for an offshore sailing boat for a while and have
decided that I like the Amel range.I am looking for something between
48 and 55 feet so I think that has to be either a Mango or Maramu.My
budget goes to approx 240K US$.Is there anything out there.Regards
Bill
Young.


Wanting to buy

bill.young20 <bill99@...>
 

Hi,
I have been looking for an offshore sailing boat for a while and have
decided that I like the Amel range.I am looking for something between
48 and 55 feet so I think that has to be either a Mango or Maramu.My
budget goes to approx 240K US$.Is there anything out there.Regards Bill
Young.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel Stainless Steel Anchor Shank Bend

dlm48@...
 

YEP WE managed that on Bill and Judy's SM200 just off the entrance to the
Moorings base in Road Town Tortola - they had it straightened no problem - i am
sure Judy or Bill will post and give you chapter and verse on the repair. It
would appear to my engineering brain that the shank need to be upsized
considerably as it cant handle the load that the flukes can generate with an SM200
leaping about in a boisterous anchorage

regards

David

In a message dated 14/02/2008 15:03:27 GMT Standard Time,
no_reply@yahoogroups.com writes:

Hi Folks:

On a recent bit of sailing in Barbuda, West Indies, we were anchored
overnight in a bit of a
windy anchorage (about 25 knots, gusts to 30 knots). We were anchored in a
sand bottom as
far as we know and the boat would sail about somewhat as is customary. We
had a nylon
anchor snubber in place. Upon weighing anchor (the anchor broke out with the
normal
amount of resistance) we found the bent anchor shank depicted in the photo
that I have
posted in the photo's section.

Has anybody else had this problem? I have delivered the anchor to a shop in
Antigua that
says they can straighten the shank in their hydraulic press. I am concerned
about work
hardening of the metal from the bending forces. Anybody have thoughts about
the
advisability of straightening the shaft. The shank is welded in place so
replacement would be
a major undertaking. There is no deformation of the blade of the anchor.

Regards, Gary Silver s/v Liahona Amel SM2000 Hull # 335


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: greeting and question about AIS

bootlegger@...
 

Hello Miles

As someone with the same system as yourself including the VHF aerial
splitter which I picked up at last year's Southampton Boat Show and
which I found easy to install and which has worked brilliantly since,
I would subscribe to everything you say.

Awesome system. Yes, I too found there is much more liklihood
of a response from a closing ship when called up by name.

Frank Newton
Bootlegger of Mann #321
(currently lying in Guadeloupe)

Hello Mark,




I used a slightly different approach to AIS which may be of interest. I
purchased a SITEX black box unit and connected it to the VHF antenna with
an
active splitter. The splitter is a unit called "EasySPLIT. I do not know
if it is sold in the US, but I have seen others in the Defender catalog.
The splitter costs more than the AIS but avoids adding another antenna and
cabling. The AIS shows on a laptop that lives on a shelf (that Amel
designed) over the chart table. This has worked flawlessly for the last
year. Passing through the Straits of Gibraltar last December, I counted
about 40 ships underway. Since the AIS range is well over 40 miles for a
big ship with a high antenna, I could have seen more ships on a larger
scale
chart, but the close ones were of more interest. An added benefit of the
AIS is that it shows the name of the ship as well as the closest passing
distance. Ships seem to respond better when addressed by name than by
"the
ship at position . . . . "



Miles Bidwell

S/Y LADYBUG (now in Martinique)

SM 216






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] greeting and question about AIS

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Mark, we agree with Eric. We have a NASA unit with screen at the Nav station and use it the same way... When we are in the shipping lanes we can see shipping even when in a rain or wind storm and the radar has lots of clutter...
Richard and Joan at Simpson Bay SM 209

eric <kimberlite@optonline.net> wrote:
MARK,

I would order the "radar unit "from Nasa. Otherwise I would order the black
box from NASA. It is so cheap.

The black box comes with computer software.

Before I was hit by lightning I used the "radar unit "and it was amazing.
Now that I have the new Raymarine E series

I get the Ais info on the Raymarine screen it is doubly amazing. I do not
see the need of ais at the helm. You will see the ship on radar and then use
the Ais to figure out your tactics. I have received Ais signals on my chart
plotter since it is rectangular at over 80 miles.

Fair Winds,

Eric

_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Pitt
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 10:58 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] greeting and question about AIS

Eric:

Thanks for the quick reply. I do have Raymarine
chartplotters but they are an RL80C at the nav station
and an RC530 repeater at the helm. That was state-of-the-art
in October 2003. As far as I can tell, these are not Raymarine
series C or E, and thus will not take AIS input. If I am wrong,
please let me know since then I will get a blackbox receiver.

If these Raymarine units will not display AIS, the issue is how else to
display AIS output?
There is a NASA unit with a small monochrome display, but
I am not sure where to add another display at the helm. The SeaCas unit
connects to a
laptop via usb (in fact, usb powers the SeaCas receiver so one does not
have to wire it to the boat's power supply). I was thinking of just
mounting my laptop securely on the nav table and using it as the AIS
display -- with full color and large font lettering. I already have
navigation software that support AIS input.

Best,

Mark
S/V Sabbatical III
ASM #419

eric wrote:

Mark,
Why did you choose the seacas system over the NASA unit? Do you have a
Raymarine chart plotter on board? the Nasa black box will put the ais
targets on the C and E series chart plotters.
The install of the Ais antenna is simple.
I believe I suggested the sea me unit to you. If the unit is mounted as on
Kimberlite, there is a hole in the edge of the mizzen masthead on the
starboard side.
I just used a large reamer to enlarge the hole for the VHF antenna. Amel
left runners on the masthead to be able to pull a cable through the
mast. It
is accessible at the bottom of the mast on the port side. It is a
fiberglass
plate with two screws.
You pull the cable down to that point. Then go into the aft head and there
is a panel to the right of the mirror. Remove the panel and you will
find a
piece of corrugated hose that leads up to the bottom of the mizzenmast
with
the radar cable in it. You then just pill the cable down into the mirror
area with a snake. . there is a wood panel below the forward port in
the aft
cabin . Remove this with the few wood screws. Incidentally, Amel uses torx
screws and not Phillips head screws. They look very similar, but the torx
screwdriver available from McMaster works much better on all the screws of
the boat. With this panel removed you can run the ais antenna cable across
the boat. Just follow the radar cable across the headliner in the
mid-ships
bunk using the access panels. The cable then runs down into the forward
cabinet in the mid ships cabin. It is behind removable panels on the
forward
side, which is held in with Velcro. Then remove the panel behind the
bookshelf and you are at the nav station. After mounting the antenna, I
believe we had the cable at the nav station in less than 30 minutes.
Fair Winds,
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

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