Date   

[Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Volvo Turbos

Stephan Regulinski
 

Ian and Judy,

Good grief! I didn't realize that the belt change tool kit was so
expensive! You may try ofering to "rent" the tools from your local
Volvo mechanic. This could work for both of you. Good luck on your
first change.

By the way, as to the question of 1000 versus 2000 hours, this is
usually settled on two pieces of data. First is the point at which a
significant number of failures begin to occur. When the engine is
first developed, it is estimated based on prior experience with
similar engines plus engineering "judgement". In time, this estimate
is updated using data from the actual engine.

"Significant" in this case is a function of the cost of repairing in
the event of running to failure as compared to the cost of replacing
the belt prior to failure. Since the engine overhaul is likely to
cost on the order of ten times the cost of a belt change,
a "signifcant" number of failures would be anything greater than ten
percent of the belts failing between 1000 and 2000 hours under normal
use.

The second piece of data is the effectiveness of inspection. If
inspections were perfectly effective in identifying belts that will
fail before the next inspection, than you would have no "hard time"
limit on the belt. Instead, you would inspect on the interval and
replace only when the belt failed inspection.

With things that slowly wear out and then catostrophically fail, we
mix the two ideas and inspect through the part of the life where
failure is unlikely and then as the probability of failure increases,
we replace the part and start over.

Stainless steel is a good example of substance that does not yield to
visual inspection. It is hard to observe minute cracks in stainless
and it fails quickly after the formation of small cracks. Belts,
however, seem to be of the other sort. Evidence of belt wear is easy
to observe and failure happens well after the first signs of belt
degradation.

I am inclined to believe that the original maintenance program is
correct. But remember it has two parts: Inspection and
replacement. Inspecting the belt requires that the inspection port
is opened and the belt is rotated through its entire circumference.
You are looking for "teeth wear and damage" and "cracks in the belt
and oil contamination" (from the maintenance manual). Oil degrades
the belt material and causes the fibers in the belt to begin to pull
apart.

Jay, who wrote in earlier (759 and 762) may shed some light on the
question of whether belt inspections are useful if he can tell us
what was observed when his belts were inspected prior to their
failure.

Stephan G. Regulinski


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian & Judy Jenkins"
<ianjudyjenkins@h...> wrote:
Dear Stephan, What a useful note. I was hoping to change the belt
myself
until I found out the price of the belt tension guage ( somewhere
in the
region of $6-800).Interestingly, my prophet on the mountain in La
R. , M.
Selo, has recently emailed me that 2,000 hours before a change was
OK,
whilst cautioning that an amateur attempt to change should not be
undertaken
lightly.I have noticed a few Volvo trucks on(and off)the road in
Ecuador so
I am now hunting down a knowledgeable Jose to lend me his tools and
ride
shotgun on my very cautious first change
Marine Express Parts recomend 1000 hours, which I think is in
the latest
handbook. They also say that in their experience unless there is
something
wrong with the fuel pump they would not check it when changing the
cam belt.
Ian

From: "Stephan Regulinski" <stephreg@y...>
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Volvo Turbos
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 17:53:01 -0000

Ian, Joel, Jay, etc.,

My copy of the Instruction Book ("Instruction Book 22 Series",
Volvo-
Penta, 1998) page 28 says that the timing gear belt (also called
the
cam belt) should be inspected every 200 hours and replaced every
2000
hours. This is twice the interval recommended by Joel.

I have just replaced my belt at 2000 hours and found no excessive
wear. I would like to know more about Jay's experience,
particularly
the maintenance findings on the last belt inspection prior to
failure. It would be nice to know whether the 200 hour inspection
is
capable of picking up premature belt wear in time to replace the
belt. I am not surprised that he has to adopt a more rigorous
maintenance program (he reports belt failure at just over 1000
hours)
given he is operating under more extreme conditions. The question
is
whether this program is necessary for the rest of us. A timing
belt
change is neither cheap or fast.

For those interested in doing this job yourself, you will need a
new
belt ($40 in Gibraltar), a workshop manual or copy of the relevant
pages, a belt tension guage, two locator pins and two locator
bolts.
I was able to borrow all of the above from a cooperative Volvo
shop.
The were made more cooperative by the fact that I had just spent a
large sum of money repairing the rigging and we were arguing about
the bill. I agreed to pay the bill in full and the shop manager
agreed to loan me the manual, the tools, and a chat with his Volvo
mechanic. Now we both think that the other is a perfect gentleman.

The job took me five hours and would take an experienced mechanic
half that (assuming an Amel were engine access is good). Here are
a
few hints:

(1) Have handy: a full set of sockets including two wrenches, a
31/32 socket, a strap wrench to hold the water-pump pulley while
loosening and tightening screws, and a crow bar or equivalent to
help
tighten alternator belts. An assistant wouldn't hurt to hand tools
and read the manual.

(2) After removing the alternator belts and the water-pump pulley,
the timing-belt cover can be removed with gentle twisting.

(3) The maintenance manual calls for removing the starter motor
and
inserting an anti-rotation tool. My mechanic advised me that this
was not necessary. I did not find it necessary.

(4) Fitting the timing pins into the camshaft and into the
flywheel
is a little tricky. Use a socket wrench with 31/32 socket to turn
the drive shaft, and listen for a little "click" on the pin in the
camshaft hole. It took me six or seven revolutions to convince
myself I had found it. Then kneel beside the engine (next to the
genset) and hold the pin in the flywheel hole. Wiggle the drive
shaft and see if the flywheel pin sets. It will do so firmly and
fully. If not, rotate the drive shaft one half turn (the camshaft
will turn one full turn) and the pin should set. Beware of setting
the flywheel pin in a place where the camshaft pin is not set. I
think there is a second hole, but couldn't swear to it.

(5) Set the two bolts in the pulley of the fuel injection pump.
All
is well if the "B" on this pulley lines up with the notch in the
housing.

(6) The manual says to remove the belt tensioner pulley and the
idler pulley. I did and found that I had to put them back before I
could get the new belt on. My mechanic later said that he doesn't
remove them at all. However, check the bearing on the idler
pulley.
I am told that it can seize and that early evidence is a failure to
turn smoothly.

(7) Replace the belt. Cut the old belt in two so that it cannot
be
reused and dispose.

(8) When tensioning the belt. My mechanic suggested rotating the
tensioner pulley (actually it is a cam) counter-clockwise to
tension
so that the belt, which rotates clockwise, pulls the pulley into
itself thereby increasing tension.

(9) My mechanic advised that he did not adjusted the timing of the
fuel pump as part of a belt replacement, despite this being a step
in
the maintenance procedure. I did not attempt this operation.

(9) Follow the manual in all other circumstances.

(10) Finally, before starting the engine, remember that prayer is
an
important part of any good maintenance program.

Stephan G. Regulinski
Delos (SMM #303)


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Joel F. Potter"
<jfpottercys@a...> wrote:
Hello Ian,

Joel Potter here. The turbo boost pop-off valve really needs A
LOT
of
requested power to function. To check:

1. Go about 3-4 KTS in reverse
2. Gently go to neutral, then forward to idle speed.
3. Wait 3 seconds then wide open throttle in forward. WIDE
OPEN.

You will see the rod move ever so briefly. The engine is
governed
and you
will never get into the boost limit in cruise power conditions.
Only when
asking for more than you should, like at avoiding a crash. Hope
this helps.

All the best,
Joel F. Potter, Hull #400

P.S. Change your cam belt every 1000 hours. Trust me, this is
important.
-----Original Message-----
From: Ian & Judy Jenkins [mailto:ianjudyjenkins@h...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2003 1:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Turbos




I have SM 302 with the Volvo/Perkins TMD22p. No complaints
after
800
hours,
other than replacing the key switch and the engine hour meter
and
rev
counter, both at crazy Volvo prices.Power output is fine and I
take care
to
open up the revs every few hours to ensure the Turbo is
properly
exercised.
When the revs are high and the turbo is really being used
there
is a
pressure control valve that opens up if the turbo pressure
gets
too
high.As
I understand it the rod attached to this valve moves back
against
the
resistance of a spring.I have been advised to move this rod
back
manually
from time to time ( with engine switched off) to ensure that
it
is free
moving and it has always been free when I have moved it.
However, when I use full revs there is no discernible
movement on
this rod
(
possibly 1/2 mm but it's difficult to guage when the engine is
flat
out).It
has been suggested to me that as Amel govern the output to
60hp
the turbo
pressure doesnt reach the point where the valve opens.( this
wouldn't
prevent the turbo from working ok as mine seems to be)
Has anyone any experience to suggest that the rod should or
should not be
seen to move at full revs, and if it does move is this a
momentary and
occasional movement or should the the valve be seen to stay
open
above
certain revs?
Ian Jenkins

_________________________________________________________________
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Delivery and Crossing

wcreed2 <wcreed2@...>
 

My name is Bill Reed and I am taking delivery of my Amel on December
15th in La Rochelle. I am sailing it to Guadaloupe and then on to
the states. I am in the process of preparing my packing list and
would appreciate any advice from those that have taken delivery in
La Rochelle and made the crossing. Specifically, I would be
interested in a packing list that breaks down what was procured
prior to departure for France and what was procured in La Rochelle.
Would appreciate any comments on the merits of U.S. documentation
vs. foreign documentation.

Thanks

Bill Reed
Amel SM 2000 "Gallatea"


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Volvo Turbos

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Dear Stephan, What a useful note. I was hoping to change the belt myself until I found out the price of the belt tension guage ( somewhere in the region of $6-800).Interestingly, my prophet on the mountain in La R. , M. Selo, has recently emailed me that 2,000 hours before a change was OK, whilst cautioning that an amateur attempt to change should not be undertaken lightly.I have noticed a few Volvo trucks on(and off)the road in Ecuador so I am now hunting down a knowledgeable Jose to lend me his tools and ride shotgun on my very cautious first change
Marine Express Parts recomend 1000 hours, which I think is in the latest handbook. They also say that in their experience unless there is something wrong with the fuel pump they would not check it when changing the cam belt. Ian

From: "Stephan Regulinski" <stephreg@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Volvo Turbos
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2003 17:53:01 -0000

Ian, Joel, Jay, etc.,

My copy of the Instruction Book ("Instruction Book 22 Series", Volvo-
Penta, 1998) page 28 says that the timing gear belt (also called the
cam belt) should be inspected every 200 hours and replaced every 2000
hours. This is twice the interval recommended by Joel.

I have just replaced my belt at 2000 hours and found no excessive
wear. I would like to know more about Jay's experience, particularly
the maintenance findings on the last belt inspection prior to
failure. It would be nice to know whether the 200 hour inspection is
capable of picking up premature belt wear in time to replace the
belt. I am not surprised that he has to adopt a more rigorous
maintenance program (he reports belt failure at just over 1000 hours)
given he is operating under more extreme conditions. The question is
whether this program is necessary for the rest of us. A timing belt
change is neither cheap or fast.

For those interested in doing this job yourself, you will need a new
belt ($40 in Gibraltar), a workshop manual or copy of the relevant
pages, a belt tension guage, two locator pins and two locator bolts.
I was able to borrow all of the above from a cooperative Volvo shop.
The were made more cooperative by the fact that I had just spent a
large sum of money repairing the rigging and we were arguing about
the bill. I agreed to pay the bill in full and the shop manager
agreed to loan me the manual, the tools, and a chat with his Volvo
mechanic. Now we both think that the other is a perfect gentleman.

The job took me five hours and would take an experienced mechanic
half that (assuming an Amel were engine access is good). Here are a
few hints:

(1) Have handy: a full set of sockets including two wrenches, a
31/32 socket, a strap wrench to hold the water-pump pulley while
loosening and tightening screws, and a crow bar or equivalent to help
tighten alternator belts. An assistant wouldn't hurt to hand tools
and read the manual.

(2) After removing the alternator belts and the water-pump pulley,
the timing-belt cover can be removed with gentle twisting.

(3) The maintenance manual calls for removing the starter motor and
inserting an anti-rotation tool. My mechanic advised me that this
was not necessary. I did not find it necessary.

(4) Fitting the timing pins into the camshaft and into the flywheel
is a little tricky. Use a socket wrench with 31/32 socket to turn
the drive shaft, and listen for a little "click" on the pin in the
camshaft hole. It took me six or seven revolutions to convince
myself I had found it. Then kneel beside the engine (next to the
genset) and hold the pin in the flywheel hole. Wiggle the drive
shaft and see if the flywheel pin sets. It will do so firmly and
fully. If not, rotate the drive shaft one half turn (the camshaft
will turn one full turn) and the pin should set. Beware of setting
the flywheel pin in a place where the camshaft pin is not set. I
think there is a second hole, but couldn't swear to it.

(5) Set the two bolts in the pulley of the fuel injection pump. All
is well if the "B" on this pulley lines up with the notch in the
housing.

(6) The manual says to remove the belt tensioner pulley and the
idler pulley. I did and found that I had to put them back before I
could get the new belt on. My mechanic later said that he doesn't
remove them at all. However, check the bearing on the idler pulley.
I am told that it can seize and that early evidence is a failure to
turn smoothly.

(7) Replace the belt. Cut the old belt in two so that it cannot be
reused and dispose.

(8) When tensioning the belt. My mechanic suggested rotating the
tensioner pulley (actually it is a cam) counter-clockwise to tension
so that the belt, which rotates clockwise, pulls the pulley into
itself thereby increasing tension.

(9) My mechanic advised that he did not adjusted the timing of the
fuel pump as part of a belt replacement, despite this being a step in
the maintenance procedure. I did not attempt this operation.

(9) Follow the manual in all other circumstances.

(10) Finally, before starting the engine, remember that prayer is an
important part of any good maintenance program.

Stephan G. Regulinski
Delos (SMM #303)


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Joel F. Potter"
<jfpottercys@a...> wrote:
Hello Ian,

Joel Potter here. The turbo boost pop-off valve really needs A LOT
of
requested power to function. To check:

1. Go about 3-4 KTS in reverse
2. Gently go to neutral, then forward to idle speed.
3. Wait 3 seconds then wide open throttle in forward. WIDE
OPEN.

You will see the rod move ever so briefly. The engine is governed
and you
will never get into the boost limit in cruise power conditions.
Only when
asking for more than you should, like at avoiding a crash. Hope
this helps.

All the best,
Joel F. Potter, Hull #400

P.S. Change your cam belt every 1000 hours. Trust me, this is
important.
-----Original Message-----
From: Ian & Judy Jenkins [mailto:ianjudyjenkins@h...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2003 1:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Turbos




I have SM 302 with the Volvo/Perkins TMD22p. No complaints after
800
hours,
other than replacing the key switch and the engine hour meter and
rev
counter, both at crazy Volvo prices.Power output is fine and I
take care
to
open up the revs every few hours to ensure the Turbo is properly
exercised.
When the revs are high and the turbo is really being used there
is a
pressure control valve that opens up if the turbo pressure gets
too
high.As
I understand it the rod attached to this valve moves back against
the
resistance of a spring.I have been advised to move this rod back
manually
from time to time ( with engine switched off) to ensure that it
is free
moving and it has always been free when I have moved it.
However, when I use full revs there is no discernible movement on
this rod
(
possibly 1/2 mm but it's difficult to guage when the engine is
flat
out).It
has been suggested to me that as Amel govern the output to 60hp
the turbo
pressure doesnt reach the point where the valve opens.( this
wouldn't
prevent the turbo from working ok as mine seems to be)
Has anyone any experience to suggest that the rod should or
should not be
seen to move at full revs, and if it does move is this a
momentary and
occasional movement or should the the valve be seen to stay open
above
certain revs?
Ian Jenkins

_________________________________________________________________
Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger


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_________________________________________________________________
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Re: Volvo Turbos

Stephan Regulinski
 

Ian, Joel, Jay, etc.,

My copy of the Instruction Book ("Instruction Book 22 Series", Volvo-
Penta, 1998) page 28 says that the timing gear belt (also called the
cam belt) should be inspected every 200 hours and replaced every 2000
hours. This is twice the interval recommended by Joel.

I have just replaced my belt at 2000 hours and found no excessive
wear. I would like to know more about Jay's experience, particularly
the maintenance findings on the last belt inspection prior to
failure. It would be nice to know whether the 200 hour inspection is
capable of picking up premature belt wear in time to replace the
belt. I am not surprised that he has to adopt a more rigorous
maintenance program (he reports belt failure at just over 1000 hours)
given he is operating under more extreme conditions. The question is
whether this program is necessary for the rest of us. A timing belt
change is neither cheap or fast.

For those interested in doing this job yourself, you will need a new
belt ($40 in Gibraltar), a workshop manual or copy of the relevant
pages, a belt tension guage, two locator pins and two locator bolts.
I was able to borrow all of the above from a cooperative Volvo shop.
The were made more cooperative by the fact that I had just spent a
large sum of money repairing the rigging and we were arguing about
the bill. I agreed to pay the bill in full and the shop manager
agreed to loan me the manual, the tools, and a chat with his Volvo
mechanic. Now we both think that the other is a perfect gentleman.

The job took me five hours and would take an experienced mechanic
half that (assuming an Amel were engine access is good). Here are a
few hints:

(1) Have handy: a full set of sockets including two wrenches, a
31/32 socket, a strap wrench to hold the water-pump pulley while
loosening and tightening screws, and a crow bar or equivalent to help
tighten alternator belts. An assistant wouldn't hurt to hand tools
and read the manual.

(2) After removing the alternator belts and the water-pump pulley,
the timing-belt cover can be removed with gentle twisting.

(3) The maintenance manual calls for removing the starter motor and
inserting an anti-rotation tool. My mechanic advised me that this
was not necessary. I did not find it necessary.

(4) Fitting the timing pins into the camshaft and into the flywheel
is a little tricky. Use a socket wrench with 31/32 socket to turn
the drive shaft, and listen for a little "click" on the pin in the
camshaft hole. It took me six or seven revolutions to convince
myself I had found it. Then kneel beside the engine (next to the
genset) and hold the pin in the flywheel hole. Wiggle the drive
shaft and see if the flywheel pin sets. It will do so firmly and
fully. If not, rotate the drive shaft one half turn (the camshaft
will turn one full turn) and the pin should set. Beware of setting
the flywheel pin in a place where the camshaft pin is not set. I
think there is a second hole, but couldn't swear to it.

(5) Set the two bolts in the pulley of the fuel injection pump. All
is well if the "B" on this pulley lines up with the notch in the
housing.

(6) The manual says to remove the belt tensioner pulley and the
idler pulley. I did and found that I had to put them back before I
could get the new belt on. My mechanic later said that he doesn't
remove them at all. However, check the bearing on the idler pulley.
I am told that it can seize and that early evidence is a failure to
turn smoothly.

(7) Replace the belt. Cut the old belt in two so that it cannot be
reused and dispose.

(8) When tensioning the belt. My mechanic suggested rotating the
tensioner pulley (actually it is a cam) counter-clockwise to tension
so that the belt, which rotates clockwise, pulls the pulley into
itself thereby increasing tension.

(9) My mechanic advised that he did not adjusted the timing of the
fuel pump as part of a belt replacement, despite this being a step in
the maintenance procedure. I did not attempt this operation.

(9) Follow the manual in all other circumstances.

(10) Finally, before starting the engine, remember that prayer is an
important part of any good maintenance program.

Stephan G. Regulinski
Delos (SMM #303)


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Joel F. Potter"
<jfpottercys@a...> wrote:
Hello Ian,

Joel Potter here. The turbo boost pop-off valve really needs A LOT
of
requested power to function. To check:

1. Go about 3-4 KTS in reverse
2. Gently go to neutral, then forward to idle speed.
3. Wait 3 seconds then wide open throttle in forward. WIDE
OPEN.

You will see the rod move ever so briefly. The engine is governed
and you
will never get into the boost limit in cruise power conditions.
Only when
asking for more than you should, like at avoiding a crash. Hope
this helps.

All the best,
Joel F. Potter, Hull #400

P.S. Change your cam belt every 1000 hours. Trust me, this is
important.
-----Original Message-----
From: Ian & Judy Jenkins [mailto:ianjudyjenkins@h...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 23, 2003 1:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Turbos




I have SM 302 with the Volvo/Perkins TMD22p. No complaints after
800
hours,
other than replacing the key switch and the engine hour meter and
rev
counter, both at crazy Volvo prices.Power output is fine and I
take care
to
open up the revs every few hours to ensure the Turbo is properly
exercised.
When the revs are high and the turbo is really being used there
is a
pressure control valve that opens up if the turbo pressure gets
too
high.As
I understand it the rod attached to this valve moves back against
the
resistance of a spring.I have been advised to move this rod back
manually
from time to time ( with engine switched off) to ensure that it
is free
moving and it has always been free when I have moved it.
However, when I use full revs there is no discernible movement on
this rod
(
possibly 1/2 mm but it's difficult to guage when the engine is
flat
out).It
has been suggested to me that as Amel govern the output to 60hp
the turbo
pressure doesnt reach the point where the valve opens.( this
wouldn't
prevent the turbo from working ok as mine seems to be)
Has anyone any experience to suggest that the rod should or
should not be
seen to move at full revs, and if it does move is this a
momentary and
occasional movement or should the the valve be seen to stay open
above
certain revs?
Ian Jenkins

_________________________________________________________________
Stay in touch with absent friends - get MSN Messenger
http://www.msn.co.uk/messenger


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ADVERTISEMENT




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amelyachtowners-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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Re: Zeise diesel generator

Zanareva
 

Koen,

Thanks. Yes the foam is a bit oily. This info really helps!

Richard

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, koenvelleman <no_reply@y...>
wrote:
Hi Richard,

The water "sensor" in the Zeisse capsule is a simple double wire
with
a screw connector at the end. The foam in the container can get a
bit
oily and wet and the screw connector rusts away. This connector
must
be drifting somewhere under the genset, just try to find it, put a
new screw connector on and things should be OK.
The other main problem with the Zeisse is the sea water pump,
driven
by a small belt wich slips easely. Normaly Farryman puts the pump
directly on the cranckshaft, this works fine.
I also changed the thermostat to an 85°C and changed the cooling
to
fresh water cooling and the Genset runs very smooth now.
Good Luck !
Koen
Flash IV
S/M 17


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "closereach"
<closereach@y...> wrote:
I have a Zeise installed in my Super Maramu. The control panel
has
an indicator light notifying me that there's water in
the 'capsule'.
Does anyone know where or what this 'capsule' is, and how to
remove
the water? The manual is no help to me on this matter!
Thanks
Richard


Re: Super Maramu for Sale in Australia

koenvelleman <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Robert,

Flash IV is Belgium registred. She is a Super Maramu built in 1990.
I have updated her with all the important changes that Amel has done
trough the years. She has the new propulsing sytem fitted by Amel.
Also fitted by Amel is the new triple groove furling system, new
mainsail and gib furling gearbox and moters. I changed the Autohelm
pilot to a Brookes@Gatehouse pilot. Kept the Autohelm as back-up.
I also updated the electrical charging and battery system to the new
standards. Renewed the ceiling lining, wich was foam backed and came
loose (a major problem with the Amels ) with the new felt backed
stuff)
The Genoa is 3 years old and the main has been renewed this year.
She has full Brookes@Gatehouse instruments with 2 extra repeaters.
Apart from the standard equipment she has an extra small gimballed
watch radar, a 700W full sine-wave 220V converter for the breadmaker,
SSB, davids, musk. screens, inmarsat-C, extra forward looking depth
sounder, electric front toilet, new italian cooking stove with
electric oven, new fridge and water cooled freezer system (no more R-
12 gas), airco in the aft cabin.
She has an alternator fitted to the propeller wich gives all the
needed electricity while cruising even for the breadmaker.
She got a 50l/h watermaker. The genset has been overhauled and fitted
with a fresh water cooling system 3 yrs ago.
I always did an agressive preventive maintenance and all the sytems
are working and are in good condition.
Price: 300.000 Euro




--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Vivian, Robert & Aron Lewin"
<lewin@b...> wrote:
Hello... Pls let me have some details ...Age ...equipment Etc.. I
am in
Sydney on 02 93371150
Robert.



On Sunday, September 21, 2003, at 12:26 AM, koenvelleman wrote:

My Super Maramu Flash IV is now for sale
She is on the hardstand in Bundaberg QLD and in perfect condition.


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Varnishing

stargazer41amel <no_reply@...>
 

Has anyone attempted to varnish over or repair the original factory
applied varnish? I understand from the Amel factory that the varnish
is a sprayed 2 part polyurethane finish. It is very hard finish and
has held up well for the 16 year old vessel we have. But there are
areas that need repairing and I am really concerned how difficult it
is to deal with the existing finish. I was able to refinish the
floors, exterior trims and interior steps beautifully but they had a
different varnish finish. Any knowledgable help in this area will be
greatly appreciated. Delores Carter


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu for Sale in Australia

Vivian, Robert & Aron Lewin <lewin@...>
 

Hello... Pls let me have some details ...Age ...equipment Etc.. I am in
Sydney on 02 93371150
Robert.



On Sunday, September 21, 2003, at 12:26 AM, koenvelleman wrote:

My Super Maramu Flash IV is now for sale
She is on the hardstand in Bundaberg QLD and in perfect condition.


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Super Maramu for Sale in Australia

koenvelleman <no_reply@...>
 

My Super Maramu Flash IV is now for sale
She is on the hardstand in Bundaberg QLD and in perfect condition.


Re: Zeise diesel generator

koenvelleman <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Richard,

The water "sensor" in the Zeisse capsule is a simple double wire with
a screw connector at the end. The foam in the container can get a bit
oily and wet and the screw connector rusts away. This connector must
be drifting somewhere under the genset, just try to find it, put a
new screw connector on and things should be OK.
The other main problem with the Zeisse is the sea water pump, driven
by a small belt wich slips easely. Normaly Farryman puts the pump
directly on the cranckshaft, this works fine.
I also changed the thermostat to an 85°C and changed the cooling to
fresh water cooling and the Genset runs very smooth now.
Good Luck !
Koen
Flash IV
S/M 17


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "closereach"
<closereach@y...> wrote:
I have a Zeise installed in my Super Maramu. The control panel has
an indicator light notifying me that there's water in
the 'capsule'.
Does anyone know where or what this 'capsule' is, and how to remove
the water? The manual is no help to me on this matter!
Thanks
Richard


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning

amelforme
 

Hi Vito,

I NEVER advocated a loose rig. It's dangerous to have loose rigging on an
AMEL. Most riggers/yards loosen the rigging because most boats are tuned
loose because they flex. Amels are tuned very tight because they don't
flex. You shouldn't have much sag in the headstay and very little, if any,
real slop in the lazy side shourds.

TIGHT IS RIGHT. NEVER LOOSE.

Hope this helps.
Joel SUPER MARAMU MILLENNIUM #400 "MARY BROWN"

-----Original Message-----
From: asm283 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 8:53 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning


I would be intrested in any opinions and recomendations on tuning the
Amel ketch rig. The proper tune of the rig is directly related to the
boats ability to point. Joel you recomend a loose rig what is your
reason for this?

Thanks

Vito Ciaravino
asm283


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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning

amelforme
 

-----Original Message-----
From: asm283 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 8:53 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning


I would be intrested in any opinions and recomendations on tuning the
Amel ketch rig. The proper tune of the rig is directly related to the
boats ability to point. Joel you recomend a loose rig what is your
reason for this?

Thanks

Vito Ciaravino
asm283


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heaving to

Bill & Sara Atz <WCZ4455@...>
 

Occasionally we arrive before daylight after a long passage. I
asked Amel a few years ago how to "heave to" in the Super Maramu,
and they said to point just slightly off the wind and then run the
engine at low rpm. Is there a better way, without the engine?
Bill on Lady Sadie


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

Hi Joel,

Does this apply also to the backstays of the mizen mast? Mine was quite
loose and as far as I understand there are screws that prevent the rig to
get loose.

Regards


Dimitris Krassopoulos




Mobile GSM: +306944302318
Email: dkra@almalibre.gr <mailto:dkra@almalibre.gr>
Web: www.almalibre.gr <http://www.almalibre.gr/>

-----Original Message-----
From: Joel F. Potter [mailto:jfpottercys@att.net]
Sent: Saturday, September 20, 2003 1:11 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning


Hi Vito,

I NEVER advocated a loose rig. It's dangerous to have loose rigging on an
AMEL. Most riggers/yards loosen the rigging because most boats are tuned
loose because they flex. Amels are tuned very tight because they don't
flex. You shouldn't have much sag in the headstay and very little, if any,
real slop in the lazy side shourds.

TIGHT IS RIGHT. NEVER LOOSE.

Hope this helps.
Joel SUPER MARAMU MILLENNIUM #400 "MARY BROWN"
-----Original Message-----
From: asm283 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 8:53 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rig tuning


I would be intrested in any opinions and recomendations on tuning the
Amel ketch rig. The proper tune of the rig is directly related to the
boats ability to point. Joel you recomend a loose rig what is your
reason for this?

Thanks

Vito Ciaravino
asm283


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Rig tuning

asm283 <no_reply@...>
 

I would be intrested in any opinions and recomendations on tuning the
Amel ketch rig. The proper tune of the rig is directly related to the
boats ability to point. Joel you recomend a loose rig what is your
reason for this?

Thanks

Vito Ciaravino
asm283


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pointing ability of Super Maramu

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

HELLO,

It is very interesting to read all these mails. My comment is that the
SM2000 is a superb boat for cruising and in cruising mode it outperforms
many cruisers/racers. My example is our recent common cruising with a superb
cruiser/racer from Denmark the X-562 (56 feet). I was sailing with my wife
and children the other boat had a crew of 3 sailors. We were able to arrive
always first to our end destination because we were able to start sailing 15
minutes before they were and we were able to reef online as we call it. When
the wind changed we wre able to hoist our mizzen staysail and we were again
faster although they were trying to hoist a gennaker. So the boat is
designed for cruising and it is fast, safe and easy to handle what are we
looking more than that.

Dimitris SM 2000 "Alma Libre"
www.almalibre.gr <http://www.almalibre.gr>

-----Original Message-----
From: Horst Pause [mailto:horst@dpnsoftware.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 1:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pointing ability of Super Maramu


Hello All,

I have read the various messages about the pointing ability of your boats,
saw, to my
horror, the suggestion to have an inside track fitted. Please don't - the
Amel boats are
the only ones where one can walk around on the deck without having to wear
shoes
with steel caps!

Also, it must have occurred to you that the (flatter) in-mast mainsail may
have some
influence on the drive of the boat when she's pointing high. I have only
compared this
on two Maramus, one with furling, the other with conventional main - the
difference was
just under 5 degrees (they both had reasonably new foresails).

Anyway, a ketch is not supposed to win races round the cans.

Horst

'
' Hi David
'
' I agree with everyone about the pointing ability of the SM. On my
' boat with a new 140 headsail by super sailmakers I am seeing about 40
' dg apparent. This weekend I came in 2nd in one of the local races. My
' main competition were a Cardinal 46, J35 and a Benetau 42s7. Boats
' known for their performance characteristics. In winds of 25 to 30
' knots I held my own against these boats to windward and nailed them
' off the wind. Most of the other boats including a J35 were nowere
' close. Any pointing ability that I gave up to my competition was more
' than made up to the ability of the SM to stand up to a breeze and its
' pure speed.
' --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "davidcrisp" <david@f...>
' wrote:
' > Hi All,
' >
' > How close hauled should a Super Maramu sail? The best I can do is
' > 45deg apparent, which basically means going to windward is very
' slow
' > and frustrating. In calm seas I can pinch up to maybe 40deg
' > sometimes but speed suffers badly and I usually end up with an
' > accidental tack. Am suspecting (hoping) I have a problem. Having
' > raced a lot I believe I know how to trim sails and I have a new
' > genoa.
' >
' > So is 45deg apprent normal? If not anyone ahve any suggestions as
' to
' > my problem?
' >
' > Regards
' > David
' > Gallant of Fowey
'
'
' To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
' amelyachtowners-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
'
'
'
' Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pointing ability of Super Maramu

Horst Pause <horst@...>
 

Hello All,

I have read the various messages about the pointing ability of your boats, saw, to my
horror, the suggestion to have an inside track fitted. Please don't - the Amel boats are
the only ones where one can walk around on the deck without having to wear shoes
with steel caps!

Also, it must have occurred to you that the (flatter) in-mast mainsail may have some
influence on the drive of the boat when she's pointing high. I have only compared this
on two Maramus, one with furling, the other with conventional main - the difference was
just under 5 degrees (they both had reasonably new foresails).

Anyway, a ketch is not supposed to win races round the cans.

Horst

'
' Hi David
'
' I agree with everyone about the pointing ability of the SM. On my
' boat with a new 140 headsail by super sailmakers I am seeing about 40
' dg apparent. This weekend I came in 2nd in one of the local races. My
' main competition were a Cardinal 46, J35 and a Benetau 42s7. Boats
' known for their performance characteristics. In winds of 25 to 30
' knots I held my own against these boats to windward and nailed them
' off the wind. Most of the other boats including a J35 were nowere
' close. Any pointing ability that I gave up to my competition was more
' than made up to the ability of the SM to stand up to a breeze and its
' pure speed.
' --- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "davidcrisp" <david@f...>
' wrote:
' > Hi All,
' >
' > How close hauled should a Super Maramu sail? The best I can do is
' > 45deg apparent, which basically means going to windward is very
' slow
' > and frustrating. In calm seas I can pinch up to maybe 40deg
' > sometimes but speed suffers badly and I usually end up with an
' > accidental tack. Am suspecting (hoping) I have a problem. Having
' > raced a lot I believe I know how to trim sails and I have a new
' > genoa.
' >
' > So is 45deg apprent normal? If not anyone ahve any suggestions as
' to
' > my problem?
' >
' > Regards
' > David
' > Gallant of Fowey
'
'
' To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
' amelyachtowners-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
'
'
'
' Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pointing ability of Super Maramu

Joel F. Potter <jfpottercys@...>
 

Hi David,

Full water tank helps the boat to weather (stands up better, weight is down
low) 100' of chain is like having a fat boy on your bow pulpit and probably
worth about 2 degrees. Really. If the keel has any growth, ANY, it stalls
early.

The reason weight forward is bad is because it increases the polar moment of
inertia. Makes the bow go up and down more and a bit more side to side
which interrupts the flow, increases drag, and degrades your pace.

Hope this helps.

Joel F. Potter - SUPER MARAMU MILLENNIUM # 400 "MARY BROWN"


Re: Pointing ability of Super Maramu

asm283 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi David

I agree with everyone about the pointing ability of the SM. On my
boat with a new 140 headsail by super sailmakers I am seeing about 40
dg apparent. This weekend I came in 2nd in one of the local races. My
main competition were a Cardinal 46, J35 and a Benetau 42s7. Boats
known for their performance characteristics. In winds of 25 to 30
knots I held my own against these boats to windward and nailed them
off the wind. Most of the other boats including a J35 were nowere
close. Any pointing ability that I gave up to my competition was more
than made up to the ability of the SM to stand up to a breeze and its
pure speed.
--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "davidcrisp" <david@f...>
wrote:
Hi All,

How close hauled should a Super Maramu sail? The best I can do is
45deg apparent, which basically means going to windward is very
slow
and frustrating. In calm seas I can pinch up to maybe 40deg
sometimes but speed suffers badly and I usually end up with an
accidental tack. Am suspecting (hoping) I have a problem. Having
raced a lot I believe I know how to trim sails and I have a new
genoa.

So is 45deg apprent normal? If not anyone ahve any suggestions as
to
my problem?

Regards
David
Gallant of Fowey


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pointing ability of Super Maramu

David Crisp
 

Claude,

I concur, the inner headstay is too much hassle and I would be
conncerned to make a modification to a proven design. Those guys in
Rochelle have got more things right than I have seen on any other
boat.
I'll go for the idyllic reaches. Are you out in the Caribbean,
that's our domain at the moment, would be nice to cross tracks one
day hsould the wind blow the right way.

David

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Claude Roessiger
<nearlynothing@y...> wrote:
Dear David,
Basically the SM doesn't do well closer than 45 wind
apparent. The sheeting angle is surely a major factor.
It is a hallmark of Amel boats; they are built to
cruise, for the open sea, where sailing close hauled
for any period of time isn't wonderful in any case.
This said, it is an issue, and one can only hope that
in a future boat Amel will improve upwind performance.
I have sometimes wondered if fitting an inboard track
and combining this with a smaller headsail might not
help, but I have concluded that it's more bother than
it's worth.
If you are really adamant about gaining another 5
degrees upwind, I suspect a headsail with a very
modern construction might achieve that. Maybe someone
has tried?
Basically, think in terms of idyllic reaches under the
stars of tropical skies....
Claude Roessiger

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